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Blunt Force Truth
The Vaccine / What's Coming Next - An Interview with Michael Guy

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 89:23


Today's show rundown: Mark is going to Texas to spend Thanksgiving with his buddy Chuck. Chuck and Mark wish all our listeners a Happy Thanksgiving. The WHO have received 20,000 reports of new eye disorders that have occurred POST COVID-19 vaccinations. Mark goes into some detail on the various disorders and explains some of the facts. Heres the bottom line all of these eye conditions are related to increased pressure and spinal fluid. If you were vaccinated prior to may, the government says you are now unvaccinated, because you need to get jabbed every 6 months. Our Government is NOT recognizing natural immunity. Mark explains - the government wants to eliminate a control group. When the people without the vaccination do NOT develop these future health problems, there is no control group. Michael Guy explains his experience with Operation Warp Speed - he was in meetings with multiple Generals, and they were all asking Michael "how we get people to wear masks". The Path to 71%, they wanted to know what Michael thought about helping get people to comply. But thy lied - it was taking a direction he was not privy to say. Anthony Fauci was on TV reading copy that Michael Guy wrote...how is it that they are real. We need to stop calling this COVID-19 Vaccine a vaccine. The old definition used to be a substance that protected and PREVENTED you from getting a disease. Now you can call it a vaccine even if it only a therapeutic, having nothing do do with prevention. When you got the Polio VACCINE....you didn't get Polio. https://worldmission.cc/donate-humanitarianoutreach/

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.24.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:01


