Podcasts about 1960s

Decade of the Gregorian calendar (1960–1969)

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Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

Freedom's Children - HomecomingThe Allman Brothers Band - In Memory of Elizabeth Reed 9/26/73Focus - anonymusThe Outsiders - TouchShelagh McDonald - stargazerThe Grateful Dead - dancing in the street 4/15/70Spirit - Earth ShakerBig Brother and the Holding Company - Hey Baby (live 1966)Family Mystic - animal songDesert Wave - Logan's RunWarhorse – RitualThe Grateful Dead - West L.A. FadeawayBob Dylan - Million Dollar BashLos Bravos – Bye Bye Baby Octopus - I am the Walrus (live 1971)First State Bank - Before You LeaveTwentieth Century Zoo – You Don't RememberThe Grateful Dead - new minglewood blues 10/10/80Blackwater Holylight - jizz witchThe Association - One Too Many MorningsAmon Acid - HyperionThe Byrds - She Don't Care About TimeThe Doors - My Eyes Have Seen YouSupport the show

Master of One Network
PCR 488: Welcome to the 60s! - Video Game Origins, 60s TV to Now & 60s Mascot Trivia

Master of One Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:38


AndrewDisney Gold Statues Figurines: https://www.shopdisney.com/walt-disney-world-fab-50-series-3-figure-blind-pack-461033517703.html60s TV Shows:The Addams Family: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057729/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_1Scooby Doo: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063950/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_2Spider-Man: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt23460244/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0Dr Who: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0436992/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_1Startrek: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060028/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_2LaurenWakanda Forever: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9114286/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0Guardians Holiday Special: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt13623136/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_3Magnavox Oddessey: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnavox_OdysseyPatrickWildest Black Friday Deal60s Mascot TriviaTwitch - Live Every Monday at 7pmhttps://www.twitch.tv/mof1podcast

SBS Maltese - SBS bil-Malti
1960s scheme assisting young Maltese women to travel from Malta to settle in Australia - L-iskema tas-snin sittin li għenet lix-xebbiet Maltin jissetiljaw fl-Awstralja

SBS Maltese - SBS bil-Malti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 5:05


Maltese-Australian historian and researcher, Mark Caruana speaks with Joe Axiaq about the 1960s scheme which assisted young Maltese women to travel alone from Malta to settle in Sydney and Melbourne. - L-istoriku u riċerkatur tal-istorja tal-Maltin fl-Awstralja, Mark Caruana jitkellem ma' Joe Axiaq dwar l-iskema tas-snin sittin tas-seklu l-ieħor li permezz tagħha ħafna xebbiet Maltin kienu mgħejjuna biex jiġu weħidhom l-Awstralja u jissetiljaw f'Melbourne u f'Sydney.

Cinema60
Ep# 68 - Korean War Movies in the 60s

Cinema60

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 104:57


The Korean War is aptly known in America as the “Forgotten War.” During the 1960s, the subject took in its last cinematic hurrah before getting overshadowed by the rising unpopularity of America's involvement in the Vietnam War. Meanwhile, South Korea was experiencing a fabled “Golden Age” of cinema that followed the civil war and continued into the ‘60s – one that had some of its most famous hits rather cruelly lost to time. At Cinema60, we've largely ignored the Combat Film genre on whole… until now! In this episode, Bart and Jenna take the opportunity to dig a little deeper into the war and “Golden Age” that time forgot. Watching three American films about the Korean War side-by-side with three films from South Korea on the same subject, they parse propaganda from profundity, patriotism from personal morality, and savagery from psychosis from two different nationalistic perspectives. While our two hosts don't necessarily see eye-to-eye on the entertainment value of the genre or what makes a film pro- or anti- war, there's an unexpected amount of agreement on which of these films is worth a look and which you can skip.The following films are discussed:• All the Young Men (1960) Directed by Hall Bartlett Starring Alan Ladd, Sidney Poitier, James Darren• Five Marines (1961) 오인의 해병 Directed by Kim Ki-duk Starring Choi Mun-lyong, Shin Yeong-gyun, Hwang Hae • War Hunt (1962) Directed by Denis Sanders Starring John Saxon, Robert Redford, Sydney Pollack• The Marines Who Never Returned (1963) 돌아오지 않는 해병 Directed by Lee Man-hee Starring Jang Dong-hwi, Lee Dae-yeob, Ku Bong-seo• The Hook (1963) Directed by George Seaton Starring Kirk Douglas, Robert Walker Jr., Nick Adams• Red Scarf (1964) 빨간 마후라 Directed by Shin Sang-ok Starring Choi Eun-hie, Shin Yeong-gyun, Choi Mu-ryong

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

Cream - What A BringdownThe 13th Floor Elevators - Tried To Hide (Live)Amon Acid - Parallel RealmJethro Tull - AqualungDonovan - The Ballad Of GeraldineThe Grateful Dead - china cat sunflower>I know you rider 5/3/72The Answer – I'll Be InJefferson Airplane - Plastic Fantastic LoverBob Dylan - All Along The WatchtowerThese Thrilling Lies - These Thrilling LiesThe Nice - Hang On To A Dream (live)The Grateful Dead - caution (do not stop on tracks)The Soft Machine - TeethThe Allman Brothers Band - Mountain Jam 3/13/71The Move - The Last Thing On My MindHawkwind - It's So EasyQuicksilver Messenger Service - Who Do You Love (Part 1)The Grateful Dead - doin' that rag 2/22/69The Pynnacles - You Never Had It BetterThe Count Five - Psychotic ReactionFocal Point - 'Cept MeBig Brother and the Holding Company - MauiThe Byrds - 5D (Fifth Dimension)Support the show

Rock Talk with Dr. Cropper
E116: The Kinks — "Waterloo Sunset"

Rock Talk with Dr. Cropper

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 25:35


In this episode, in belated celebration of the 55th anniversary of its release, we examine the Kinks' "Waterloo Sunset," one of my all-time favourite songs...Support the showInstagram & TikTok — @rocktalk.dr.cropperTwitter — @RockTalkDrCroppFacebook, LinkedIn & YouTube — Rock Talk with Dr. CropperEmail — rocktalk.dr.cropper@gmail.com

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Seawolves (Part Two)

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 43:08


Honor Flight San Diego takes 85 HA(L)-3 Seawolves to Washington, D.C. for a tour of memorials and museums. Along the way, men who haven't stood together in 50 years rekindle old connections and forge new ones, remember their fallen brothers… and receive the surprise of a lifetime.

NEO420's Podcast
Criminals In America. MK Ultra. 1960s animal brain implant. Neuralink. Starlink. EarthNow. DARPA BlackJack. Patriots Bring Justice!

