Podcast appearances and mentions of Benito Mussolini

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Italian dictator and founder of fascism

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Benito Mussolini

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Echo der Zeit
Die Schweiz und Deutschland wollen ein Gasabkommen

Echo der Zeit

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 41:54


Die Schweiz möchte mit Deutschland ein Solidaritätsabkommen für die Gasversorgung im Krisenfall aushandeln. Das haben die Bundesräte Parmelin und Sommaruga mit dem deutschen Vizekanzler und Wirtschaftsminister Habeck beschlossen. Deutschland, das in hohem Masse von russischem Gas abhängig ist, hat gerade eine Partnerschaft mit Katar unterzeichnet. Davon soll auch die Schweiz profitieren. Weitere Themen: (05:41) Die Schweiz und Deutschland wollen ein Gasabkommen (10:59) WEF: Wie der Krise an den Energiemärkten begegnen? (17:06) Russischer Soldat als Kriegsverbrecher verurteilt (23:15) Tagebuch aus der Ukraine: die Rückkehr nach Kiew (27:53) Die hohe Staatsverschuldung trifft nicht alle gleich (32:44) Zürcher Altersheime müssen Sterbehilfe zulassen (36:35) Mussolini hat in Rom viele Spuren hinterlassen

Choses à Savoir
Qui Mussolini envoya-t-il sur l'île de San Domino ?

Choses à Savoir

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 2:41


On le sait, il ne faisait pas bon être homosexuel dans des régimes totalitaires comme l'Allemagne nazie ou l'Italie fasciste. Dans ce dernier pays, les personnes convaincues d'homosexualité étaient exilées dans une petite île de l'Adriatique. Les homosexuels : une "menace pour la race" Le nouveau code pénal italien, publié en 1930, ne comprit finalement aucune disposition contre les homosexuels. Mussolini en personne l'avait exigé. Au motif qu'une telle mesure serait inutile dans un pays où les tous les hommes ne pouvaient que faire preuve de virilité. Vers la fin des années 1930, au moment où l'Italie se rapproche de l'Allemagne nazie, le dictateur dut pourtant se rendre à l'évidence. Les homosexuels existaient bel et bien dans le pays. Dans l'esprit des dirigeants fascistes, qui s'étaient alignés sur les thèses nazies en la matière, ces individus représentaient donc une menace pour "l'intégrité de la race". Et un obstacle à la forte natalité que le dictateur italien voulait promouvoir. Aussi, en 1939, se décida-t-on, après des procès expéditifs, à exiler les homosexuels sur une petite île de l'Adriatique, au large des Pouilles. Une liberté paradoxale Les condamnés sont donc conduits en barque dans l'île de San Domino, une ancienne colonie pénitentiaire. À leur arrivée, ils reçoivent un petit pécule, mais qui ne suffit pas pour vivre. Ils peuvent donc exercer un métier, qui s'ajoute aux travaux auxquels ils sont tenus de se livrer. De façon assez paradoxale, leur situation est plutôt favorable. En effet, ils sont bien accueillis par la population et ils jouissent d'une liberté dont ils ne pourraient profiter dans aucune autre partie du pays. Pourtant, la petite île est trop peuplée et la situation sanitaire se dégrade. On envisage un temps de les transférer dans un autre lieu, mais, avec l'entrée en guerre, les autorités ont d'autres soucis. C'est pourquoi, en 1940, ces homosexuels sont tout bonnement renvoyés chez eux et assignés à résidence. Isolés et parfois abandonnés par leur famille, soumis aux vexations du voisinage, ils se retrouvent alors dans une situation plus difficile que lors de leur séjour à San Domino. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Midnight Train Podcast
What Happened to the Sodder Children?

