Podcasts about 1960s

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Decade of the Gregorian calendar (1960–1969)

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1960s

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Best podcasts about 1960s

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Latest podcast episodes about 1960s

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Thanksgiving part 2!!!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 123:51


John and Jeni run down what they're doing for Thanksgiving and also talking about how the cook certain dishes or how they would tweek them to shake things up. Thanks for listening!!!

East Bay Yesterday
"More than just the 1960s": Following the footsteps of rock & roll legends

East Bay Yesterday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:59


The Bay Area's status as a rock & roll mecca may have peaked during the psychedelic sixties, but the party didn't stop after the hippies took the flowers out of their hair. Following the height of the Haight-Ashbury scene, a wild diversity of styles and iconic performers continued to emerge from this region's clubs, cafes, and even churches. These locations are compiled in “Rock and Roll Explorer Guide to the San Francisco Bay Area,” a new book that traces the rise of groups ranging from The Pointer Sisters to Primus by literally following in these superstars' footsteps. This episode features an interview with authors Mike Katz and Crispin Kott about the geographic history of Bay Area rock & roll and also explores the profound ways this terrain has shifted over the past few decades. If you want to hear about how they tracked down all the East Bay landmarks mentioned in Green Day lyrics, why Metallica ditched L.A. for the Bay, and much more, listen to the full episode. To see photos related to this episode, visit: https://eastbayyesterday.com/episodes/more-than-just-the-1960s/ East Bay Yesterday can't survive without your support. Please donate to keep this show alive: www.patreon.com/eastbayyesterday

Cinema60
Ep# 52 - Sapphic Cinema in the 60s

Cinema60

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 115:01


While the end of the decade ushered in an explosion of gay rights movements, it's no secret that the 1960s were not exactly the friendliest decade for LGBTQ people. When it comes to showing lesbians on film, there seemed to be a bit more wiggle room – in the same way laws were more punishing towards male homosexuality, the female variety seemed to be allowed to get away with being more openly about gay issues. Or you know, about peering into the lives of some “very close friends”… with benefits. The films that managed to get wide release in the ‘60s remain notable, both in their attempts to understand the plight of the gay community and serve as sometimes embarrassing reminders of how little progress we've made in cinematic representation. In this episode, Bart and Jenna take a worldwide tour of lesbian cinema – specifically avoiding pornography and exploitation cinema, even though some of these blur the lines a bit. But nevertheless, they open their minds and hearts and experiment with a variety of films that explore the highs and lows of sapphic love. The following films are discussed:• The Children's Hour (1961) Directed by William Wyler Starring Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, James Garner• Manji (1964) 卍(まんじ) Directed by Yasuzô Masumura Starring Ayako Wakao, Kyōko Kishida, Eiji Funakoshi• The Cats (1965) Kattorna Directed by Henning Carlsen Starring Eva Dahlbeck, Gio Petré, Monica Nielsen• The Fox (1967) Directed by Mark Rydell Starring Sandy Dennis, Anne Heywood, Keir Dullea• Les Biches (1968) Directed by Claude Chabrol Starring Jacqueline Sassard, Stéphane Audran, Jean-Louis Trintignant• The Killing of Sister George (1968) Directed by Robert Aldrich Starring Beryl Reid, Susannah York, Coral Browne• Le Altre (1969) Directed by Alessandro Fallay Starring Erna Schurer, Monica Strebel, Raul LovecchioAlso mentioned:• Walk on the Wild Side (1962) Directed by Edward Dmytryk Starring Jane Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Capucine• The Balcony (1963) Directed by Joseph Strick Starring Shelley Winters, Peter Falk, Lee Grant• The Haunting (1963) Directed by Robert Wise Starring Julie Harris, Claire Bloom, Richard Johnson• Persona (1966) Directed by Ingmar Bergman Starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook• The Nun (1966) La religieuse Directed by Jacques Rivette Starring Anna Karina, Liselotte Pulver, Micheline Presle

New Books in History
Amy Aisen Kallander, "Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the Global 1960s" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:37


Following Tunisian independence in 1956, President Habib Bourguiba centered women's liberation as part of the identity of the new nation. In Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the 1960s (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Amy Aisen Kallander uses this political appropriation of women's rights to look at the importance of women to post-colonial state-building projects in Tunisia. She explores how the notion of modern womanhood was central to a range of issues from economic development and family planning to intellectual life and the growth of Tunisian academia. Looking at political discourse, popular culture, the women's press, fashion, and ideas about love, the book traces how this concept was reformulated by women through transnational organizing and in the press in ways that proposed alternatives to the dominant constructions of state feminism. Situating Tunisia within broader Afro-Asian networks and global Cold War politics, it highlights comparisons with other state-feminist projects, and how women served as symbolic envoys for the new Tunisian state in the international arena. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Amy Aisen Kallander, "Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the Global 1960s" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:37


Following Tunisian independence in 1956, President Habib Bourguiba centered women's liberation as part of the identity of the new nation. In Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the 1960s (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Amy Aisen Kallander uses this political appropriation of women's rights to look at the importance of women to post-colonial state-building projects in Tunisia. She explores how the notion of modern womanhood was central to a range of issues from economic development and family planning to intellectual life and the growth of Tunisian academia. Looking at political discourse, popular culture, the women's press, fashion, and ideas about love, the book traces how this concept was reformulated by women through transnational organizing and in the press in ways that proposed alternatives to the dominant constructions of state feminism. Situating Tunisia within broader Afro-Asian networks and global Cold War politics, it highlights comparisons with other state-feminist projects, and how women served as symbolic envoys for the new Tunisian state in the international arena. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Amy Aisen Kallander, "Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the Global 1960s" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:37


Following Tunisian independence in 1956, President Habib Bourguiba centered women's liberation as part of the identity of the new nation. In Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the 1960s (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Amy Aisen Kallander uses this political appropriation of women's rights to look at the importance of women to post-colonial state-building projects in Tunisia. She explores how the notion of modern womanhood was central to a range of issues from economic development and family planning to intellectual life and the growth of Tunisian academia. Looking at political discourse, popular culture, the women's press, fashion, and ideas about love, the book traces how this concept was reformulated by women through transnational organizing and in the press in ways that proposed alternatives to the dominant constructions of state feminism. Situating Tunisia within broader Afro-Asian networks and global Cold War politics, it highlights comparisons with other state-feminist projects, and how women served as symbolic envoys for the new Tunisian state in the international arena. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books Network
Amy Aisen Kallander, "Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the Global 1960s" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:37


Following Tunisian independence in 1956, President Habib Bourguiba centered women's liberation as part of the identity of the new nation. In Tunisia's Modern Woman: Nation-Building and State Feminism in the 1960s (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Amy Aisen Kallander uses this political appropriation of women's rights to look at the importance of women to post-colonial state-building projects in Tunisia. She explores how the notion of modern womanhood was central to a range of issues from economic development and family planning to intellectual life and the growth of Tunisian academia. Looking at political discourse, popular culture, the women's press, fashion, and ideas about love, the book traces how this concept was reformulated by women through transnational organizing and in the press in ways that proposed alternatives to the dominant constructions of state feminism. Situating Tunisia within broader Afro-Asian networks and global Cold War politics, it highlights comparisons with other state-feminist projects, and how women served as symbolic envoys for the new Tunisian state in the international arena. Rebecca Turkington is a PhD Candidate in History at Cambridge University studying transnational women's networks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Thanksgiving Q&A!!!!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 129:09


John and Jeni answer all of the questions with answers that can only be though of as magnificent. From turkey troubles to pie panics we are here to soothe all of your last minute Gobble day worries. Thanks for listening!! 

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

John and Jeni face their fears and phobias about Sweet Potatoes. We go far beyond the syrupy glop that we know from Thanksgivings past and look to the future for culinary inspiration. We also go into it's history and it's journey across the globe. Thanks for listening!!!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Food in Horror Movies!!!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 122:08


John and Jeni keep spooky season going by talking about food scenes in some of their favorite horror movies. Listen in to see if your favorite frightening foods are included. Thanks for listening!!!