NEO420's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 28:11


Criminals In America have continued to use our money to do some psychopath things. In the 1950s and 1960s Prof Delgado was placing electronic brainchips in animals. This was part of the MK Ultra program which looked at many ways to manipulate people and their minds with drugs, torture, and other means. The program was said to have stopped in the 1973 but evidence is that the program continued in the private sector now manifesting as "social media" (social engineering) and the "internet of things" (internet connected to everything). Then:MK UltraProf Delgado brainchip animal to control itLSDTimothy LearyCA counter culture movementNow:Musk & GatesNeuralinkStarlink / EarthNow DARPA BlackJackElectronics everywhere in everyones hands (cell phones / Obama phones)I do not think the MK Ultra program ever stopped, just got more sophisticated. ________________________NEO420 = Real News + Real Information for WE THE PEOPLEWE THE PEOPLE are at war with the deepstate criminal cabal!!!Turn off your tv, radio, and stop listening to paid professional liars spreading propaganda.***SUPPORT Independent Free Speech Reporting***Thank you for the SUPPORT & SHARING the TRUTH!!!Go to GOD for discernment and wisdom.Know the Truth as the Truth will make you free! (John 8:32)___________________________Listen and learn as we have an extensive coverage within our reporting and analysis.  The link is here http://neo420.com/talks-podcast/The link to our video channel is here. https://odysee.com/@NEO420TALKS:4The Viral Delusionhttp://www.theviraldelusion.com/IT IS TIME FOR WE THE PEOPLE OF THE WORLD TAKE DOWN the criminal cabal. WE know who they are, and now it is time to bring them to JUSTICE!!!_______________________________NEVER FORGET!!!9/11 was a day that global*cabal*conspired to take our freedoms!!!Rumsfeld admitted $2.3 Trillion missing from Pentagon.  https://odysee.com/@NEO420TALKS:4/rumsfeld-2.1Trillionunaccountedforb-ccriminalsstoleit:7Planes did NOT bring down the two towers.AE911Truth.orgGeorge Bush Sr was CIA director before being Vice President then President. MANY are a part of this crime against US.Towers that fell:-Building 1-Building 2-Building 7 (seldom reported even though BBC reporter reported building down before it happened) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0VFMqiSupport the show

DB Comedy Presents THE ELECTABLES
President 37 - Richard Nixon

DB Comedy Presents THE ELECTABLES

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 95:26


Are you ready for the biggest Dick that ever served in the White House? Why, everyone's ready to kick around the worst President between the guy that lost states and the guy who nearly lost the American Experiment - and that includes us! Enjoy the epic DB Comedy episode of the one and only Richard M. Nixon. (You can record if you'd like.)This episode's sketches were Written, Produced, and Performed by:Gina BuccolaSandy BykowskiJoseph FedorkoSylvia MannPaul MoultonPatrick J. ReillyAnd Tommy SpearsThis Episode's Historians: Dr. Chelsea Denault, James McRaeOriginal Music written and performed by Throop McClergAudio production by Joseph FedorkoSound effects procured at Freesound.orgDB Comedy Logo Designed by Adam L. HarlettELECTABLES logo and Presidential Caricatures by Dan PolitoTHE ELECTABLES concept was created by Patrick J. Reilly.CAST AND CREDITS COLD OPEN – Written by Paul Moulton            Dr. Nair - Tommy            Tommy – Tommy!CHECKERS – A REBUTTAL – Written by Joseph Fedorko            Announcer – Tommy            Checkers – PatrickTHE GOOD OLD DAYS – Written by Tommy Spears            Announcer - Sandy             Dick - Joe            Ike - Paul             Barry - Tommy             Strom - Patrick THE DICK STAYS IN THE PICTURE – Written by Paul Moulton            Robert – Joe            Francis – Patrick            David – Tommy            Polly – SylviaCHICKS WITH A DICK – Written by Paul Moulton            Dick - Joe             Henry - Paul             Grace Slick - Sandy             Angela Davis – Sylvia            Andrea Dworkin - PatrickROWAN AND  MARTIN'S BREAK-IN! – Written by Patrick J. Reilly            Announcer and Dick – Joe            Dan – Patrick            Dick – Tommy            Ernestine – Sylvia            German - Paul            Goldie – SandyFeaturing The Cast at the Break-In Joke Wall NIXON AT THE RADIO SHACK – Written by Sandy Bykowski            Narrator - Sylvia             Dick – Joe            Clerk - TommyContributions to DB Comedy are graciously accepted by going to the DB COMEDY donation page at https://fundraising.fracturedatlas.org/db-comedy, the nonprofit fiscal sponsor of DB COMEDY. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.For more information on DB Comedy and THE ELECTABLES, visit DB Comedy's web site, dbcomedy.com, or DB Comedy's host page on Simplecast.com. Follow us on Facebook at DB Comedy. Join us on The Trident Network, and listen to us on World Perspectives Radio Chicago, on Live365.com and Hard Lens Media!Thanks for listening! Thanks for downloading! Don't forget to subscribe! And don't forget to like!!

Anyways, Back To The Godfather
Episode 26: Hey, Great Opening Line: 1960s/70s and 90s/00s Edition

Anyways, Back To The Godfather

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 64:56


In which Rachel and Lauren try to guess the movie based on the first line, sometimes with needed hints and help.Remember to watch November's Film Club pick Curious George and submit your review! Email it to abttg95@gmail.com.Here's the inspiration for this episode:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HJ003G4GI4

Polishing Turds
#32: THANKSGIVING SPECIAL 2022: Alice's Restaurant

Polishing Turds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 51:08


HAPPY THANKSGIVING! In this surprise minisode, Cal & Nick carve up the bizarre Turkey Day anthem "Alice's Restaurant" by Arlo Guthrie. Join us as we sip whiskey colas and ponder why this rambling, 18-minute folk song became a Thanksgiving tradition. DID YOU KNOW??--"Alice's Restaurant" was based an actual events in Arlo Guthrie's life, including an arrest for littering which may have helped him avoid the Vietnam draft...--Arlo's father, the legendary Woody Guthrie, wrote a diss track against Donald Trump's dad back in 1954...--There truly isn't ever more in the back...We're thankful for all the love and support you've given us over the past two years. Enjoy! Instagram: polishing.turds Facebook: facebook.com/PolishingTurdsPodcast Twitter: @polishing_turds email: polishingturdspodcast@gmail.com

The Revisionist History Podcast
Fifteen Historical Films from the 1960s Everyone Should See

The Revisionist History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 14:29


In today's Saturday episode we're back at the movies. This time we're looking at 15 great historical films from the glorious 1960s that everyone should see. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/revisionisthistory/support

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

Blue Cheer - Fruit & IcebergsThe Byrds - Don't Make WavesJethro Tull - Minstrel In The GalleryThe Mothers Of Invention - Dog BreathDantalian's Chariot - the Madman Running Through the FieldsThe Grateful Dead - dark star 10/20/68U.F.O. – Prince KajukuThe Association - never my loveThe Pynnacles - A Better DirectionEls Xocs – Mes EnllaThe Pleasure Seekers – Never Thought You'd Leave MeThe Grateful Dead - Alice D. MillionaireThe Beaten Path – Dr. StoneAphrodite's Child - valley of sadnessLos Ovnis - Ya SeThe Tokens - How Nice?The Rolling Stones - Jumpin' Jack FlashThe Grateful Dead - death don't have no mercy 3/2/69Kempy & The Guardians – Love For A PriceBo Street Runners - drive my carAgitation Free - Laila, part 2The Backdoor Society – I'm The KindThe Otherside - StreetcarSupport the show

Tossed Popcorn
American Graffiti: Questionable & Car

Tossed Popcorn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 48:48


Beep beep! This movie had us cruisin' for a snoozin'. Pull up for George Lucas nonsense, the morality of mooning, and the lengths teens will go to when they have nothing to do but drive around. The person most confused by the film this week was: Lianna, who still can't believe that was Ron Howard.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Minnesota Now
In new memoir, Elisa Bernick on growing up Jewish in 1960s New Hope, Minnesota

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 9:44


We are coming up on that time of year where there may be a little more family drama than usual. Elisa Bernick grew up with her share of family drama in suburban New Hope, Minnesota. But in a new book, she explores the roots of that drama and comes to some astounding and healing revelations. She spoke with our Euan Kerr about it.

Easy Riders Raging Podcast
51- Carry On Camping (1960s)

Easy Riders Raging Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 61:00


Hello! It occurred to me that it was five years ago that I uploaded this anecdote packed episode on 'Carry On Camping' to https://www.patreon.com/ErrP. And since that's a nice round number- and we're between seasons- I figured why not upload it to the main feed. Oh and RIP to Dame Barbara Windsor who has sadly passed since the release of the episode. She really was a British institution.