Popular antioxidant linked to pain relief University of Naples (Italy), November 22, 2021 People with pain of unknown causes who took alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) experienced less pain than a placebo group, a double-blind study in  Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy revealed.1 This most recent trial enrolled 210 nondiabetic men and women with mild or moderate joint pain, neuropathic pain or muscle pain of unknown cause. Participants received 800 mg or 400 mg ALA per day or a daily placebo.  The results? People who received ALA had a significant improvement in their pain after two months of intake, while the placebo group didn't report a difference. ALA was similarly effective for all sources of pain considered. It was also shown to be safe and well-tolerated. (NEXT) Mental Qigong can be just as rewarding as its physical cousin In recent decades modern scientific techniques have fully documented the health benefits of the ancient meditation technique of Qigong. One example of physical Qigong is the technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals play), in which participants sequentially move through poses that represent the form of different animals, holding each pose for several minutes. During each phase individuals seek to regulate their breathing and still their minds. Although this is a challenging endeavor the benefits are significant. Effective Qigong practice can reduce feelings of depression and anxiety, decrease blood pressure and increase feelings of relaxation and attention. This raises the question: do the effects of these two types of Qigong manifest themselves the same in the brain, or differently? This is what the University of Mainz, wanted to find out.  (NEXT) Study links stress to Crohn's disease flare-ups McMaster University (Ontario), November 20, 2021 A possible link between psychological stress and Crohn's disease flare-ups has been identified by a McMaster University-led study. Researchers using mouse models found that stress hormones suppressed the innate immune system that normally protects the gut from invasive Enterobacteriaceae, a group of bacteria including E. coli which has been linked to Crohn's disease. (NEXT) Meta-analysis finds benefits for dietary supplements among breast cancer patients Hallym University (South Korea), November 19 2021 A meta-analysis published in Cancers found associations between improved breast cancer prognosis and the intake of multivitamins and other nutrients. The meta-analysis included 63 studies that evaluated the association between dietary factors and breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer mortality and/or mortality from any cause during the studies' follow- up periods among a total of 120,167 breast cancer patients.  (NEXT) Physical activity may improve Alzheimer's disease outcomes by lowering brain inflammation University of California at San Francisco, November 22, 2021 No one will disagree that an active lifestyle is good for you, but it remains unclear how physical activity improves brain health, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. The benefits may come about through decreased immune cell activation, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (NEXT) Aspirin is linked with increased risk of heart failure University of Freiburg (Germany), November 23, 2021 Aspirin use is associated with a 26% raised risk of heart failure in people with at least one predisposing factor for the condition. That's the finding of a study published today in a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). This is the first study to report that among individuals with at least one risk factor for heart failure, those taking aspirin were more likely to subsequently develop the condition than those not using the medication. (OTHER NEWS NEXT) Plant-derived antiviral drug is effective in blocking highly infectious SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant, say scientists University of Nottingham, November 22, 2021 A plant-based antiviral treatment for Covid-19, recently discovered by scientists at the University of Nottingham, has been found to be just as effective at treating all variants of the virus SARS-CoV-2, even the highly infectious Delta variant. The study showed that a novel natural antiviral drug called thapsigargin (TG), recently discovered by the same group of scientists to block other viruses, including the original SARS-CoV-2, was just as effective at treating all of the newer SARS-CoV-2 variants, including the Delta variant. In their previous studies* the team showed that the plant-derived antiviral, at small doses, triggers a highly effective broad-spectrum host-centred antiviral innate immune response against three major types of human respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. “Together, these results point to the antiviral potential of TG as a post-exposure prophylactic and an active therapeutic agent.” (NEXT) In Memory of JFK: The First U.S. President to be Declared a Terrorist and Threat to National Security (entire article is here) By Cynthia Chung, The Saker Blog, November 22, 2021 In April 1954, Kennedy stood up on the Senate floor to challenge the Eisenhower Administration's support for the doomed French imperial war in Vietnam, foreseeing that this would not be a short-lived war.[1] In July 1957, Kennedy once more took a strong stand against French colonialism, this time France's bloody war against Algeria's independence movement, which again found the Eisenhower Administration on the wrong side of history. Rising on the Senate floor, two days before America's own Independence Day, Kennedy declared: “The most powerful single force in the world today is neither communism nor capitalism, neither the H-bomb nor the guided missile – it is man's eternal desire to be free and independent. The great enemy of that tremendous force of freedom is called, for want of a more precise term, imperialism – and today that means Soviet imperialism and, whether we like it or not, and though they are not to be equated, Western imperialism. Thus, the single most important test of American foreign policy today is how we meet the challenge of imperialism, what we do to further man's desire to be free. On this test more than any other, this nation shall be critically judged by the uncommitted millions in Asia and Africa, and anxiously watched by the still hopeful lovers of freedom behind the Iron Curtain. If we fail to meet the challenge of either Soviet or Western imperialism, then no amount of foreign aid, no aggrandizement of armaments, no new pacts or doctrines or high-level conferences can prevent further setbacks to our course and to our security.”[2] In September 1960, the annual United Nations General Assembly was held in New York. Fidel Castro and a fifty-member delegation were among the attendees and had made a splash in the headlines when he decided to stay at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem after the midtown Shelburne Hotel demanded a $20,000 security deposit. He made an even bigger splash in the headlines when he made a speech at this hotel, discussing the issue of equality in the United States while in Harlem, one of the poorest boroughs in the country. Kennedy would visit this very same hotel a short while later, and also made a speech: “Behind the fact of Castro coming to this hotel, [and] Khrushchev…there is another great traveler in the world, and that is the travel of a world revolution, a world in turmoil…We should be glad [that Castro and Khrushchev] came to the United States. We should not fear the twentieth century, for the worldwide revolution which we see all around us is part of the original American Revolution.”[3] What did Kennedy mean by this? The American Revolution was fought for freedom, freedom from the rule of monarchy and imperialism in favour of national sovereignty. What Kennedy was stating, was that this was the very oppression that the rest of the world wished to shake the yoke off, and that the United States had an opportunity to be a leader in the cause for the independence of all nations. On June 30th, 1960, marking the independence of the Republic of Congo from the colonial rule of Belgium, Patrice Lumumba, the first Congolese Prime Minister gave a speech that has become famous for its outspoken criticism of colonialism. Lumumba spoke of his people's struggle against “the humiliating bondage that was forced upon us… [years that were] filled with tears, fire and blood,” and concluded vowing “We shall show the world what the black man can do when working in liberty, and we shall make the Congo the pride of Africa.” Shortly after, Lumumba also made clear, “We want no part of the Cold War… We want Africa to remain African with a policy of neutralism.”[4] As a result, Lumumba was labeled a communist for his refusal to be a Cold War satellite for the western sphere. Rather, Lumumba was part of the Pan-African movement that was led by Ghanaian President Kwame Nkrumah(who later Kennedy would also work with), which sought national sovereignty and an end to colonialism in Africa. Lumumba “would remain a grave danger,” Dulles said at an NSC meeting on September 21, 1960, “as long as he was not yet disposed of.”[5] Three days later, Dulles made it clear that he wanted Lumumba permanently removed, cabling the CIA's Leopoldville station, “We wish give [sic] every possible support in eliminating Lumumba from any possibility resuming governmental position.”[6] Lumumba was assassinated on Jan. 17th, 1961, just three days before Kennedy's inauguration, during the fog of the transition period between presidents, when the CIA is most free to tie its loose ends, confident that they will not be reprimanded by a new administration that wants to avoid scandal on its first days in office. Kennedy, who clearly meant to put a stop to the Murder Inc. that Dulles had created and was running, would declare to the world in his inaugural address on Jan. 20th, 1961, “The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans.” La Resistance Along with inheriting the responsibility of the welfare of the country and its people, Kennedy was to also inherit a secret war with communist Cuba run by the CIA. The Bay of Pigs set-up would occur three months later. Prouty compares the Bay of Pigs incident to that of the Crusade for Peace; the Bay of Pigs being orchestrated by the CIA, and the Crusade for Peace sabotaged by the CIA, in both cases to ruin the U.S. president's (Eisenhower and Kennedy) ability to form a peaceful dialogue with Khrushchev and decrease Cold War tensions. Both presidents' took onus for the events respectively, despite the responsibility resting with the CIA. However, Eisenhower and Kennedy understood, if they did not take onus, it would be a public declaration that they did not have any control over their government agencies and military. Further, the Bay of Pigs operation was in fact meant to fail. It was meant to stir up a public outcry for a direct military invasion of Cuba. On public record is a meeting (or more aptly described as an intervention) with CIA Deputy Director for Plans Richard Bissell, Joint Chiefs Chairman Lyman Lemnitzer, and Navy Chief Admiral Burke basically trying to strong-arm President Kennedy into approving a direct military attack on Cuba. Admiral Burke had already taken the liberty of positioning two battalions of Marines on Navy destroyers off the coast of Cuba “anticipating that U.S. forces might be ordered into Cuba to salvage a botched invasion.”[7] (This incident is what inspired the Frankenheimer movie “Seven Days in May.”) Kennedy stood his ground. “They were sure I'd give in to them,” Kennedy later told Special Assistant to the President Dave Powers. “They couldn't believe that a new president like me wouldn't panic and try to save his own face. Well they had me figured all wrong.”[8] Incredibly, not only did the young president stand his ground against the Washington war hawks just three months into his presidential term, but he also launched the Cuba Study Group which found the CIA to be responsible for the fiasco, leading to the humiliating forced resignation of Allen Dulles, Richard Bissell and Charles Cabell. (For more on this refer to my report.) Unfortunately, it would not be that easy to dethrone Dulles, who continued to act as head of the CIA, and key members of the intelligence community such as Helms and Angleton regularly bypassed McCone (the new CIA Director) and briefed Dulles directly.[9] But Kennedy was also serious about seeing it through all the way, and vowed to “splinter the CIA into a thousand pieces and scatter it to the winds.” * * * There is another rather significant incident that had occurred just days after the Bay of Pigs, and which has largely been overshadowed by the Cuban fiasco in the United States. From April 21-26th, 1961, the Algiers putsch or Generals' putsch, was a failed coup d'état intended to force President de Gaulle (1959-1969) not to abandon the colonial French Algeria. The organisers of the putsch were opposed to the secret negotiations that French Prime Minister Michel Debré had started with the anti-colonial National Liberation Front (FLN). On January 26th, 1961, just three months before the attempted coup d'état, Dulles sent a report to Kennedy on the French situation that seemed to be hinting that de Gaulle would no longer be around, “A pre-revolutionary atmosphere reigns in France… The Army and the Air Force are staunchly opposed to de Gaulle…At least 80 percent of the officers are violently against him. They haven't forgotten that in 1958, he had given his word of honor that he would never abandon Algeria. He is now reneging on his promise, and they hate him for that. de Gaulle surely won't last if he tries to let go of Algeria. Everything will probably be over for him by the end of the year—he will be either deposed or assassinated.”[10] The attempted coup was led by Maurice Challe, whom de Gaulle had reason to conclude was working with the support of U.S. intelligence, and Élysée officials began spreading this word to the press, which reported the CIA as a “reactionary state-within-a-state” that operated outside of Kennedy's control.[11] Shortly before Challe's resignation from the French military, he had served as NATO commander in chief and had developed close relations with a number of high-ranking U.S. officers stationed in the military alliance's Fontainebleau headquarters.[12] In August 1962 the OAS (Secret Army Organization) made an assassination attempt against de Gaulle, believing he had betrayed France by giving up Algeria to Algerian nationalists. This would be the most notorious assassination attempt on de Gaulle (who would remarkably survive over thirty assassination attempts while President of France) when a dozen OAS snipers opened fire on the president's car, which managed to escape the ambush despite all four tires being shot out. After the failed coup d'état, de Gaulle launched a purge of his security forces and ousted General Paul Grossin, the chief of SDECE (the French secret service). Grossin was closely aligned with the CIA, and had told Frank Wisner over lunch that the return of de Gaulle to power was equivalent to the Communists taking over in Paris.[13] In 1967, after a five-year enquête by the French Intelligence Bureau, it released its findings concerning the 1962 assassination attempt on de Gaulle. The report found that the 1962 assassination plot could be traced back to the NATO Brussels headquarters, and the remnants of the old Nazi intelligence apparatus. The report also found that Permindex had transferred $200,000 into an OAS bank account to finance the project. As a result of the de Gaulle exposé, Permindex was forced to shut down its public operations in Western Europe and relocated its headquarters from Bern, Switzerland to Johannesburg, South Africa, it also had/has a base in Montreal, Canada where its founder Maj. Gen. Louis M. Bloomfield (former OSS) proudly had his name amongst its board members until the damning de Gaulle report. The relevance of this to Kennedy will be discussed shortly. As a result of the SDECE's ongoing investigation, de Gaulle made a vehement denunciation of the Anglo-American violation of the Atlantic Charter, followed by France's withdrawal from the NATO military command in 1966. France would not return to NATO until April 2009 at the Strasbourg-Kehl Summit. In addition to all of this, on Jan. 14th, 1963, de Gaulle declared at a press conference that he had vetoed British entry into the Common Market. This would be the first move towards France and West Germany's formation of the European Monetary System, which excluded Great Britain, likely due to its imperialist tendencies and its infamous sin City of London. Former Secretary of State Dean Acheson telegrammed West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer directly, appealing to him to try to persuade de Gaulle to back track on the veto, stating “if anyone can affect Gen. de Gaulle's decision, you are surely that person.” Little did Acheson know that Adenauer was just days away from signing the Franco-German Treaty of Jan 22nd, 1963 (also known as the ÉlyséeTreaty), which had enormous implications. Franco-German relations, which had long been dominated by centuries of rivalry, had now agreed that their fates were aligned. (This close relationship was continued to a climactic point in the late 1970s, with the formation of the European Monetary System, and France and West Germany's willingness in 1977 to work with OPEC countries trading oil for nuclear technology, which was sabotaged by the U.S.-Britain alliance. The Élysée Treaty was a clear denunciation of the Anglo-American forceful overseeing that had overtaken Western Europe since the end of WWII. On June 28th, 1961, Kennedy wrote NSAM #55. This document changed the responsibility of defense during the Cold War from the CIA to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and would have (if seen through) drastically changed the course of the war in Vietnam. It would also have effectively removed the CIA from Cold War military operations and limited the CIA to its sole lawful responsibility, the collecting and coordination of intelligence. By Oct 11th, 1963, NSAM #263, closely overseen by Kennedy[14], was released and outlined a policy decision “to withdraw 1,000 military personnel [from Vietnam] by the end of 1963” and further stated that “It should be possible to withdraw the bulk of U.S. personnel by 1965.” The Armed Forces newspaper Stars and Stripes had the headline U.S. TROOPS SEEN OUT OF VIET BY '65. It would be the final nail in the coffin. Treason in America “Treason doth never prosper; what is the reason? Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.” – Sir John Harrington By Germany supporting de Gaulle's exposure of the international assassination ring, his adamant opposition to western imperialism and the role of NATO, and with a young Kennedy building his own resistance against the imperialist war of Vietnam, it was clear that the power elite were in big trouble. On November 22nd, 1963 President Kennedy was brutally murdered in the streets of Dallas, Texas in broad daylight. With the assassination of Ngo Dinh Diem, likely ordained by the CIA, on Nov. 2nd, 1963 and Kennedy just a few weeks later, de facto President Johnson signed NSAM #273 on Nov. 26th, 1963 to begin the reversal of Kennedy's policy under #263. And on March 17th, 1964, Johnson signed NSAM #288 that marked the full escalation of the Vietnam War and involved 2,709,918 Americans directly serving in Vietnam, with 9,087,000 serving with the U.S. Armed Forces during this period. The Vietnam War would continue for another 12 years after Kennedy's death, lasting a total of 20 years for Americans, and 30 years if you count American covert action in Vietnam. Two days before Kennedy's assassination, a hate-Kennedy handbill was circulated in Dallas accusing the president of treasonous activities including being a communist sympathizer. On November 29th, 1963 the Warren Commission was set up to investigate the murder of President Kennedy. The old Congressman Hale Boggs of Louisiana was a member of that Warren Commission. Boggs became increasingly disturbed by the lack of transparency and rigour exhibited by the Commission and became convinced that many of the documents used to incriminate Oswald were in fact forgeries. In 1965 Rep. Boggs told New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison that Oswald could not have been the one who killed Kennedy.[15] It was Boggs who encouraged Garrison to begin the only law enforcement prosecution of the President's murder to this day. Nixon was inaugurated as President of the United States on Jan 20th, 1969. Hale Boggs soon after called on Nixon's Attorney General John Mitchell to have the courage to fire J. Edgar Hoover.[16] It wasn't long thereafter that the private airplane carrying Hale Boggs disappeared without a trace. Jim Garrison was the District Attorney of New Orleans from 1962 to 1973 and was the only one to bring forth a trial concerning the assassination of President Kennedy. In Jim Garrison's book “On the Trail of the Assassins”, J. Edgar Hoover comes up several times impeding or shutting down investigations into JFK's murder, in particular concerning the evidence collected by the Dallas Police Department, such as the nitrate test Oswald was given and which exonerated him, proving that he never shot a rifle the day of Nov 22nd, 1963. However, for reasons only known to the government and its investigators this fact was kept secret for 10 months.[17]It was finally revealed in the Warren Commission report, which inexplicably didn't change their opinion that Oswald had shot Kennedy. Another particularly damning incident was concerning the Zapruder film that was in the possession of the FBI and which they had sent a “copy” to the Warren Commission for their investigation. This film was one of the leading pieces of evidence used to support the “magic bullet theory” and showcase the direction of the headshot coming from behind, thus verifying that Oswald's location was adequate for such a shot. During Garrison's trial on the Kennedy assassination (1967-1969) he subpoenaed the Zapruder film that for some peculiar reason had been locked up in some vault owned by Life magazine (the reader should note that Henry Luce the owner of Life magazine was in a very close relationship with the CIA). This was the first time in more than five years that the Zapruder film was made public. It turns out the FBI's copy that was sent to the Warren Commission had two critical frames reversed to create a false impression that the rifle shot was from behind. When Garrison got a hold of the original film it was discovered that the head shot had actually come from the front. In fact, what the whole film showed was that the President had been shot from multiple angles meaning there was more than one gunman. When the FBI was questioned about how these two critical frames could have been reversed, they answered self-satisfactorily that it must have been a technical glitch… There is also the matter of the original autopsy papers being destroyed by the chief autopsy physician, James Humes, to which he even testified to during the Warren Commission, apparently nobody bothered to ask why… This would explain why the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), reported in a July 1998 staff report their concern for the number of shortcomings in the original autopsy, that “One of the many tragedies of the assassination of President Kennedy has been the incompleteness of the autopsy record and the suspicion caused by the shroud of secrecy that has surrounded the records that do exist.” [emphasis added] The staff report for the Assassinations Records Review Board contended that brain photographs in the Kennedy records are not of Kennedy's brain and show much less damage than Kennedy sustained. There is a lot of spurious effort to try to ridicule anyone who challenges the Warren Commission's official report as nothing but fringe conspiracy theory. And that we should not find it highly suspect that Allen Dulles, of all people, was a member and pretty much leader of said commission. The reader should keep in mind that much of this frothing opposition stems from the very agency that perpetrated crime after crime on the American people, as well as abroad. When has the CIA ever admitted guilt, unless caught red-handed? Even after the Church committee hearings, when the CIA was found guilty of planning out foreign assassinations, they claimed that they had failed in every single plot or that someone had beaten them to the punch, including in the case of Lumumba. The American people need to realise that the CIA is not a respectable agency; we are not dealing with honorable men. It is a rogue force that believes that the ends justify the means, that they are the hands of the king so to speak, above government and above law. Those at the top such as Allen Dulles were just as adamant as Churchill about protecting the interests of the power elite, or as Churchill termed it, the “High Cabal.” Interestingly, on Dec. 22nd, 1963, just one month after Kennedy's assassination, Harry Truman published a scathing critique of the CIA in The Washington Post, even going so far as to state “There is something about the way the CIA has been functioning that is casting a shadow over our historic position [as a] free and open society, and I feel that we need to correct it.”[18] The timing of such a scathing quote cannot be stressed enough. Dulles, of course, told the public not to be distressed, that Truman was just in entering his twilight years. In addition, Jim Garrison, New Orleans District Attorney at the time, who was charging Clay Shaw as a member of the conspiracy to kill Kennedy, besides uncovering his ties to David Ferrie who was found dead in his apartment days before he was scheduled to testify, also made a case that the New Orleans International Trade Mart (to which Clay Shaw was director), the U.S. subsidiary of Permindex, was linked to Kennedy's murder. Col. Clay Shaw was an OSS officer during WWII, which provides a direct link to his knowing Allen Dulles. Garrison did a remarkable job with the odds he was up against, and for the number of witnesses that turned up dead before the trial… This Permindex link would not look so damning if we did not have the French intelligence SDECE report, but we do. And recall, in that report Permindex was caught transferring $200,000 directly to the bankroll of the OAS which attempted the 1962 assassination on de Gaulle. Thus, Permindex's implication in an international assassination ring is not up for debate. In addition, the CIA was found heavily involved in these assassination attempts against de Gaulle, thus we should not simply dismiss the possibility that Permindex was indeed a CIA front for an international hit crew. In fact, among the strange and murderous characters who converged on Dallas in Nov. 1963 was a notorious French OAS commando named Jean Souetre, who was connected to the plots against President de Gaulle. Souetre was arrested in Dallas after the Kennedy assassination and expelled to Mexico, not even kept for questioning.[19] What Does the Future Hold? After returning from Kennedy's Nov. 24th funeral in Washington, de Gaulle and his information minister Alain Peyrefitte had a candid discussion that was recorded in Peyrefitte's memoire “C'était de Gaulle,” the great General was quoted saying: “What happened to Kennedy is what nearly happened to me… His story is the same as mine. … It looks like a cowboy story, but it's only an OAS [Secret Army Organization] story. The security forces were in cahoots with the extremists. …Security forces are all the same when they do this kind of dirty work. As soon as they succeed in wiping out the false assassin, they declare the justice system no longer need be concerned, that no further public action was needed now that the guilty perpetrator was dead. Better to assassinate an innocent man than to let a civil war break out. Better an injustice than disorder. America is in danger of upheavals. But you'll see. All of them together will observe the law of silence. They will close ranks. They'll do everything to stifle any scandal. They will throw Noah's cloak over these shameful deeds. In order to not lose face in front of the whole world. In order to not risk unleashing riots in the United States. In order to preserve the union and to avoid a new civil war. In order to not ask themselves questions. They don't want to know. They don't want to find out. They won't allow themselves to find out.” The American people would do well to remember that it was first John F. Kennedy, acting as the President to the United States, who was to be declared a terrorist and threat to his country's national security. Thus is it not natural that those who continue to defend the legacy of Kennedy should be regarded today as threat, not truly to the nation's security, but a threat to the very same grouping responsible for Kennedy's death and whom today have now declared open war on the American people. This will be the greatest test the American people have ever been confronted with, and it will only be through an understanding of how the country came to where it is today that there can be sufficient clarity as to what the solutions are, which are not to be found in another civil war. To not fall for the trapping of further chaos and division, the American people will only be able to rise above this if they choose to ask those questions, if they choose to want to know, to want to find out the truth of things they dared not look at in the past for fear of what it would reveal. “Whenever the government of the United States shall break up, it will probably be in consequence of a false direction having been given to public opinion. This is the weak point of our defenses, and the part to which the enemies of the system will direct all their attacks. Opinion can be so perverted as to cause the false to seem true; the enemy, a friend, and the friend, an enemy; the best interests of the nation to appear insignificant, and the trifles of moment; in a word, the right the wrong, the wrong the right. In a country where opinion has sway, to seize upon it, is to seize upon power. As it is a rule of humanity that the upright and well-intentioned are comparatively passive, while the designing, dishonest, and selfish are the most untiring in their efforts, the danger of public opinion's getting a false direction is four-fold, since few men think for themselves.” -James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851( We must dare to be among the few who think for ourselves. (NEXT) VAERS Data Reveals 50 X More Ectopic Pregnancies Following COVID Shots than Following ALL Vaccines for Past 30 Year Health Impact News, November 22, 2021 While the latest data dump into the government's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) showed 2,620 fetal deaths, which are more fetal deaths than are reported following ALL vaccines for the past 30 years in VAERS, one “symptom” that is tracked in VAERS that it did not account for is an ectopic pregnancy which also results in a fetal death. Ectopic pregnancy, also called extrauterine pregnancy, is when a fertilized egg grows outside a woman's uterus, somewhere else in their belly. It can cause life-threatening bleeding and needs medical care right away. I performed a search in VAERS for ectopic pregnancies following COVID-19 shots for the past 11 months, and there have been 52 cases where a woman received a COVID-19 shot and then was found to have an ectopic pregnancy. Next, I performed the exact same search but excluded COVID-19 “vaccines” and it returned a result of 30 cases where a woman received an FDA-approved vaccine and then reported an ectopic pregnancy following ALL vaccines for the past 30+ years, which is about 1 per year. That means that following COVID-19 injections into child-bearing women for the past 11 months has seen a 50 X increase in ectopic pregnancies compared to child-bearing women receiving vaccines for the past 30+ years. (NEXT) Massive study reveals editorial bias and nepotism in biomedical journals University of Rennes, November 23, 2021 Scientific journals are expected to consider research manuscripts dispassionately and without favor. But a study published in the journal PLOS Biology reveals that a subset of journals may be exercising considerable bias and favoritism. To identify journals that are suspected of favoritism, the authors explored nearly 5 million articles published between 2015 and 2019 in a sample of 5,468 of biomedical journals indexed in the National Library of Medicine. Their results reveal that in most journals, publications are distributed across a large number of authors, as one might hope. However, the authors identify a subset of biomedical journals where a few authors, often members of that journal's editorial board, were responsible for a disproportionate number of publications. In addition, the articles authored by these “hyper-prolific” individuals were more likely to be accepted for publication within 3 weeks of their submission, suggesting favoritism in journals' editorial procedures. Why would this matter? Such “nepotistic journals,” suspected of biased editorial decision-making, could be deployed to game productivity-based metrics, which could have a serious knock-on effect on decisions about promotion, tenure and research funding. (NEXT) Hurricanes expected to linger over Northeast cities, causing greater damage More storms like Hurricane Sandy could be in the East Coast's future, potentially costing billions of dollars in damage and economic losses. Rowan University, November 22, 2021 By the late 21st century, northeastern U.S. cities will see worsening hurricane outcomes, with storms arriving more quickly but slowing down once they've made landfall. As storms linger longer over the East Coast, they will cause greater damage along the heavily populated corridor, according to a new study. The new study analyzed more than 35,000 computer-simulated storms. To assess likely storm outcomes in the future The researchers found that future East Coast hurricanes will likely cause greater damage than storms of the past. The research predicted that a greater number of future hurricanes will form near the East Coast, and those storms will reach the Northeast corridor more quickly. The simulated storms slow to a crawl as they approach the East Coast, allowing them to produce more wind, rain, floods, and related damage in the Northeast region. The longest-lived tropical storms are predicted to be twice as long as storms today.