Hey! We Just Saw A Movie
Last Night in Soho

Hey! We Just Saw A Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 89:35


Hey! We took a trip to 2020's London or was it 1960's London? I'm not sure where we went but there was a pink dress, a bunch of mirrors, and we think we saw several ghosts. Find out what we thought of this decade hopping horror film and if we solve the ghostly mystery. 

Mystery to Me
Last Night in Soho (2021)

Mystery to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 57:36


So ... about Last Night in Soho ...Last Night in Soho is a psychological thriller from director Edgar Wright, released on October 29, 2021 in the United Kingdom. The film stars Thomasin McKenzie, Anya Taylor-Joy, Matt Smith, Diana Rigg, Terence Stamp, Michael Ajao, Rita Tushingham, Margaret Nolan, and Synnøve Karlsen.McKenzie plays Eloise, a fragile, daydream-believing fashionista from Cornwall who's overwhelmed by the intensity and bustle of London after she's accepted into a competitive fashion school. After she lands her own apartment in neon-drenched Soho, Eloise begins to experience dreams of the Swinging Sixties through the eyes of a blonde bombshell named Sandie. But quickly, Eloise learns that the past is sometimes best left in the past, as her visions become less groovy and more terrifying..Listen to Kevin and Áine dance around Beatles fan-fiction, psychics, and storytelling missteps around weighty issues.Follow us on the usual social media suspects:FacebookTwitterInstagramAnd send us your dreams and nightmares at mysterytomepodcast@gmail.com.Mystery to Me is a production of Mystery Sheet LLC.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

All Spoiler Recap
78: LAST NIGHT IN SOHO

All Spoiler Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 71:30


Episode 78 of The All Spoiler Recap takes you through the 2021 psychological horror film LAST NIGHT IN SOHO. This movie has everything - 1960's nostalgia, murder, struggles with sanity, microfiche, and Olenna Tyrell from Game of Thrones! Come on! Complete the journey with Julia Cunningham and her guest, John Matthews. 

Marvel by the Month
December 1969 Omnibus - "The Coming of... Orka!"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 83:17


Issues Covered In This Episode:"Suprema, the Deadliest of the Species!" - Captain America #123, written by Stan Lee, art by Gene Colan and Joe Sinnott, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Man Who Killed Tony Stark!!" - Iron Man #23, written by Archie Goodwin, art by George Tuska and Joe Gaudioso (Mike Esposito), ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Coming of... Orka!" - Sub-Mariner #23, written by Roy Thomas, art by Marie Severin and Johnny Craig, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Trapped -- By the Trio of Doom!" - Daredevil #61, written by Roy Thomas, art by Gene Colan and Syd Shores, ©1969 Marvel Comics"... And Now, the Absorbing Man!" - Incredible Hulk #125, written by Roy Thomas, art by Herb Trimpe, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Mad Thinker and His Androids of Death!" - Fantastic Four #96, by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby w/Frank Giacoia, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Ulik Unleashed!" - Thor #173, by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby w/Bill Everettt, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Marvel by the Month" theme v. 2.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen, with bass by Ryan ‘Biff' Dudder. All incidental music by Robb Milne. Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.

Chakkuri's Time Capsule
Ep. 56 - Childhood Books

Chakkuri's Time Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 7:13


Remember learning to read with "Dick and Jane"? Join me as I look back on some of my favorite books from childhood and see if you remember them as well.   Intro/Outro: "Feather Duster" by Shane Ivers (www.silvermansound.com)

That's Cool, That's Trash!
Ep116 - It's Trad, Dad!

That's Cool, That's Trash!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 92:31


We jumped at the chance to participate in the 3rd Hammer-Amicus Blogathon and chose something a little different: Amicus' 1st production from 1962...a musical comedy about the then-popular fad of digging 1920's traditional jazz music. This was legendary director Richard Lester's (A Hard Day's Night, Help!) film debut. Thankfully, he was smart enough to pepper some pop stars in amongst the Dixieland. With guests Devin Bruce (Apocalypse Kow) and Jacob Balcom. Check out the Blogathon HERE.

This is Democracy
This is Democracy: Episode 169 – Vietnam War Legacies

This is Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


In this episode, Jeremi and Zachary talk with special guest Dr. Mark Atwood Lawrence about the Vietnam War and its continuing legacies in American society, global policy, as well as recent similar conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Zachary sets the scene with his poem, “It is Hard to Build Utopias”. Mark Atwood Lawrence is Director of the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas. Until January 2020, he taught history at UT-Austin, where his classes focused on American and international history. Lawrence is author of Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam, The Vietnam War: A Concise International History, and, this fall, The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era, as well as several edited books and numerous articles, chapters, and reviews on various aspects of the history of U.S. foreign relations. Lawrence has held the Cassius Marcellus Clay Fellowship at Yale University (2006-2008) and the Stanley Kaplan Visiting Professorship in American Foreign Policy at Williams College (2011-2012). He earned his BA from Stanford University and his PhD from Yale University. This episode of This is Democracy was mixed and mastered by Ean Herrera.

Marvel by the Month
December 1969 (w/Douglas Wolk) - "And Then Came Electro!"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 76:15


Douglas Wolk is the author of All of the Marvels: A Journey to the Ends of the Biggest Story Ever Told, for which he read every single Marvel superhero comic. It's available now, and if you're listening to this podcast, you are the target audience! Get yourself a copy today wherever books are sold (like Books with Pictures).Douglas is also the host of the Cold War-era Doctor Doom podcast, Voice of Latveria, which Lord Doom commands you to listen to under pain of death. Robb has guested on an episode, and so has Bryan. For an extra 15 minutes of this episode, support us on Patreon at the $4/month level to get access to our super-secret bonus feed of content. The expanded edition of this episode includes our conversation about Silver Surfer #13 and the woulda-coulda-shoulda been of the Lee-Kirby partnership, PLUS Robb's recording of Rick Jones' very first public musical performance, as seen in the pages of Captain Marvel #18!Stories Covered In Detail This Episode:"And Then Came Electro!" - Amazing Spider-Man #82, written by Stan Lee, art by John Romita and Jim Mooney, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Sting of the Serpent" - Avengers #73, written by Roy Thomas, art by Frank Giacoia and Sam Grainger, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Before I'd Be Slave..." - X-Men #65, written by Dennis O'Neil, art by Neal Adams and Tom Palmer, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Marvel by the Month" theme v. 2.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen, with bass by Ryan ‘Biff' Dudder. All incidental music by Robb Milne. Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.Much of our historical context information comes from Wikipedia. Please join us in supporting them at wikimediafoundation.org.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 133 - Part 2: The “Simply Brilliant” Jewelry of the 1960s and 1970s with Kimberly Klosterman, of Kimberly Klosterman Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 24:43