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 113:28


Welcome aboard for another crazy episode! Today on the train we step into a familiar world…or should we say .. Worlds? A couple episodes ago we did some mass disappearances and you know we love some true crime so today we sort  of combine the two. You see, for the mass disappearances episode there was one case that kept popping up. Now this was interesting to us because we've had that particular case on our list of shows to do for some time now. We figured this would be a good time to go ahead and finally do it. Today we are talking about the disappearance of the Sodder children.  The incident happened on Christmas Eve in 1945 in Fayetteville, West Virginia. George and Jenny Sodder lived with 9 of their 10 children. At the time, the oldest son was off fighting in WW2. The night of the incident, Jennie was awoken three times.   First, at 12:30 a.m., she was awoken by a phone call during which she could hear a woman's voice she didnt recognize asking for a name she didn't know, as well as glasses clinking in the background. Jennie told the caller she had reached the wrong number, later recalling the woman's "weird laugh". As she did, she noticed that some of the lights were still on and the curtains hadn't been closed, two things the children normally did when they stayed up later than their parents. Marion had fallen asleep on the living room couch, so Jennie assumed the other children ,who had stayed up later, had gone back up to the attic where they slept. She closed the curtains, turned out the lights, and returned to bed. She then went back to bed only to be startled by a loud bang and a rolling noise on the roof. She soon dozed off again and finally awoke an hour later at around 130, to see the house engulfed in smoke. She found that the room George used for his office was on fire, around the telephone line and fuse box.   Those are pretty much the facts that can be proven for the most part. Everything else…well it's strange to say the least.   George and Jennie made it out of that fire, as did Sylvia, just a toddler at the time. Also two of their teenage children, Marion and George Jr, made it out. 23 year old John rounded out the kids that made it out alive. Or did he? John said in his first police interview after the fire that he went up to the attic to alert his siblings sleeping there, though he later changed his story to say that he only called up there and did not actually see them. The children remaining inside were Maurice 14 , Martha 12, Louis 9, Jennie 8, and Betty 5. According to accounts, Marion, ran to the neighbors house to call the fire department because their phone was not working. A driver on the nearby road had also seen the flames and called from a nearby tavern; they too were unsuccessful either because they could not reach the operator or because the phone there turned out to be broken. It was Christmas Eve and I've read that the police chief sent everyone home to their families. She couldn't get an answer so another neighbor went to find the fire chief and let him know what was happening.    While this was going on, George, who climbed an outside wall, barefoot, to get to the attic and Jennie tried desperately to save their other children. This is where some of the strange things happen. First off neither of the Sodders trucks would start, despite having worked perfectly during the previous day.. Then their ladder was found to be mysteriously missing. Because of the family not being able to get help from the neighbor and their trucks oddly not starting when they tried to leave to look for the fire chief, help didn't arrive until 8am, almost 7 hours later. The fire department is just 2 miles from the home. The fire department was low on manpower due to the war and relying on individual firefighters to call each other. Chief F.J. Morris said the next day that the already slow response was further hampered by his inability to drive the fire truck, requiring that he wait until someone who could drive was available. Because he was fucking drunk; partying at a local pub, celebrating Christmas Eve. Oh, and one of the firefighters was Jennie's brother, their children's uncle.   The fire was initially blamed on faulty wiring, even though the Sodders claim there had never been any kind of issues with the electrical wiring before. In fact, A visitor to the house, seeking work, went around to the back of the house and warned George that a pair of fuse boxes would "cause a fire someday." George was puzzled by the observation, since he had just had the house rewired when an electric stove was installed, and the local electric company had said afterwards it was safe.   During the investigation something happened that makes this case the crazy thing that we are talking about. 5 of the Sodder children allegedly perished in the fire but the body's were never found. The fire chief told them the fire had cremated the bodies. Jennie asked a crematorium worker if that was possible, the worker told Jennie that bones remain even after bodies are burned at 2,000 degrees for two hours. The Sodder home only took 45 minutes to burn to the ground. So we did a little fact checking about this and there is a lot of argument about whether a house fire can burn bones to ash, but, it seems like those who have degrees and a bunch of letters after their name all agree that a house fire typically will not burn hot enough to get rid of bones. Also another thing we found is that even during cremations bones do not actually turn to dust. In fact after being incinerated at usually between 1800-2000°f, for about 2 hours, the bones are the only thing left. Now, the bones are not the same, granted, as with all the heat, it destroys the structure of the bone but does not turn it to ash. The ashes you receive are actually the bones of the deceased that have been put into what is essentially a big mixer, to pulverize them into dust. So enjoy that thought.    At any rate, due to what the experts said, the family did not believe that the other children simply burned up in the fire. They believed something else happened to the kids. But what else could have happened?   What else would lead one to think something possibly nefarious happened? Well according to some reports, some strange things happened in the lead up to the fire. One strange thing that happened was that in the months before the fire a "ominous drifter, hinted at doom '' We're assuming it was like Friday the 13th…the guy just points and goes…you're all dooooooomed, doomed! Whatever happened it sounds funny.    A few weeks earlier, not too far out from the incident, an angry insurance salesman berated George, telling him that his house was going to go up in smoke and his children would be destroyed as a retaliation for his criticisms of Mussolini in the mostly Italian immigrant community. Actually he said "the dirty remarks you have been making about Mussolini." If it was a sales tactic, it definitely needs work, otherwise, it's oddly specific! Also a bus driver came forward and spoke of how she saw "fireballs" being thrown into the roof of the house, could that be the noise she heard?   In the weeks before Christmas that year, George's older sons had also noticed a strange car parked along the main highway through town, its occupants watching the younger Sodder children as they returned from school.   What about the man who cut off the telephone lines at the Sodder residence? Someone witnessed him taking away a block and tackle used to remove car engines during the fire. He admitted to the theft but answered that he had no part in starting the fire; he had just wanted to cut off the power lines but instead clipped the telephone line. He was let go, and no records exist identifying him or questioning why he wanted to cut lines to steal a block and tackle.    Then on top of that you have the incidents on the night of the fire. There was the phone call and then the noise on the roof and she woke up to smoke in the house. Put all that together, and one could see where people may start to form some theories that this was more than just a tragic house fire.  You know we love a good conspiracy theory as much as the next folks…well at least Moody does.    Not only that, sightings of the children started almost immediately. For starters, locals reported seeing the 5 children in a car that was driving past and watching the fire. Then the next morning a woman operating a truck stop claimed she saw the children come in for breakfast with 4 Italian speaking adults.  Once pictures began to circulate, more sightings came in. a woman said that she saw four of the children (where was the fifth?) in the company of four adults at a hotel in South Carolina.  Which could lend credence to the truck stop story, which also mentioned 4 adults.    Armed with all these facts, George and Jennie went back to the police and demanded to have the fire further investigated. But the police refused, claiming that the coroner's inquiry determined that no crime had been committed.   This is when George and Jennie decided they would continue the search on their own.   George would constantly go and dig through the rubble trying to find something. At one point his searching seemed to find the first evidence of the children. He found what appeared to be an internal organ and also some small pieces of bone. They were sent for testing and the tests revealed that the "organ" was a cow's liver, and that the bones were from someone older than any of the missing children. The small bone fragments that were unearthed were determined to have been human vertebrae. The bone fragments were sent to Marshall T. Newman, a specialist at the Smithsonian Institution. They were confirmed to be lumbar vertebrae, all from the same person. "Since the transverse recesses are fused, the age of this individual at death should have been 16 or 17 years", Newman's report said. "The top limit of age should be about 22 since the centra, which normally fuse at 23, are still unfused". Thus, given this age range, it was not very likely that these bones were from any of the five missing children, since the oldest, Maurice, had been 14 at the time (although the report allowed that vertebrae of a boy his age sometimes were advanced enough to appear to be at the lower end of the range). Also the bones show no sign of being affected in any way by the fire. It was speculated that the bone fragments were mixed in with some dirt brought in to help fill in the basement. Later, Tinsley supposedly confirmed that the bone fragments had come from a cemetery in nearby Mount Hope, but could not explain why they had been taken from there or how they came to be at the fire site. The Smithsonian returned the bone fragments to George in September 1949, according to its records; their current location is unknown.  As far as the liver, it is said that a private investigator found out that the liver was put there by the fire chief at some point in hopes the family would find it and accept the idea that the kids perished in the fire.  George sometimes made his own sightings. On one occasion, George saw a magazine photo of a group of young ballet dancers in New York City, one of whom looked like his missing daughter Betty. He drove all the way to the girl's school, where his repeated demands to see the girl himself were refused.   The investigation and its findings attracted national attention, and the West Virginia Legislature held two hearings on the case in 1950. Afterwards, however, Governor Okey L. Patteson and state police superintendent W.E. Burchett told the Sodders the case was "hopeless" and closed it at the state level. The FBI decided it had jurisdiction as a possible interstate kidnapping, but dropped the case after two years of following fruitless leads.   After this second official investigation ended, George and Jennie continued their search.   George followed up on many leads on his own including heading to St Louis where a woman claimed Martha was being held in a convent but nothing came of that. Another woman in Texas claimed that she overheard two other patrons making incriminating remarks about a fire that happened on Christmas Eve in West Virginia several years before. Again nothing here proved significant.    At one point George heard that a relative of Jennies who lived in Florida had children that looked exactly like his had. He went down there to check it out and only when the relative was able to prove the children were his that George would leave it alone.         In 1967, George went to the Houston area to investigate another tip. A woman there had written to the family, saying that Louis had revealed his true identity to her one night after having too much to drink. She believed that he and Maurice were both living in Texas somewhere. However, George and his son-in-law, Grover Paxton, were unable to speak with her. Police there were able to help them find the two men she had indicated, but they denied being the missing sons. Paxton said years later that doubts about that denial lingered in George's mind for the rest of his life.   That same year the family would receive something pretty crazy. A photo showed up in the mail one day. The photo showed a man that appeared to be around his early 30s with strikingly similar features as their son Louis had had.    Written on the back of the photo was this:               Louis Sodder I love brother Frankie Ilil boys A90132 or 35   Interesting…. Very interesting.    The photo was in an envelope postmarked central city Kentucky. There was no return address.    The Sodders hired a private detective to go to Central city and try and track down where this letter came from and follow this lead. The private detective headed to Central city and guess what he fucking found….. well no one will ever know because after he left he was never heard from again. He never reported back to the Sodders and they were unable to ever locate him. Did he disappear with their money or was he made to sleep with the fishes?   Unfortunately, this took a pretty heavy toll on George. He said in an interview the following year that the lack of information had been "like hitting a rock wall—we can't go any further". "Time is running out for us", he admitted in another interview around that time. "But we only want to know. If they did die in the fire, we want to be convinced. Otherwise, we want to know what happened to them".   George would pass a year later in 1969 believing that his children were never killed in that fire and they were still out there someplace.    After this the rest of the family would continue to search and publicize the case. The only one that would not get involved was John. John believed that the family should accept what happened and all move on with their lives. Jennie stayed in the family home and built a fence around it and added rooms. She wore black for the mourning for the rest of her life and tended the garden at the site of the former house.    These are basically the facts as we know them. Since there's not much in the way of actual forensic evidence in this case, there's no way of telling for sure what happened as far as the children's bodies being burned. Obviously the investigation was quick, taking only 2 hours, and there wasn't a ton of forensic detective work back then. Plus DNA testing wasn't a thing. And just in general investigating wasn't generally as thorough as it is these days.   