The Chris Top Program
Emie And Me

The Chris Top Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 11:38


The old folks have always said that love tends to hurt. Well, they were spot on when it came to Emie and me. I couldn't have been more than eleven when she moved into the neighborhood. Clarkstown is a quaint community, but that girl sure did liven things up. I caught her attention when I passed her house on my bike for the ninth time. The whole ordeal was my fault. She did warn me, after all. Emily belted out, "Stop!" as soon as I zipped by her driveway. Her voice carried more authority than anticipated, so I complied and locked the brakes on my Huffy. Never judging a book by the cover finally made sense when I witnessed Emily throw her doll down in the dirt and crawl under the house to grab a weathered baseball. She didn't give a second thought to getting her Sunday best muddy. Once the tiny giant stood up, she wiped her hands on her lacy dress and spoke again, "This is your one and only warning. You'll be sorry if I catch you riding by my house again." She pretended to throw the ball at me by the time she finished speaking. It startled me enough that I decided peddling could be better than hanging around to see if she was serious. My new neighbor stood at attention, ready to fire as I rode around the corner and out of sight. Hours passed before I worked up the courage to soar past her yard again. After stopping up the street to check and see if the coast was clear, I decided to go for it. In one sweet motion, I relieved my kickstand and pushed off the pavement with my scruffy Converse. Luckily there was enough of a hill that I could build up plenty of momentum. All I had to do was pass her driveway, and I'd be safe. My confidence was over the top because there was no way anyone could hit me with a baseball at my supersonic speed. Like a runner winning a marathon, I passed her drive, flinging my arms into the air in triumph. "I guess she knows who the boss is around here," I spoke into the wind right before I heard it. The sound was like a golfer smacking a ball on the course, except it was a baseball nailing the back of my head. Pain instantly followed, and my body flew over the handlebars onto the blacktop. Everything went dark until my eyes focused, divulging an angel. Emie crouched next to me with a look of concern blended into a precious innocence I'd never experienced. Her face was prettier than sunlight leaping from water drops before drying up on blades of grass. "Water drops? Blades of grass?" She mumbled before continuing, "Why didn't you just listen to me? None of this had to happen, but you had to prove how big and bad you are. Now you're lying here talking nonsense and bleeding to death in the street." By the time I could lift my head, I had noticed grownups approaching in the distance. After stuffing the baseball into my pocket, I introduced myself to the girl who had tried to kill me, "I'm Jack." She said, "I'm Emie," right before the adults took me home. It was the first time I ever heard her say her name. No one but Emie and me knew why I wrecked that Sunday afternoon. The doctor never questioned me as he stitched up my head. Mom and Dad figured I was being stupid and showing off. They were grateful Emie came to my rescue and even took me back to her house to say thanks for ensuring I was okay. When my folks left the room, the young baseball pro told me we'd be best friends from now on because she'd never trusted anyone as she did me. And that was precisely the moment we became the best of friends. Life sure does move fast. Plans break, and situations get rearranged before we realize it most of the time. I began to grow and forget things that matter. Somewhere in there, girls became the culprit who kept me up at night instead of my fear of one-eyed, one-horned flying purple people eaters. All females were aliens except for Emie. We'd often argue over small things like whose turn it was to swing from the rope to splash in the lake. Even when we fought, we grew closer, something I wouldn't experience with anyone else in my lifetime. By the time I hit sixteen, I was driving my best friend to school and back home daily. It wasn't a long trip, but we'd often sit in front of her house talking for an extra hour or two. We discussed everything from the plans after graduation to the opposite sex. And it was all frightening."Whatever happens, we should always stick together, Jack.""Gosh, Emie, I'm not even sure what I want to do yet. Everyone is pressuring me into college, but that's not what I'm passionate about." "How often do I have to tell you to stop worrying about what others want you to do? Man up and make your own decisions. Besides, we still have a year to think about it." "You don't even make sense. You're always telling me to be my own person, but you insist on us living in the same town forever. How am I supposed to make decisions for myself if they always have to include you?" Frustrated, Emie reaches for the door to get out of the car, but Jack changes his attitude and continues, "Wait. Don't go; I have something to tell you. It's about the Christmas dance coming up soon." Emie takes a deep breath and listens, "This isn't easy for me to say, but I've decided to take Beth.""Beth! What is wrong with you? That girl has no personality, and she can't even rollerskate. Jack, listen, you can do so much better than her. She talks funny too. It's like she's a mix between Cher and Walter Cronkite.""Do better? Like who? You? At least Beth doesn't confuse me. At least she doesn't contradict herself every five minutes!" "You know what, mister, I will now exit this automobile and retire into my home. Please do not talk to me again until you come to your senses. Don't worry about picking me up tomorrow; I can walk to where I need to go just fine!" Emie slammed the door, marched up the sidewalk, and inside.Anger got the best of me as I threw the car in reverse and screeched out, not paying attention. The car didn't get far because I backed right into Mr. Ken's Cadilliac. He's the local pharmacist and has a reputation for being a nice guy. Let's just say I saw a completely different side of Mr. Ken while I waited for my Dad to show up at the scene. Emie came back out to sit with me while I was getting yelled at by the infuriated gentlemen. Emie and I sat there, trying not to giggle at the choice of words directed through my window while she held a bag of frozen peas to the knot on my forehead. We walked to school together the next day. Later that year, we attended the Christmas dance with each other.I'm sure by now you've guessed that we eventually got married. We had kids, and those kids had kids, and it felt like our home here in Clarkstown was never empty. None of the children needed the excuse of a holiday to stop by to see us; they simply dropped by unannounced, which was fine by us. One year Emie had me get a real tree for Christmas. I slipped on the ice in the driveway, and she was the first to come to my rescue. It was only a couple of stitches on that occasion. Through all the hardships and minor injuries, the old song by Louise Armstrong always stuck with me. We did indeed live in a wonderful world as long as we were together. Our daughter Jessica, who turned forty last month, loves to keep the tradition alive, and I don't mind one bit. She'll drag her husband along with their three kids and spend the majority of the Christmas season here. They'll all help with the tree, and sweet smells always drift from the kitchen to fill the house. It's not just the scent of freshly baked cookies that makes me happy. The aroma, accompanied by love, is one fragrance I'll forever adore. Jessica is her mother; whenever she glances at me, a look of concern blends into a precious innocence. She delicately questioned if I'd been speaking to Mom again. I explained a day doesn't pass without sharing a few words. Jessica then reminds me it's been almost twenty years since her mother died. After politely asking my daughter to shush, I closed my eyes and rested my head on the couch before supper. I'm sure she thinks I'm a senile old man, but the truth is I've never been sharper. Aside from losing my Emie, my biggest fear was getting used to her being gone. I'll never forget how hard she loved me and what it felt like to lose her. The pain reminds me of how wonderful this world is. Years ago, Emie and me sat on the front porch watching the kids play. We knew it wouldn't be long before she moved on, but we laughed and joked anyway. "Hey Jack, remember that time you tripped over the garden hose in the front yard after I flashed you through the kitchen window? You walked funny for a whole week." I told her the old folks were right all along. Love certainly does hurt. But I wouldn't change a thing.