What you'll learn in this episode: Why jewelry artists from the 60s and 70s, such as Andrew Grima and Arthur King, are gaining more appreciation today The difference between artist jewelers and jewelry by artists What a jewelry lover should do to refine their taste and start their collection What defines a passionate collector What to expect from the Kimberly's upcoming exhibition “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s” About Kimberly Klosterman A graduate of Stephens College with a BFA in design, Kimberly Klosterman was always interested in art, antiques and design. After graduation she studied Decorative Arts at Sotheby's London, where she was exposed to the world of antique jewelry. Upon return to Cincinnati, she and her Husband, Michael Lowe, opened their first gallery selling art and antiques. At this time, she also began her search for fine jewelry. To make ends meet for the new business, Klosterman went to work in the family company, Klosterman Baking Company, in 1982 where she currently moonlights as C.E.O. Her jewelry business, established after another Sotheby's course, Understanding Jewelry, was opened in 1996. Her love of 1960s and 70s jewelry developed through the tutelage of Amanda Triossi, whose own collection thrilled Klosterman. After living in Amsterdam and London, she returned to Cincinnati where she continues to collect fine jewelry.  Klosterman has given gallery talks at the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Taft Museum, the American Society of Jewelry Historians, and the American Society of Jewelry Appraisers, NYC Jewelry Week, Christies Auction, Bonhams Auction, etc.   The current exhibition “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s,” organized by Cynthia Amnéus, Chief Curator and Curator of Fashion at the Cincinnati Art Museum, is a result of Klosterman's passion for collecting. Her goal, to help preserve the legacy of these bold men and women who were jewelers to the jet-set. The exhibition, which opened at DIVA in Antwerp, Belgum and traveled to the Schmuckmuseum in Pforzhiem, Germany, will be on view in Cincinnati Oct 22- Feb 6. A catalog complete with biographies and makers' marks accompanies the exhibition. Additional Resources: Website Facebook Instagram Pintrest Photos: This is the cover of the book, which is also the catalog and a listing of where the exhibit has been. Roger Lucas for Cartier astronaut ring Romolo Grassi Gold and emerald pendant. Gilbert Albert ammonite and pearl Bracelet Brooch Cedars Devecchi carved coral and gold brooch. Arthur king Brooch Collection of Andy Warhol and Kim Klosterman Andrew Grima amethyst ring. Andrew Grima agate and tourmaline necklace. Transcript: What makes a passionate collector? For Kimberly Klosterman, it's someone who can't get enough of the objects they love, no matter what they are. She herself became a passionate collector of 1960s and 70s jewelry long before it became popular. Her collection is now being featured in a traveling exhibition, “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the qualities that draw her to 60s and 70s jewelry; why the unique jewelry of this period has come back in style; and what aspiring collectors should do to create a thoughtful collection. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Could you collect a production piece in your collection? Kimberly: I do have some production pieces in my collection, for example pieces by Elsa Peretti; I happen to like Elsa Peretti very much. I think she's a great designer, but again, she settled on jewelry as being her first and foremost love. Even though they're production pieces, in my opinion, she's an artist jeweler because she's designing that way. Other production pieces that I have—during the late 60s and early 70s, Cartier made some production pieces that were pretty wonderful. There was another person, Aldo Cipullo, who designed the love bracelet and a number of other things that Cartier started selling. I think of him as an artist jeweler as well. Sharon: Is a piece that you want for your collection high-end or limited like Peretti? She's not what I consider a production jeweler. I'm sure some of her work she signed and numbered, but I wouldn't consider it production. You used TJ Maxx before; if you walked into TJ Maxx and saw a piece and you thought, “Oh my god, this is incredible,” would you maybe not wear it but consider buying it?  Kimberly: I love all kind of things, but for my collection, no. They're signed pieces. That's something, too, that I always looked for in forming my collection. I would see things that I thought were interesting and I would buy them. It didn't always have to be signed, but nine out of 10 times, if the piece was signed, even if I didn't know the name of the maker at all, I would buy it if I liked the piece because then I could do the research later. A lot of the material I have in my collection came to me that way, by buying unknown people and later finding out who they were and why they were important to this group of people in this time period. Sharon: If somebody wants to start a collection, if you've ignited somebody's interest in this, where would you say they start? I don't necessarily believe that things always have to be signed. I have some very nice things that aren't signed, but where would you suggest they start? Are there certain designers? Kimberly: First of all, just getting out and seeing what's available is very helpful. Go to the big shows. If you can, go to Miami, or there's a show coming up in New York. Go to interesting places, because you can see a lot of jewelry and start thinking about what you might like. Look at books, look at auction catalogues; auctions are also a great place to look. Then settle on something that sings to you and go down that path. I think people have accumulations of things, which is really a shame. I find that people want what their friends have. They buy this and this, things that are hot, like Van Cleef and Arpels Zodiac pendants, which are fine; they're wonderful and they're really cool, but you start ticking off things. I want an Alhambra necklace; I want a Van Cleef Zodiac signed. To me, that's wonderful jewelry. It's great to wear all the time, and it is a collection. Believe me, the stuff will become and is more valuable than many of the one-of-a-kind pieces I like. You know what? Scratch all that stuff. That's not good to say. Sharon: It is a collection if you're talking about the Zodiac piece and Alhambra.  Kimberly: It's a collection and it's fine to have. I guess sometimes I get bummed out because I feel so passionate about these wonderful, one-of-a-kind pieces, and I find that a lot of times, people can't wrap their minds around it because it's something they don't understand or haven't seen much of. Sharon: Also, you might not be doing as much dealing now, but you look at things in terms of whether it's going to appreciate. I buy things knowing sometimes they will appreciate. I have a friend who buys only with the idea of selling it. I don't do that.  Kimberly: No, I definitely don't either. I just buy my passion and what appeals to me. Sharon: I don't know if I would have had the fortitude; you must have had to buckle up. Why you started out in this genre of jewelry, you must have had to buck a lot of people saying, “Oh my god, what do you see in that?” Kimberly: Well, dealers didn't say that because they were just happy to get rid of it. I had a number of people showing me things that weren't right at all, and I'd still get that. This is my view, and it's like, “No, that doesn't look like it at all.” I just love this path, and I think you do too, of having jewelry that celebrates your individualism. Sharon: Similar to you, I love it when I find a piece that's one of a kind, even though nobody ever heard of the person. They're never going to become a Cartier, but I like the fact that it's really different. I'm curious about the exhibit, which I'm looking forward to seeing at some point in Cincinnati. Tell us about how it came about. Was that your brainchild? Kimberly: Yeah, it was interesting. In 2012, I had given a lecture for the American Society of Jewelry Historians in Manhattan, and in the audience was the curator of jewelry for the Cooper Hewitt, Sarah Coffin. Sarah came up to me after the lecture and said, “All this stuff is amazing. I think we should do an exhibition,” and I said, “Oh, that's a cool idea. I like that idea.” For one reason or another, we could never get it together.  In 2015, I started thinking, “I'm going to propose this to someone else,” and I started thinking about what museum might make sense and who might like the idea. I went to the Cincinnati Art Museum and heard Cynthia Amnéus speak, and I was very impressed by the talk she gave. I remember that it was on modernism, a subject I know pretty well, and she had to get the lecture together overnight. I thought, “Wow, if she can do that overnight, she knows her stuff.” So, I went to Cynthia and said, “I have this collection of jewelry, and I'd like to talk to you about it.” She took my PowerPoint presentation and she really liked it. I thought this would make perfect sense because she's Curator of Fashion for the Cincinnati Art Museum, and it's literally in my own backyard. I know the material really well and I knew that a lot of people didn't understand it, so I knew I was going to have to be hands on with the exhibition. This gave me the opportunity to do that, and it was really exciting.  After the show was accepted, we decided to travel it. It was an honor that DIVA picked up the show. They did a great exhibition. Sadly, I didn't get to see it because of Covid. Following that, it went to the Schmuckmuseum of Pforzheim, Germany. Cornelie Holzach knew all about this kind of material, which I was very excited about. I had met with her and asked if they would be interested. She knew almost everyone in the exhibition, and she had great stories about them. I showed her a watch I had and she said, “I think that's this artist,” and she went back and showed me where the source came from and some of their early catalogues. It was a real honor to be in both of those museums. I'm looking forward to the show in Cincinnati. Sharon: How long is it on for? Until next year, at least? Kimberly: Yes, it runs October 21 through February 6. Sharon: I certainly hope I get there. Cincinnati from Los Angeles is at least a little bit closer than New York. The other thing I'm curious about is what attracted you to this kind of jewelry first and what holds your attention. Kimberly: For me, it's the naturalistic quality of the jewelry. There's a lot of texture and warmth in most of the jewelry I collect, and I love the idea of using odd materials. The necklace I have on today by Arthur King has an amber piece with a petrified mosquito in it, and I just love that. The Gilbert Albert pieces that are in the catalogue with the fossilized ammonites, I think those are very interesting. I have some jewelry also by Gilbert Albert with beetles in them. I find all this natural material something special, and the natural crystals and uncut stones. Sharon: Did it give birth to what we see today? Kimberly: I really believe so. I haven't talked to any young designers as to what their inspiration is, but one would think. All you have to do is look at the catalogue and page through it to see how this jewelry could have influenced young designers. Jacobs, for example, is a huge fan of Andrew Grima. So was the fashion world, I think.  Sharon: You could take any piece from the catalogue and put it in Nieman Marcus today. It wouldn't look like a dated piece or anything; it would look like a fashion piece or a current piece. It's a beautiful book, and I encourage anybody who has an interest in this to get their hands on it and take a look. Did you think about the book on its own aside from the exhibit, or did the book only come about because you knew you were doing an exhibit? Kimberly: The book came about because of the exhibit, but I did feel very strongly that the two should go hand in hand. I think, especially for jewelry, that's a wonderful thing to happen, because you're able to see the pieces in the flesh rather than just see them in a book. I do like having the record of the book. One thing we did, and this is where the dealer and the collector part of me comes in, is that the book is mainly buyers of these different artist jewelers who were fascinated themselves. Many of them sold to the jet set; it was that time and period and craziness. There are buyers of the artist jewelers, and in the back we have makers' marks of all the jewelers that are in the exhibition. That comes in handy, especially for some of the more cryptic makers' marks that people can't figure out so well.  Sharon: It's fabulous to see that. It's a great resource. I know you have a background—is it in art history? Kimberly: Design primarily, but my husband I have had a gallery for as long as I can remember, and we've been together about 40 years. My husband sells, but mainly he's like I am. We're both hopeless collectors. It's mostly minimal and conceptual art. Sharon: Wow! Do you enjoy the research part because it's researching jewelry and art, or do you like research in general? Kimberly: I love research. I love research in general I suppose, but anything I'm passionate about. The only other thing I like to do is eat. Sharon: I can join you in that. Are there certain characteristics that a new collector should look at in terms of signatures or one-of-a-kind or limited edition? You're driven by what you like and you're suggesting that new collector would be driven by what they like. O.K., but are there certain things—everything you're pointing out has what I call tentacles. You called them something else before. What are the characteristics here? Kimberly: Again for me, I think it goes back to the naturalism of all the material. I have to say I've always described my jewelry as painterly, meaning it's textural, it has some kind of artistic quality to it. If I had to give advice to a budding collector, like I said, it would be try to see as much as you can, read as much as you can, and if you don't read, that's O.K.; look at the pictures. Look at jewelry catalogues and jewelry books and jewelry publications. Everybody will hit on something. It's like you said earlier; you've got how many black shirts in your closet? I'm with you on that account, too. I think we will walk down our path of what our own taste is. It's just discovering what the level of taste is and then going with it.  Sharon: Years ago, I was trying to decide what I should keep, what I should look at passing on or selling, and someone who sold art said to me, “Buy what you love.” I talked to other collectors in other areas where I tend to be—if it's in TJ Maxx, I may not buy it, just to be truthful about it. Are you a believer in the buy what you love, or are you looking for certain things? Kimberly: Oh, absolutely. You have to buy what you love. The things is, you have to learn what you love, and you only do that by exposing yourself to what's out there, or else you don't know what you love. It's just like a kid; they won't eat certain things because they  haven't tried them. Then they try them and they like them. You need to know what's out there and what's available so you can form an educated opinion. After all, like Christopher Dresser said, “Knowledge is power.” I think that's an important statement. Sharon: I want to say it's amazing—that's not really the word I want, but the fact that you've collected this for so many decades now, several decades, and it's still what you love. I don't know what I want to say, but there are things I've liked; there are trends, but the fact that you have been so passionate about it for so long— Kimberly: It's interesting, because I am very passionate about it still and I don't see that waning at all, but that said, I love ancient jewelry. I love antique jewelry. I love jewelry by artists. There are many, many different kinds of jewelry that I absolutely adore as well. I just don't go down that path as much because I find that I know more about this now. It's like a friend of mine said, “Stick to your knitting.” I try to do that. However, with the ancient jewelry and ethnic jewelry, it informs the stuff I collect anyway. It's not uncommon for me to wear a pre-Columbian pendant. What else do I have that I like to wear a lot? I have a lot of jewelry by a woman named Patti Cadby Birch who took ancient materials and reconfigured them in the 70s, so the materials are ancient, but they're a little more wearable. I love that as well. Sharon: Have you thought about what your next exhibition is going to be? Kimberly: I'm going to say, because I don't know if it'll be an exhibition or not, but I'm really fond of the work by Arthur King. I think he's an interesting American jeweler and an important American jeweler from the 60s. There are lots of people out there that have his jewelry. In my dream world, if I have time to do it, I'd like to do an exhibition of Arthur King, not just with the jewelry I have. Anybody listening, if you're an Arthur King collector, I would really like to do a museum exhibition of his work. I would do that myself. Sharon: That would be fabulous. I don't know his work. When you say there are a lot of people out there who collect him, I'm sure there are. I don't see a lot of it. When I go to shows, I don't see it or I don't know it. It's not being called out, like when they have a little tag saying, “This is a Cartier.” There are lots of jewelers besides Cartier, but I'm just saying. That would be fabulous. I didn't even know he was American. Kimberly: Oh, yeah. He had a couple of stores in Manhattan and, like I said, in Florida as well, so lot of his jewelry ended up in those pockets of the world. A lot of people knew him, and there are some great stories about him. I have been in touch with people that were close to him, and right now I'm trying to get their stories just in case this comes to fruition. Sharon: That would be a fabulous next step. I'm sure you're just going to sit down and be, like my husband would say, “eating bonbons” after this. Anyway, Kimberly, thank you so much for being here. The exhibit sounds wonderful. Who better to put it together and drive it than you, with your passion and knowledge? We are all looking forward to it. It starts October 21 at the Cincinnati Art Museum, which I understand is a fabulous museum. I look forward to getting there, and I hope everybody listening to this can make it also. Thank you so much. Kimberly: Thank you so much, Sharon. I hope to see you in Cincinnati.  We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