stars western new york canada bay university california american mexico america americans new orleans louisiana french south africa british texas france president delta san francisco nottingham cold war peace vietnam war united states nazis treason washington bern security medicine church cancer opinion helms cia fbi east coast stripes africa pigs independence day african northeast trail wwii popular oss washington post cuba senate cuban fda republic montreal james fenimore cooper garrison navy algiers shortly great britain american revolution rising belgium churchill vietnam switzerland col britain air force soviet truman oswald commission threats declared scientific joint chiefs marines frankenheimer participants western europe castro communists frank wisner algeria anglo american rowan university assassins congo national library ala john f kennedy rennes lumumba nato armed forces crusade terrorists qigong crohn patrice lumumba seven days johannesburg naples italy fidel castro alzheimer's disease researchers fontainebleau bloomfield mainz algerian incredibly west germany treaty hurricane sandy generals national security district attorney gaulle adenauer iron curtain jim garrison clay shaw nsc maj opec zapruder cia director plos biology boggs acheson dulles tg murder inc former secretary mcmaster university pan african dwight eisenhower john f franco german special assistant future hold oas harry truman european society dallas police department gary null ectopic united nations general assembly angleton nikita khrushchev common market warren commission dave powers cia deputy director prouty challe enterobacteriaceae freiburg germany sars cov allen dulles atlantic charter french algeria covid-19 edgar hoover
Quiz and Hers
S14 E7 - A "General" Knowledge Quiz

Quiz and Hers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:51


We have a pretty “major” episode this week because Justin has written six trivia questions all about famous generals. We also “private”ly discuss “colonels” of truth about military history, TV shows, and classic literature. “Lieutenant”.2:02: Q1 (Sports & Games): The Washington Generals are primarily known for being the longsuffering opponents of what much more famous sports team?8:35: Q2 (Arts & Literature): General Scheisskopf – which literally means “shithead” in English – is a minor, minor, minor, minor character in what satirical Joseph Heller novel?16:26: Q3 (Times & Places): What American General famously promised the Philippines “I shall return”, in 1942?29:04: Q4 (Movies & TV): What action-comedy TV series introduced viewers to an orange 1969 Dodge Charger nicknamed the “General Lee”?34:48: Q5 (Everything Else): While the U.S. Army, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Space Force call their four-star officers “Generals”, what is the equivalent rank in the Navy, Coast Guard, Public Health Commissioned Corps, and NOAA Corps?42:33: Q6 (Music): The very modern Major General Stanley is a character in what Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera?Theme music: "Thinking it Over" by Lee Rosevere, licensed under CC BY 2.0E-Mail: quizandhers@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quizandhers/Twitter: https://twitter.com/quizandhersInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/quizandhers/Voice from the Underground Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/voice-from-the-underground-politics-pop-culture/id1302884018Brain Ladle Podcast: http://www.brainladletrivia.com/Cormac on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CormacsThoughts

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-17-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 109:38


Hour 1 * Kyle Rittenhouse trial: Jury deliberations begin as Kenosha braces for verdict. * FBI Admits It Doesn't Track Leftist Violence – TownHall.com * During the misnamed “Summer of Love”, riots, looting, vandalism, and political violence was carried out by radical leftists under the (often literal) Antifa and Black Lives Matter banners – The violent leftists besieged federal property, private businesses, law enforcement, and private citizens with costly, deadly, and devastating outcomes. * Prosecution caught lying in closing argument in Kyle Rittenhouse murder trial – Mike Landry. * Oroville, California, declares itself a ‘constitutional republic,' stops enforcing state's tyrannical mandates – Abby Liebing, The Western Journal. * Twelve states announced Monday, they are suing the Biden Administration to block the vaccine mandate for health care workers, arguing the mandate is unconstitutional and violates several federal laws – Generals from Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah and West Virginia announced the suit. Hour 2 * Guest: James Edwards – Race, Politics & Hypocrisy in 21st Century America – thepoliticalcesspool.org * Video from Charlottesville shows Gallatin businessman Richard A. Hamblen being punched by a protester. * Kyle Rittenhouse supporters and protesters clash outside courthouse. * Trial in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia. * Thanksgiving 2021 is here and with it, a turkey shortage! * Grandmother accidentally invited stranger to Thanksgiving. Years later he's still a welcomed guest Gabriela Miranda. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Liberty Roundtable Podcast
Radio Show Hour 1 – 11/17/2021

Liberty Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 54:49


* Kyle Rittenhouse trial: Jury deliberations begin as Kenosha braces for verdict. * FBI Admits It Doesn't Track Leftist Violence - TownHall.com * During the misnamed “Summer of Love”, riots, looting, vandalism, and political violence was carried out by radical leftists under the (often literal) Antifa and Black Lives Matter banners - The violent leftists besieged federal property, private businesses, law enforcement, and private citizens with costly, deadly, and devastating outcomes. * Prosecution caught lying in closing argument in Kyle Rittenhouse murder trial - Mike Landry. * Oroville, California, declares itself a 'constitutional republic,' stops enforcing state's tyrannical mandates - Abby Liebing, The Western Journal. * Twelve states announced Monday, they are suing the Biden Administration to block the vaccine mandate for health care workers, arguing the mandate is unconstitutional and violates several federal laws - Generals from Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah and West Virginia announced the suit.

New Books in American Studies
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Stephen Cushman, "The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:37


In the decades following the American Civil War, several of the generals who had laid down their swords picked up their pens and published accounts of their service in the conflict. In The Generals' Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today (University of North Carolina Press, 2021), Stephen Cushman analyzes a half-dozen of these works to discern the perspectives they provided on the era and the insights they offered about their authors. The publication of the service memoirs proliferated during the Gilded Age, thanks to the increases in literacy and the market for books that this created. Beginning in the 1870s several generals took advantage of the opportunity created by this emergence to recount for profit their time in uniform and justify the decisions they made. As Cushman details, several of these books, such as those of the Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and Union commander William T. Sherman, contained contrasting views of similar events that, when read together, reflect the process of postwar reconciliation between the former foes. For others, such as Richard Taylor and George McClellan, their accounts served as an opportunity to present themselves as wagers of a more gentlemanly and “humane” war than that subsequently conducted by Sherman and Ulysses Grant. Grant's own memoir proved the greatest successes of the genre, a testament both to his wartime stature and the skills as a writer he developed over the course of his life. The success of Grant's posthumously published book was such that it overshadowed the subsequent release of both McClellan's and Philip Sheridan's memoirs, both of which proved a disappointment for their publisher, Charles L. Webster and Company. Cushman shows how the firm's founder, Mark Twain, exerted an outsized influence on the genre, not only as a publisher but more famously as the editor of Grant's memoirs and as a writer about the war in his own right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

The 4D Podcast Network
Ring General Radio: Second Place; First Loser

The 4D Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 118:23


As two of the three Generals recover from a weekend of AEW festivities (and one recovers from a night of wings and beer), they convene together in a remote location on the south side. They discuss what happened at Full Gear, make their predictions for the upcoming Survivor Series show and cut you a 3-count of second-tier title holders that never won the big one. Catch up with the boys on this rowdy Tuesday night!

Ring General Radio
Ring General Radio: Second Place; First Loser

Ring General Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 118:23


As two of the three Generals recover from a weekend of AEW festivities (and one recovers from a night of wings and beer), they convene together in a remote location on the south side. They discuss what happened at Full Gear, make their predictions for the upcoming Survivor Series show and cut you a 3-count of second-tier title holders that never won the big one. Catch up with the boys on this rowdy Tuesday night!

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
History of the Mongols SPECIAL: Chinggis Genetic Legacy