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

The Nice - Diamond Hard Blue Apples Of The MoonOriental Sunshine - VisionsEmerson, Lake & Palmer - The Enemy God Dances With The Black Spirits 3/17/77The Aftermath - Freakout U.S.A.Genesis - Dance On A VolcanoThe Grateful Dead - viola lee blues 1/10/67Billy Strings - spinningThe Standells - Sometimes Good Guys Don't Wear WhiteThe Golden Dawn - my timeJefferson Airplane - Somebody To LoveThe Knight Riders – I Don't KnowThe Grateful Dead - box of rainShadows Of Knight - The BehemothFamily Mystic - New MoonThe Troggs - Love Is All AroundLos Bravos - going nowhereChris Towns & The Townsmen – StuffThe Grateful Dead - lindy 9/16/66Phil Cordell - Red LadyThin Lizzy – Return Of The Farmer's SonThe Rolling Stones - Surprise SurpriseQuicksilver Messenger Service - Three Or Four Feet From HomeBlue Cheer - Just A Little BitSupport the show

The Blume Saloon: A Judy Blume Book Podcast

“Go Ask Alice,” ?-April 24, 1970. Join us for fruit cups and wilted lettuce salad, it's time for more Alice shenanigans! Alice meets herself in the park, somehow finds her way back home, has a terrifying-but-sexy flashback, and yet manages to whip up a gourmet meal for mom. Alison and Jody talk about hair, firemen, and dogs in strollers. And there's dramatic readings galore. It's a Judy Blume book club. Join us every week!

Cracker Classics
#134 - A Couple of SIC Men

Cracker Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 32:19


The movie: Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965) Ian and Joshua explore the world of forgotten '60s parody with this strange mix of spy flick and beach party spectacular. They also debate the weight of gold and the importance of Vincent Price.

Let It Roll
Arthur Lee and Love Ruled LA's Sunset Strip Between The Byrds and The Doors

Let It Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 61:33


Host Nate Wilcox asks John about the ups and downs and self-imposed limitations that kept Arthur Lee and Love strictly a Southern California phenomenon.Buy the book and support the podcast.Download this episode.Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter.Follow us on Facebook.Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts.

The Allusionist
164. Emergency

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 44:33


When is a war not a war? When the British Empire called it an 'emergency' so they didn't have to abide by wartime rules or lose their insurance payouts. Artist and journalist Sim Chi Yin reflects on the Malayan Emergency, a 12-year conflict that doesn't get talked about much now by either side; and historian Charlotte Lydia Riley considers the various reasons why the British opted for the term 'emergency', and why they don't celebrate even when they supposedly won them. Find out more about this episode and get extra information about the topics therein at theallusionist.org/emergency, where there's also a transcript. The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow. The Allusionist is produced by me, Helen Zaltzman. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs via palebirdmusic.com. Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Wondrium, the online library of lectures, courses, tutorials, documentaries and more. Get 50% off your first three months of Wondrium at wondrium.com/allusionist.• Catan, the endlessly reconfigurable board game. Shop at catanshop.com/allusionist and get 10% off the original base game CATAN by using the promo code ALLUSIONIST at checkout. • Bombas, whose mission is to make the comfiest clothes ever, and match every item sold with an equal item donated. Go to bombas.com/allusionist to get 20% off your first purchase. • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a sleek website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free 2-week trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code allusionist. Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionistSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

The La De Das - how is the air up there?Keith Allison - Action, Action, ActionSpirit - TaurusMind Garage – Asphalt MotherThe Rugbys – Walking The Streets TonightThe Grateful Dead - Sugar Magnolia 5/4/72Manfred Mann - You're My GirlThe Third Bardo – I'm Five Years Ahead Of My TimeFamily Mystic - All Of YouArif Mardin – Sympathy For The DevilThe Moody Blues - the story in your eyesThe Grateful Dead - dire wolfThe Common Cold - Come DownOrange Seaweed - Pictures in the SkyThe Rolling Stones - If You Can't Rock Me, Get Off Of My Cloud 7/13/75Genesis - SquonkThe California Poppy Pickers – Yellow SubmarineThe Grateful Dead - the race is on 10/13/80White Lightning - 1930Dr. Marigold's Prescription – Visions Of A HoboFortes Mentum - MarrakeshFresh Maggots - Rosemary HillCaptain Beefheart - Autumn's ChildSupport the show

Cracker Classics
#133 - A Rigid Milk Pyramid

Cracker Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:05


The movie: A Hard Day's Night (1965) Joshua and Ian throw on their mop-top wigs and scream at The Beatles, giving them a glimpse at what life was like on speed in the mid '60s.

Cinema60
Ep #67 - Kiss, Marry, Kill in the 60s: 1969

Cinema60

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 105:45


With a starting list of over 15,000 features and documentaries to choose from, it's unlikely that the Cinema60 team will ever run out of movies to watch and discuss from their chosen decade. But Bart and Jenna have crossed a significant finish line with today's episode. Starting with Episode 5 back in March of 2019, Cinema60 has regularly put out “grab bag” episodes where your hosts pick three movies each from a given year - one they've never seen but are itching to watch, one they absolutely adore and have been itching to talk about on the show, and one terrible movie that they're itching to disparage for your listening pleasure. They call these episodes “Kiss, Marry, Kill,” and you are about to listen to their tenth and final round of the game, having now gone through every year of the Sixties.Jenna has chosen to keep things light and funny and has chosen three notable comedies from 1969 for discussion. Bart, on the other hand, has taken the opportunity to choose several firsts for Cinema60: their first Iranian film, their first kaijû movie, and, most importantly, their first Éric Rohmer film! So while Bart gushes for perhaps too long about what is arguably the best film by his favorite filmmaker, Jenna makes a tripartite bid to pull comedies out of the genre ghetto and defends their right to stand alongside any serious artsy movie you care to name.The following films are discussed:• The Cow (1969) Gaav Directed by Dariush Mehrjui Starring Ezzatolah Entezami, Mahin Shahabi, Ali Nassirian• Cactus Flower (1969) Directed by Gene Saks Starring Walter Matthau, Ingrid Bergman, Goldie Hawn• My Night at Maud's (1969) Ma nuit chez Maud Directed by Éric Rohmer Starring Jean-Louis Trintignant, Françoise Fabian, Marie-Christine Barrault• Take the Money and Run (1969) Directed by Woody Allen Starring Woody Allen, Janet Margolin, Jackson Beck• All Monsters Attack (1969) Gojira-Minira-Gabara: Oru kaijû daishingeki Directed by Ishirô Honda Starring Kenji Sahara, Machiko Naka, Tomonori Yazaki• The Magic Christian (1969) Directed by Joseph McGrath Starring Peter Sellers, Ringo Starr, John Cleese

Unsung History
The Politics of Reproductive Rights in 1960s & 1970s New York

Unsung History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 49:34


Prior to the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973, much of the focus of reproductive rights organizing in the US was done in the states, and nowhere was that more effective than in New York, where leftist feminists in groups like Redstockings and more mainstream activists in groups like the National Organization for Women (NOW) together pushed the state legislature to enact the most liberal abortion law in the country by early 1970. The wide range of reproductive rights activism in New York also included the headquarters for both the Clergy Consultation Service, which helped women find safe abortion care, and the Committee to End Sterilization Abuse (CESA), which fought the often deceptive population control inflicted on women of color.  Joining me to help us understand more about the push for reproductive rights in New York in the 1960s and 1970s is Dr. Felicia Kornbluh, a Professor of History and Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at the University of Vermont, and the author of the upcoming book, A Woman's Life Is a Human Life: My Mother, Our Neighbor, and the Journey from Reproductive Rights to Reproductive Justice. Our theme song is Frogs Legs Rag, composed by James Scott and performed by Kevin MacLeod, licensed under Creative Commons. The episode image is “Betty Friedan, president of the National Organization for Women, tells reporters in the New York State Assembly lobby of the groups intention to ‘put sex into section I of the New York constitution,'” Albany New York, 1967, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, NYWT&S Collection, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-DIG-ppmsca-83073]. Additional Sources: “How Clergy Set the Standard for Abortion Care,” by Bridgette Dunlap, The Atlantic, May 29, 2016. “Clergymen Offer Abortion Advice,” by Edward B. Fiskethe, New York Times, May 22, 1967. “The 1960s provide a path for securing legal abortion in 2022,” by Felicia Kornbluh, Washington Post, June 25, 2022. “Harsh, then a haven: A look at New York abortion rights history,” b​By Tim Balk, New York Daily News, May 07, 2022. “Remembering an Era Before Roe, When New York Had the ‘Most Liberal' Abortion Law,” by Julia Jacobs, The New York Times, June 19, 2018. “The First Time Women Shouted Their Abortions,” by Nona Willis Aronowitz, The New York Times, March 23, 2019.  “Karen Stamm collection of Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse (CARASA) records,” Sophia Smith Collection, SSC-MS-00811, Smith College Special Collections, Northampton, Massachusetts. “Committee to End Sterilization Abuse (CESA) Statement of Purpose,” 1975. “Dr. Helen Rodriguez-Trias: A Warrior in the Struggle for Reproductive Rights,” by Kathryn Krase, National Women's Health Network, January 5, 1996. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