CultureShift
"Black Is Beautiful" Exhibition at Detroit Institute of Arts Highlights 1960s Cultural Movement

CultureShift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


The work of photographer Kwame Brathwaite gets top billing via a traveling exhibition now on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts through January 2022.

Remembering the Days: A UofSC Podcast
South by southwest: USC‘s 1960s expansion

Remembering the Days: A UofSC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 8:41


Like other universities across the nation, the University of South Carolina needed more land in the 1960s to keep up with skyrocketing student enrollment brought on by the Baby Boom. In a previous episode, we talked about the campus migration that created the east campus in the University Hill neighborhood. This episode explores the underpinnings of the campus expansion into Ward One and Wheeler Hill, which were largely obliterated by the 'urban renewal' efforts that acquired more land for the university.

Cinema60
Ep #51 - Czechoslovak New Wave & the Forman School in the 60s

Cinema60

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 101:22


Like the rest of Europe, Czechoslovakia was busy making its own cinematic waves in the 1960s. Arguably, the Czechoslovak New Wave was one of the broadest and most formidable, stretching from extremely abstract art films to slice-of-life kitchen sink dramas. These filmmakers went in search of truth – indulging in a mix of dark humor, social satire and pure absurdism – and they would have gotten away with it too if it weren't for that dang ol' Soviet Union eventually putting the smack down on them. At the forefront of this movement was a special foreman – Miloš Forman, that is. By his side was Ivan Passer, Jaroslav Papoušek and Václav Šašek, all of whom graduated from FAMU and went on to work together closely as filmmakers. In our latest episode, Bart and Jenna take a plunge into the Czechoslovak New Wave and start with the this Miloš Forman School of collaborators. Get ready for some killer Czech rock'n'roll, a whole bunch of brass bands, a lot of existential crises and some super judgmental looks!The following films are discussed:• Audition/Talent Competition (1964) Konkurs Directed by Miloš Forman Starring Vera Kresadlová, Jan Vostrcil, Vladimír Pucholt• Black Peter (1964) Černý Petr Directed by Miloš Forman Starring Ladislav Jakim, Jan Vostrcil, Vladimír Pucholt• Intimate Lighting (1965) Intimní osvetlení Directed by Ivan Passer Starring Vera Kresadlová, Jan Vostrcil, Zdenek Bezusek• Loves of a Blonde (1965) Lásky jedné plavovlásky Directed by Miloš Forman Starring Hana Brejchová, Jan Vostrcil, Vladimír Pucholt• The Firemen's Ball (1967) Hoří, má panenko Directed by Miloš Forman Starring Jan Vostrcil, Josef Sebánek, Jan Stöckl• The Most Beautiful Age (1969) Nejkrásnější věk Directed by Jaroslav Papousek Starring Hana Brejchová, Vera Kresadlová, Ladislav Jakim