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:25


At the start of the twenty-first century, a study was released which brought the thirteenth century starkly into the present. A 2003 study led by Chris Tyler-Smith published in the American Journal of Human Genetics simply titled “The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols,” determined that an alarming number of men across Asia, from China to Uzbekistan, carried the same haplotype on their Y-chromosome, indicating a shared paternal lineage. 8% of the studied group, just over 2100 men from 16 distinct populations in Asia shared this haplotype, which if representative of the total world population, would have come out to about 16 million men. This was far beyond what was to be expected of standard genetic variation over such a vast area. The researchers traced the haplogroup to Mongolia, and with the BATWING program determined that the most recent common ancestor lived approximately 1,000 years ago, plus or minus 300 years in either direction. The study determined that this could only be the result of selective inheritance, and there was only man who fit the profile, who had the opportunity to spread his genes across so much of Asia and have them be continually selected for centuries to come; that was Chinggis Khan, founder of the Mongol Empire. Identifying him with the Y-Chromosome haplogroup, the C3* Star Cluster, the image of Chinggis Khan as the ancestor of 0.5% of the world population has become irrevocably attached to his name, and a common addition in the comment sections on any Mongol related topic on the internet will be the fact that he is related to every 1 in 200 men in Asia today. Yet, recent studies have demonstrated that this may not be the case, and that Chinggis Khan's genetic legacy is not so simple as commonly portrayed. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       Inside each human being are the genes we inherit from our parents. Distinct alleles within the thousands of genes of our 23 chromosomes affect the makeup of our bodies, from our physical  appearances to blood type. Each allele is inherited from our parents, who inherited from their parents, and so on, leaving in each human being a small marker of every member of their ancestry. Due to interbreeding and mixing over time, people living in a certain region will share  alleles, given that various members of their community shared ancestors at some point. A collection of these alleles is a haplotype, and a group of similar haplotypes with shared ancestry is a haplogroup. Tracing specific haplogroups attached to the Y-Chromosome, for instance, allows us to trace paternal ancestry of selected persons. It was the haplogroup dubbed the C3*star cluster that the researchers identified as Chinggis Khan's haplotype, though later research has redefined it to the C2* star cluster. Thus, while you may see it somewhat interchangeably referred to as C3 or C2, depending on how recent the literature you're reading is. Whoever carried the markers on their chromosome associated with this haplogroup, according to the study, was therefore a descendant of Chinggis Khan. The lineage, it should be noted, does not start with Chinggis Khan; it is detectable in the ancestors of the Mongols dating back at least to the fifth century BCE, to the Donghu people in eastern Mongolia and Manchuria. It is found in high frequencies in populations which had close contact with Mongols from Siberia to Central Asia, as as the Buryats, Udeges, Evens, Evenks, Kazakhs, and in lower frequencies in places conquered by the Mongol Empire. As demonstrated by the 2003 study, a map of these haplogroups lines up rather neatly with a map of the Mongol Empire at the time of Chinggis Khan's death.        The 2003 study found that 8% of the men sampled had high frequencies of haplotypes from a set of closely related lineages, the C2*  star cluster. With the highest numbers of this cluster found in Mongolia, it was the logical origin point for this cluster. Its frequencies in so many populations of the former Mongol Empire seemed to suggest it spread with Mongol imperial expansion. The researchers therefore identified Chinggis Khan and his close male-relatives as the likely progenitors. While the public has understood this as Chinggis Khan and his family raping a massive percentage of the thirteenth century human population, this was not quite what the study implied. Rather, the selective marriage into the Chinggisid royal family, with each son having high numbers of children, and so on for generations due to prestige associated with the lineage, was the cause for the haplogroup's spread.        The study decided that, since the haplogroups showed up in high frequencies among the Hazara of Afghanistan and Pakistan, and as they were deemed to be direct descendants of Chinggis Khan, then this must have meant no one else other than the Great Khan himself was the most recent common ancestor for this haplogroup. The high frequencies across Asian populations, an origin point in Mongolia, an estimated common ancestor approximately a thousand years ago, and association with the supposed Chinggisid Hazaras was the extent of the evidence the study had to make Chinggis Khan the progenitor.       When released, this study made headlines around the world. You'll find no shortage of articles stating that “Genghis Khan was a prolific article,” with the underlying, thought generally unstated, assumption that these genes were spread by a hitherto unimaginable amount of rape, “backed up” by the medieval sources where Chinggis is described taking his pick of conquered women after the sack of a city. It's a useful addition to the catalogue of descriptions to present the Mongols as mindless barbarians, with this study being essentially the scientific data to back up this presentation.  It's now become one of the key aspects of Chinggis Khan's image in popular culture.       However, as more recent studies have demonstrated, there are a number of problems with this evidence presented in the 2003 study. Firstly, later researchers have pointed out how indirect the evidence is for the connection of Chinggis Khan to the C2 lineage. The estimates for the most recent common ancestor can vary widely depending on the methods used; while some estimates can place a figure within Chinggis Khan's epoch, other estimates put the most recent common ancestor for the C2* cluster over 2,000 year ago. Even going by the 2003 study, it still gives a 600 year window for the most recent common ancestor, who still could have lived centuries before or after Chinggis Khan.   One of the most serious assumptions in the study was that the Hazara of Afghanistan were direct descendants of Chinggis KhanThis is an assumption which rests more on misconception than medieval materials. In fact, the thirteenth and fourteenth century sources indicate that Chinggis Khan spent only a brief time in what is now Afghanistan, only from late 1221 and throughout much of 1222, which he largely spent campaigning, pursuing Jalal al-Din Mingburnu and putting down local revolts before withdrawing. There is no indication that a Mongol garrison was left in the region by Chinggis, and it is not until the 1230s that Mongol forces returned and properly incorporated the region into the empire. Still, it was not until the end of the thirteenth century were Chinggisid princes actually staying in the region, when Chagatayid princes like Du'a's son Qutlugh Khwaja took control over the Negudaris. The sources instead describe waves of Mongol garrisons into Afghanistan which began almost a decade after Chinggis Khan's death, from the initial tamma garrisons under Ögedai Khaan's orders to Jochid troops fleeing Hulegu to Afghanistan in the 1260s. Later, from the late fourteenth century onwards, Afghanistan was the heart of the Timurid realm, and while the Timurids shared some descent from Chinggis through marriage, it's not exactly the process which would have led to high percentages of Chinggisid ancestry.Together, this strongly suggests that the Hazara would not bear Chinggisid ancestry in any considerable quantity.   Perhaps most prominently, there is little evidence that connects the C2* star cluster to known descendants of Chinggis Khan. The fact that no tomb of Chinggis Khan or any other known members of his family has been found, means that there is no conclusive means to prove what haplogroups he possessed. Without human remains which undeniably belong to one of his close male relatives or himself, Chinggis Khan's own haplogroup can not ever be reliably identified. Most royal Chinggisid lineages in the western half of the empire, such as that of the Ilkhanate or Chagatais, disappeared long before the advance of genetic sciences. You might think that looking in Mongolia, you'd find a lot of Chinggisids running about, but this is not the case. Even during the empire, many members of the Chinggisid family were spread across Asia, leaving by the end of the fourteenth century largely lines only from his brothers, and of his grandsons Ariq Böke and Khubilai. In the fifteenth century, a massive massacre of the royal family was carried out by the leader of the Oirats and the true master of Mongolia, the non-Chinggisid Esen Taishi. Mongolia was reunified some fifty years later under the Khubilayid prince Dayan Khan, and it was the descendants of his sons who made up the Chinggisid nobility for the next centuries. Then, in the 1930s Soviet supported purges resulted in the near annihilation of the Chinggisid princes, Buddhist clergy and other political enemies. From 1937-1939, over 30,000 Mongolians were killed, and the Dayan Khanid nobility nearly extinguished.   While it is true that today in Mongolia, you can find many people who claim the imperial clan name of Borjigin, this is largely because after democratization in Mongolia in 1990, Mongolians were encouraged to take clan names- a fact that, as many commenters have pointed out, historically the Mongols did not do, unless they were actually members of the Chinggisid royal family. While the 1918 census in Mongolia recorded only 5.7% of the population as being Borjigid, during the recent registering of clan names some 50% chose, of course, the most famous and prestigious name for themselves. Therefore, it's rather difficult to find a lot of a Chinggisids today.   The 2003 study relied on a random selection of people from across Asia, rather than looking specifically for individuals who claimed Chinggisid descent. Other studies which have sought out people who claim Chinggisid ancestry do not support the C2* Star cluster hypothesis of the 2003 study. A 2012 study by Batbayar and Sabitov in the Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy of Mongolian individuals who could trace their lineage back to Chinggis Khan's fifteenth century descendant, Dayan Khan, found none of them matched the Star cluster proposed by the 2003 study. To overcome the previously mentioned issues about finding Chinggisids, to quote Batbayar and Sabitov, “In this study, seven patrilineal descendants of [...] Dayan Khan and two of Chinggis Khan's brothers' descendants were chosen for Y-chromosome DNA sequencing. Rather than testing a multitude of subjects, for the sake of accuracy, the most legitimate and proven descendants of Dayan Khan were selected. The DNA donors were selected based upon their official Mongol and Manchu titles and ranks, which were precisely recorded in Mongolian, Manchu, and Soviet documents.” Essentially, as close as you can get to a definite, unbroken paternal line from Chinggis Khan, given the 800 years since his death. When they compared the Dayan Khanid descendants, the descendants of Chinggis' brothers, and those who could reliable claimed ancestry from Chinggis' son Jochi, Batbayar and Sabitov demonstrated that essentially each lineage bore different haplogroups, and none, except for a small branch of the Jochids, bore the C2* star cluster of the 2003 study.    Study of the bodies of medieval Mongol burials have likewise yielded contrasting results when their DNA has been examined.  One of the most notable burials which has been studied is the Tavan Tolgoi suit, from eastern Mongolia. Essentially it was a burial of an extremely wealthy family, dated to the mid-thirteenth century. Adorned with jewelry and buried in coffins made of Cinnamon, which would have had to be imported from southeastern Asia, the researcher suggested due to such obvious wealth and power that they must have been Chinggisid. Their bodies showed haplogroups associated, interestingly enough, with western Asia populations, with effectively no descendants in modern Mongolian populations, and most definitely, not the C2* star cluster. This led to the 2016 study by Gavaachimed Lkhagvasuren et al., titled “Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen's Family and her Possible kinship with Genghis Khan,” to suggest Chinggis must have borne this haplogroup, and possibly, western Asian ancestry. He also pointed to supposed descriptions of Chinggis Khan having red hair as possible supporting literary evidence.    But this is not reliable evidence. Firstly, none of the graves conclusively can be identified as Chinggisid.  The Chinggisid's known preference for burials on Burkhan Khaldun seems unlikely to make the Tavan Tolgoi burials a close relation.  Further, the “red hair” description of Chinggis Khan comes from a mistranslation of a phrase from Rashid al-Din's Compendium of Chronicles, where Chinggis remarks that young Khubilai lacked his grandfather's ruddy features, indicating not red hair, but a face red in colour; hardly uncommon for a man who spent his lifetime in the harsh winds of the steppe. Therefore, the Tavan Tolgoi burials seem more likely to represent a family, possibly of Qipchaq origin, taken from western Asia, incorporated into the Mongol military and gaining wealth and power- hardly unusual in the Mongol army, but revealing nothing of Chinggis' haplogroups. Other wealthy burials of nobility from the Mongol Empire in Mongolia and northern China have revealed differing chromosomal haplogroups, providing no answer as of yet to the question of the Great Khan's own genetic lineage.   Much like the 2003's study erroneous identification of the Hazaras as direct descendants of Chinggis Khan, a more recent study demonstrates the pitfalls of attempting to connect historical figures to genetic data. A 2019 study by Shao-Qing Wen et al. in the  Journal of Human Genetics looked at the y-chromosomal profiles of a family from northwestern China's Gansu-Qinghai area, who traced their ancestry back to Kölgen, a son of Chinggis Khan with one of his lesser wives. Importantly, this family also backed up their claims in genealogical records, and had inhabited the same region for centuries. After the expulsion of the Mongols, they had been made local officials [tusi 土司] by the succeeding Ming and Qing dynasties. This family, the Lu, did not match the C2* Star Cluster, but actually showed close affinity to other known descendants of Chinggis Khan, the Töre clan in Kazakhstan. The Töre  trace their lineage to Jani Beg Khan (r.1473-1480), one of the founders of the Kazakh Khanate and a tenth generation descendant of Chinggis Khan's first born son Jochi. Jochi, as you may recall, was born after his mother Börte was taken captive by Chinggis Khan's enemies, and was accused, most notably by his brother Chagatai, of not being their father's son. Chinggis, for the record, always treated Jochi as fully legitimate. As the Lu family in China traced themselves to Kölgen, who shared only a father with Jochi, then the fact that the Lu and the Töre belong to the same C2 haplogroup, with a  genealogical separation of about 1,000 years, would suggest that if this is in fact the Y-chromosomal lineage of Chinggis Khan, then Jochi's uncertain paternity could be laid to rest, and that he was a true son of Chinggis Khan.   This theory is comfortable and convenient, but other scholars have noted that the connection of the Lu to Toghan, the descendant of Kölgen, is very tenuous. The sources connecting the Lu clan to Kölgen's family were not compiled until the late Qing Dynasty, some four to five centuries after Toghan's death. The sources more contemporary to Toghan's life do not match the description of his life described in the histories used by the Lu clan, leading scholars to argue that, while the Lu clan does have Mongolian origin, and likely did have an ancestor with the very common medieval Mongolian name of Toghan, it seems likely that at some point the Lu clan's family compilers decided to associate their own ancestor with the more well known Chinggisid of the same name, and therefore claim for themselves Chinggisid ancestry and prestige- hardly an unknown thing by compilers of Chinese family trees. Therefore, the matter of Jochi's paternity still remains uncertain.       Perhaps the final nail in the coffin comes in the 2018 study by  Lan Hai-Wei, et al. in the European Journal of Human Genetics. Compiling data from previous studies that found issue with the 2003 hypothesis, they looked at groups with high frequencies of the C2* Star clusters like the Hazara or the Daur, a Mongolic-speaking people from Northeastern China who, based off of historical records, make no claims of Chinggisid descent. Newer estimates also suggest the most recent common ancestor for this lineage was over 2,600 years ago. In the most recent hypothesis then, it seems more likely that the star cluster identified by the 2003 study does not represent the lineage of Chinggis Khan, but was simply an incredibly common paternal lineage among ordinary inhabitants of the Mongolian plateau. Its presence in other peoples across Asia was not evidence of selective breeding into the Golden Lineage, but simply the movement of Mongolian troops into a region, and intermixing with the local population. In the case of the Hazaras, this is the exact scenario demonstrated by the historical sources, with waves of Mongol troops rather than a host of Chinggisids descending into the Hazarajat. The possibility cannot be excluded however, that while C2* was a dominant haplotype in thirteenth century Mongolia, that before 1200 it had already been spread across Central Asia by earlier nomadic expansions of Mongolia-based empires like the Göktürk Khaghanates or the Uighur. The Mongol expansion in the thirteenth century, then, would only be another wave of the spread of C2* across Eurasia.       While it is possible that Chinggis Khan and his close male relatives did in fact, carry the C2* star cluster, there is no evidence which directly or conclusively connects him to it. His known descendants through the line of Dayan Khan are of a different Y-chromosomal haplogroup. The descendants of Dayan Khan, himself a descendant of Chinggis Khan's grandson Khubilai, and the Kazakh Töre, descendants of Chinggis Khan's son Jochi, bear haplotypes so distant that their most recent common ancestor is estimated to have lived 4,500 years ago, which does not fair well for the likelihood of Jochi being Chinggis' son. A third known and tested branch, of the Shibanids in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, does match the C2* star cluster, but has less than 1,000 known members and again, are descended from Chinggis Khan via Jochi. Chinggis Khan then cannot be said to be the ancestor of 0.5% of the world's population, since his y-chromosomal marking remains unknown. Any attempts at identifying it conclusively can never be more than mere assumptions without finding the bodies of either the Khan or any of his close-male relatives- a prospect highly unlikely, given the Chinggisids' preference for secret graves. Thus, it seems that his haplotypes are but one more secret that Chinggis will keep with him.       Our series on the Mongols will continue, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this, and would like to help us keep bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.  -SOURCES- Abilev, Serikabi, et al. “The Y-Chromosome C3* Star-Cluster Attributed to Genghis Khan's Descendants is Present at High Frequency in the Kerey Clan from Kazakhstan.” Human Biology 84 no. 1 (2012): 79-99.   Adnan, Atif, et al. “Genetic characterization of Y-chromosomal STRs in Hazara ethnic group of Pakistan and confirmation of DYS448 null allele.” International Journal of Legal Medicine 133 (2019): 789-793.   Callaway, Ewen. “Genghis Khan's Genetic Legacy Has Competition.” Scientific American. January 29th, 2015.   Derenko, M.V. “Distribution of the Male Lineages of Genghis Khan's Descendants in Northern Eurasian Populations.”  Russian Journal of Genetics 43 no. 3 (2007): 3334-337.   Dulik, Matthew C. “Y-Chromosome Variation in Altaian Kazakhs Reveals a Common paternal Gene Pool for Kazakhs and the Influence of Mongolian Expansions.” 6 PLoS One no. 3 (2011)   Gavaachimed Lkhagvasuren et al. “Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen's Family and her Possible kinship with Genghis Khan.” PLoS ONE 11 no. 9 (2016)   Kherlen Batbayar and Zhaxylyk M. Sabitov. “The Genetic Origins of the Turko-Mongols and Review of The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols. Part 1: The Y-chromosomal Lineages of Chinggis Khan.” The Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy 4 no. 2 (2012):    Lan-Hai Wei, et al. “Whole-sequence analysis indicates that the  Y chromosome C2*-Star Cluster traces back to ordinary Mongols, rather than Genghis Khan.” European Journal of Human Genetics 26, (2018): 230-237.   Lan-Hai Wei et al.  “Genetic trail for the early migrations of Aisin Gioro, the imperial house of the Qing Dynasty.” Journal of Human Genetics 62 (2017): 407-411.   Shao-Qing Wen et al., “Molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu's family reveals their apternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan's eldest son.” Journal of Human Genetics 64 (2019): 815-820.   Ye Zhang et al. “The Y-chromosome haplogroup C3*-F3918, likely attributed to the Mongol Empire, can be traced to a 2500-year-old nomadic group.” Journal of Human Genetics 63 (2018): 231-238.   Yi Liu. “A Commentary on molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu's family reveals their paternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan's eldest son.” Journal of Human Genetics 66 no. 5 (2020): 549–550.    Zakharov, I.A. “A Search for a “Genghis Khan” Chromosome.” Russian Journal of Genetics 46 no. 9 (2010): 1130-1131.     Zerjal, Tatiana, et al. “The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols.” American Journal of Human Genetics 72 (2003): 717-721.  