Blonde On Blonde – Heart Without A HomeTour - One Of The Bad Guys13th Floor Elevators - Splash 1Moonkyte - way out hermitColder Children – MemoriesThe Grateful Dead - mississipi half-step 10/19/74Sweet Smoke - people are hard (live)The Moody Blues - Voices In The SkyGUN - Yellow Cab ManCaptain Beefheart - Old Fart At PlayThe Baytovens - Luv Look AwayThe Grateful Dead - easy windPink Floyd - See Emily PlayBullfrog – The Joker (Live)The Beatles - Paperback WriterThe Mindbenders - The Morning AfterBob Dylan - Don't Think Twice, It's All Right (live)The Grateful Dead - rosalie mcfall 9/26/80The Little Boy Blues - look at the sunDave Berkham - GenevieveThe Motions - for another manEyes of Blue - Little BirdFamily Mystic - Family MysticGet The Fluff Out - Listen, laugh and enjoy GenX Music + Talk Get The Fluff Out! is a fun GenX Music + Talk podcast releasing 4 episodes per monthListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Oddity Poddity: A Paranormal PodcastTerrifying tales of the supernatural! Love a good haunt? A spine-tingling urban legend?...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Every Picture Tells a Story

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 29:01


Completing the Wall of Faces took more two decades of sustained effort by thousands of volunteers around the world. In this episode, you'll hear the story of two of them — a story that sheds some light on why this project was so important to so many people.

Weird Crap in Australia
Episode 229 - The Aliens of Woomera

Weird Crap in Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 58:20


There's always been something weird going on out there on the horizon. Long before nuclear bombs showed up in South Australia, there was a rocket range designed to test rockets. But what else was out there? If you trust the reports, at least a couple of alien visitors...

Conversations
Suburban crime and mishap in 1950s and 1960s Sydney

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


Crime writer, Peter Doyle delves into the notes and photographs kept by his uncle, Detective Sergeant Brian Doyle on the Kingsgrove Slasher and other cases that he helped crack 

1960s UK radio girls pubs cars clubs ghosts
Pregnancy Out Of Wedlock 1960s

1960s UK radio girls pubs cars clubs ghosts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 55:31


Despite the sexual revolution and free love in the 1960s, pregnancy out of wedlock was frowned upon. An unmarried teenage girl becoming pregnant... Stone the crows, there was real stigma! Join me for a look back at the 50s and 60s, pregnancy, traffic jams and loads of other stuff.

Commentary Club
COMMENTARY CLUB 068 - The Manster

Commentary Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 81:05


It's crap film time again, and this time we are going to experience a truly bizarre American sci-fi horror shot in Japan - The Manster AKA The Split (1962) NOTE - my apologies the first upload had completely the wrong intro - this has now been fixed

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

The Next Step - I've Got Power to FlyThe California Poppy Pickers – Special DeliveryDave Berkham - coloursIron Butterfly - it's up to you (live)The Charlatans - Devil Got My ManThe Grateful Dead - Cream Puff War 7/3/66The Rolling Stones - Fingerprint File 6/17/75The Lost Souls -This Life Of MineColin Blunstone - Caroline GoodbyeDavid Bowie - I Dig EverythingThe Blue Beats - he's Comin' HomeThe Grateful Dead - cold rain and snowCaptain Beefheart & The Magic Band - I Wanna Find A Woman That'll Hold My Big Toe Till I Have To GoHawkwind - Back On The StreetsWishbone Ash - jail baitThe Byrds - Lay Down Your Weary TuneJohn Mayall - Fly TomorrowThe Grateful Dead - black throated wind 10/19/74Spooky Tooth - I am the WalrusThe Assortment – Bless Our Hippy HomeJethro Tull - Witches PromiseThe Nice - AmericaBodhi Mojo - Midnight SunSupport the show

Audio Judo Podcast
091 - The Moody Blues - In Search Of The Lost Chord - Audio Judo

Audio Judo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 63:32


On this episode of Audio Judo, Matthew and Kyle try to help find the Moody Blue's missing cord while we talk about their 1968 album "In Search Of The Lost Chord."Do you really want to see what we look like while we record? Check out select episodes on our YouTube, you weirdo:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO8oo8oZkSLUqOuiiw8hD7QIf you like what you hear (and see) and want to support the podcast, you can become a Patreon supporter for as little as $1/month:https://www.patreon.com/audiojudoYou can also buy some swag with our logo on it:https://www.teepublic.com/user/audio-judo-podcastAs always, let us know what you think by emailing info(at)audiojudo(dot)com.Website: https://www.audiojudo.comGet in touch on social media:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/audiojudoTwitter: @audiojudoInstagram: @audio_judoWe are proud members of the Pantheon Podcast Network. If you like our show check out other music related podcasts at https://www.pantheonpodcasts.comEpisode info and notes updated June 15, 2022.

Book Vs Movie Podcast
Rosemary's Baby (1968) Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon, Ralph Bellamy

Book Vs Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 74:50


Book Vs. Movie: Rosemary's BabyThe Ira Levin Novel Vs. 1968 Classic FilmIt's October, and the Margos are filling the month with scary, spooky films based on creepy books, and few have a more sinister premise than Rosemary's Baby by Ira Levin. The story of a 1960s housewife who is married to a struggling actor who will make a deal with the devil himself in order to succeed. Released in 1967, the story is set in NYC, where Guy and Rosemary settle into the Gothic Bramford apartment building with a strange history of murder and witchcraft. The nosy, older neighbors, Minnie and Roman Castevet, start to meddle in their lives, and soon enough Guy is becoming a successful actor, and Rosemary becomes pregnant. What should be the happiest time in her soon becomes a hellscape of pain, tannis root drinks, creepy sex, and “chocolate mouse.” Is Rosemary carrying the spawn of Satan? The movie stars Mia Farrow, is directed by the deeply problematic Roman Polanski, and is now considered a classic thriller. So between the book & movie, which did we like better?In this ep the Margos discuss:The life and work of Ira Levin & Roman PolanskiHow closely the film resembles the bookThe controversy around the movie The cast: Mia Farrow (Rosemary Woodhouse,) John Cassavetes (Guy Woodhouse,) Ruth Gordon (Minnie Castevetes,) Sidney Blackmer (Roman Castevets,) Maurice Evans (Hutch,) Ralph Bellamy (Dr. Saperstein,) Angela Dorian (Terry Gionffrio,) Charles Grodin (Dr. Hill,) and Tony Curtis as Donald Baumgart.)Clips used:Guy Woodhouse is THE WORSTRosemary's Baby (1968 trailer) Morning after baby nightRosemary's pain endsRuth Gordon wins the Academy AwardRosemary meets her sonMia Farrow sings the closing music by Krzysztof Komeda.Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts. Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.comEmail us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.comMargo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine

Dressed: The History of Fashion
Generation Paper: Fast Fashion of the 1960s, an interview with Helen Jean

Dressed: The History of Fashion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 60:48 Very Popular


Get groovy with us this week as Helen Jean joins us to talk about the fad for 'paper' fashions of the late 60s as explored in the exhibition Generation Paper: Fast Fashions of the 1960s at the Phoenix Museum of Art.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Girl Pants
Fishnets and Mini-skirts

Big Girl Pants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 6:59


I was always on the outskirts of high fashion. But when the fishnet hose and mini-skirts arrived in my school, I was determined to have them!