The surviving Sodder children, joined by their own children, along with older Fayetteville residents, have theorized that the Sicilian Mafia was trying to extort money from George and the children may have been taken by someone who knew about the planned arson and said they would be safe if they left the house. They were possibly taken back to Italy. If the children had survived all those years and were aware that their parents and siblings had survived too, the family believes, they may have avoided contact in order to keep them from harm.   Sylvia Sodder Paxton, the youngest of the surviving Sodder siblings, died in 2021. She was in the house on the night of the fire, which she said was her earliest memory. "I was the last one of the kids to leave home", she told the Gazette-Mail in 2013. She and her father would stay up late, talking about what might have happened. "I experienced their grief for a long time". She believed that her siblings survived that night, and assisted with efforts to find them and publicize the case. Her daughter said in 2006: "She promised my grandparents she wouldn't let the story die, that she would do everything she could".   George and Jennie passed out flyers and put up a billboard on route 16 in Fayetteville. The Sodders purchased the billboard in 1952. It featured black-and-white photographs of each missing child and an account of the fire with a $5000 reward that was increased to $10,000. It was taken down shortly after Jennie's death in 1989. It read:  “After thirty years, it's not too late to investigate. So what happened to the children if they didn't die in the fire? Well there's a few  theories but nothing solid.   One of the biggest questions is how someone could abduct 5 children with nobody being woken up. Well truecrimefiles.com say of that question:             "One of the most puzzling questions is how the actual alleged abduction took place. How did the kidnapper(s) get the five children out of the house, considering that the eldest sister was asleep on the sofa in the living room and the parents were asleep in a bedroom less than 20 feet away? Surely at least one of the children would have made some noise had a stranger (or even someone known to the family) come into the house and taken them away. There is at least one scenario that may have happened that would solve this specific puzzle. One of the chores the two boys were told to do was to attend to the family's handful of farm animals.”   On a side note, Marion, the oldest daughter, had been working at a dime store in downtown Fayetteville, and she surprised three of her younger sisters—Martha, Jennie, and Betty—with new toys she had bought for them. The younger children were so excited that they asked their mother if they could stay up past what would have been their usual bedtime.   At 10 p.m., Jennie told them they could stay up a little later, as long as the two oldest boys who were still awake, 14-year-old Maurice and his 9-year-old brother Louis, remembered to put the cows in and feed the chickens before going to bed themselves.    ”It is possible that all five of the children left the house to perform these chores (the three girls went along to watch) and were taken once they were outside and away from the house."   But an even bigger question would be why would someone do this. Many people believe that it had to do with George's and his background.    George immigrated from Italy and changed his last name from Soddu to Sodder upon arrival. Nobody really knows why he came to America or the circumstances behind his immigration. He would never discuss the issues and whenever it was brought up he would change the conversation. So that's kind of strange. Also George owned a coal trucking business, and at that time the coal industry was under a lot of pressure from the mafia. That plus his little known about past, have lead many people to speculate about mafia involvement in the crime.    Another theory suggests the kids were abducted by an illegal child-selling agency similar to Georgia Tann's with help from the local police. And remember that insurance guy George argued with, the guy that warned that their house would burn and the children would vanish. He was also a member of the coroner's jury which ruled the fire accidental. Leading many to suspect foul play.   For those of you wondering, For more than 20 years, Georgia Tann ran the Tennessee Children's Home Society, where she and an elaborate network of co-conspirators kidnapped and abused children to sell them off to wealthy adoptive parents at a steep profit. This is too crazy a story to not talk about a little here because if there was a network similar to this operating in that area, it seemed like another plausible theory.    Beulah George "Georgia" Tann was born in 1891 in Philadelphia, Mississippi. Named for her father, a powerful judge, she hoped to follow in his footsteps and practice law. Instead, her domineering father forbade it, and she instead pursued a career in social work — one of the few socially acceptable positions for a woman of her means.   She first went to work in Mississippi, but she was soon fired for inappropriately removing children from impoverished homes without cause. She made her way to Texas, where it's believed she adopted her daughter, June, in 1922. Later, in 1923, she adopted Ann Atwood Hollinsworth, a woman believed to be Tann's longtime same-sex partner. It was common at the time for same-sex couples to use adult adoption as a means of transferring property or inheritances.   Tann then moved on to Memphis, where her father used his political connections to secure a new job for her as executive secretary at the Memphis branch of the Tennessee Children's Home Society in 1922.   By 1929, she had staged a takeover and named herself executive director.   Tann's scheme coincided with a sharp increase in families looking to adopt kids In the 1900s and 1910s, formalized adoptions were fairly rare, but in the 1920s adoption began to be marketed as a shortcut to societal improvement. According to one ad from the National Home Finding Society, adopting would "reduce divorces, banditry, murder, and control births, fill all the churches and do real missionary work at home and abroad, exchanging immigrants for Americans and stopping some of the road leading to war."   At the time, the theory of eugenics — that is, the controlling of the reproduction of genetically "inferior" people through sterilization — was popular. The movement claimed that people of better genetic endowment were subject to greater infertility. It became important in adoption not just to get babies but to get the best babies. A campaign to explain the superiority of adoption was launched.   This new outlook, along with the popularization of baby formula, helped Tann's baby-trafficking business grow. Suddenly, nonnursing mothers could easily and affordably feed their babies. The demand for adoptable infants rose, especially among busy, successful women.   Tann was calculated in her approach and targeted the rich and famous, who paid premium prices for their adopted children. Actors, authors, and entertainers, including Dick Powell and June Allyson, Lana Turner, Pearl S. Buck, Smiley Burnette, and New York Gov. Herbert Lehman, all adopted Tann babies. In 1947, Joan Crawford adopted twins, Cathy and Cindy, from Tann.   Stealing children wasn't a small side business. During the 21 years Tann ran the Children's Home Society, it's believed she made more than $1 million from taking and selling children — about $11 million in today's money. And she didn't do it alone.   Tann's extensive child-trafficking operation required connections, and she quickly linked up with E.H. "Boss" Crump, who ran a powerful Tennessee political machine. Crump offered Tann protections in exchange for kickbacks.   To kidnap and traffic her victims, Tann paid off a network of social workers, police officers, doctors, and lawyers. Some kidnapped children from preschools, churches, and playgrounds for her. Kidnappers preyed on poor children and families who didn't have the means to fight back. Tann's coconspirators were authority figures — people not to be contradicted — so children often went with them willingly. Sometimes, Tann would approach families and offer medical or other help. Tann would tell parents she could get their children into a clinic at no cost, but if they came along as well they'd be charged a large bill.   In the era before internet and with few phones, Tann relied on her network of spotters. They alerted Tann to children on riverbanks, in shantytowns, or walking home from school. She drove up in her big black car and offered them rides.   Tann was also in cahoots with a local judge who helped procure children, specifically from impoverished single or widowed mothers. One of her most high profile coconspirators was Judge Camille Kelley, who presided over the juvenile court in Shelby County, Tennessee, for 30 years.   "She had a stooge down in the welfare department when someone would apply for assistance, this person would get their name, and get in touch with Camille Kelley," Robert Taylor, an investigator, said in a 1992 interview with "60 Minutes."   In 1950, Taylor, a local lawyer, was asked by newly elected Gov. Gordon Browning to do an in-depth investigation into Children's Home Society and Tann. "Camille Kelley would send a deputy out to pick them up and award custody to Georgia Tann," he added.   Tennessee law required children to be adopted in state for a fee of $7, about $75 in today's money. But Tann moved her "merchandise" at $1,000 per head — $10,000 today. When the state finally investigated, the report on the Children's Home Society, the Browning report, found that Tann conducted "private" adoptions and pocketed up to 90% of the fee. She would gouge prospective parents on everything from travel costs, to home visits, and attorney's fees.   The report also detailed how children were then spirited away from the Home Society in the middle of the night to avoid detection by authorities who weren't in the know or others who might ask too many questions. Her "nurses" had regular circuits to New York and California, though she shipped to all US states and Great Britain.   Elaborate backstories were added to stolen children's files to make them more "marketable." Their files said they came from "good homes" with "very attractive" young mothers. Fathers were described as "intelligent" and often in medical school.   Tann also knew how to capitalize on opportunities in the adoption market. Few agencies adopted to Jewish families, and Tann saw her chance. A few pen strokes turned a Southern Baptist child into a baby from a "good Jewish" family. As the Children's Home Society scandal was exposed, the scenario played out in the adoption records over and over again.   If parents, biological or adoptive, asked too many questions about children, Tann threatened to have them arrested or the child removed. She was known for "repossessing" children whose adoptive parents couldn't make full payments on time. And she wasn't above blackmailing customers for more money later.   Often she would return to adoptive parents months later and say relatives of the child had come around asking for a baby's return. But for a hefty fee she had lawyers who could make the situation go away.   Homes for unwed mothers, welfare hospitals, and prisons were targeted. Doctors, working with Tann, told new mothers their babies had died during birth. Those children were "buried" at no cost to the families.   Other mothers were coerced into signing their children away while still under sedation from labor. Tann preyed on women's desperation, their poverty, and their sense of shame.   "If they were unsedated and tried to hold on to the babies after the baby was born, then Georgia Tann would step in and say, 'Well, you don't want people in your home town to know about [your pregnancy], do you?'" Robert Taylor, a lawyer who investigated the Tennessee Children's Home Society scandal for Gov. Gordon Browning, said in his 1992 "60 Minutes" interview.   By the 1930s, as a result of Tann's scam, Memphis had the highest infant mortality rate in the US.   Archives at the Benjamin Hooks Library, in Memphis, reveal some of the cruelties children were subjected to. Babies were kept in sweltering conditions, and some children were drugged to keep them quiet until they were sold. Other children were hung in dark closets, beaten, or put on starvation rations for weeks at a time. Drug addicts and pedophiles were hired to watch over them.   According to "The Baby Thief: The Untold Story of Georgia Tann, the Baby Seller Who Corrupted Adoption," sexual abuse was a common occurrence at the home.   Tann was brutally unsparing in her cruelty. Former Home Society employees revealed to Taylor that if an infant was deemed too weak, it might be left in the sun to die. If a child had a congenital disability or was considered "too ugly" or "old" to be of use, Tann had people get rid of them. Many were buried on the property, though about 20 children were buried in an unmarked plot of land within Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis.   In the 1940s, Tann developed a new publicity stunt.   "They would raffle 20 or 30 babies off every year in the 'Christmas Baby Give Away' in the newspaper," Wingate said. "How did anyone ever think that was all right?"   For $25 a ticket — about $350 today — purchasers could buy as many raffle tickets as they liked.   Tann pocketed thousands of dollars that ticket holders assumed went to the Home Society, and had to give away just a fraction of her "merchandise" in the process.   Tann's baby-selling scheme carried on unabated for over two decades. But in 1949 things took a turn. Tennessee elected a new governor, Gordon Browning. Weakened, E.H. Crump, Tann's crony, lost his hold on Memphis politics.   On September 12, 1950, Gov. Browning held a press conference during which he revealed Tann and her network managed to amass more than $1 million from her child-selling scheme — again, nearly $11 million in today's money.   But Tann was never held accountable. Three days later, she died at home after slipping into a mysterious coma from untreated uterine cancer.   On November 11, 1950, Judge Camille Kelley, who had worked so closely with Tann, quietly resigned. It took until late November or early December to find safe homes for the remaining children. Somewhere in the waning days of 1950, the doors to the Tennessee Children's Home Society were closed for good.   No one was ever prosecuted for their roles in the black-market baby ring.   Holy fuck…. So we know that was a tangent but you got a 2 fer here with that crazy tale, and again the reason we went into the  details on this are because there is speculation that the Sodder children could have been victims of a similar scheme. I mean.. If it happened on that scale in one place who's to say it didn't happen here as well. https://www.ranker.com/list/best-movies-about-kidnapping/ranker-film