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career
RFT 549: Marine Corps Birthday/Veteran's Day

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 9:16


In the battle for Iwo Jima, 7000 marines were killed and 20,000 wounded. From az central: It's an image seared into the American consciousness. After four days of fierce fighting on the tiny Pacific island of Iwo Jima during World War II, part of the United States' “island hopping” strategy to defeat the Japanese after retaking the Philippines, six U.S. Marines climb the highest peak of the 8-square-mile outpost and plant an American flag. One helmet-clad Marine holds the post in place amid the rubble, while the others thrust the stars and stripes toward the smoke- and cloud-pocked sky; a triumphant moment captured by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal. The photo would publish nationwide to great fanfare two days later on Sunday, Feb. 25, 1945, and prove that, yes, we can win the war. Rosenthal would later win a Pulitzer Prize for Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, and the U.S. Postal Service would affix the image on a 3-cent stamp. From my author website: November 10, 1969 I was sitting in the Doom Club with a couple of the other Covey FACs. The weather had been especially lousy, with squall line thunderstorms over the mountains between DaNang and Laos. Because of the weather either over the target area or over our route to the AO, we hadn't flown any missions in several days. We were getting antsy, and spent most of our time bitching. And drinking. We were about to order another round of drinks, when in walked a Marine Lieutenant. It was Lieutenant Royce! “Who wants to help celebrate the Marine Corps birthday?” he bellowed. I got the impression he'd already started celebrating a bit earlier. When he saw me, his eyes lit up. “Lieutenant! Great to see you. I have a jeep outside, and I can take five of you.” “I'm ready!” I answered, “Let's go.” Three other guys joined me in piling into the jeep for a quick, albeit dangerous, drive to Camp DaNang, the Marine outpost. When we arrived we spilled out and went into the Marine Officer's Club. The Marines didn't know how to live in luxury, but they sure knew how to throw a party. All the booze we could drink. All the food, great food, we could eat. Steak, lobster, shrimp. We had a ball. Like every other time I got shit-faced drunk, I blacked out. I think I had a good time. Next thing I knew, someone was shaking me. “Lieutenant. Wake up.” It was Royce. I felt like crap. I lifted my head and looked around. I was on a canvas cot. “It's 0500 hours,” Royce proclaimed, “Let's go for a run.” “I, I think I'll pass,” I responded. “Okay. If you want to wash up, here's a basin.” He handed me an empty helmet. All I could think was, “You gotta be shitting me.” I thanked Royce and hitched a ride back to DaNang. Damn, those Marines knew how to throw a party! From Today: A sacred part of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier usually only visited by presidents and foreign dignitaries is open to the public this week in honor of the 100th anniversary of the memorial dedicated to America's unidentified war casualties. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Plaza on the hallowed ground of Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia is usually reserved for the sentinels who stand guard and presidents and other dignitaries presenting a wreath or flowers. Ahead of Veterans Day on Thursday, the American public is being given the chance to step forward on the plaza and pay their respects by placing flowers at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The special opportunity is available on Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST by registering online in advance. TODAY's Craig Melvin traveled to the site of the sacred white marble sarcophagus to speak with a gold star mother who regularly visits Arlington as well as a senior member of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, known as “The Old Guard,” who keep watch day and night at the tomb. The memorial was dedicated on Nov. 11, 1921, after the remains of an unidentified soldier from World War I were exhumed from a military cemetery in France, flown to the United States, and buried in a ceremony officiated by President Warren G. Harding. Remains of unidentified soldiers from World War II and the Korean War were later interred at the tomb in the 1950s. The remains of a Vietnam War veteran were buried there in 1984, but they were exhumed in 1998 and buried at a Missouri military cemetery at the request of the soldier's family after he was positively identified as Air Force 1st Lt. Michael Joseph Blassie, according to the Arlington National Cemetery website. Cindy Chip, whose son Sgt. Michael Hardegree died while serving in Iraq in 2007, is among the more than 12,000 people who have signed up so far to lay flowers at the tomb on Tuesday and Wednesday. "We don't know that soldier's name," she told Craig on TODAY Tuesday. "We don't know anything about him except that he was an American soldier and he gave his life for his country. And we will never forget him. "And every mother in her heart, that is what we want to say. Just don't forget them. Just don't forget that he lived. And that's what that tomb says to me. This country will never forget it." From my author website: Saying Goodbye To A Friend Posted on April 15, 2015 I buried a friend yesterday. At this age, that's not terribly unusual. What made this different is that Rick Chorlins was killed 45 years ago, and his remains have finally been brought home. Rick and I were close when we were cadets at the Air  Force Academy. Then, in 1967, graduation sent us in different directions, and we didn't meet up again until late 1969. I was stationed at DaNang Air Base, South Vietnam, and had wangled a good-deal trip to Thailand for a few days. I was going to go for an orientation ride on a C-130 Airborne Command and Control Center (ABCCC), call-sign Moonbeam. It was a chance to get away from the unrelenting nightly rocket attacks, and see locals who were not burdened by war and who knew how to smile. I arrived at Nakon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base, called NKP, and headed to the Officers Club. And there, standing at the bar, was Rick, along with another classmate I hadn't seen in over two years, Bob Moore. Meeting up with old friends after a long time is always fun. Running into them unexpectedly on the other side of the world is really special. We hung around together the entire night. After a few drinks, we had dinner, then went back to their hootch and caught up with what had been happening in our lives. We had all gotten married since we last saw each other. Rick had gotten a Master's Degree. Bob had become a father. We swapped war stories. I told them what it was like to be a Forward Air Controller, and they told me what it was like to fly the A-1 in combat. Truth be told, I felt like I was the kid and they were the grown-ups. I was flying a dinky little O-2A Skymaster, while they were flying the Skyraider, a gigantic, fire-breathing tail-dragger with a round engine that carried thousands of pounds of bombs under its wings and dueled with enemy gunners for a living. They were real fighter pilots. After hours of shooting down our watches with our hands, we said our good-byes and vowed to get together again, at some unknown time in the future. Great guys. If you've read Hamfist Over The Trail, this story might sound familiar. Chapter 28 is the fictionalized account of my meeting up with Bob and Rick. Dave and Dick in the book are the fictional characters representing the real-life Rick and Bob. Bob was killed the next week . A few months later, Rick was shot down and he was listed as KIA, but his remains were not recovered. Until now. After 45 years, Rick came home. His remains had been discovered in Laos in 2003 and sent to Hawaii, where DNA testing finally confirmed it was Rick. Rick was buried at the Air Force Academy cemetery with full military honors, including a 21-gun salute, a missing-man fly-by, and the solemn playing of Taps. Generals presented flags to his two surviving relatives, his sisters, Cheryl and Toby. Then we all gathered together at a restaurant to tell Rick stories. And we all had a really great time, reminiscing about Rick's great sense of humor, his intelligence, and his dedication to duty. It was a great Celebration of Life. And it was also a solemn reminder of the sacrifices the families of servicemen faced, and continue to face, when they send their loved ones off to war. They wait at home, never knowing if the sound of the closing car door in the street is a neighbor coming home or a military staff car with a Colonel and a Chaplain coming to bring news that will change their lives forever. That happened 58,286 times during the Vietnam War. Eighteen on my classmates were lost in Southeast Asia. Five have still not been found.

The 4D Podcast Network
Ring General Radio: Lay-Z-Boys Club

The 4D Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 107:41


After a week off, the Generals get back down to bid-niss as they convene to talk about poorly named tag-teams. With all kinds of happenings to discuss, the boys dive right into the nitty gritty of the released participants along with the upcoming AEW PPV. Never a dull moment when the Generals get together!

Ring General Radio
Ring General Radio: Lay-Z-Boys Club

Ring General Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 107:41


After a week off, the Generals get back down to bid-niss as they convene to talk about poorly named tag-teams. With all kinds of happenings to discuss, the boys dive right into the nitty gritty of the released participants along with the upcoming AEW PPV. Never a dull moment when the Generals get together!

Veterans  Radio
MICHIGAN MILITARY AND VETERANS HALL OF HONOR AND SISTERS IN ARMS

Veterans Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:00


Navy Reserve Captain Paul J. Ryan (ret) talks about the mission of the Michigan Military and Veteran  Hall of Honor and its inductee class of 2021. Captain Ryan gives us a summary of a few of the 2021 Inductees: Catherine Farrell, Command Sergeants Major (ret), Army National GuardJeffrey Stitzel, Command Sergeants Major, US ArmyThomas Hass, Captain (ret), US Coast Guard The ceremony will be on November 19, 2021, at the Michigan History Museum in Lansing. Every branch of service is recognized, from enlisted members to retiring Generals. For more information: www.mimilitaryvethallofhonor.org WWII BATTALION – SISTERS IN ARMS Kaia Alderson's historical fiction novel reveals the untold true story of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion  (Six Triple Eight), the only all-Black battalion of the Women's Army Corps who made the dangerous voyage to Europe to ensure American servicemen received word from their loved ones during World War II. Based on a true story of the 6888th Postal Battalion (the Six Triple Eight), Sisters in Arms explores the untold story of what life was like for the only all-Black, female U.S. battalion to be deployed overseas during World War II. Alderson discusses her research, the 6888th, and the potential for  Congressional Gold Medal for the 6888th.   For more information: www.kaiaalderson.com

Fate of Isen: A Kiwi D&D Podcast
Chapter 6 Ep27 - Jungles & Generals

Fate of Isen: A Kiwi D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 60:53


In this episode, the Apple Squadeth gets acquainted with the welcoming people of the Lochry jungle. Trestlespoon and Arcus get very acquainted... the Marley makes a very bold move.Visit www.fateofisen.com to learn moreA proud member of the Necropodicon Network, and one of the Feedspot top 60 D&D podcasts in the world! Check out Feedspot here.If you like the show, please feel free to join us on Discord or support us on Patreon!Intro, outro, and recap music by freesound user, Tyops★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Zero Blog Thirty
How We'll Lose The Biggest War To China

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 105:21


Round 1: Huge news out of Philly that Chaps could not agree with more! Round 2: OPSEC: Chaps saw an interview last night that has my radar on my highest alert. We are getting farmed silly! Round 3: The Army doesnt want your body to hurt. I wish the Marine Corps felt that way because my (Chaps') body is an absolute wreck. Round 4: Generals are admitting that advances in China have caught them off guard. Round 5: Cons sat down with Dr Amishi Jha to discuss a different approach to mental health focus to understand that Attention is the one driving our mental cars

The Truepenny Show
The Beginnner's Guide To Japan Part 75; Hustle House In 2004

The Truepenny Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 63:48


James and John Dinsdale explore the topsy turvy world of HUSTLE as Shoot Legends become magical Generals and King's Road Champions become soldiers in a fantasy army. Also Taichi as a good guy.