Anxious and Afraid The Pod
Episode 84: I Don't Like This Information, Here I Go (Silver Bridge Collapse)

Anxious and Afraid The Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:12


In this week's episode, Shawna gives the crew a new thing to be scared of after she describes the tragic 1967 Silver Bridge collapse over the frigid Ohio river during rush-hour traffic.Tune in to learn the details of this devastating disaster which would claim many lives and as always, stick around to the end to find out if your town is our city of the week!Credits:Wikipedia.comDispatch.comwvgazettemail.comwvpublic.orgMusic By:Brokeforfree.comMatt EdwardsEdited By:MichaelNetwork:www.theoracl3network.comWebsite:https://anxiousandafraid.com/Support the show by purchasing our merch!https://www.teepublic.com/stores/anxious-and-afraid-the-pod?ref_id=13121You can also support the show by becoming a Patreon!Join today and get early ad-free episode releases and a shout-out on the show as well as a cool sticker!https://www.patreon.com/anxiousandafraid

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 133 - Part 1: The “Simply Brilliant” Jewelry of the 1960s and 1970s with Kimberly Klosterman, of Kimberly Klosterman Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:09


What you'll learn in this episode: Why jewelry artists from the 60s and 70s, such as Andrew Grima and Arthur King, are gaining more appreciation today The difference between artist jewelers and jewelry by artists What a jewelry lover should do to refine their taste and start their collection What defines a passionate collector What to expect from the Kimberly's upcoming exhibition “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s” About Kimberly Klosterman A graduate of Stephens College with a BFA in design, Kimberly Klosterman was always interested in art, antiques and design. After graduation she studied Decorative Arts at Sotheby's London, where she was exposed to the world of antique jewelry. Upon return to Cincinnati, she and her Husband, Michael Lowe, opened their first gallery selling art and antiques. At this time, she also began her search for fine jewelry. To make ends meet for the new business, Klosterman went to work in the family company, Klosterman Baking Company, in 1982 where she currently moonlights as C.E.O. Her jewelry business, established after another Sotheby's course, Understanding Jewelry, was opened in 1996. Her love of 1960s and 70s jewelry developed through the tutelage of Amanda Triossi, whose own collection thrilled Klosterman. After living in Amsterdam and London, she returned to Cincinnati where she continues to collect fine jewelry.  Klosterman has given gallery talks at the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Taft Museum, the American Society of Jewelry Historians, and the American Society of Jewelry Appraisers, NYC Jewelry Week, Christies Auction, Bonhams Auction, etc.   The current exhibition “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s,” organized by Cynthia Amnéus, Chief Curator and Curator of Fashion at the Cincinnati Art Museum, is a result of Klosterman's passion for collecting. Her goal, to help preserve the legacy of these bold men and women who were jewelers to the jet-set. The exhibition, which opened at DIVA in Antwerp, Belgum and traveled to the Schmuckmuseum in Pforzhiem, Germany, will be on view in Cincinnati Oct 22- Feb 6. A catalog complete with biographies and makers' marks accompanies the exhibition. Additional Resources: Website Facebook Instagram Pintrest Photos: This is the cover of the book, which is also the catalog and a listing of where the exhibit has been. Roger Lucas for Cartier astronaut ring Romolo Grassi Gold and emerald pendant. Gilbert Albert ammonite and pearl Bracelet Brooch Cedars Devecchi carved coral and gold brooch. Arthur king Brooch Collection of Andy Warhol and Kim Klosterman Andrew Grima amethyst ring. Andrew Grima agate and tourmaline necklace. Transcript: What makes a passionate collector? For Kimberly Klosterman, it's someone who can't get enough of the objects they love, no matter what they are. She herself became a passionate collector of 1960s and 70s jewelry long before it became popular. Her collection is now being featured in a traveling exhibition, “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the qualities that draw her to 60s and 70s jewelry; why the unique jewelry of this period has come back in style; and what aspiring collectors should do to create a thoughtful collection. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Today, my guest is Kimberly Klosterman of Kimberly Klosterman Jewelry. While she's dealt in jewelry across a number of periods, she's recognized for her collection of designer jewels from the 60s and 70s. Her collection is currently being featured in the museum exhibit “Simply Brilliant,” scheduled to open at the Cincinnati Art Museum on October 21. The show has already been at DIVA, which is the new diamond museum in Antwerp, as well as at Pforzheim in Germany. We'll hear all about Kimberly's jewelry journey today as well as about the museum exhibit. Kimberly, welcome to the program. Kimberly: Thank you. I'm so happy to be here, Sharon. Sharon: Tell us about your jewelry journey. I was looking at this beautiful catalogue, “Simply Brilliant.” It's a standalone book, but it's a catalogue of the show. I'm reading the review that Ruth Peltason, I think, did with you. You've really had such a journey if you'd tell us about that. Kimberly: I've been interested in jewelry for a long time and started collecting Art Deco things and different kinds of jewelry earlier on. I decided if I'm going to do this, I'd better learn a little more about what I'm getting myself into. So in 1996, I went to London and found out there was a course called “Understanding Jewelry” at Sotheby's. I thought, “This might be a great thing for me to do. I've been a Sotheby's student before, and I learned a lot the first time around.” This was a course that lasted five or six weeks and Amanda Triosi was teaching it. So, my husband and I went to London and I took the course. It was great. It was the history of jewelry. It was a lot of fun. I do have an art background, so it was easy to pick up on the jewelry she was talking about. We had great speakers, but one thing that stood out for me was that I was exposed to the artists' jewelry of the 1960s and 1970s, and that happened in two ways.  One of our projects for extra points was to go see a show at Hancocks in London, and that was an Andrew Grima retrospective. I went to the show, and I was completely bowled over. I was almost shaking when I saw the jewelry there. I walked in, looked at it, and the man behind the counter was very tall and dapper, a really elegant man, and he looked at me and saw my enthusiasm and said, “Would you like to meet the artist?” I said, “Oh yes, that would be fantastic,” and he extended his hand. It was Andrew Grima. That was my first exposure to that kind of jewelry. Up until then, if you think about what was happening the mid-90s, everybody was into white gold and small jewelry and little, tiny things. Here were pieces that were big and bold and gold, and all kinds of materials were used instead of precious and semiprecious stones. It was a real eye-opener. The other thing is Amanda, who has become a very close friend, at the time when I was her student, she took some of us back to her little apartment in London and said, “Would you like to see my jewels?” I said, “Oh sure, that would be great.” So, she reached behind the radiator and pulled out these hot jewels, and they were incredible. She had a necklace by Gilbert Albert and Andrew Grima pieces and a host of things I had never laid my eyes on. The other few students that were with us didn't get it at all. I immediately responded to it, and I knew that was a path I wanted to carve out for myself.  At the time, I was taking a bit of a break from my family business, which is Klosterman Baking Company. My husband and I were in Europe, and I didn't know what I was going to do. I woke up one morning and said, “I know; I'm going to sell jewelry.” I took the previous stuff I had collected, which actually turned out to be a lot better than I thought, and started selling that, but with an eye to look for these other jewels. I think one thing that was so amazing to me is how difficult it was to source that material from the 60s and 70s. I didn't realize until some years later that the reason was because it simply wasn't out of the jewelry boxes yet. It hadn't come into the marketplace, and if it did, it was probably scrapped pretty quickly, as they were heavy pieces of gold. So I went on this quest, but it took quite a while to build a collection. If you are thinking about this jewelry in today's marketplace, say for the past four or five years, it's everywhere, but it was very difficult to source in the beginning. I made a little booklet on my iMac that I used to take to shows on the jewelry I was collecting. This was before we had cellphones. I would take it around with me to shows and show various dealers, “If you get anything like this, call me. Here's my card.” That's how I started collecting. Sharon: Did you get a response from dealers? Did they say, “Oh, I've had that in my drawer for ages”? Kimberly: I did have a funny thing happen one time in Miami. I was wearing a piece of jewelry by Arthur King, and I really like King's work. He's an American jeweler that started working in the late 40s. He started out as a studio jeweler making his own jewelry in Greenwich Village, right on the same street as Sam Kramer and— Sharon: Art Smith? Kimberly: Art Smith, yes. He was right in that group. I think he went to Florida right after that and eventually started working in gold. He started hiring other bench jewelers to help him as well. He had a place in Cuba. He had a couple of different stores in Florida, and he was also showing at Fortnum & Mason in London. He's a very interesting jeweler to me, but anyway, back to the Miami Beach, Florida Antique Show. I was wearing an Arthur King piece, and one of the dealers looked at me and said, “Do you like that stuff?” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” She said, “I have these things in my safe.” It ended up being a number of pieces that came directly from Louise King, Arthur's wife, and she had them on consignment. I bought those pieces and started my friendship with that dealer, who down the road would show me things like that when she got them.  Sharon: I'm sure people were surprised because that stuff was so out of fashion when you started collecting it. Kimberly: It really was. The other dealer stories are a total crackup. I say my best pieces came out of people's big and ugly boxes. You would go to the show, and they'd have this box, big and ugly.  Sharon: Today it's not white gold, but it's still tiny, little pieces. I call it Brentwood jewelry.  That's an affluent area near here. I'm knocking somebody's jewelry, not any particular designer, but I don't understand; it doesn't show up. Why are you wearing it? That's all. Kimberly: I've always said it's funny about jewelry. I learned a long time ago that people that wear big jewelry don't necessarily have to be big people. A lot of times different jewelers would say, “Oh well, you need a big woman for that,” and I said, “No, you need a big personality.” Some of the people I know that wear the biggest jewelry happen be to the tiniest people. Sharon: That's true with art jewelry being made out of plastic or wood. It's big, but it may be a little more out there, avant garde. I remember at a gallery, there was a small, very elegant woman telling me how she would have to convince her clients they could wear this stuff. They didn't have to be big women, like you're saying. You mentioned Graham Hughes. Tell us who this is and how he influenced your collecting or your path. Kimberly: Graham Hughes was in the late 50s at Goldsmiths' Hall. His father had been at Goldsmiths' Hall and Graham followed in his father's footsteps. This is in London. Graham was initially involved with the silver department there, but he had a real love of jewelry and decided this would be a good avenue for Goldsmiths' Hall to go down to start a collection of jewelry. He was very passionate about it and has written a number of books on the history of jewelry. I always liked his take on things. We just seemed to have the same taste. Even in his historic collection of jewels that he chose to picture in his books, they were always the best; they're just great. He was a bit of a character, from what I understand.  I never did get to meet him, but he got together with some people at the V&A. They started talking in the late 50s about putting an exhibition of jewelry together, and they didn't want to do just any jewelry. They thought jewelry was boring, staid; “What can we do to shake it up?” This little group initially said, “I know. We'll get artists to make jewelry. We'll commission artists to make jewelry and we'll have this exhibition.” They talked about that, and the more they talked about it—it was actually Graham, I believe, that said, “No, we can't do that, because artists don't always understand how jewelry hangs on the body or how it attaches to clothing because they're artists; they're not jewelers.” He said, “We need to reach out to people that are jewelers making amazing jewelry already, people making one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry that are thinking outside the box.”  There were a couple of different reasons; I don't know exactly what they were. Health was one issue. One of the people had a health issue, and something else happened at the V&A where they were going to cancel the show. Instead, Graham proposed that they have the show at Goldsmiths' Hall, and everything came together. They started reaching out to people all over the world for this proposed show. I can't remember how many countries; maybe 80 countries, something like that. Just under a thousand pieces, 900 and some odd pieces were exhibited in the show when it happened in 1961. It was also a historic show because it showed works by René Lalique, Chaumet, some other big houses. It was kind of a survey in that area, but the idea was modern jewelry, 1890-1961. Sharon: I want to make sure everybody knows that the V&A is the Victoria and Albert Museum. Kimberly: Anyway, this put a lot of people in the limelight. People like Arthur King exhibited from America in that show; Andrew Grima exhibited; just a whole host of people. Those people helped inform my collection. The catalogue he wrote that accompanied the exhibition as well as the book that followed it became the Bible for my collection, my wish book. Sharon: I want to ask you something else, a small detail. Amanda Triosi's class, was that every day for five or six weeks or once or twice a week? Because if it was every day, wow!  Kimberly: It was five days, and it was great. We had the best speakers and great field trips. It was really wonderful. Sharon: Wow! I'm ready. Sign me up. That sounds wonderful. I'm curious if today you go to some social event and wear your jewelry, do people understand it more than they did 10, 15 years ago? Kimberly: I think so, absolutely! If you look in today's marketplace, heck, go to TJ Maxx and look in the case. So much jewelry is influenced by what was happening in the 60s and 70s, whether these contemporary jewelers know it or not. It has definitely come back around. Uncut stones, rough diamonds, textured gold, bigger, bolder items; all of these things have come back into the marketplace, and yellow gold again as opposed to white gold. Sharon: Was there a time, maybe 20, 25 years ago, when friends, people at social events, would say, “What is that?” Was there no understanding or appreciation? Kimberly: I think overall people do appreciate it more than they did. To my face they didn't tell me they didn't get it, but it's been interesting working with different people on the exhibition that maybe weren't exposed to this kind of jewelry before, even possibly the curator at the art museum, Cynthia Amnéus, who wrote the book, or Ruth Peltason, who's also writing a book on 1960s and 1970s jewelry and did the interview with me in our book. I have educated them to the point where they really like the jewelry now.  Sharon: It definitely grows on you. Kimberly: It does, and I think that's true with anything. People tend to like what they know, not know what they like. Sharon: That's interesting. That could lead into a whole different discussion. Did somebody have to teach us to love Art Deco jewelry, or is that just something that is beautiful? Kimberly: You know what? I think it's just beautiful. I remember declaring, after I graduated from my “Understanding Jewelry” course at Sotheby's, that I knew what I was going to sell: Cartier Art Deco, because it's the best. Well yeah, everybody else thought so, too. So, I carved out a niche for myself that was remotely different. Sharon: It must have been easier to source at least, Cartier Art Deco. A lot pricier I would think, but easier to source. Kimberly: Easier to source, but out of reach for me at the time. Sharon: In some of the literature I was reading about you, it says you sell to the passionate collector. What is the passionate collector to you? Kimberly: It's anyone that can't enough of anything. I have one friend I sell to and they're—you know what? I think you should answer that question. You're the collector. Sharon: I was thinking about that. Is that somebody like me who occasionally will buy—let's say it's out of my budget; it's out of my reach, but it's so beautiful I have to have it. There are a lot of things I don't think about that way. I don't need sports cars. I don't need a boat. I don't need a horse. Kimberly: I think it's when you can't stop. I know from my own self I'm a passionate collector. I keep thinking, “I don't need that, but that's fantastic.” You try to say, “Hey, I've got all this. I don't need another example of this, but I need an example of this.” Sharon: I's like as my mother used to say to me, “You have a black blouse.” Yes, I have a black blouse, but does it have short sleeves? Does it have a bow? Anyway, the other thing you talked about is jewelry by artists versus artists' jewelry. Can you tell us a little bit more? Kimberly: The difference between an artist jeweler and jewelry by an artist is this: an artist like Calder, Goya, Dalí, etc. makes other art. They're more passionate—I don't know about passionate, but— Sharon: They're artists in that way. Kimberly: They're artists in a bigger realm. They're making paintings and sculptures and different things, and jewelry is just a small portion of what their oeuvre is. Whereas an artist jeweler is a jeweler by trade or in the jewelry industry by trade, making one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry that are in that marketplace. It's almost like a marketplace situation. You've got jewelers and you have artists, but certain jewelers that we call artist jewelers are making one-of-a-kind pieces, usually, or limited pieces for the jewelry market. Does that make sense? Sharon: Yes, it is hard to define. I've talked to a lot of different people about what a passionate collector is and what collecting is. Someday somebody will come up with some definition that's definite. What you're saying makes sense. I understand what you're saying.