#SistersInLaw
75: Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Jill Wine-Banks & Victor Shi - introducing iGen Politics Podcast

#SistersInLaw

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:11


Jill and Victor are joined by Professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an expert on the politics and history of strongmen and authoritarians from Mussolini through Trump and Putin.  They discuss how these leaders play to toxic hypermasculinity, and use grievance politics, propaganda, and kompromat to take power and maintain control.  She also emphasizes the need for prosecution and justice, then explains what happens when they fall. Get More From Professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat: Twitter | NYU | Website | Substack | Author of “Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present” & Other Books Get More From Victor and Jill:  Jill Wine-Banks: Twitter | Facebook | Website | Author of The Watergate Girl: My Fight For Truth & Justice Against A Criminal President | iGen Politics Victor Shi: Twitter |Medium | Blog w/Jill Wine-Banks |  Former Biden Delegate: @Bideninaugural | iGen Politics Email iGen Politics at igp@politicon.com Or tweet using #iGenPolitics

The Bledsoe Show
Chaos & Order

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 76:51


00:00.00 mikebledsoe Welcome to Monday morning with Mike and max and today we're gonna be talking about order and chaos. You know I think that there's a place for both and society as a whole likes to swing really really hard and me as an individual I do the same thing max. Thanks for joining for another Monday as we discuss topics that seem highly abstract and somehow try to get it to become practical for the listeners. 00:28.90 Max Shank Yeah I think order and chaos could be the name of our show because it's really quite a chaotic ride I think it's an excellent train of thought that gets frequently derailed. But that's part of what makes it fun and interesting and not only do I think order and chaos are ah definitive of each other they define each other i. I think what you said is perfect. We we swing back and forth really hard from more order to more chaos and we try to get tighter control and then more freedom and ah you know more openness or more boundary setting and that back and forth ah can be. Can be really exciting and in societies actually None of the things that's really important about playing and especially wrestling roughhousing that sort of thing is understanding the line between fighting and play fighting and ah. Being able to introduce chaos in a safe environment because the whole purpose of society is to create order reduce chaos as much as possible so you need something to dose you. With chaos. So you don't become um a a sissy and sad. 04:01.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, that and it yeah said I mean the like for me creativity happens after things get shaken up I think about um, no structure is the structure forever. Um, we the human spirit desires for change because we also live in an environment. Ah, ah, ever present change and um, you know we got to if we want to have some stability. We do need to set up structures in society. We need to set up structures in our own life. But we also need to recognize when it's time to assess and reassess these things and I think creating those safe spaces like you're saying where we can't introduce chaos in small amounts or over a short period of time in ah and a confined space. Ah. Really allows us to not have to go through really big societal bits of chaos which I think we're experiencing right now. There's when I think about rites of passage for young men that has been. Ah, regularly conducted over Millennia and it hasn't really happened in american society in the last few generations and so nature comes along and says hey um. Noticed that you guys haven't introduced any of this planned chaos. Ah you know a rite of passage for a man usually involves being out of control and and being needing to submit to the universe and. And usually facing death in some way or the acknowledgement of death and it can feel It's a big pattern interrupt and pattern interrupts tend to be a little chaotic in nature and when a society or an individual. Has been comfortable for too long in their order then nature is going to come along and shake it up because everything's always changing and we may be fighting to keep it the same but at some point the environment's going to break the the individual or the culture. 08:24.35 Max Shank Yes, and you also sacrifice some of the excitement of life if you imagine someone who was born in a castle isolated from most of the world. There's going to be None of order. None exposure to chaos and they may live their whole life in that environment and then have a child of their own that lives in that environment but eventually ah just like the seasons change and ah different. Creatures Rise up and overcome in different parts of the ecosystem. Ah the people in power never stay up there for long and the more you try to create order the more fragile that individual becomes because they're not dosed. With that chaos and that stimulus because our bodies and minds are always adapting via the said principle. So We're always adjusting to what's going on. So if you have no exposure to Chaos. You will be much more fragile. Ah. 10:54.40 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 10:50.13 Max Shank By by definition. 11:18.74 mikebledsoe Yeah I'm listening to a book by Ray Dalio right now I think it's called the rise of the rise of nation rise and fall of nations or something like that and he he he's talking about the 5 cycles through a society and. 11:10.69 Max Shank M. 11:24.51 Max Shank Ah. 11:58.14 mikebledsoe You know if you've read the fourth turning they they identify None cycles. He identifies 5 and these cycles last about 100 years or the the cycles last about 2025 years and there's 4 or 5 of them depending on which expert you ask? and basically what happens is it. Ah, you the society falls into ah each generation becomes more and more chaotic until it's unbearable and that everyone who's like and it usually ends in civil war and external war and then everybody says. Fuck it. We need. We need more order. You know the the economics are broken where everyone's fighting with each other It's it's highly disordered and then what you end up with is a whole yeah a whole generation comes comes along and is like starving for it. So they. 13:04.10 Max Shank The big prick comes in. 13:19.11 Max Shank Yeah, one and it's ah. 13:52.30 mikebledsoe They're wanting I mean that that's basically how Hitler got the power right? Germany was experiencing an incredible amount of chaos and this guy says you know what? if you just do what I say then things will be better and and they were for a while. There's there's there's videos of like. 13:33.19 Max Shank Exactly. 13:52.97 Max Shank And it's frightening. 14:31.72 mikebledsoe The the population gathering and arenas and exercising together. They were like very lockstep and everything was really good for a short period of time until the 1 person who was in charge decided to fucking go nuts and one of the thing. 14:34.17 Max Shank Right? Where there's there's like a line where people are like you know we're really glad that this ah this dick really like got things under control. You know it was a little too chaotic I felt afraid there was pillaging and rioting and then that dictator. Crosses the line and everyone's like whoa, not like that and then and then it goes back to you know, just that did that to that to da today. 15:47.14 mikebledsoe Um, well the the danger is is when you're when you're in ah and a highly ordered society like that the the amount of thinking by the individual is reduced because they don't have to make as many choices and so. They're less likely.. There's that slippery slope they're less likely to catch poor judgment from the top because it's been so good and just one value judgment at a time and next thing you know you're just killing a bunch of people. 16:15.69 Max Shank Yo absolutely and you you can understand why that would attract people I remember watching this series. Excellent series. The dictator's playbook. The episode on Mussolini he's you know, given a speech from some balcony and he goes None italy None decision and everyone goes. Yeah, they are. 17:51.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 17:24.61 Max Shank Onboard They want a so bad like None maybe hundreds. It's so many people and they were so excited that he's like look I will call the shots. You guys don't want to trouble yourselves with these minor details I will take care of everything and. If you've had a good lady or significant other in your life having someone make decisions for you effectively in ah is amazing like there are certain things like some. You have this comparative advantage where someone else now is responsible for stocking the kitchen stocking the bathrooms getting this taken care of like you know you have that division of management basically and it feels amazing. Like if you get the right person to make your decisions you are on Easy Street. It's just ah, absolute power right. 19:55.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, well I think I think the the happy medium with that because I agree is is you know when you have for instance in the United States you have if you had None person if we had a dictatorship you have None person making the. Decision for 350000000 people. It's not possible for the human mind to be able to grasp the actual impact of the decision on on the individuals and this makes me think about Dunbar's number you know was a. 20:42.37 Max Shank Oh. 21:10.94 mikebledsoe Around None is about as many people as 1 person can keep up with in relationship after that you know people all kind of start looking the same. You don't make as much eye contact. You're not going to remember their names. You're you're not in community and this is why a lot of churches. 21:07.45 Max Shank Oh. 21:49.94 mikebledsoe What they do is they break up after they get to about 150 members and then another church will open up. Ah yeah, and so these like that most churches do that. But in some churches become megachurches and have 10000 members or something like that. 21:37.77 Max Shank It's like setting up little franchises with limits. 21:56.53 Max Shank Yeah. 22:28.92 mikebledsoe And that requires a higher level of leadership and hierarchy hierarchy has to be built into the system in order for that to happen. So when there's and the same thing for Crossfit Gyms all these crossfit gyms sprung up a decade ago and we all watched it happen. It. 22:10.19 Max Shank Right. 23:05.62 mikebledsoe It was a very community driven thing and when it got about 150 members 1 member goes I could do this better. They go open another gym and then they pull some of the gym members away and it's it's just like church and. 22:53.27 Max Shank Ah, crossfits are like church well said I agree there are a lot of similarities there I'm on board. 23:41.28 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, there's a lot of similarities. Yeah, but I think it's a really great demonstration of Dumbbar's number and that the person the person that I'm gonna trust to help. 23:29.31 Max Shank O. 24:13.36 mikebledsoe So make decisions for me right? There's somebody on my team and my company my girlfriend my close group of friends. You know, somebody's organizing a ah ah week long vacation I don't even ask me any questions. They just tell me how much money to throw in the pot and then I show up I'm okay with that. But when we start dealing with people I've never met before and have never met me and now they're making decisions on my behalf I think that becomes problematic. 24:31.63 Max Shank Well, yeah I mean that's that's trust right there I mean who who you choose to trust is a really important choice choosing the right doctor instead of the wrong doctor. Choosing the right trainer instead of the wrong trainer right? Coach instead of the wrong coach and it's not that there it was an absolute good and an absolute bad.. It's just whether or not the resultant partnership or collaboration is gonna be constructive or not because. Some people respond really well to ah stick-based motivation and competitiveness and some people respond way better to carrot-based motivation and creativity and Non-competitiveness. So just finding the right? um. Partnership there like who do you trust with that area of your life is massive. 26:59.62 mikebledsoe Yeah, and going into trust I think one of the reasons we're we're in a massive amount of chaos in our society right now is because there is a lack of trust you know nobody like like the trust of the media is an all time low. 26:43.99 Max Shank Um, well yeah. 27:37.62 mikebledsoe Politicians is an all time low you you ask the average american and they'll just be like yeah the the news and the the politicians are all full of shit. You know there's probably twenty thirty percent think it's still good. But. 27:25.71 Max Shank Which I think is which I think is good I think ah like a skeptical society will actually come up with better solutions but trust saves Calories. Ah the whole Concept. Of a group is built on trust the the whole the whole thing is trust based ah fiat currency all these different things you're trusting that the person in charge is going to do. What's best for You. You're trusting that. Um. You know if you help out with the hunt that you're going to get some of the bounty from that hunt and that we're all going to be part of this unit. We're going to look out for each other.. It's like you scratch my back I'll scratch yours and having those relationships. Is the most powerful thing there is like I think of one of the best survival tools as a radical Rolodex So Just having the right array of people that you can call experts in different fields. But more importantly people that you trust to give you. Real solid Answer. So our whole response to bringing order into chaos bringing order out of chaos is based on faith or Trust. Ah, even if you take it from a religious standpoint. You are putting your faith or trust in a supreme being that we cannot see so it's all it's all trust you could say that? yeah. 31:12.48 mikebledsoe Know or or you could say that that supreme being is everything and everywhere and you see it all the time. But yeah, that's what I say. Ah. 31:13.51 Max Shank I'm pretty sure God is a butterfly. It's the butterfly God Yeah, the other all the other ones are not true I mean I'm pretty religious but it's definitely the butterfly god. 31:45.94 mikebledsoe The Butterfly god. 32:04.78 mikebledsoe There you go. So I I think I think back to like personal experiences with order and chaos and I watch I look at my own life and I watch my own self I'm one of those people that the pendulum swings pretty hard. I Think for some people the pendulum kind of hangs out in the middle for me. It's I go really deep into chaos and then really deep into order and ah, there's not a lot of time spent in the middle. But for me I think that helps with ah. 32:39.39 Max Shank Go. 33:23.50 mikebledsoe More progress is it's definitely not the less least painful way of going about it. But I find it's not for everybody but when I'm but everyone does experience that everyone goes to these cycles of order and chaos and the when I go into. 33:06.10 Max Shank It's not for everybody. 33:59.68 mikebledsoe Times of order what I see is a destruction of the structures. Ah that I had set up in my life previously. Whatever rituals or routines that I had previously were swept away So a really good example of this is I went I sold all my things. 33:32.25 Max Shank Length. 34:39.80 mikebledsoe Got down to two bags and went nomadic for a few years I really didn't have much of anything I left my books with some friends. Yeah yeah, dude I I did some crazy shit Um, during that time it was it. 34:20.60 Max Shank Speaking of a rite of passage right? feels like a rite of passage. 