New Books in History
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Dance
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books Network
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

DB Comedy Presents THE ELECTABLES
President 36 - Lyndon B. Johnson

DB Comedy Presents THE ELECTABLES

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 91:08


Are you getting used to Presidents genuinely full of contradictions? Because WOW do we have that with Lyndon Johnson - a warmongering civil rights crusader ... a liberal bully ... a crude and ruthless political operator whose heart broke by the time he left the Presidency ... a guy misunderstood when alive being reconsidered with the advantage of time. (But don't worry - it's funny as Hell, too!) LBJ is here for your Electable goodness!This episode's sketches were Written, Produced, and Performed by:Gina BuccolaSandy BykowskiJoseph FedorkoSylvia MannPaul MoultonPatrick J. ReillyAnd Tommy SpearsThis Episode's Historians: Dr. Chelsea Denault, James McRaeOriginal Music written and performed by Throop McClergAudio production by Joseph FedorkoSound effects procured at Freesound.orgDB Comedy Logo Designed by Adam L. HarlettELECTABLES logo and Presidential Caricatures by Dan PolitoTHE ELECTABLES concept was created by Patrick J. Reilly.CAST AND CREDITS COLD OPEN – Written by Paul Moulton          Dr. Nair - Tommy          Joe - JoeTHE LYNDON B. JOHNSON SCHOOL OF POLITICAL PERSUASION – Written by Joseph Fedorko            J.H. – Tommy            Jeremy – Patrick            Jade – Sandy            Jasmine - SylviaTHE BIGGEST JOHNSON – Written by Tommy Spears (including Music)            LBJ - Patrick             Announcer AND Louis C.K. AND Jason Matsoukas - Tommy             Walter Cronkite - Paul             Ladybird/Sarah Silverman – Sylvia            Humphrey/Andy Dick - JoeJOHNSON SAUSAGES – Written by Sandy Bykowski            Announcer - Patrick             Housewife - Sylvia             Jingle - TommyDANIEL IN THE LION'S DEN – Written by Paul Moulton            LBJ – Patrick            Hoover – Joe            Ellsberg - TommyLBJ AND JFK – Written By Sandy Bykowski            LBJ – Patrick            Ladybird – Sandy            JFK – Tommy            McNamara – Joe            Oswald – Sylvia            Crowds - CastContributions to DB Comedy are graciously accepted by going to the DB COMEDY donation page at https://fundraising.fracturedatlas.org/db-comedy, the nonprofit fiscal sponsor of DB COMEDY. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.For more information on DB Comedy and THE ELECTABLES, visit DB Comedy's web site, dbcomedy.com, or DB Comedy's host page on Simplecast.com. Follow us on Facebook at DB Comedy. Join us on The Trident Network, and listen to us on World Perspectives Radio Chicago, on Live365.com and Hard Lens Media!Thanks for listening! Thanks for downloading! Don't forget to subscribe! And don't forget to like!! 

Solus Christus Reformed Baptist Church
Reformed Baptist Church Beginnings in the 1960s

Solus Christus Reformed Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 48:00


A talk given at the fall conference of the Indiana Reformed Baptist Association in Indianapolis, IN

Captain-Freak-Out's Psychedelic Radio

Jerusalem – Primitive ManThe Sires – Come To Me BabyThe Rolling Stones - Sympathy For The DevilThe Electric Prunes - Luvin'Duncan Browne - gabilanThe Grateful Dead - ParallelogramThe Grass Roots – Mr. Jones (Ballad of a Thin Man)The Strangeloves - I want candyThe Doors - Unknown SoldierCream - Sitting On Top Of The WorldThe Reverberations - The way I want youThe Grateful Dead - crazy fingersThe Moody Blues - Dear DiaryThe Nice - The Cry Of EugeneCurtiss Maldoon - Sepheryn (ray of light)Chaz & The Classics – Girl Of The 13th HourYES - Sweet DreamsThe Grateful Dead - ship of fools 10/18/74Amon Acid - beast codeMahavishnu Orchestra - Trilogy: Sunlit Path/La Mere de la Mer/Tomorrow's Story Not the Same 8/18/73King Crimson - Cadence & CascadeBig Brother and the Holding Company - Gutra's Garden (live)Hawkwind - Lost JohnnySupport the show

The History of Computing
Simulmatics: Simulating Advertising, Data, Democracy, and War in the 1960s