Buddy Weaver Music Podcast
Vintage MWSD in mid-1960s - Wayne West Album on Hi Hat

Buddy Weaver Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 35:33


This episode we feature a vintage Hi Hat Records long-play album recorded by Wayne West.  Released in mid-1960s as Hi Hat 7001 - "Modern Square Dances For The Student Dancer". Cover notes state the dances were selected to offer the newer dancer good, challenging practice to better prepare for club level dancing. Please take a moment to make a gift to offset our production costs.  Every contribution helps and is appreciated. MAKE A DONATION

News Talk 920 KVEC
Hometown Radio 10/15/21 4p: King Harris covers the British Rock Invasion of the 1960s

News Talk 920 KVEC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 42:26


Hometown Radio 10/15/21 4p: King Harris covers the British Rock Invasion of the 1960s

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Chefisode #14- Vincent Price

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 155:34


John and Jeni get into spooky season with our favorite Ghoulish Gourmand, Vincent Price. From his cookbooks to his TV Show as well as cooking records (yes you read that right), we cover everything food related to the Master of the Macabre. We also give you an early Halloween treat with an radio play featuring Vincent from 1974. Enjoy!!

Marvel by the Month
November 1969 Omnibus - "The Rhino Says No!"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 83:33


Issues Covered In This Episode:"From this Conflict... Death!" - Iron Man #22, written by Archie Goodwin, art by George Tuska and "Joe Gaudioso" (Mike Esposito), ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Sting of the Scorpion!" - Captain America #122, written by Stan Lee, art by Gene Colan and Joe Sinnott, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Showdown at Sea!" - Daredevil #60, written by Roy Thomas, art by Gene Colan and Syd Shores, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Rhino Says No!" - Incredible Hulk #124, written by Roy Thomas, art by Herb Trimpe and Sal Buscema, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Gather, Ye Witches!" - Silver Surfer #12, by Stan Lee and John Buscema w/Dan Adkins, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Monarch and the Mystic!" - Sub-Mariner #22, written by Roy Thomas, art by Marie Severin and Johnny Craig, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Immortal and the Mind-Slave!" - Thor #172, by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby w/Bill Everett, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Marvel by the Month" theme v. 2.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen, with bass by Ryan ‘Biff' Dudder. All incidental music by Robb Milne. Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.

Breaking Mayberry
93: Miss Crime Island, 1963

Breaking Mayberry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 67:58


So listen, you're probably gonna want to read this before listening: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_AristocratsAnd uhhhhhh otherwise, I think we're good. Good times. See you next episode everyone.

Three Geeky Dads
Horror Films Through The Decades: the 50s and 60s

Three Geeky Dads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:00


This week, the Dads continue to stalk their way through the decades of Horror movies and to stop to take a look at the decades of the 50s and 60s where the lines between horror and sci-fi started to blur! The horror landscape was changing and gone were the days of creepy atmospheric gothic horror! These decades ushered in the nuclear age with giant mutated creatures, teens being attacked by monsters or being turned into monsters themselves, horrors from outer space and psychotic, knife-wielding killers!!!

The LA Report
How an obscure 1960s rule hinders funding for mental health treatment. Plus, CA has rent relief to give, but it's bypassing some immigrant tenants – The Weekend Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 9:14


In this weekend edition: How an obscure 1960s rule hinders funding for mental health treatment, by Robert Garrova. Plus, CA has rent relief to give, but it's bypassing some immigrant tenants, by Josie Huang. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Food news- Renn Fest Food Fight!!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 150:31


John and Jeni talk about the food they ate (or didn't eat) at the Renaissance Festival. From the mini corn dogs to the salacious sausage on a stick, we give you the play-by-play. We also cover food news topics including Cracker Jack soda, airline food fetishists, mustard wine and fudge made on a grave stone. Thanks for listening!!!

MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend
Meet The Author - Donna D. Conrad - House Of The Moon

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 88:37


https://donnaconrad.com/PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/minddogtvSponsors:https://podmatch.com/signup/minddogtv
https://mybookie.com Promo Code minddog
https://record.webpartners.co/_6_DFqqtZcLQWqcfzuvZcQGNd7ZgqdRLk/1
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https://myvitalc.com/minddog. promo code minddogtvhttps://skillbuilder.academy/dashboard?view_sequence=1601856764231x540742189759856640&promoCode=MINDDOG100OFFhttps://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=599839&u=1659788&m=52971&urllink=&afftrack=https://enticeme.com/#minddog

Planet Fantasy
Planet Fantasy Ep. 72: Stewards of Sound - The 1960s

Planet Fantasy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 115:55


It's the second episode of our new series Stewards of Sound! This time we're joined by guests Dre and Waheed, and we're diving into the 1960s to draft the best songs of the decade! Music by @junoandtheechodog --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Marvel by the Month
November 1969 (w/Will Hines and Kevin Hines) - "The Coming of Sunfire!"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 76:23


Will and Kevin Hines are brothers. They are kind of comedians. And they are the only two guys to host a podcast about a thing that they like. That podcast is the extremely good Screw It, We're Just Gonna Talk About Comics, which is sort of like what we do except they only talk about their favorite comics. We've wasted hundreds of hours of our lives.For more than an extra hour of this episode, support us on Patreon at the $4/month level to get access to our super-secret bonus feed of content. The expanded edition of this episode includes our conversations about Avengers #72 (which features the first appearance of the Zodiac) and Fantastic Four #95 (featuring the debut of... uh, the Monocle), as well as the creative origins of Agatha Harkness, the final fate of the Kangaroo, and banter aplenty.Stories Covered In Detail This Episode:"The Coming of Sunfire!" - X-Men #64, written by Roy Thomas, art by Don Heck and Tom Palmer, ©1969 Marvel Comics"The Coming of the Kangaroo!" - Amazing Spider-Man #81, written by Stan Lee, art by John Buscema and Jim Mooney, ©1969 Marvel Comics"Marvel by the Month" theme v. 2.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen, with bass by Ryan ‘Biff' Dudder. All incidental music by Robb Milne. Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.Much of our historical context information comes from Wikipedia. Please join us in supporting them at wikimediafoundation.org.

The Smerconish Podcast
Howard Fishman on the Reemergence of Yusuf/Cat Stevens

The Smerconish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 11:22


Washington Post Magazine Contributor Howard Fishman with Michael Smerconish. Original Air Date 1 October 2021.

Human Voices Wake Us
First Person: A Waitress in Chicago in the 1960s

Human Voices Wake Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 19:18


A reading from one of my favorite books, Studs Terkel's Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. Here, Terkel interviews a waitress named Dolores Dante. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Worcestershire Sauce!!!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 128:32


Jeni and John get saucy about Worcestershire Sauce. From how to pronounce it, how it's made, it's history and how it's still very popular around the globe. Thanks for listening!!!