35:15.32 mikebledsoe I destroyed everything like I I left the business I had spent years building I ended up getting divorced I was traveling didn't have a home the level of novelty that was always present was so high that getting making progress on any None thing was. Was close to impossible including taking care of my own health and but it was a really necessary time for me to reestablish a new structure so I needed to I desired a. 35:29.75 Max Shank A. 36:26.78 mikebledsoe New structure so much that I had to I had to really flatten the building I had to rebuild some people are just renovating their house all the time I needed to it was a teardown say my life is a Teardown. Let's just go back down to the slab. Let's go down to the slab and then rethink the floor plan. 36:11.45 Max Shank Ah. 37:05.66 mikebledsoe And everything so the I think I think the reason yeah I think the reason people don't do that is because well when you've been living under 1 structure your whole life going back to the and rebuilding new floor plan. You have no idea what to do so there's there's the lack of. 36:39.21 Max Shank Takes a lot more time to do that. Also. 37:43.52 mikebledsoe Knowledge that can be scary for people to do that demolition plan and then the the knowing that man I I spent say None building this one house and now I'm just going to completely demolish it and start over I know that what I build next is going to be so much better. But. 37:35.91 Max Shank Her. 38:23.36 mikebledsoe That's a lot of work. 37:56.33 Max Shank And absolutely and it's even ah, depending on. Ah how you're wired. It's more like choosing which limb to cut off because it's a part of you is like you're. 38:54.38 mikebledsoe Yeah. 38:30.73 Max Shank Your identity is wrapped up into whatever it is you have going on this marriage this business this habit this thing over here to like strip those away and start coming to the I I think. Crazy shocking realization that most of your like baggage and Bullshit was just thoughtlessly inherited just thoughtlessly and you you weren't like trying to inherit it. It was just Monkey See Monkey Do Bing Bam boom. 39:58.54 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 39:48.63 Max Shank And you're like now I'm this and you get wrapped up into like I'm this and this is good cause I'm good and that's what I'm trying to say all the time. So why would you want to let that go in exchange for something that is unknown right? because that's what really scares people is like I'll take this from. 40:44.56 mikebledsoe Yeah, and. 40:26.73 Max Shank Familiar pain to the unknown that is like I don't know if it's a devil's bargain or a fool's bargain but it doesn't sound like a good deal and yet that's what most of us make is we'll take the familiar pain I'll take familiar pain again. Thank you compared to the unknown. 41:28.26 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, there's um I think in the landmark education they call it the winning strategy. So it's it's a strategy that you learn at a young age where you go Oh if I behave like this. 41:03.49 Max Shank Ah, no yeah. 41:17.77 Max Shank Oh. 41:29.70 Max Shank Um, ah yeah. 42:04.72 mikebledsoe Then this happens or I get to avoid this by being like this I get to you know my dad got mad at me 1 time for doing this. You know I'll never do anything that resembles that ever again and now you become now that that becomes part of who you are and forms the personality and it becomes a winning strategy and. 41:39.89 Max Shank Totally. 42:15.71 Max Shank Oh man. 42:44.80 mikebledsoe And you end up and you get the reward at a young age and then you start collecting evidence for that being a winning strategy. Yeah, you're like oh and you're unable to see where it's not working because it's the only thing that's present. So this is what creates the blind spots. 42:27.79 Max Shank Um, it's like heroin. Oh my god. 42:45.71 Max Shank Man. 43:23.54 mikebledsoe And the the winning strategy is something that is very difficult to let go because it is usually very responsible for a lot of success in your life like somebody may their winning strategy may be shit talking themselves and that's and they overcome it like the beside Navy Seal's name. 43:21.95 Max Shank Yeah. 44:01.38 mikebledsoe Who are ah David Goggins yeah I mean he's he's highly accomplished but he seems miserable as fuck and so he he seems like it is like like he's a perfect example. David Goggins is a perfect example of somebody who. 43:36.69 Max Shank Goggins. Yeah. 44:41.32 mikebledsoe Has a winning strategy. It's getting him some type of reward. But it's costing him so much in his life that he's completely unaware of and doesn't he doesn't value it because he hasn't touched it yet and yet I've met I mean I went through this myself I went from becoming successful. 44:37.30 Max Shank When. 45:16.80 mikebledsoe Shit talking myself and what I was trying to avoid versus you know, ah talking to myself like I was a how would I talk to a None ar old. Well, that's probably how I should talk to myself and so anyways going back to the the people are afraid to give up that. Winning strategy because they're afraid that if they let go of that piece that that piece of their identity. They're not going to be good at something anymore and being good at something is what's earned them. Love. 45:46.51 Max Shank Oh my God It's like a tool. It's It's like you're setting down your sword before you waltz into the Dragons Den It's like when I was a kid I learned about lying now. Okay, lying is a strategy. 46:30.44 mikebledsoe Yeah. 46:24.11 Max Shank That has almost no limits to it in terms of what you can get for Yourself. You can get out of trouble instantly so I was lying all the time growing up as soon as I was able to get away with it I mean what's a better rush than that and there are all kinds of behaviors like that. That they work so you just keep doing them. 47:34.92 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah, they work and then until they don't right? and this is this is where you know, um when we did when in psychology when when we look at like stages of development and. 47:19.29 Max Shank Until they don't. 48:13.72 mikebledsoe What ends up happening is the the things that that move you into one stage of development will end up being the things that hold you back from the next and in fact, when if you look at say the the model of spiral dynamics for psychology and and human development is you're actually moving from. Um. 47:59.71 Max Shank A. 48:52.36 mikebledsoe More of an eye oriented to a we oriented but there's also a bit of chaos and order on either side of that as well. So it's more of a spiral so you got we and I so some stages are more we oriented some stages more eye oriented but then it's it's not ah, it's not a straight line back and forth. It's ah it's a spiral. 48:40.75 Max Shank Ah. 49:29.10 mikebledsoe And in between the eye and the we is is chaos and when you're making the transition and then you've got to bring the order back and so for people to want that chaos in their life. They usually have to be really unhappy with the way something's going on in their life. People when I think about this I think about ah people that have dysfunctional patterns of behavior and a lot of people I think think about oh I have anxiety or I have like some type of system a symptom that might show up in the Dsm um, Dsm whatever it is the. Psychology playbook of symptoms and diagnoses and they they think oh I've got this I'm suffering from this thing and that's the dysfunction. But it's not the best way to find dys function in your life is to just to see what's not working. What what do you desire to be different in your life but you can't seem to get there that to me that demonstrates that there's some type of dysfunction and usually people believe that there's nothing they can do about it. But once they get a hint. And they're just fucking sick and tired of this thing being true in their life. You're like you know I'm gonna do something about it fuck it and then they start digging deep and there's a lot of work to be done there but that that itself becomes chaotic because as you start making changes in your life. You basically have to start behaving differently for everyone else in your life. And they do not like that because they expect you to behave a certain way and that that creates relational chaos. 52:14.97 Max Shank I Think of it in a very basic way which is you have momentum being a certain way and the easiest thing to do is just continue with that Momentum. That's the most effortless thing you can do. So your pain or discomfort needs to be proportional to the adjustment of your trajectory like you need to be dissatisfied or uncomfortable enough to overcome the momentum of living a certain way. And it's not until that happens that a person takes action. Otherwise why would they? it's pure law of least Action. We're going to do the minimum we can unless ah otherwise authorized from a higher order kind of function. And even that is going to be based on a ah big picture discomfort um with just letting things flow as they may. It's like ah I'm uncomfortable not doing this thing. It's it's too painful to not. Go to Mars anymore. It's too painful to not get a divorce anymore. It's too painful to not start a business anymore. Whatever it is. There's like it's different for everybody different pain threshold for different pain catalyst. 55:40.30 mikebledsoe Everyone's got different rock bottom. Yeah, and that makes me think about our concept I I know I didn't create it. But um, the the feather I don't know where it came from the feather the break the Mac truck and if have I told you about this yet. 55:46.10 Max Shank The feather the brick and the Mac truck. No no I told you this but why don't you go ahead and share it with everybody. 56:28.20 mikebledsoe Are you. 56:34.76 mikebledsoe Pretty out did I hear I didn't hear from you did you or did you are you the originator. 56:15.21 Max Shank Go ahead. Just let let them know what it is. It's fine. Go ahead. 56:55.98 mikebledsoe Um, so yeah, the the the feather the Breakke the mack truck. You always get the message very lightly in the beginning and most people ignore it then it comes a little harder and then it's a fucking mack truck and it runs you over. 56:51.95 Max Shank Here. A e. 57:31.96 mikebledsoe And think that the skill is learning to listen for feathers and so it's a it's a it's a it's about being more sensitive. Yeah. 57:23.75 Max Shank Right? But you don't want to get startled every time you feel the wind either right? when there's nothing there. Yeah, you didn't get that for me for me. It's always been the wind the feather the brick and the Mac truck. 58:04.28 mikebledsoe No, you gotta be you gotta be listening to the right thing. 58:23.54 mikebledsoe The wind the feather oh shit oh shit, did you get it from somebody. Are you reading the same person or did you are you really an originator. Do you even know. 58:12.97 Max Shank Now I just I just made the whole thing up I never heard of it until just now. But I thought it would be fun to ah, just throw that Monkey Wrench in there because because see for me. Ah I think. 59:01.42 mikebledsoe Ah, the wind the fact. Okay, we'll throw in the wind now now we've got 4 levels. 58:52.97 Max Shank It's it's like ah a hypochondriac. The hypochondriac is thinking. Everything is some health disaster and really they were just constipated or something like that and I think the line between Prudence and paranoia is a truly fascinating one. 59:33.18 mikebledsoe Yeah, um. 59:31.55 Max Shank Because everybody has a different idea of what is reasonable preparedness and responsibility like the ability to respond or not so it's It's really the same thing like what's the line between prudence and having like a very deep awareness. 01:00:11.44 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:00:09.93 Max Shank Of what's going on around you and responding to the slightest stimulus so being a little I don't know hypersensitive versus like hyposensitive. It's ah it's an interesting thing. 01:01:04.60 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:00:41.87 Max Shank So so like to kind of bring us back to that concept of the feather the brick and the Mac truck that what you're saying is change is or or like life. Let's say is giving you signals. 01:01:43.28 mikebledsoe M. 01:01:19.51 Max Shank And if you pay attention to the signal when it's really light. It's not going to cause you much harm. But if you if you wait the feather becomes a brick becomes a mac truck when it eventually just absolutely wrecks you. 01:01:57.20 mikebledsoe Right. 01:02:13.12 mikebledsoe Yeah, becomes more painful but also the amount of change that you're gonna have to make is probably more drastic so it's a double whammy you got extra pain and and additional work to do like I think about say somebody who is a. 01:01:56.33 Max Shank Um, yeah. 01:02:52.68 mikebledsoe A meth at it. You know if they're one weekend and they notice like oh I'm not getting good sleep I'm Jittery I you know I'm not paying attention at work or whatever and they and they go you know what? I've you know I'm gonna check myself into a clinic and I'm gonna kick this thing but then you got the person who's. 01:02:25.25 Max Shank Ah. 01:02:38.41 Max Shank For her. 01:03:31.22 mikebledsoe 10 years in you know they're missing their teeth like for them to be able to get their life back on track and get a job and all that is going to be monumentally more difficult. 01:03:25.91 Max Shank Right? So going past the point of no return basically like how how hard it is. yeah yeah I mean David Goggins is a ah great example of ah. 01:04:07.88 mikebledsoe Yeah, there's a point you cross where you never getting back? Yeah yeah. 01:04:05.55 Max Shank Someone who has just made such an impression on so many people I think you know he he just flipped total extremes right? Big fat guy boom now I'm a Navy seal running millions of miles. Oh my foot's broken. 01:04:55.40 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 01:04:45.43 Max Shank Who Cares stay hard and I think that now that Persona has gotten him speaking of winning strategies. So now even if he did say you know what I think a more gentle form of exercise is really the right choice for most people because. You know, Actually you're going to harm yourself long term by just running through these injuries. Ah, he almost can't do that now because he has got this winning strategy as this character and I think he. 01:05:55.24 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. Well, you know. 01:05:59.77 Max Shank Wants to be that character for himself and for everybody else I think he's got to be thinking. Wow This is an amazing thing that I am doing here and I'm this guy for myself and for these other folks. 01:06:50.50 mikebledsoe Yeah I think a lot of people are attracted to it because they yeah they're they're attracted to it and they want to do it. They want to be like it. But I think it's a it's. 01:06:37.95 Max Shank Superhero shit. Of course it's attractive. 01:07:27.40 mikebledsoe It's immature in a lot of ways you know there's there's somebody who I saw go through a transformation which was a gary banynerchuk and I don't know if he shifted I Never really heard him say hey I had a realization I'm changing the way that I'm speaking now. 01:07:14.71 Max Shank He. 01:08:05.50 mikebledsoe But I watched him shift over like a 5 year period of hustling rind. You know, get out of your mouth and maybe that his audience matured and he needed to shift his his message. 01:07:47.10 Max Shank Ah. 01:08:00.99 Max Shank He. 01:08:33.64 mikebledsoe But it became more of like hey let's work smarter not harder like be kind to yourself all these things Gary Vaynerchuk I mean if you go back and watch videos from ten years ago and him trying to motivate a crowd. He's telling him to like you know, buck up, you know quit being a little bitch and now he's. 01:08:31.53 Max Shank In. 01:09:09.56 mikebledsoe He's found a little more kindness in in his approach. So I think there's a that's something that was working for him but he also was able to to mature beyond that hopefully David Goggins experiences the same thing I mean for his sake because I mean if you got to keep that persona on. 01:08:47.84 Max Shank Right. 