Bullets 2 Beans
Episode 44 - Afghanistan, COVID and Supply Chain

Bullets 2 Beans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 55:32


In episode 44, Doc discusses the fall of Afghanistan, the COVID Vaccine mandates and impacts to the supply chain across America.In segment 1, Doc goes over how he believes Afghanistan fell, why every warrior on the ground knew it would happen, and his theory of how there was such a great disconnect between the frontline fighters and the Generals at the Pentagon.  In segment 2, Doc revisits the COVID-19 vaccine mandates and discusses the impact this is having on our national healthcare delivery system; he looks at the high number of healthcare workers leaving the industry by choice or by force as these mandates begin getting enforced, and how this will lead to higher acuity, or sicker, patients and will also increase our overall cost of healthcare.  Finally Doc closes our segment 2 with a discussion around the growing supply chain crisis, and provides some color behind last years passing of legislation in California by Governor Gavin Newsom that has directly attributed to what we are seeing today.Maverick TacticalBlack Rifle CoffeeTeam Rubicon

Scott J Corley
#8 Counselor to Generals: Matt Sherman on his 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan. W/Chad Hinkson

Scott J Corley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 124:11


Matt received his bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina in 1994, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. Sherman received his master's degree in international relations from Cambridge University in 1996. As a Fulbright Scholar, he worked with the Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs on US - Australian trade regulations. He later returned to Chapel Hill and received his J.D. from the University of North Carolina School of Law in 2002. (Source:Wikipedia—But also confirmed by Matt) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Sherman_(lawyer)  Matt's unique charismatic personality helped him build relationships with all types of players on all sides of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.  His resulting perspective would inform the key decision makers in both wars.  The list of people he advised includes General Stanley McChrystal, General David Petraeus, and General John F Campbell.   12:46 Nothing Simple  14:00 Geography plays huge role in how nations evolve  15:30 Long term force presence  17:00  How to interpret the political views regarding now..  18:50 Forever War isn't the way to look at it  21:00 How wars end  32:20 Afghani Institutions today  33:46 US Mission in Afghanistan  34:30 Reason for Pride in the mission  35:00 What caused 9/11 and will the Taliban be able to enforce prevention of terrorist training camps.  38:40 Justification for Invading Afghanistan and whether the Taliban could have turned over Osama Bin Laden to the US.  41:00 How Important was finding and killing OBL.  44:45  Perceptions of Force  46:20 The Fierce debate in Washington on the first surge in 2006  51:10 Obama Surge  53:20 The psychological impact of leaving  54:30 How many Americans are in Afghanistan against their will right now  56:20  Afghani helpers to the US left there  56:50 Helping People Out of Afghanistan  78:30 Advertisement  88:00 Dan Carlin  93:20 Wars bringing out the best in people.  94:00  Looking for more or broader perspective  100:00 Round up of Saddam's AirForce  109:30 Colin Powell's perspectives  1:58:00 Sister BA   Acknowledgments: Thanks to Matt Sherman for his time and the sharing of his perspectives.  Thanks to Sheila Corley for help in general in life and more specifically to this episode helping me consolidate my thoughts for the Intro.  Chad H for showing up.  The Ninja 9 for the intro music.  (Solstice from the Pandemia album.)  Mike Marts for creative connections.  Parkin Corley for writing/playing drums on the outro music.  Brendan Ruane, who is an outstanding audio engineer, for coaching me over the last year plus to help me get to the point where I was able to create the sound mix from this episode by myself….  Shawn G Smith for demanding better from me.

Ring General Radio
Ring General Radio: Two-Damn-Fiddy!

Ring General Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 136:48


The Generals hit another milestone as they celebrate 250 episodes on the 4D network. As the boys convene on New Thompson Home Studios, they share their 3-counts of favorite moments from the 4D network. Tune in as they take a trip down memory lane and force the Nickname Machine to re-create a memorable moment they weren't able to track down the clip of. So much great stuff that you'll kick yourself if you don't tune in!

The 4D Podcast Network
Ring General Radio: Two-Damn-Fiddy!

The 4D Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 136:48


The Generals hit another milestone as they celebrate 250 episodes on the 4D network. As the boys convene on New Thompson Home Studios, they share their 3-counts of favorite moments from the 4D network. Tune in as they take a trip down memory lane and force the Nickname Machine to re-create a memorable moment they weren't able to track down the clip of. So much great stuff that you'll kick yourself if you don't tune in!

Veterans  Radio
2021 Michigan Military and Veterans Hall of Honor inductees

Veterans Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:00


Navy Reserve Captain Paul J. Ryan (ret) talks about the mission of the Hall of Honor and its inductee class of 2021. The ceremony will be on November 19, 2021, at the Michigan History Museum in Lansing. Paul discusses with host Jim Fausone some of the inductees including Catherine Farrell, Jeffrey Stitzel, and Thomas Hass. Every branch of service is recognized, from enlisted tour members to retiring Generals may earn a spot in the Hall.

Air Force Judge Advocate Generals School Podcast
Air Force Judge Advocate Generals School Podcast - 51. The First Amendment in the Military with Major Alan Serrano - Part 2

Air Force Judge Advocate Generals School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


This is the second of a two-part interview with Maj Alan Serrano on the First Amendment. In it, we discuss the freedom of speech, the freedom of assembly, and the freedom of religion within the military. We tackle some of the most hot-button issues, including the interplay between free speech and the use of social media, how commanders grapple with curtailing certain types of speech, what constitutes an extremist group, and how the military typically handles requests for religious accommodations.

Be Present
10/21/2021 - Praying the Scripture | Episode 19

Be Present

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:58


Proverbs 24:10 TPT. If we have need of courage, ask! It is a time to war and do spiritual warfare. Generals of spiritual warfare and all other spiritual warriors, it's time to raise up the new generation of warriors. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rashad-smith9/support

Steady On
Focus IQ with Rachel G. Scott

Steady On

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:53


Writer, speaker, and branding strategist Rachel G. Scott shares five tips for overcoming distraction and staying focused https://livesteadyon.com/Facebook @livesteadyonInstagram @angiebaughman421 https://rachelgscott.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iamrachelgscott/Instagram: @iamrachelgscott Take the Focus IQ Quiz here: https://icantcomedown.com/5 Simple Tips to Help You Focus: Take the Focus IQ Quiz here: https://icantcomedown.com/2021/05/07/blog-5-simple-tips-to-help-you-focus/ Rachel mentioned:God's Generals by Liardon RobertsThe Simple Faith of Mister Rogers by Amy HollingsworthRedeeming Your Time by Jordan Raynor Angie mentioned: The Grit ‘n Grace podcast with Amy Carroll & Cheri Gregory: https://gritngracegirls.com/ Heartwarming by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3864-heartwarmingLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Made To Reign
064 | For Men Striving to Become More Confident & Disciplined | Alive In Five

Made To Reign

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:18


Here's the # 1 tip for guys striving to become more confident & disciplined

The Van Maren Show
Former Trump adviser blasts woke generals, 'politicization' of US military

The Van Maren Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:50


In the latest episode of The Van Maren Show, Jonathon sat down with a retired Army general and former adviser to President Donald Trump, to explain his recent book "War by Other Means: A General in the Trump White House." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Air Force Judge Advocate Generals School Podcast
Air Force Judge Advocate Generals School Podcast - 50. The First Amendment in the Military with Major Alan Serrano - Part 1

Air Force Judge Advocate Generals School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


This is part one of a two-part interview with Maj Alan Serrano on the First Amendment. In it, we discuss the freedom of speech, the freedom of assembly, and the freedom of religion within the military. We tackle some of the most hot-button issues, including the interplay between free speech and the us of social media, how commanders grapple with curtailing certain types of speech, what constitutes an extremist group, and how the military typically handles requests for religious accommodations.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.59. History of the Mongols: Franco-Mongol Alliance