Coming in From the Cold
Terrorism in New York: The Long 1960s

Coming in From the Cold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 34:24


When most American's think of terrorism in New York City, they think of September 11, 2001. However, there is an entire untold history of terrorism in the city dating back decades. On today's episode of CIFTC, Bill sits down with David Viola professor of criminology at John Jay College, who tells the story of terrorism in New York, during the long 1960s. David C. Viola Jr., Ph.D., is an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. He received his Ph.D. in history from the City University of New York Graduate Center. In addition to his teaching and scholarship, Viola is a documentary filmmaker and an intelligence officer in the US Navy Reserves. Further Reading David C. Viola Jr., “Terrorism and the Response to Terrorism in New York City During the Long Sixties,” Ph.D. diss., The Graduate Center, City University of New York, 2017, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2955&context=gc_etds

Marvel by the Month
October 1969 Omnibus - "The Torpedo Will Get You If You Don't Watch Out!"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 93:27


Episodes Covered In This Issue:"The Coming of... the Man-Brute!" - Captain America #121, written by Stan Lee, art by Gene Colan and Joe Sinnott, © November 1969 Marvel Comics"The Torpedo Will Get You If You Don't Watch Out!" - Daredevil #59, written by Roy Thomas, art by Gene Colan and Syd Shores, © November 1969 Marvel Comics"O, Bitter Victory!" - Silver Surfer #11, by Stan Lee and John Buscema w/Dan Adkins, © November 1969 Marvel Comics"No More the Monster!" - Incredible Hulk #123, written by Roy Thomas, art by Herb Trimpe, © November 1969 Marvel Comics"Invasion From the Ocean Floor!" - Sub-Mariner #21, written by Roy Thomas, art by Marie Severin and Johnny Craig, © November 1969 Marvel Comics"War In the World Below!" - X-Men #63, written by  Roy Thomas, art by Neal Adams and Tom Palmer, © November 1969 Marvel Comics"Marvel by the Month" theme v. 2.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen, with bass by Ryan ‘Biff' Dudder. All incidental music by Robb Milne. Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.

Text, Prose & RocknRoll
Track 23: ? and the Mysterians

Text, Prose & RocknRoll

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:30


This time of Text prose & RocknRoll Kris sits down with the founding guitarist of the age-defying group ? and the Mysterians to discuss their rise as rock n roll icons. 

Cinema60
Ep #50 - The Soviet Fairy Tales of Aleksandr Rou in the 60s

Cinema60

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 91:58


Bart & Jenna dive into the magical 1960s films of Aleksandr Rou – a mystical, technicolor world of amazing costumes, practical effects and live bears… aka Soviet fairy tales. The following films are discussed:Maria the Wonderful Weaver, Cinderella, Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka, Kingdom of Crooked Mirrors, Jack Frost, Through Fire Water and … Brass Pipes, & Barbara the Fair With the Silken Hair

Grindbin Podcast - Grindhouse and Exploitation Films
270 - Wild in the Streets (1968)

Grindbin Podcast - Grindhouse and Exploitation Films

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 190:20


This is one of those times we get to talk about a good movie on the show. Wild in the Streets (1968) is one of the greatest movies to ever be on the bin. An underrated classic and something that draws eerie parallels to modern day. Fair warning... there is a LOT of political talk in this episode, so if you don't agree with us on politics... be wary of pressing that play button.  Thanks to our beloved Patreon member Mike Ratt (Grandpa Grindbin) for the amazing pick!

The Old Soul Movie Podcast
Leave It to Beaver Memories with Jerry Mathers!

The Old Soul Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 25:37


Golly gee, consider us star-struck! This week, we had the pleasure of chatting with Jerry Mathers-the actor who portrays Beaver Cleaver from Leave It to Beaver (1957-1963)! Emma and Jerry discuss Jerry's childhood memories of working with Sir Alfred Hitchcock on The Trouble with Harry (1955), filming the iconic “In the Soup” episode, and having fun on set at Universal Studios. Tune in and learn about the magic behind one of the most beloved American family shows in television history. To celebrate your love for Leave It to Beaver, check out this website!: https://www.jerrymathersbeavermerch.com/Please Comment, Rate, and Share our episodes and tell us what you like and what you want to hear more of!— Be sure to check us out onOur website: https://the-old-soul-movie-podcast.simplecast.com/FacebookTwitter: @oldsoulpodInstagram: @oldsoulmoviepodcast

Breaking Mayberry
92: I'm Ted Koppel, and Someday We Will All Die

Breaking Mayberry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:59


Welcome to our mid-season break, kinda. We're spending half the episode discussing a truly bizarre news piece about Mt. Airy, NC, and then the other half talking about an episode I've already forgotten. Also we go in hard on those punks at NPR. About time someone put them in their place.Watch the CBS News segment on Mt Airy here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZme-GsKv_gMarty on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SchneidRemarksDan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theluddsSUPPORT BREAKING MAYBERRY ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/breakingmayberryMusic by Max Ludwig: twitter.com/sleeptalkyFollow Breaking Mayberry on Twitter: twitter.com/BreakMayberry, Facebook facebook.com/BreakingMayberry or email us at breakingmayberry@gmail.com

My Rock Moment
Music manager & producer Jeff Jampol discusses the California rock scene in the 1960s - from Haight-Ashbury to the Sunset Strip

My Rock Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 56:32


Jeff Jampol is a Grammy® winning and Emmy® nominated producer and the CEO of Jam Inc, which manages legendary rock artists and bands such as The Doors, Jim Morrison, Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Grace Slick, The Mamas and the Papas, and a host of others...and many of his clients are responsible for crafting that California sound - an epoch in rock history. We'll discuss his road to managing rock legends and his take on the California rock scene in the 60s - The Northern California and Southern California scenes were different in ethos and zeitgeist but they gave birth to bands that changed the face of rock and roll.To find out more about Jeff Jampol and Jam, Inc. check out their website at: https://wemanagelegends.com/

The Old Soul Movie Podcast
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) with Vincent Casaregola, Ph.D

The Old Soul Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 76:15


Emma is joined this week by Dr. Vincent Casaregola of Saint Louis University to cover a film that is considered one of the best of all time: Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)! An iconic Kubrick film, Dr. Strangelove takes a dark, comedic look at nuclear tensions and end-of-the-world antics.  Dr. Casaregola helps frame what the mindset was of the American people during the Cold War, the (very real) problems of nuclear mishaps, how Stanley Kubrick became one of the most innovative directors in the motion picture industry, what the best tips are for learning to appreciate classic movies.  Be sure to tune into this explosive episode!  Please Comment, Rate, and Share our episodes and tell us what you like and what you want to hear more of!— Be sure to check us out onOur website: https://the-old-soul-movie-podcast.simplecast.com/FacebookTwitter: @oldsoulpodInstagram: @oldsoulmoviepodcast— Films/Series Mentioned:On the Beach (1959)Fail Safe (1964)Paths of Glory (1957)The Americanization of Emily (1964)The Mouse That Roared (1959)Lolita (1962)Metropolis (1927)The Killing (1956)2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)A Clockwork Orange (1971)Barry Lyndon (1975)The Longest Day (1962)The Wizard of Oz (1939)Dawn's Early Light (Year Unknown)No Highway in the Sky (1951)The High and the Mighty (1954)Strategic Air Command (1955) Bombers B52 (1957)A Gathering of Eagles (1963) – Film featuring Rock Hudson and Rod TaylorHidden Figures (2016)Atomic Café (1982)*Canadian documentary title not foundThe Stand (2020 miniseries)Contagion (2011)Novels/Literary Works Mentioned:On the Beach by Nevil Shute (Published 1957)Red Alert by Peter George (Published 1958)Fail-Safe by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler (Published 1962)The Americanization of Emily by William Bradford Huie (Published 1959)Underworld by Don DeLillo (Published 1997)Missile Envy by Helen Caldicott (Published 1984)The Rhetoric of Antinuclear Fiction by Patrick Mannix (Published 1992)The Time Machine by H. G. Wells (Published 1895)The Shape of Things to Come (Published 1933)Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (Published 1932)The Stand by Stephen King (Published 1978)

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast
Food News: Slug Life!

The Rouxde Cooking School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 137:21


John and Jeni talk about cooking Kugel, Pork Belly Bun and making Ramen Noodles from Spaghetti before getting into this weeks food news. Nerds candy, D&D, Pretzel flavored beer and lab made Kobe Beef are among the many topics discussed this week. Thanks for listening!!!

Who Killed Amy Mihaljevic?
My Favorite Crime Books

Who Killed Amy Mihaljevic?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 31:54


I am obsessed with audiobooks and I wanted to bring you a couple of my recent favorites.SOURCES:https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/oct/25/1mdb-scandal-explained-a-tale-of-malaysias-missing-billionshttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/52032133-facebookhttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/486050.Night_Stalkerhttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43868109-empire-of-painhttps://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/43015073-chaoshttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38743564-billion-dollar-whale