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 27:43


Dassler shoes was started by Adolf Dassler in 1924 in Germany, after he came home from World War I. His brother Rudolph joined him. They made athletic shoes and developed spikes to go on the bottom of the shoes. By 1936, they convinced Jesse Owens to wear their shoes on the way to his gold medals. Some of the American troops who liked the shoes during World War II helped spread the word. The brothers had a falling out soon after the war was over. Adolph founded Adidas while Rudolph created a rival shoe company called Puma. This was just in time for the advertising industry to convince people that if they bought athletic shoes that they would instantly be, er, athletic. The two companies became a part of an ad-driven identity that persists to this day. One most who buy the products advertised hardly understand themselves. A national identity involves concentric circles of understanding. The larger a nation, the more concentric circles and the harder it is to nail down exactly who has what identity. Part of this is that people spend less time thinking about who they are and more time being told who they should want to be like. Woven into the message of who a person should be is a bunch of products that a person has to buy to become the ideal. That's called advertising.  James White founded the first modern advertising agency called ‘R. F. White & Son' in Warwick Square, London in 1800. The industry evolved over the next hundred or so years as more plentiful supplies led to competition and so more of a need to advertise goods. Increasingly popular newspapers from better printing presses turned out a great place to advertise. The growth of industrialism meant there were plenty of goods and so competition between those who manufactured or trafficked those goods. The more efficient the machines of industry became, the more the advertising industry helped sell what the world might not yet know it needed. Many of those agencies settled into Madison Avenue in New York as balances of global power shifted and so by the end of World War II, Madison Avenue became a synonym for advertising. Many now-iconic brands were born in this era. Manufacturers and distributors weren't the only ones to use advertising. People put out ads to find loves in personals and by the 1950s advertising even began to find its way into politics. Iconic politicians could be created.  Dwight D Eisenhower served as the United States president from 1953 to 1961. He oversaw the liberation of Northern Africa in World War II, before he took command to plan the invasion of Normandy on D Day. He was almost universally held as a war hero in the United States. He had not held public office but the ad men of Madison Avenue were able to craft messages that put him into the White House. Messages like “I like Ike.” These were the early days of television and the early days of computers. A UNIVAC was able to predict that Eisenhower would defeat Adlai Stevenson in a landslide election in 1952. The country was not “Madly for Adlai” as his slogan went.  ENIAC had first been used in 1945. MIT Whirlwind was created in 1951, and the age of interactive computing was upon us. Not only could a computer predict who might win an election but new options in data processing allowed for more granular ways to analyze data. A young Senator named John F. Kennedy was heralded as a “new candidate for the 1960s.” Just a few years later Stephenson had lambasted Ike for using advertising, but this new generation was willing to let computers help build a platform - just as the advertisers were starting to use computers to help them figure out the best way to market a product. It turns out that words mattered. At the beginning of that 1960 election, many observed they couldn't tell much difference between the two candidates: Richard Nixon and John Kennedy. Kennedy's democrats were still largely factored between those who believed in philosophies dating back to the New Deal and segregationists. Ike presided over the early days of the post-World War II new world order. This new generation, like new generations before and since, was different. They seemed to embrace the new digital era. Someone like JFK wasn't punching cards and feeding them into a computer, writing algorithms, or out surveying people to collect that data. That was done by a company that was founded in 1959 called Simulmatics. Jill Lepore called them the What If men in her book called If/Then - a great read that goes further into the politics of the day. It's a fascinating read. The founder of the company was a Madison Avenue ad man named Ed Greenfield. He surrounded himself with a cast of characters that included people from John Hopkins University, MIT, Yale, and IBM.  Ithiel de Sola Pool had studied Nazi and Soviet propaganda during World War II. He picked up on work from Hungarian Frigyes Karinthy and with students ran Monte Carlo simulations on people's acquaintances to formulate what would later become The Small World Problem or the Six Degrees of Separation, a later inspiration for the social network of the same name and even later, for Facebook. The social sciences had become digital. Political science could then be used to get at the very issues that could separate Kennedy from Nixon. The People Machine as one called it was a computer simulation, thus the name of the company. It would analyze voting behaviors. The previous Democratic candidate Stevenson had long-winded, complex speeches. They analyzed the electorate and found that “I Like Ike” resonated with more people. It had, after all, been developed by the same ad man who came up with “Melts in your mouth, not in your hands” for M&Ms. They called the project Project Microscope. They recruited some of the best liberal minds in political science and computer science. They split the electorate into 480 groups. A big focus was how to win the African-American vote. Turns out Gallup polls didn't study that vote because Southern newspapers had blocked doing so. Civil rights, and race relations in general wasn't unlike a few other issues. There was anti-Catholic, anti-Jew, and anti-a lot. The Republicans were the party of Lincoln and had gotten a lot of votes over the last hundred years for that. But factions within the party had shifted. Loyalties were shifting. Kennedy was a Catholic but many had cautioned he should down-play that issue. The computer predicted civil rights and anti-Catholic bigotry would help him, which became Kennedy's platform. He stood for what was right but were they his positions or just what the nerds thought? He gained votes at the last minute. Turns out the other disenfranchised groups saw the bigotry against one group as akin to bigotry against their own; just like the computers thought they would. Kennedy became an anti-segregationist, as that would help win the Black vote in some large population centers. It was the most aggressive, or liberal, civil-rights plank the Democrats had ever taken up.  Civil rights are human rights. Catholic rights are as well. Kennedy offered the role of Vice President to Lyndon B Johnson, the Senate Majority Leader and was nominated to the Democratic candidate. Project Microscope from Simulmatics was hired in part to shore up Jewish and African-American votes. They said Kennedy should turn the fact that he was a Catholic into a strength. Use the fact he was Catholic to give up a few votes here and there in the South but pick up other votes. He also took the Simulmatics information as it came out of the IBM 704 mainframe to shore up his stance on other issues. That confidence helped him out-perform Nixon in televised debates. They used teletypes and even had the kids rooms converted into temporary data rooms. CBS predicted Nixon would win. Less than an hour later they predicted Kennedy would win. Kennedy won the popular vote by .1 percent of the country even after two recounts. The Black vote hat turned out big for Kennedy. News leaked about the work Simulmatics had done for Kennedy. Some knew that IBM had helped Hitler track Jews as has been written about in the book IBM and the Holocaust by Edwin Black. Others still had issues with advertising in campaigns and couldn't fathom computers. Despite Stalin's disgust for computers some compared the use of computers to Stalinistic propaganda. Yet it worked - even if in retrospect the findings were all things we could all take for granted. They weren't yet. The Kennedy campaign at first denied the “use of an electronic brain and yet their reports live on in the Kennedy Library. A movement against the use of the computer seemed to die after Kennedy was assassinated.  Books of fiction persisted, like The 480 from Eugene Burdick, which got its title from the number of groups Simulmatics used. The company went on to experiment with every potential market their computer simulation could be used in. The most obvious was the advertising industry. But many of those companies went on to buy their own computers. They already had what many now know is the most important aspect of any data analytics project: the data. Sometimes they had decades of buying data - and could start over on more modern computers. They worked with the Times to analyze election results in 1962, to try and catch newspapers up with television. The project was a failure and newspapers leaned into more commentary and longer-term analysis to remain a relevant supplier of news in a world of real-time television. They applied their brand of statistics to help simulate the economy of Venezuela in a project called Project Camelot, which LBJ later shot down.  Their most profitable venture became working with the defense department to do research in Vietnam. They collected data, analyzed data, punched data into cards, and fed it into computers. Pool was unabashedly pro-US and it's arguable that they saw what they wanted to see. So did the war planners in the pentagon, who followed Robert McNamara. McNamara had been one of the Quiz Kids who turned around the Ford Motor Company with a new brand of data-driven management to analyze trends in the car industry, shore up supply chains, and out-innovate the competition. He became the first president of the company who wasn't a Ford. His family had moved to the US from Ireland to flee the Great Irish Famine. Not many generations later he got an MBA from Harvard before he became a captain in the United States Army Air Forces during World War II primarily as an analyst. Henry Ford the second hired his whole group to help with the company.  As many in politics and the military learn, companies and nations are very different. They did well at first, reducing the emphasis on big nuclear first strike capabilities and developing other military capabilities. One of those was how to deal with guerrilla warfare and counterinsurgencies. That became critical in Vietnam, a war between the communist North Vietnamese and the South Vietnamese. The North was backed by North Korea, China, and the Soviet Union, the South backed by the United States, South Korea, Australia. Others got involved but those were the main parties. We can think of McNamara's use of computers to provide just in time provisioning of armed forces and move spending to where it could be most impactful, which slashed over $10 billion in military spending. As the Vietnam war intensified, statistically the number of troops killed by Americans vs American casualties made it look computationally like the was was being won. In hindsight we know it was not.  Under McNamara, ARPA hired Simulmatics to study the situation on the ground. They would merge computers, information warfare, psychological warfare, and social sciences. The Vietnamese that they interviewed didn't always tell them the truth. After all, maybe they were CIA agents. Many of the studies lacked true scholars as the war was unpopular back home. People who collected data weren't always skilled at the job. They spoke primarily with those they didn't get shot at as much while going to see. In general, the algorithms might have worked or might not have worked - but they had bad data. Yet Simulmatics sent reports that the operations were going well to McNamara. Many in the military would remember this as real capabilities at cyber warfare and information warfare were developed in the following decades. Back home, Simulmatics also became increasingly tied up in things Kennedy might have arguably fought against. There were riots, civil rights protests, and Simulatics took contracts to simulate racial riots. Some felt they could riot or go die in in the jungles of Vietnam. The era of predictive policing had begun as the hope of the early 1960s turned into the apathy of the late 1960s. Martin Luther King Jr spoke out again riot prediction, yet Simulmatics pushed on. Whether their insights were effective in many of the situations, just like in Vietnam - was dubious. They helped usher in the era of Surveillance capitalism, in a way. But the arrival of computers in ad agencies meant that if they hadn't of, someone else would have.  People didn't take kindly to being poked, prodded, and analyzed intellectually. Automation took jobs, which Kennedy had addressed in rhetoric if not in action. The war was deeply unpopular as American soldiers came home from a far off land in caskets. The link between Simulmatics and academia was known. Students protested against them and claimed they were war criminals. The psychological warfare abroad, being on the wrong side of history at home with the race riots, and the disintegrating military-industrial-university complex didn't help. There were technical issues. The technology had changed away from languages like FORTRAN. Further, the number of data points required and how they were processed required what we now call “Big Data” and “machine learning.” Those technologies showed promise early but more mathematics needed to be developed to fully weaponize the surveillance everything. More code and libraries needed to be developed to crunch the large amounts of statistics. More work needed to be done to get better data and process it. The computerization of the social sciences was just beginning and while people like Pool predicted the societal impacts we could expect, people at ARPA doubted the results and the company they created could not be saved as all these factors converged to put them into bankruptcy in 1970.  Their ideas and research lived on. Pool and others published some of their findings. Books opened the minds to the good and bad of what technology could do. The Southern politicians, or Dixiecrats, fell apart. Nixon embraced a new brand of conservatism as he lost the race to be the Governor of California to Pat Brown in 1962. There were charges of voter fraud from the 1960 election. The Mansfeld Amendment restricted military funding of basic research in 1969 and went into effect in 1970. Ike had warned of the growing links between universities as the creators of weapons of war like what Simulmatics signified and the amendment helped pull back funding for such exploits. As Lepore points out in her book, mid-century liberalism was dead. Nixon tapped into the silent majority who countered the counterculture of the 1960s. Crime rose and the conservatives became the party of law and order. He opened up relations with China, spun down the Vietnam war, negotiated with the Soviet leader Brezhnev to warm relations, and rolled back Johnson's attempts at what had been called The Great Society to get inflation back in check. Under him the incarceration rate in the United States exploded. His presidency ended with Watergate and under Ford, Carter, Reagan, and Bush, the personal computer became prolific and the internet, once an ARPA project began to take shape. They all used computers to find and weigh issues, thaw the Cold War, and build a new digitally-driven world order. The Clinton years saw an acceleration of the Internet and by the early 2000s companies like PayPal were on the rise. One of their founders was Peter Thiel. Peter Thiel founded Palantir in 2003 then invested in companies like Facebook with his PayPal money. Palantir received backing from In-Q-Tel “World-class, cutting-edge technologies for National Security”. In-Q-Tel was founded in 1999 as the global technological evolution began to explode. While the governments of the world had helped build the internet, it wasn't long before they realized it gave an asymmetrical advantage to newcomers. The more widely available the internet, the more far reaching attacks could go, the more subversive economic warfare could be. Governmental agencies like the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) needed more data and the long promised artificial intelligence technologies to comb through that data. Agencies then got together and launched their own venture capital fund, similar to those in the private sector - one called In-Q-Tel. Palantir has worked to develop software for the US Immigration and Customers Enforcement, or ICE, to investigate criminal activities and allegedly used data obtained from Cambridge Analytica along with Facebook data. The initial aim of the company was to take technology developed for PayPal's fraud detection and apply it to other areas like terrorism, with help from intelligence agencies. They help fight fraud for nations and have worked with the CIA, NSA, FBI, CDC, and various branches of the United States military on various software projects. Their Gotham project is the culmination of decades of predictive policing work.  There are dozens of other companies like Palantir. Just as Pool's work on Six Degrees of Separation, social networks made the amount of data that could be harvested all the greater. Companies use that data to sell products. Nations use that data for propaganda. Those who get elected to run nations use that data to find out what they need to say to be allowed to do so. The data is more accurate with every passing year. Few of the ideas are all that new, just better executed. The original sin mostly forgotten, we still have to struggle with the impact and ethical ramifications. Politics has always had a bit of a ruse in a rise to power. Now it's less about personal observation and more about the observations and analyses that can be gleaned from large troves of data. The issues brought up in books like The 480 are as poignant today as they were in the 1950s.