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:37


    The Mongols were famous for their ultimatums of destruction and submission. No shortage of thirteenth century states received demands for their unconditional surrender to the Great Khan granted divine mandate to rule by Eternal Blue Heaven. Initially, the Mongol imperial ideology was extremely black and white: you could submit to Mongol rule, or face total annihilation. There was no room for other relationships, for the Great Khan had no allies, only subjects. But as the thirteenth century went on and the dream of Chinggisid world hegemony slipped away as the divisions of the Mongol Empire went their separate ways, the Mongol Khans in the west began to seek not the capitulation, but the cooperation of western Europe to aid in their wars against Mamluks. For the Ilkhanate's sixty-year struggle against the Mamluk Sultanate, the Il-Khans sought to bring the Popes and Monarchs of Europe to a new crusade to assist in the defeat of the Mamluks, an ultimately fruitless endeavour, and the topic of today's episode. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       The first Mongol messages to the Kings of Europe came in the late 1230s and 40s, accompanying Batu and Sube'edei's western invasion, asking the Hungarians how they possibly could hope to flee the grasp of the Mongols. We know the Mongols sent a number of envoys to European monarchs and dukes, and employed a variety of peoples in this enterprise, including at least one Englishman. Over the 1240s and 50s, European envoys like John de Plano Carpini or William of Rubrucks to the Mongol Empire returned from Karakorum with orders for the Kings and Popes to come to Mongolia and submit in person.While Rus' and Armenian lords and kings did do so, there is little indication that European rulers even responded to these demands. For the Mongols, who seemed poised to dominate everything under the Eternal Blue Sky, there was little reason to adopt more conciliatory language. From their point of view, the Europeans were only stalling the inevitable: soon Mongol hoofbeats would certainly be heard in Paris and Rome. The Mongols treated the European states as their diplomatic inferiors, subjects basically in a state of rebellion by fact that they had not already submitted. Cruel, threatening and demanding letters were the norm, and it's safe to say any future efforts at alliance were greatly hampered by this opening salvo. The rare diplomatic exception was an embassy sent to King Louis IX of France during his stay in Cyprus in 1248 just before the 7th Crusade. There, messengers came from the Mongol commander in the west, Eljigidei, an ally to the reigning Great Khan, Guyuk. Headed by two Christians in Eljigidei's service, the embassy bore letters from Eljigidei. These letters called Louis ‘son,' and had no demand of submission, but mentioned Mongol favouritism to Christians, urged the French King not to discriminate between Latin and non-Latin Christians as all were equal under Mongol law, and wished him well in his crusade. The two Christian representatives of Eljigidei asserted that he was a Christian and that Guyuk himself had already been baptised. The urged Louis to attack Egypt, and prevent its Ayyubid prince from sending forces to aid the Caliph in Baghdad, who the Mongols were soon to attack.     Louis, is should be noted, almost certainly had not been anticipating any cooperation from the Mongols; he had  been well aware of their attacks on Hungary only a few years before, learned of Mongol demands and treatment of foreign powers from travellers like Carpini, and apparently received Mongol ultimatums for his submission in 1247. Further, a devout Christian, it is unlikely he would have gone looking for allies among “pagans,” even for fighting against Muslims. Still, he reacted well to Eljigidei's messengers and sent a return embassy with gifts with them back to Eljigidei which were to be sent on to Guyuk, while the initial letter was forwarded back to France and ultimately to King Henry III of England. Ultimately, it was for naught. Guyuk was dead even before Louis received Eljigidei's letter, and  Eljigidei himself was soon put to death in the following political turmoil. Little is known of the embassy Louis sent back with Eljigdei's representatives, but from the little heard of it through William of Rubruck a few years later, it seems to have achieved nothing beyond meeting Guyuk's widow and the regent, Oghul Qaimish, who portrayed Louis' gifts as tokens of the French King's submission.  Following the meeting on Cypress, Louis IX suffered a humiliating defeat in Egypt at Mansura, captured and was ransomed by the newly emerging Mamluks. By the time he returned to France and received Oghul Qaimish's reply, not only was she dead, but the responding letter was essentially another demand for his surrender. This first non-threatening Mongol embassy succeeded only in making the King of France feel like he had been tricked, especially since the new Great Khan, Mongke, sent a letter back with William of  Rubruck that disavowed Eljigidei's embassy. It has been speculated that Eljigidei was using the embassy to spy on Louis, as he was wary of the sudden arrival of Louis' army in Cyprus, and a desire to find out his military intentions, rather than any genuine interest in cooperation at this point.  His hope may have been to ensure that this new army attacked Mongol enemies, rather than get in the way of the Mongols.       The halting of the Mongol advance at Ayn Jalut by the Mamluks, and fracturing of the Empire into independent Khanates after Great Khan Mongke's death left the new Ilkhanate in a precarious position. Surrounded by enemies on all sides, the only direction they could expand not at the expense of fellow Mongols was against the Mamluks, who fortified their shared border with the Ilkhans. Even a small raid could trigger the arrival of the full Mamluk army, a dangerous prospect against such deadly warriors. Yet the Ilkhans could not bring their full might to bear on the shared border with the Mamluks in Syria, as it would leave their other borders open to attacks from the Golden Horde, Chagatais or Neguderis, in addition to the trouble of provisioning an army in the tough, hot and dry conditions of the Levantine coastline, a route the Mamluks secured and fortified. Opening a new front against the Mamluks was necessary, and there were already convenient beachheads established  in the form of the remaining Crusader States.   A shadow of their former selves, the Crusader states were represented by a few major coastal holdings like Antioch, Tripoli, and Acre, and inland fortifications like Krak de Chevaliers and Montfort, as well as the Kingdom of Cyprus, whose ruler, Hugh III of Cyprus, took the title King of Jerusalem in 1268. The Crusader States had shown neutrality to the Mongols, or even joined them such as the County of Tripoli did in 1260 after the Mongols entered Syria. In early 1260, the papal legate at Acre sent an embassy to Hulegu, most likely to discourage him from attacking the Crusader holdings. Along with information from the Kings of Armenian Cilicia, their most important regional vassals, the Mongols would have had a vague knowledge of western Europe and their crusading history. The Ilkhanate's founder, Hulegu, sent the first letter to the west in 1262, intended once more for King Louis IX, though this embassy was turned back in Sicily. This letter was friendlier terms than most Mongol missives, but still contained threats, if rather subdued. Pope Urban IV may have learned of the attempt, and the next year sent a letter to Hulegu, apparently having been told that the Il-Khan had become a Christian.  Delighted at the idea, the Pope informed Hulegu that if he was baptised, he would receive aid from the west. In reality, Hulegu never converted to Christianity, and died in 1265 without sending any more letters.       His son and successor, Abaqa, was the Il-Khan most dedicated to establishing a Franco-Mongol alliance and came the closest to doing so. Due to conflict on his distant  borders with the Golden Horde and Chagatayids, as well as the troubles of consolidating power as new monarch in a new realm, for the 1260s he was unable to commit forces to the Mamluk frontier. As a good Mongol, Abaqa was unwilling to allow the enemy total respite, and made it his mission to encourage an attack from the west on the Mamluks. His first embassy was sent in 1266, shortly after becoming Il-Khan, contacting the Byzantines, Pope Clement IV and King James I of Aragon, hoping for a united Christian front to combine efforts with the Mongols against the Mamluks, inquiring which route into Palestine the Christian forces would take. The responses were generally positive, Pope Clement replying that as soon as he knew which route, he would inform Abaqa.       Abaqa sent a message again in 1268, inquiring about this progress. James of Aragon found himself the most motivated by the Il-Khans requests, encouraged by the promises of Abaqa's logistical and military support once they reached the mainland. James made his preparations, and launched a fleet in September 1269. An unexpected storm scattered the fleet, and only two of James' bastard children made it to Acre, who stayed only briefly, accomplishing little there.        Not long after, King Louis IX set out for Crusade once more, making the inexplicable choice to land in Tunis in 1270. Despite his well planned efforts, the Crusade was an utter disaster, and Louis died of dysentery outside the walls of Tunis in August 1270. Prince Edward of England with his army landed in Tunis shortly before the evacuation of the crusaders, and disgusted by what he saw, set his fleet for the Holy Land, landing at Acre in May 1271, joined by Hugh of Lusignan, King of Cyprus.  Edward's timing was good, as Abaqa had returned from a great victory over the Chagatai Khan Baraq at Herat in July 1270, though had suffered a major hunting accident that November.       The Mamluk Sultan Baybars was campaigning in Syria in spring 1271, the famous Krak des Chevaliers falling to him that April. Tripoli would have fallen next, had Baybars not retreated back to Damascus hearing of the sudden arrival of a Crusader fleet, and was wary of being caught between European heavy cavalry and Mongol horse archers. Soon after landing Edward made his preparations for an offensive, and reached out to Abaqa. Abaqa was delighted, and sent a reply and orders for Samaghar, the Mongol commander in Anatolia, to head to Syria. Edward did not wait for Abaqa's reply, and there is no indication he ever responded to Abaqa's letter. He set out in mid-July, ensuring his army suffered the most from the summer heat, while missing the Mongols who preferred to campaign in the winter. Suffering high casualties and accomplishing little, he withdrew back to Acre. In mid-October Samaghar arrived with his army, raiding as far as to the west of Aleppo while an elite force of Mongols scouted ahead, routing a large group of Turkmen between Antioch and Harim, but was soon forced to retreat with the advance of the Mamluk army under Baybars.       Missing Samagahr by only a few weeks, in November Edward marched south from Acre at the head of a column of men from England, Acre, Cyprus, with Templars, Hospitallers and Teutonic Knights. They ambushed some Turkmen on the Sharon plain, forced the local Mamluk governor to withdraw, but with the arrival of large Mamluk reinforcements the Crusaders fled, losing their prisoners and booty.  That was the closest the Mongols and the Franks came to proper coordination. Edward helped oversee a peace treaty between the Mamluks and the Kingdom of Jersualem, but the heat, difficulties campaigning, political infighting and an assassination attempt on his life permanently turned him off of crusading. By September 1272, Edward set sail for England. A  few weeks after his departure the Mongols again invaded, besieging al-Bira but were defeated by the Mamluks in December.        Edward's brief effort in Syria demonstrated the difficulties prefacing any Mongol-Frankish cooperation. The Mamluks were a cohesive, unified force, well accustomed to the environment and working from a well supplied logistic system and intelligence network, while the Franks and Mongols were unable to ever develop a proper timetable for operations together. The European arrivals generally had unrealistic goals for their campaigns, bringing neither the men, resources or experience to make an impact.       Abaqa continued  to organize further efforts, and found many willing ears at the Second Council of Lyons in France in 1274, a meeting of the great powers of Christendom intended to settle doctrinal issues, the division of the Catholic and Orthodox Churches, and plan the reconquest of the Holy land. Abaqa's delegation informed the Council that the Il-Khan had secured his borders, that peace had been achieved between all the Mongols Khanates, and he could now bring his full might against the Mamluks, and urged the Christian powers to do likewise. The current Pope, Gregory X, fully supported this and made efforts to set things in motion, but his death in 1276 killed whatever momentum this process had had. Abaqa sent another round of envoys, who reached the King of France and the new King of England, Edward. The envoys brought the Il-khan's apologies for failing to cooperate properly during Edward's crusade, and asked him to return. Edward politely declined. This was the final set of envoys Abaqa sent west. Perhaps frustrated, he finally organized a proper invasion of Syria, only an army under his brother Mongke-Temur to be defeated by the Mamluks at Homs, and Abaqa himself dying soon after in 1282. His successors were to find no more luck that he had.        The most interesting envoy to bring the tidings of the Il-Khan to Europe did not originate in the Ilkhanate, but in China: Rabban Bar Sawma, born in 1220 in what is now modern day Beijing, was a Turkic Nestorian priest who had set out on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem before being conscripted to act as a messenger for the Il-Khan, in a journey which is a fascinating contrast to that of his contemporary Marco Polo. Even given him his own dedicated episode in this podcast series, but we'll give here a brief recount of his journey. Writing his accounts down upon his return to Baghdad later in life, he described how he brought messages and gifts to the Byzantine Emperor Andronicos II Palaiologus, marvelled at the Hagia Sophia, then landed in Sicily and made his way to Rome, having just missed the death of Pope Honorius IV. Travelling on to France, he was warmly welcomed by King Phillip IV, and then on to Gascony where he met the campaigning King Edward of England, who again responded kindly to the Il-khan's envoy.  On his return journey, he met the new Pope Nicholas IV in 1288 before returning to the Ilkhanate.    Despite the generous receptions Rabban Sauma was given by the heads of Europe, and despite the Il-khan's promises to return Jerusalem to Christian hands, the reality was there was no ruler in the west interested, or capable of, going on Crusade. By now, the act of Crusading in the Holy land had lost its lustre, the final crusades almost all disasters, and costly ones at that. With the final Crusader strongholds falling to the Mamluks in the early 1290s, there was no longer even a proper beachhead on the coast for a Crusading army. The sheer distance and cost of going on Crusade, especially with numerous ongoing issues in their own Kingdoms at hand, outweighed whatever perceived benefit there might have been in doing so. Further, while Rabban Sauma personally could be well received, the Mongols themselves remained uncertain allies. From 1285 through to 1288, Golden Horde attacks on eastern Europe had recommenced in force. Even the new Khan of the Golden Horde, Tele-Buqa, had led an army into Poland. For the Europeans, the distinctions between the Mongol Khanates were hard to register; how could messages of peace from some Mongols be matched with the open war other Mongols were undertaking? All evidence seems to suggest that the western Franks did not understand that the Golden Horde and Ilkhanate were separate political entities. Recall earlier the conflicting letters Louis IX had received in the 1240s, where one Mongol general offered friendship, only to be tricked in seemingly submitting to the Mongols and then receive letters in the 1250s telling him to discount the previous envoys. Together these encouraged unease over perceiving the Mongols as allies, and served to further dampen interest to pursue these alliances.       In contrast, the Mamluks had somewhat greater success in their own overseas diplomacy: in the 1260s Baybars initiated contact with the Golden Horde, ruled by the Muslim Berke Khan, encouraging him to keep up his warfare with his Ilkhanid cousins. Sultan Baybars also kept good relations with the Byzantine Empire and the Genoese, allowing him to keep the flow of Turkic slave soldiers from the steppes of the Golden Horde open, the keystone of the Mamluk military. There is also evidence they undertook some limited diplomacy with Qaidu Khan during the height of his rule over Central Asia and the Chagatayids. While the Mamluks and Golden Horde never undertook any true military cooperation, the continuation of their talks kept the Ilkhanate wary of enemies on all borders, never truly able to bring the entirety of its considerable might against one foe least another strike the Il-Khan's exposed frontiers. But, did the Golden Horde, in the 1260s, perceive this as an alliance? We only have Mamluk accounts of the relationship, but scholarship often supposes that the Golden Horde Khans perceived this as the submission of the Mamluks, and any cooperation was the cooperation between overlord and subject. As many of the Mamluk ruling class were Qipchaqs, so the Mongols had come to see as their natural slaves, it may well be that Berke saw the submission of the Mamluks as a natural part of their relationship, especially since he already ruled the Qipchaq homeland. This alliance, alongside never resulting in direct cooperation, was also never always amicable. When the Jochid Khans grew annoyed with the Mamluks, they would halt the trade of Qipchaq slaves and threaten to deprive the Mamluks of their greatest source of warriors. During the long reign of Mamluk Sultan al-Nasir Muhammad, a daughter of the Golden Horde Khan Ozbeg was wed to him, in an effort to cement the relationship after a rocky start to the 1300s. Al-Nasir soon accused her of not actually being a Chinggisid, insulting her and infuriating Ozbeg. Yet the relationship survived until the invasions of Emir Temur at the close of the fourteenth century, when the Mamluks and Golden Horde once again took part in a doomed west-Asian effort to ally against Temur.       Ilkhanid-European contacts continued into the 14th century, but with somewhat less regularity after Rabban bar Sawma's journey. An archbishopric was even founded in the new Ilkhanid capital of Sultaniyya in 1318, and Papal envoys would travel through the Ilkhanate to the Yuan Dynasty in China until the 1330s. A few envoys came from the Il-Khans still hoping to achieve military cooperation; Ghazan Il-Khan continued to send them before his invasions, including the only one that actually defeated the Mamluk army and led to a brief Mongol advance down the coast, occupying Damascus. News of Ghazan's successes did spread rapidly, for the Spanish Franciscan Ramon Llull learned of it and promptly sailed all the way across the Mediterranean, hoping to be among the first missionaries to land in the newly reclaimed Holy Land. But upon arriving in Cypress, Llull learned of Ghazan's equally quick withdrawal. The combined news of a Mongol victory followed by sudden Mongol withdrawal must have only affirmed the opinion of many of the futility of taking part in any more crusades with the Mongols.  Military operations against the Mamluks mostly ceased after Ghazan's death, until a formal peace was achieved between them and the Ilkhanate at the start of the 1320s. Naturally, no further messages for alliances with the powers of Europe were forth coming, and consequently putting an almost total end to European interest and contacts with the Middle East for the next five centuries. European-Mongol relations would continue for some time longer in the territory of the Golden Horde, where the attention of our podcast moves next, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast for more. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue bringing you great content, then consider supporting us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.   