01:09:47.38 mikebledsoe For the rest of your life. It's just hard to. 01:09:21.90 Max Shank But maybe that feels like good for him. Maybe that's that's exactly what he's looking for he he won't be happy unless there's a ah, big physical challenge and you know who can imagine what it's like to live that guy's life. 01:10:22.44 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah, who knows and there's a place for everybody right? like there's a reason that he's so prolific right now is because there are a lot of soft people that need to hear that message. They're probably sick and tired of being soft or like you know what I'm I'm fat too. 01:09:57.85 Max Shank Is what I say. Ah. 01:10:21.19 Max Shank Yes. 01:11:00.82 mikebledsoe And I don't know what to do about this so you know what? like and I mean I am of the opinion that whatever, whatever the fuck gets you started go but my encouragement is it's never the whole thing get gets you started on being healthier. 01:10:33.47 Max Shank Right. 01:10:55.17 Max Shank Whatever gets you started on anything. Ah. 01:11:40.46 mikebledsoe But you know it got fat shamed Now you're losing weight. Okay, but here's the thing is take it further yeah like take it get up take it further. You know I think people a lot of times. It's It's like. 01:11:22.69 Max Shank You got fat shamed you got fat shamed. 01:12:15.30 mikebledsoe The reason you're fat is not because it's not necessarily because you're not exercising enough or you didn't You're not I mean these are the the behaviors you're not exercising enough and you're and you're eating like shit but like there's an entire lifestyle that goes behind this that that needs to shift that doesn't need to be. Maniacal about food and exercise. 01:12:35.29 Max Shank It's literally just using food as pleasure more than your activity will allow and the reason we do things like that is because we feel like there's something missing and we want to change our state salty sweet fatty cheesy bits. Will will pretty much resolve that immediately. It's not super long lasting but you know Obesity is just a drug addiction that has a really easy to see physical manifestation to it. 01:14:15.22 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 01:13:47.35 Max Shank Right. Ah, it's It's like a lot of people are addicted to their phones but it doesn't make you £40 heavier. Oh you're you're addicted to your phone but this other person is addicted to ah like hostess cupcakes. That's we're not getting sponsored by them but just because. 01:14:55.26 mikebledsoe Not yet max not yet. 01:14:30.53 Max Shank Just because they're addicted to just God I Hope so sponsored by Twinkie. Ah, but yeah, if someone's addicted to hostess cupcakes instead of the telephone they get fat but it's you're still just. Pulling a pleasure lever to distract from being here and now basically right. 01:15:46.26 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah I Um, definitely use food as a little bit of entertainment and but you know what I've I've figured out how to use my entertainment food. Like I can get really entertained by my food without it being just outlandishly terrible and that I think that's ah, that's a good like like. For instance I eat like ah, a keto ice cream that doesn't have It's like the cleanest one I could find mammoth It's mostly just fat. With a tiny bit of sweetener supposed to just cream and by the way I mean just eating frozen cream by itself is so good. Yeah, and then and then I put put strawberries on it I put strawberries on it and then I put. 01:16:35.10 Max Shank Don't don't eat that bad sugar. Don't eat that bad sugar fat Only sugar is bad for you. Don't eat sugar Listen there's a killer out there. It's sugar. 01:17:28.34 mikebledsoe Raw honey on it. Yeah yeah, and then that'll usually beat whatever fucking dessert that's sitting on the shelf somewhere or even at a restaurant like it's actually tastier. 01:17:00.87 Max Shank Um, very fancy. 01:17:20.81 Max Shank Well, you know that's great that you have found a strategy that that works for you. Um, for for your mouth pleasure. Although. 01:18:03.82 mikebledsoe Um, yeah I know it's not your your morning cheesecake that you like to start your day with. 01:17:54.75 Max Shank I Do like to start with a cheesecake and mocha in the morning if the opportunity arises I'm definitely going to take it. Absolutely. 01:18:46.22 mikebledsoe Ah, well ordering Chaos I. 01:18:20.35 Max Shank So with the with the food is it about the mouth pleasure like the the flavor the chewing the swallowing the whole thing I mean that's what helped me like get a handle on the the food addiction I mean it's all good right. Is it that I like the flavor while I'm chewing. Is it like some deeper primal thing where I I just feel good that I'm putting stuff in my belly like there's this primal desire. That's like yeah food goes in this tube this way and then that's a good thing. 01:19:52.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, well I think I think for me it um like I'm a low appetite person. So yeah, yeah. 01:19:39.73 Max Shank How nice someone the other day said to me he goes. Ah I've been trying he was at he was at our gym he goes I've been trying to eat more and the idea of someone who had to try to eat more. 01:20:31.44 mikebledsoe You know? okay. 01:20:17.41 Max Shank Was so foreign to me ah eating more is my absolute default. Ah the concept of eating less food than I need or even just the right amount that I need is insane like every time I'm eating food I Want more. I Want hometown Buffet I want all you can eat sushi I Want a gigantic porter house with mashed potatoes. 01:21:34.54 mikebledsoe Yeah I think I think what may be different between you and I is I've been obsessing over the nutrient density of my food since I was about 14 So it's um. 01:21:28.17 Max Shank A. 01:22:06.66 mikebledsoe Like yeah I'm in this constant search for the highest quality of what I'm what I'm eating now Super dens. It's a superfood and so the yeah. 01:21:46.59 Max Shank That's why I just eat bullying cubes. 01:22:03.33 Max Shank I Think we should try to make that a thing super concentrated beef essence. 01:22:45.88 mikebledsoe Well, it's kind of like kale kale was like being sold as ah like a garnish for these buffets at Wendy's or whatever for for almost nothing and then it was listed as a super food. It was marketed properly and then ah. 01:22:34.83 Max Shank Ah. 01:23:20.12 mikebledsoe The fucking price of it skyrocket. We can do the same thing for Bullyon Cubes I think is somehow you know hate. It's. 01:23:01.79 Max Shank That would be such an exciting thing to get like all these high level athletes just snacking on bullion cubes. Everyone starts carrying around a little beef pouch salty. Yeah. 01:23:43.38 mikebledsoe Yeah I think it's a good hydration. It's more like a hydration tool. Yeah, yeah, yeah, but ah yeah I think for me like I've always all I'm like this this quality freak about food and be and like I don't want it. 01:23:46.70 Max Shank Here. 01:24:21.96 mikebledsoe I could eat like a footlong Subway Club sandwich like I could do that like don't get me wrong I could do it but but it just it just doesn't like um, there's something about it I Just don't I don't feel satisfied in the same way and so. 01:23:59.59 Max Shank That sounds good I like a good submarine sandwich. 01:25:01.60 mikebledsoe When I'm eating higher quality foods like it does seem like it's harder to eat. It's like I get satisfied more quickly So I don't eat as many calories and then I'm also burning through a lot of calories in the day and then if I'm training which I am right now. Are you just the. 01:25:00.83 Max Shank Then. 01:25:40.30 mikebledsoe The appetite just skyrocket. But I don't I won't put down just anything So then I end up eating Keto ice cream with honey and strawberries at night. 01:25:17.83 Max Shank A. 01:25:28.93 Max Shank Yeah I'll I'll eat healthy food I'll just eat 3 times the volume of what I should eat. It's weird I'll be at a restaurant or something and they'll be like. Do you want any dessert and I'll look at the dessert menu. 01:26:12.40 mikebledsoe Yeah I think I just have a small stomach some you know. 01:26:06.89 Max Shank And I'll be like no but I will get another entree instead when it's like roughly this I Really like savory foods so we'll be out. It'll be like sushi or something they'll be like oh you want dessert and I'm looking the desserts I'm go think I'll just have more rice and fish and avocado and that kind of thing. 01:26:59.64 mikebledsoe A ah. 01:26:42.61 Max Shank Um, food Huh How about that. 01:27:13.82 mikebledsoe Yeah, so going back to ordering chaos where we started. Ah I I think that what we're gonna be witnessing moving forward is a lot of people seeking order. There was I was listening ah to. 01:26:55.61 Max Shank Order up. 01:27:16.30 Max Shank A. 01:27:52.76 mikebledsoe Gad sad god sad how do you say his name on Rogan the other day and it was talking about how some of the professors are starting to report that the that the new students in the college in the universities are. Really wanting a more conservative approach to things like they seem to be tired with you know all the the crazy shit around you know like they're being 72 different genders and and all that kind of stuff and so the ah. 01:28:26.15 Max Shank All that shit is just all that shit doesn't matter. It's just about whether or not the discourse is violent or not I think. 01:29:13.46 mikebledsoe Well I think that's part of the problem is it's it. You know it's obviously been violent people certain people aren't allowed to talk at universities because they get shouted out and basically forced out So that's chaos. That's that's people's emotional state. 01:28:57.53 Max Shank Right? wild. 01:29:51.40 mikebledsoe Overtaking their behavior becoming illogical and then are unable to you know have intepit discourse. So I yeah I think I mean if we look at if we look at what Ray Dalio says if we look at the fourth turning. We look at these things that these people who talk about. These cycles that are going on in the world and I think we're pretty getting pretty close to maxing out on chaos I mean I think the only thing that's more chaotic for for for the american public for for the. 01:30:19.51 Max Shank Um, what whoa woa I don't know I'm still listening though but I don't know. 01:31:05.40 mikebledsoe For the American Public's taste for things you think they can take more chaos. We'll see. Um, yeah I could see it going a little bit further I mean but the the only thing that's left is is now and. 01:30:58.23 Max Shank Um I think of anarchy as chaos like anarchy is chaos that I mean that would be soak I Oh my God I think things like I don't think things are being run well. But. 01:31:40.16 mikebledsoe No anarchy is different. So ah. 01:32:01.30 mikebledsoe Boy here. 01:31:36.77 Max Shank My gosh I think a lot of stuff is still running so smoothly so predictably in such an ordered fashion I mean I hope it doesn't get more chaotic and unpredictable. 01:32:22.40 mikebledsoe Well well anarchy anarchy just means without a ruler and so it no without a ruler and so it has to do with. 01:32:06.67 Max Shank Right? Well without without rule isn't it or just without a guy who enforces the rules then. 01:32:59.34 mikebledsoe God. 01:32:36.89 Max Shank No. 01:33:08.42 mikebledsoe Ah, well if you define God by natural law like like gravity like like to me that is the the forces that have put been put in place to create physical order in the world which we don't need. Anyone to be in charge to do that right? like real laws are things that no person has to enforce and so you have natural law and then you have common law which is basically don't fuck with me and I'm not going to fuck with you right. 01:33:47.53 Max Shank Right? But who's enforcing that is the question. That's what I'm saying So it's ah you know I think there would be a lot more people stealing each other shit if they didn't think there was some like repercussion. 01:34:22.64 mikebledsoe Well people ultimately have to enforce it for themselves. Yeah. 01:34:43.68 mikebledsoe Her maybe maybe well here here's wait. There is a reapercussion so here's an example San Francisco has riots how long do they last Minneapolis long fucking time. You know how long they lasted in Miami. 01:34:25.51 Max Shank That the hired guns could lay in a long time. Yeah, not as long. 01:35:20.78 mikebledsoe Yeah, about 36 hours and then it everyone went back to order and it's not because they put more police force out. It's because the the ah the police came out and said hey if you own a store on this street. You might want to come out with your gun. They basically encourage people to protect their own property because that's a state in which they honor property rights right? and then right and then but. 01:35:43.30 Max Shank Which are the only reason we have all these rules in the None place. 01:36:24.58 mikebledsoe But property rights aren't necessarily I don't think they necessarily have to be enforced by an outside entity whereas in California you have government officials that are impeding property rights so in 1 state you've got the encouragement of protecting your own property like we're not even going to do it. You do it. 01:36:19.49 Max Shank Right. 01:36:32.53 Max Shank Right. 01:37:03.90 mikebledsoe And then in San Francisco they're saying whatever you do don't protect your own property or else we're gonna come after you, you know you can't have a gun if you shoot somebody on your property. We're gonna you're gonna be in trouble. So some people would say that San Francisco has got way more order or. 01:36:46.10 Max Shank Right. 01:37:42.64 mikebledsoe Whereas Florida seems a little more anarchist right? where they're encouraging when I think about anarchy it brings it down to there is a ruler and each person has to be their own ruler in which case. So we look at Miami and people would say oh we're just gonna let people kill each other but the the amount of damage that was done and the amount of deaths were really small because what happened was people came out with their guns. A couple writers got shot and killed and then everyone goes. Oh you can't do that or else you might get shot and killed and so they just don't do it anymore. So I think this is a good example of of the order being placed by. You know, an authoritative government is shown to be ineffective. So I think. 01:38:32.51 Max Shank Um, well yeah. 01:39:31.30 mikebledsoe Majority of order that's produced people generally want to be kind to each other people generally want to get along in all the research people avoid conflict. They don't They don't do these things they enter into conflict when they think they can be faceless and nameless and they're wearing a mask and and running through the streets. 01:39:24.49 Max Shank Most people. 01:39:38.77 Max Shank A. 01:40:09.94 mikebledsoe With a thousand other people and they can blend in now they become that's chaos. That's that's that's the mob but that's not anarchy. That's ah anarchy would be everyone. There would be consequences. You're held liable for your personal stuff. 01:39:48.30 Max Shank Um, a mob. 01:40:44.12 mikebledsoe Just because everybody was doing It doesn't mean that you are um that it's okay to do it So There's a level of individual responsibility that I see that happens with anarchy and I think that this I think that anything that's not anarchy is actually a. It's an illusion because if we if we go up so we. 01:40:58.49 Max Shank Well hold up every society is an illusion based on a unify unifying set of beliefs whether it's the tree spirit or an eye for an eye code of hamurabi or hey that guy with the big stick is in charge because he can beat up everyone else. 01:41:50.46 mikebledsoe It's just it's a story. 