CineNation
235 - The House That Screamed (1969)

CineNation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 85:59


"I must run this establishment with a firm hand." For Episode 235, Thomas and Brandon continue their Slasher series by talking about The House That Screamed. Listen as they discuss why the film is an underrated classic that deserves more attention. Contact Us: Facebook: @cinenation Instagram: @cinenationpodcast Twitter: @CineNationPod TikTok: @cinenation Letterboxd: CineNation Podcast E-mail: cinenationpodcast@gmail.com

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Gonzo Wall Street: RIOTS,RADICALS,RACISM AND REVOLUTION: How the Go-Go Bankers of the 1960s Crashed the Financial System and Bamboozled Washington by Richard E. Farley

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 32:38


Gonzo Wall Street: RIOTS,RADICALS,RACISM AND REVOLUTION: How the Go-Go Bankers of the 1960s Crashed the Financial System and Bamboozled Washington by Richard E. Farley The long-hidden history of how the corrupt Wall Street investment banks of the 1960s held Congress over a barrel and got an outrageous taxpayer-funded bailout of what they owed their customers—and how little Congress and the SEC got from Wall Street in return. This set the precedent for the bailouts of the 2008 Financial Crisis—and the next Wall Street bailout. A story of corruption and financial malfeasance, it unfolds throughout the tumultuous 1960s, during the administrations of Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon with a surprising cast of famous and infamous characters playing roles: Abbie Hoffman, Roy Cohn, Ross Perot, Donald Regan, Michael Bloomberg, Felix Rohaytn, Sandy Weill, Ken Langone, and many others. In the 1960s, the fabric of American society was torn apart by deep divisions over the Vietnam War, violence in our cities, and the senseless assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and Senator Robert Kennedy. Civil rights, as well as women's and gay liberation movements, were challenging America. Music, literature, fashion, and “substances” were transforming the culture and upending conventional morality and manners. The public, the media, and politicians, preoccupied with these dramatic changes, paid little attention to Wall Street, where a crisis was brewing that would cause more investment banks to fail than during the Great Depression. The year 1968 should have been the best of times on Wall Street. It was the greatest bull market since the Roaring '20s. The Dow was breaking records. Trading volume was exploding. A hot IPO market for high-flying technology companies was defying gravity. And a swashbuckling mergers and acquisitions wave was generating enormous profits. Despite how flush Wall Street firms looked to outsiders, in truth, they were not a thundering herd but one in need of culling. Hidden from view was the fact that many of the best-known firms on Wall Street were in very precarious financial positions. Rather than investing in desperately needed state-of-the-art computer systems, the executives of these firms overpaid themselves, leaving them overextended and overleveraged. When business exploded in 1968, they were so overwhelmed by the stacks of stock certificates piled from floor to ceiling that their antiquated back offices were unable to process them. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), under the oversight of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), was the principal regulator of the Wall Street firms at the time. The NYSE still had many of the vestiges of the private club it was prior to the Depression-era laws that created the SEC and brought Wall Street under the control of the federal government. The NYSE even referred to itself as the “Club,” controlled by an old guard of firms that were among the most overleveraged. Through means legal, and likely illegal, this old guard kept many insolvent firms open while keeping the SEC and Congress in the dark until it was too late. With a systemic financial crisis at hand, the boom turned to bust and they went, hat in hand, to Washington for a bailout. This is the long-hidden history of how the Wall Street investment banks held Congress over a barrel and got a taxpayer-funded guarantee of what they owed their customers—and how little Congress and the SEC got from Wall Street in return. More than anything else, this set the precedent for the bailouts of the 2008 Financial Crisis—and the next Wall Street bailout. In a story that unfolds throughout the tumultuous 1960s, during the administrations of Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, a surprising cast of famous and infamous characters play roles: Abbie Hoffman, Roy Cohn, Ross Perot, Donald Regan, Michael Bloomberg, Felix Rohaytn, Sandy Weill, Ken Langone, and many others.