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Sara Carter Podcast: Biden & His Generals Can't Keep Their Afghanistan Lies Straight

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Sara dissects the congressional testimony of our top national security officials and explains why she doesn’t believe President Biden or our top generals about what really happened before and during the disastrous withdrawal in Afghanistan. She also discusses the growing problem of Chinese counterfeiting, from gold and silver coins to machinery to critical medicine. Universal […]

Sara Carter Show
Biden & His Generals Can't Keep Their Afghanistan Lies Straight

Sara Carter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 47:29


Sara dissects the congressional testimony of our top national security officials and explains why she doesn't believe President Biden or our top generals about what really happened before and during the disastrous withdrawal in Afghanistan. She also discusses the growing problem of Chinese counterfeiting, from gold and silver coins to machinery to critical medicines. Universal Coin and Bullion President Mike Fuljenz joins Sara to explain how he and others are pleading with Facebook and others to block ads from counterfeiters.Please visit our great sponsors:My Pillowhttps://mypillow.com/carterGet the new MySlippers at 50% off with code CARTER.The Association of Mature American Citizenshttps://amac.us/carterThe benefits of membership are great, but the cause is even greater.Tunnel to Towershttps://T2T.orgDuring this 20th anniversary year of 9/11, help America to NEVER FORGET. Donate $11/month to Tunnel to Towers at T2T.orgUniversal Coinhttps://universalcoin.com/SaraVisit online or call 1-800-UCB-GOLD for a no-cost no-obligation Gold Info Kit.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Military Generals Contradict Biden on Afghanistan Advice, Florida Sues Biden Over Border Policies, and the Global Decline of Covid Cases and Deaths

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:08


Tonight's rundown: Afghanistan is proof that the President is misleading the country in more ways than one  Bill calls for General Milley to resign, but not for his calls to China, for speaking to reporters that had only an anti-Trump agenda in mind  Florida sues the Biden administration over its lack of control in handling the border crisis – as migrants flood Florida and cause the state to take on the brunt of the finances to support them The World Health Organization reports a global decline in new COVID-19 cases and deaths Three school districts in California require all staff and eligible students to be vaccinated before the Holidays  Bill speaks with former US Attorney for Utah, Brett Tolman about the latest on the Gabby Petito case, as the search for Brian Laundrie continues  The Republican National Committee and the Vermont GOP are suing two Vermont cities for allowing non-citizens to vote on local issues in their communities This Day in History, 1789: Congress establishes the military  Final Thought: Celebrating Holly's birthday week! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Sean Hannity Show
What Did The Generals Want? - September 29th, Hour 3

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 35:05


Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas joins today to discuss the hearing yesterday with Generals Milley, McKenzie and Austin. Senator Cotton served nearly five years on active duty in the United States Army as an Infantry Officer. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Newsmax Daily with Rob Carson
The Generals Are Busy Playing Hide & Seek (9/29/21)

The Newsmax Daily with Rob Carson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 42:49


 - The January 6th “insurrection” is being exposed as an infiltrated peaceful demonstration - Mark Zuckerberg is under questioning for influencing the 2020 presidential election - Rob dissects the new Democrat infrastructure bill, the pointless spending, and the weaponization of the IRS - Lindsey Graham speaks with Newsmax's Sean Spicer about the controversial Gen. Milley phone call - Special Guest: Former Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf talks about the ongoing nightmare of illegal immigration in our country and when the boiling point will be reached Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Benny Show
Ron DeSantis SUES Joe Biden, American Generals BACKSTAB Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi FINALLY ADMITS Who Is Running The Biden White House

The Benny Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 48:00


Ron DeSantis is Standing up to The Biden Administration's Open Borders Policies with an Executive Order and a Lawsuit, American Generals BACKSTAB Biden UNDER OATH Before Congress and Nancy Pelosi FINALLY ADMITS Who Is Running The Biden White House.

The One w/ Greg Gutfeld
Our Soldiers Were Betrayed While Our Woke Generals Got Paid

The One w/ Greg Gutfeld

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 14:20


As seen on Gutfeld! Host of “Justice With Judge Jeanine” Jeanine Pirro, Country Music Singer and Songwriter Larry Gatlin, and co-Hosts of the “Tyrus and Timpf” podcast Tyrus and Kat Timpf discuss Marine Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Scheller being placed in military jail following his social media posts calling out top brass over the U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. Later, the panel weighs in on former NBA star Shaquille O'Neal's comments about not wanting to be called a celebrity anymore. Follow Greg on Twitter: @GregGutfeld 

The Brian Kilmeade Show Free Podcast
It's On You, Joe: Military Advisors, Generals Lay Blame Squarely on Biden

The Brian Kilmeade Show Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 109:55


[00:00:00] Brian's Big 3 [00:18:17] Rich Lowry [00:36:36] Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) [00:54:56] Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE) [01:13:09] Charlie Kirk [01:28:47] Martha MacCallum [01:31:33] Martha MacCallum [01:44:59] Martha MacCallum

The Buck Sexton Show
Cost Trillions or Free All the Same to Pelosi

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 25:48


Nancy Pelosi tries to convince America there will be no "price tag" for the $4.5 trillion spending package, and the Biden agenda looks like it could crash and burn this year. On Afghanistan, Generals claims they told Biden to leave troops behind in contradiction to what Biden said. Youtube is going to censor vaccine questioning, United Airlines fires employees who wont get the shot, and Matt Walsh lights up a school board of libs in VA.  Please subscribe to the podcast! And get more exclusive content from Buck at BuckSexton.com. Find Buck on: Twitter @BuckSexton   Facebook @BuckSexton  Instagram @BuckSexton  Email the Podcast: TeamBuck@IHeartMedia.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Breaking Points with Krystal and Saagar
9/29/21: Pelosi Betrayal, Generals Under Fire, Federal Reserve Corruption, Harvard Mania, R Kelly, Mint the Coin, Ken Griffin, Rhode Island Politics, and More!

Breaking Points with Krystal and Saagar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 93:32


To become a Breaking Points Premium Member and watch/listen to the show uncut and 1 hour early visit: https://breakingpoints.supercast.tech/To listen to Breaking Points as a podcast, check them out on Apple and SpotifyApple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/breaking-points-with-krystal-and-saagar/id1570045623Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4Kbsy61zJSzPxNZZ3PKbXlMerch: https://breaking-points.myshopify.com/Support Matt & Cynthia: https://www.mattandcynthiaforri.com/

The Gerry Callahan Podcast
Generals Under Fire

The Gerry Callahan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 69:30


Milley, McKenzie, and Austin all take tough questions from Senators, and come to find out Biden lied about not knowing the state of the Afghan army. Magic Forward Jonathan Isaac sounds much more reasonable than Fauci or Governor Hochul on the Covid vaccine. Plus Greta 'blahs' and people applaud, and thoughts on Brady's return to Foxborough.

Trish Intel Podcast
Sept 29 - The Big Lie: It's Called C.Y.A.

Trish Intel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 21:42


U.S. Generals say they warned the President that at least 2500 troops were needed in Afghanistan. So, why did Biden say otherwise? Meanwhile, the political spin machine goes into high gear as Dems blame the GOP for the looming government shutdown. Trish sets the record straight on who's at fault.  And, did Obama really just say we need borders? Join Trish by subscribing to the podcast on Apple Itunes and Spotify today. Plus, sign up for her free newsletter at https://TrishIntel.com. Support the show: https://trishregan.store/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hard Factor
9/29: Dog The Bounty Hunter Is Now Hunting For Brian Laundrie

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 65:41


New book from Trump's former press secretary talks about all the president quarks, including Trump's “Music Man”, Generals in charge of Afghanistan withdrawal finally turn on President Biden, Euro Soccer news, Dog The Bounty Hunter Is Now Hunting For Brian Laundrie (00:26:05) Cocaine and MDMA in the water near a music festival is endangering eels, Albino family breaks Guinness world record, Turtle delays flights at Japanese airport, man wakes up from meth binge in school concession stand covered in chicken fingers and candy (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:05:05) - Fun Fact: Poland Invented Latex Condom In 1912 (00:08:10) - Holidays: National Coffee Day & World School Milk Day (00:10:45) - This Day in History: Scotland Yard Was Founded & Chief Justice Roberts Sworn In (00:14:20) - Trending News Mentions: Rebel Wilson Shows Off On Instagram & Will Smith Admits Open Relationship (00:18:25) - #3 - Former Trump Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham Releasing Book About Trump's Temper (00:21:35) - #2 - Generals In Charge of Afghanistan Say They DID Warn President Biden To Keep Troops On Ground (00:24:25) - #1 - EURO Soccer News (00:26:05) - Dog The Bounty Hunter Is Now Hunting For Brian Laundrie TikTok International Moment (00:38:40) - UK - Glastonbury Festival is causing water surrounding the festival to have high levels of MDMA & Cocaine (00:38:38) - UK - Family of Albinos claim they have new Guinness World Record for most Albinos in a family (00:47:45) - UK - A White Deer is killed for no reason sparking outrage in the town it was sighted in (00:49:40) - Japan - Turtle delays all flights because it is slowly walking across the runway (00:56:10) - A man is released from jail, but quickly finds himself on a meth, chicken finger & candy binge at a local school concession stand These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Crowd Health - Being in the CrowdHealth community can save hundreds of dollars monthly and put thousands of dollars back in your pocket. Get your first six months for just $99 per month. That's a savings of almost 50% versus their standard pricing and a LOT LESS than one of those crappy high-deductible plans. Go to http://JoinCrowdHealth.com/99 and enter code HardFactor at sign up. Wordtune - Wordtune improves writing efficiency up to four times. Better, faster writing means better business. You can use Wordtune anywhere you're writing online, including Google Docs, Slack, Outlook Web, and Whatsapp. Your team can start writing better right away for fifty percent off, that's half price at - http://wordtune. com/HARDFACTOR Caliper CBD - Caliper CBD powder is the only clinically proven fast-acting CBD. Get 20% off your first order when you use promo code FACTOR at http://TryCaliper.com/Factor Roman - Take care of your ED without leaving your home. Complete an online visit today to connect with a US-licensed healthcare professional and take care of it. Go to http://GetRoman.com/HARDFACTOR today and if you're prescribed, get $15 off your first month of ED treatment. Make sure you're ready to have confidence and control this fall. Roman ready.

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 9/28/21

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 112:48


On Tuesday's Mark Levin Show, how many more lies does President Biden have to tell until he's impeached? Biden said no military advisor told him to leave troops in Afghanistan but his Generals are telling a different story. These Generals will go down in history as disasters for leaving American citizens behind Taliban lines. If Biden lied about this he will lie about the border, the spending, and everything else. These Generals, particularly Mark Milley, should be forcibly retired for leaking to Bob Woodward. This program expects that Rep. Liz Cheney and Sen. Ben Sasse would demand Biden's impeachment, instead of still chasing down Trump. The conversation of impeaching Biden must be had with the American people because Congress has a constitutional obligation to do so. Later, in "The Return of the Primitive: The Anti-Industrial Revolution" Ayn Rand exposed that the left's immediate goal was to destroy capitalism and to establish a global dictatorship. Americans are not as stupid as the Democrats think and Biden's lies on this spending bill is a war on your lifestyle, liberty, and private property. They use climate change as a ruse to control water and any other part of the environment to ultimately control the economy and the people. Why do we have to raise the debt ceiling if the Democrat's $5.5 trillion bill costs nothing? Afterward, Senator Marsha Blackburn joins the show to discuss her questioning in the Senate hearing on Afghanistan today. Blackburn grilled Milley on the exit from Afghanistan and his knowledge of Woodward's book and he responded he hadn't read it.

Global News Podcast
US generals advised Biden against complete Afghan pull-out

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 29:24


The US generals recommended keeping two thousand five hundred troops in Afghanistan. Also: Russia opens new criminal case against Navalny and allies, and Daniel Craig's last Bond film finally premieres.

The Charlie Kirk Show
3 Blind Mice—America's Failed Generals

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 72:04


As three failed American generals blame shift during a scathing Senate hearing where more than a few bombshell revelations emerged as one-by-one, US Senators tore into their laughable defense of the failed Afghanistan surrender, even as they revealed that Joe Biden brazenly lied about the advice he received from his military commanders. Charlie also covers a story out of Western Washington University, which is welcoming back black segregation; a shocking travesty involving Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller who has been jailed for criticizing the Biden Regime and its generals; and Joe Rogan emerges as a freedom fighter in a video that has gone viral. All this and more only on The Charlie Kirk Show.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 872 | Biden's Afghanistan Excuses FALL APART as Generals Testify | Guests: Eric July, Jaco Booyens, & Del Bigtree

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:01


Was President Biden lying when he said no generals advised him to leave troops in Afghanistan, or could he actually not remember the conversation? Top generals Mark Milley and Kenneth McKenzie testified at a Senate hearing that the suggestion was made. Meanwhile, Gen. Milley defended making two controversial calls to China. Informed Consent Action Network host Del Bigtree joins to discuss the latest statement from Pfizer's CEO about when he believes society can return to normal life, New York's decision to fill health care worker vacancies with the National Guard, and an eye-opening conversation he had with a doctor on his show, “The HighWire with Del Bigtree.” Note: The content of this episode does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID vaccine questions & concerns. Today's sponsors: If you're trying to stay fit and healthy, Built Bar is the answer. Go to https://built.com/ and use promo code NEWS15 to save 15% off your next order. Novo is the #1 business banking app that makes banking easy and secure. Get your FREE business banking account at https://BankNovo.com/WHY Fall is planting season! Skip the big box stores and visit the world's largest online nursery! Head to https://FastGrowingTrees.com/NEWS now through Nov. 30 for 15% off! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Brian Kilmeade Show Free Podcast
Generals Testify on Afghanistan, Contradict Biden on Troop Withdrawal

The Brian Kilmeade Show Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 109:09


[00:00:00] Brian's Big 3 [00:18:11] Lt. Col. Allen West [00:36:20] Brig. Gen. Don Bolduc [01:05:27] Varney & Co. Simulcast [01:12:46] Dr. Scott Gottlieb [01:31:02] Bret Baier