01:42:02.26 mikebledsoe Well well the big, the big stick guy is usually what people think about anything about anarchy is like it's like oh yeah, it's a power game right? It's like if everyone's just running around and. 01:41:38.50 Max Shank Right? And we just do what he says. That's all. 01:41:56.53 Max Shank Well it it is extra Well if there's no recourse if someone takes your stuff except for your own then everyone is going to have to arm themselves significantly more now I do think that would make a community. 01:43:01.74 mikebledsoe I Think it would be a much more peaceful community as well. 01:42:33.81 Max Shank Much much stronger been to Oklahoma I agree completely. Um, people would respect boundaries a little more I believe and if you think that you may get shot. You're less likely to go try to Rob someone unless it's really really desperate. 01:43:32.78 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 01:43:12.31 Max Shank And even then you're more likely to go ask? What can you do you can beg borrow or steal if someone has something you want. You know you can work you can beg or you can take um so I think it has a lot to do with. 01:43:52.82 mikebledsoe Now. 01:44:05.90 mikebledsoe Or. 01:43:51.67 Max Shank Fact that we can get our needs met relatively smoothly and I think if you had let's say a dis because I'm not a fan of how taxpayer dollars are managed at all because that's all government is it's all all of our pooled resources put to work by a few. Ah. Clever folks. But I think if you were to dissolve that whole system. Ah it would be a really shaky turbulent. Ah very chaotic adjustment period because the whole concept of. dollars and cents and retirements and everything would just completely collapse and all of these agreements based on that old system would also collapse so all of your existing contracts would basically be like I'm gonna just not. 01:46:08.66 mikebledsoe Well, a lot of a lot of these structures are are corporate in nature and so these agreements and so any agreements you have with government I mean it's a corporate. It's an agreement between a corporation and an individual which is technically like unlawful. 01:45:43.21 Max Shank Do that anymore. 01:46:13.47 Max Shank Right? But those ah but those agreements are basically just for if you have to go to a court. 01:46:46.74 mikebledsoe In a way. But. 01:46:56.84 mikebledsoe Yeah there I got a I got a show coming out with Jesse Elder where he covers the whole going to court thing but the which I think will be interesting but I want I want to take this back to the the idea that that do we live. My argument is we already live in anarchy right? And so the I was thinking about this the other day is so there's a war between well I'm about to explain it. So everyone everyone thinks that there's a rule of law right? like the United States is like it's it's not ruled by men. It's ruled by law. 01:47:21.70 Max Shank Why do we live in anarchy. Okay. 01:47:46.37 Max Shank Sometimes. 01:48:14.78 mikebledsoe And so that's that was that's kind of the concept of the United States it's not necessarily how it's resulted, but that's the concept was to to keep us out of trouble. But if we get outside of the United States and we go global. We have global anarchy right? the. 01:47:57.31 Max Shank Right. 01:48:53.24 mikebledsoe There is no. There is no authority that makes the countries behave So some of these. 01:48:32.10 Max Shank Maybe oligarchy maybe more like an oligarchy than total anarchy like I think there's a lot of power centers and unions and allegiances that guide the flow of the world. 01:49:22.52 mikebledsoe There are there are the um that that are a lot less oligarchies. Well depends on the oligarch like what system you're using can be less violent. You mean you could say that like Elon Musk is probably None of the most powerful people on the planet. Not probably He's more powerful than most countries. Ah and ah, but all the interaction with him and his stuff is is voluntary. So it's it's a less. He may be he may be in charge of people's minds in a way because he's deciding you know what? they. 01:49:54.17 Max Shank Which is amazing. Ah, right. 01:50:38.78 mikebledsoe They may be seeing because he controls that way, but it's not.. It's not overtly coercive or or violent. Um, but if we if we extrapolate out and we go what keeps these nations like what supersedes the nation you know and some people might say Nato UN. Ah, have all these different organizations where these countries send representatives and they jerk each other off for a few days and then go back. Ah these that the truth is is the only thing that keeps anyone from fucking with anybody else is the possibility of total destruction. There's an entire global strategy going on by each country On. You have a few powers that are trying to dominate. But there's all these allies that are created and rules and and and they're generating all this stuff but generally like if you I think people. People are under this false premise of there is law and order that's produced by human beings. But it's completely inaccurate because if we keep going to a larger Magnitude. We start seeing that there's nothing other than brute force and power that is. That is in charge and so in which case I say that that's truly just Anarchy. We already exist under it. But the problem is is we suffer under a ah like ah this illusion because people don't ah. Because they put their trust in the illusion. They never take personal responsibility. They never become their own ruler. They never make their own decisions. They never learn to protect themselves feed themselves provide for themselves and so they're putting the trust in something illusory that can change at a moment's notice. And put them out in the cold. 01:54:07.63 Max Shank Um, yeah I I tend to think that all ah Authority matters are resolved that way with the threat of total destruction on a micro level and on a macro level. You know the. 01:55:06.22 mikebledsoe M. 01:54:45.33 Max Shank Way that individuals are ruled the way that countries are ruled the way that countries rule over each other.. It's always the threat of total destruction and you know self-preservation is a very powerful instinct and I think that's probably what drives ah countries more than anything. Is the self-preservation Instinct of the rulers. 01:55:59.64 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, gotta be I mean I think that's just everybody. 01:55:39.27 Max Shank Keep the power get a little bit more keep the power get a little bit more because it never ends it very rarely ends well like the dictator doesn't like ride off into the sunset and be like hey guys I had fun oppressing the shit out of you. Thank you for letting me just go on. 01:56:36.86 mikebledsoe Yeah, well when was the last time there was a dictator that like died of natural causes and everybody all the your country. The country was like oh yeah, ah. 01:56:14.47 Max Shank Down the dusty road dude North Korea North Korea one of my favorite front. None of my favorite stories ever I another plug for dictators playbook. Very good series. The story of ah Kim il-sung. And then ah Kim Jong -il and now kim jong un none generation dictatorship pretty good for the modern era he is repressing the shit out of those people's ability to see information and see what other life is like he's smeared the hell out of the fat americans it's incredible. 01:57:29.64 mikebledsoe Now. Yeah. 01:58:00.28 mikebledsoe I need to I need to watch this. It sounds. 01:57:33.19 Max Shank Ah, anyway, Kim il-sung dot died of natural causes. Kim Jong -il also died of natural causes. Kim Jong un maybe eating himself to death. But that's still a natural cause basically like it's incredible. 01:58:25.98 mikebledsoe Yeah, well what I'm saying yeah but people aren't happy what I'm saying is like has anyone ah as a dictator ever like died and then everyone's like oh genuinely sad. 01:58:17.75 Max Shank There is way less obesity in North Korea than the United States that's a fact that's a fact. 01:58:57.48 mikebledsoe Did you did you listen to that? Ah interview Rogan did with um that North Korean woman who escaped at fucking crazy. Totally worth listening to. 01:58:44.51 Max Shank Um, yeah I did it was wild. Loved it. Dude That's the history of the world is like awful awful stuff like that look at all the like torture shame the the um juxtaposition of. Art and war as ah, vessels for this oscillation between order and chaos is Incredible. We're making these beautiful pieces of art. We're you know, putting together quilts and nice things for people and medicines and then we have like these. Ah. Mechanical suppositories that expand up your anus as torture and you just have these like weird is such ah, an insane level of destruction and violent and then creation and cooperation and you know optimism. I Mean human beings are insane and then a few of them get really insane and are like I will lead these people and then and then I here's what I think happens I don't think this is going to be a very popular take but I think ah. Most of the most of the guys who went and did these insane things. It was really like the whispers of a lady that was driving him. You know what? I mean I think we we cannot. We cannot Blame. Ah. 02:02:04.24 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 02:01:53.57 Max Shank White We We can't make white men the whipping boy of all the evil shit. That's ever been Done. You know ladies men of all colors of all creeds have oppressed people I'm sure that there were Queens who would tease their king about the size of his kingdom. And just nag nag nag him until he conquered the neighbors be like you call this a kingdom This is the tiniest Kingdom. That's what I think yeah. 02:03:07.16 mikebledsoe I think that was like Alexander the great alexander the great. Yeah and what's her name or is it Ashley and I got this conversation the other day which was we we take we take like things that are really hot. Like unstable topics in society and then we debate them in the car and because she grew up in the bay where there's a very she grew up in a very left leaning view. So there's a lot of opportunity for me to ask her questions just had a curiosity is like okay how is. 02:03:38.67 Max Shank Ah. 02:04:22.20 mikebledsoe Okay, this is how I understand this situation. What's the okay, what's going on over there and she tells me I'm like okay have are those people have they considered this so no, okay, cool and so it's like it ends up in a interesting conversation. So one was um, we were listening to a show. They're talking about. Um you know, ah, ah, equity like equity amongst men and women for pay right? who you know men men generally get paid more money than women and so the feminist movement has been. Incredibly focused on money in in regard to things not being fair and so and so that was my that was my so we got in this conversation. so so yeah yeah so Ashley's like you know it's unfair and. 02:05:19.71 Max Shank They already spend all the money. There are so many reasons for there are so many reasons for this I mean. Okay. 02:06:16.72 mikebledsoe And I was like I was like well have we talked about all the contributing factors to why it might be that way and then the number one? Well the None thing that I came up with not came up with but like the None stat that we looked at was ah okay. So men make how much more money on average and women for the same type of work. Okay, well, who spends the money who who spends more money. It's like well the women spend 70% of all the money on. 02:06:44.45 Max Shank But there there are like 10 different reasons that things usually are this way if it was so clear cut as like the Twitter sized argument would have you believe then every smart businessman would just hire women I would save. 02:07:45.74 mikebledsoe Totally. 02:07:24.37 Max Shank I would save 25% on my ah payroll and I would be because if it's the same job for ah 25% less money. You would be a fool not to do it. You would have just factories. You would only have women employees. It would only be women working ah like why wouldn't you why wouldn't you no no, it's it's stupid. It's just another distraction. We have so much more in common. 02:08:32.48 mikebledsoe That's that's a really good point or because of discrimination people are are misogynist What it's It's ah it's a. Well the thing the thing is is people people will they look at the result and then they they that that's the explanation. Oh. There's not this so it must be.. It must be that that person that men are generally bad at you know that are generally misogynistic. 02:08:37.10 Max Shank Ah, then we have different. 02:09:41.72 mikebledsoe So There's this like the proof for a lot of people. The proof is in the the lack of equity versus getting into all the little things that might contribute to that and you make a really good point because you know what? if if I could get away with that I do the same thing and. And then you could like claim to be nobles like oh I I Only hire women and and in the background you know you, you're making more money That's not necessarily I don't see in the conversations I yeah. 02:09:53.91 Max Shank Um, yeah. 02:10:09.43 Max Shank It's just like a different type of sexism I mean I don't think I think more than people being like pro-man or pro lady or anti-man or anti-lady people are just selfish understandably. So. You're the only None living your experience. You're the only one responsible for it if you can get a few extra points of street cred for talking shit. Why wouldn't you I mean we talked about how effective lying is talking shit is so effective I mean do you think Tom Sawyer painted the fence. No. Sweet talked the other kid and said hey wouldn't you like to paint this fence I will trade you the opportunity of painting this fence for that shiny red Apple you got and so he's there eating the Apple while this guy is so happy that he now has the opportunity to build a fence so people are just. Selfish and they realize that they can talk to get attention and energy and that kind of thing instead of work and there are so many I mean my god we could talk all day about this like alleged discrimination between men and women. But um. This is a contest that nobody wins there's no way to win this discussion because it's like hey did you know that men kill themselves 4 times more than women they're like no I didn't know that is like well can you just like fucking eat the quarter and like. Not worry I mean we're dying 4 times as much at our own hand like is it really? So amazing. Yeah. 02:13:43.26 mikebledsoe Well 98% of workplace deaths are men as well like I it's like is what. 02:13:27.69 Max Shank But but that's that's the whole point is like people just do what they want to do that's all and quite frankly, you know if you're a lady you can just get really hot and nice. But if you're a fella I mean I guess you could do that too like you could be a cabana boy. Type of ah life strategy I've considered it I've done the entrepreneurship thing for a while but I've also considered what if I put the same amount of dedication to being like a really like goodlooking Kabana boy right? and just like teach yoga classes by the pool of some like rich lady. And my whole responsibility is just like oh a little more suntann for you I'll whip up a little ah sandwich for you there like that's totally a strategy and maybe I would earn more doing that than what I'm currently doing so. It's fine, but it's just that usually the way that a guy shows. 02:15:33.80 mikebledsoe Maybe maybe. 02:15:21.39 Max Shank Ah, dominance in the hierarchy is by making lots of money That's usually how it is and then if you like get the gender roles confused sometimes you have people chasing things that don't even feel good to them. They just do it because they think they're supposed to and that's. 02:15:54.00 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 02:16:21.18 mikebledsoe Yeah. 02:15:59.83 Max Shank I think that is ah actually really scary sp

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

GGACP celebrates the 60th birthday (May, 14, 1962) of actor-director Danny Huston (“The Aviator,” “Hitchcock,” “Wonder Woman”) with this ENCORE presentation of a 2019 interview. In this episode, Danny regales Gilbert and Frank with stories about meeting Orson Welles, directing Robert Mitchum, getting inside the heads of big-screen bad guys and growing up with (and working alongside) his legendary father, John Huston. Also, Hal Roach cozies up to Mussolini, Katharine Hepburn makes like Eleanor Roosevelt, George Raft turns down the role of a lifetime and Danny reflects on the career of his grandfather, Oscar-winner Walter Huston. PLUS: “The Other Side of the Wind”! Remembering Robert Evans! The mystery of B. Traven! The punk rock cinema of Bernard Rose! And Danny and Gilbert reenact a scene from “Chinatown”! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Today In Jewish History
15 Iyar – Manna From Heaven – 1313 BCE – Benito Mussolini – 1945

Today In Jewish History

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE
Qui Mussolini envoya-t-il sur l'île de San Domino ?

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 2:41


On le sait, il ne faisait pas bon être homosexuel dans des régimes totalitaires comme l'Allemagne nazie ou l'Italie fasciste. Dans ce dernier pays, les personnes convaincues d'homosexualité étaient exilées dans une petite île de l'Adriatique. Les homosexuels : une "menace pour la race" Le nouveau code pénal italien, publié en 1930, ne comprit finalement aucune disposition contre les homosexuels. Mussolini en personne l'avait exigé. Au motif qu'une telle mesure serait inutile dans un pays où les tous les hommes ne pouvaient que faire preuve de virilité. Vers la fin des années 1930, au moment où l'Italie se rapproche de l'Allemagne nazie, le dictateur dut pourtant se rendre à l'évidence. Les homosexuels existaient bel et bien dans le pays. Dans l'esprit des dirigeants fascistes, qui s'étaient alignés sur les thèses nazies en la matière, ces individus représentaient donc une menace pour "l'intégrité de la race". Et un obstacle à la forte natalité que le dictateur italien voulait promouvoir. Aussi, en 1939, se décida-t-on, après des procès expéditifs, à exiler les homosexuels sur une petite île de l'Adriatique, au large des Pouilles. Une liberté paradoxale Les condamnés sont donc conduits en barque dans l'île de San Domino, une ancienne colonie pénitentiaire. À leur arrivée, ils reçoivent un petit pécule, mais qui ne suffit pas pour vivre. Ils peuvent donc exercer un métier, qui s'ajoute aux travaux auxquels ils sont tenus de se livrer. De façon assez paradoxale, leur situation est plutôt favorable. En effet, ils sont bien accueillis par la population et ils jouissent d'une liberté dont ils ne pourraient profiter dans aucune autre partie du pays. Pourtant, la petite île est trop peuplée et la situation sanitaire se dégrade. On envisage un temps de les transférer dans un autre lieu, mais, avec l'entrée en guerre, les autorités ont d'autres soucis. C'est pourquoi, en 1940, ces homosexuels sont tout bonnement renvoyés chez eux et assignés à résidence. Isolés et parfois abandonnés par leur famille, soumis aux vexations du voisinage, ils se retrouvent alors dans une situation plus difficile que lors de leur séjour à San Domino. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

il posto delle parole
Marco Di Tillo "L'orco di Mussolini"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 14:40


Marco Di Tillo"L'orco di Mussolini"Mursiahttps://www.mursia.com/«Per lui non era semplicemente una bambina. Era, in realtà, un sogno, un dolce sogno, con l'abitino alla moda, i capelli ben pettinati e quelle vezzose moine da piccola signorina che gli mettevano i brividi...»Roma, 1924. Una sera di marzo sparisce la prima bambina. Nei tre anni successivi ne sono violentate e uccise altre sei. Mussolini è furioso, la Polizia non riesce a trovare il colpevole e gli abitanti della città sono terrorizzati.Alla fine ci rimette un poveraccio di nome Girolimoni. Contro di lui vengono inventate diverse prove, trovati testimoni improbabili, e finalmente tutti possono tirare un bel sospiro di sollievo. Il mostro è stato trovato! Nelle indagini viene coinvolto un esperto poliziotto italiano, il commissario Giuseppe Dosi, che smonta, a una a una, tutte le prove contro l'innocente accusato e riesce anche a catturare il vero colpevole. Ma le cose non finiscono purtroppo nel modo sperato, perché proprio Mussolini prenderà, a sorpresa, una decisione incredibile, destinata a cambiare il corso degli eventi.Marco Di Tillo, laureato in Psicologia, è stato per anni autore di programmi radiofonici e televisivi Rai, regista e sceneggiatore cinematografico, autore di fumetti, di romanzi per ragazzi e di favole illustrate per bambini. Scrive gialli pubblicati da molte case editrici, anche negli Stati Uniti.IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

The WW2 Podcast
166 - Rodolfo Graziani

The WW2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 68:35


Rodolfo Graziani, Marshal of Italy, Viceroy of Ethiopia and one of Mussolini's most valued generals remains to this day a divisive figure in his homeland. Revered by some Italians as a patriot and vilified by others as a murderer. From the allied perspective, he was the Italian general whose troops surrendered en masse to the British during operation Compass, which almost knocked the Italians out of North Africa in 1941. But what is the true story of Rodolfo Graziani? Today I am joined by James Cetrullo. For the first time, James has translated from Italian the biography Rodolfo Graziani: Story of an Italian General written by Alessandro Cova. Patreon:patreon.com/ww2podcast

Vanilla Magazine
Donna Rachele: Moglie in Ombra di Benito Mussolini

Vanilla Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 16:25


La ContraHistoria
La guerra sin odio

La ContraHistoria

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 70:08


El 10 de junio de 1940 la Italia de Benito Mussolini declaró la guerra al Reino Unido y Francia. En aquel momento el ejército francés se encontraba en plena retirada tras la invasión alemana que había comenzado sólo un mes antes. El Reino Unido, por su parte, se encontraba totalmente sobrepasado. Había tenido que salir huyendo del continente repatriando a toda prisa a su contingente en Dunquerque y se preparaba para resistir el ataque alemán que se tenía por inminente. Parecía el mejor momento para entrar en la guerra del lado del vencedor cuando ésta se encontraba ya prácticamente decidida. Que Italia tomase partido no afectaba demasiado a los aliados en Europa Occidental (Francia se encontraba derrotada y Gran Bretaña quedaba muy lejos de Italia), pero si abría un nuevo teatro de operaciones en el Mediterráneo, los Balcanes y el norte de África. En aquella época el continente africano se encontraba colonizado en su práctica totalidad por potencias europeas. En la costa africana del Mediterráneo convivían cuatro potencias: el Reino Unido en Egipto, Italia en Libia, Francia en Túnez y Argelia y España la zona septentrional de Marruecos. Libia se convertía así en el principal bastión del eje en el norte de África. La Argelia francesa y el protectorado de Túnez se mantuvieron leales al Gobierno de Vichy presidido por el mariscal Petain y el protectorado español en Marruecos dependía de un régimen, el de Francisco Franco, claramente afín al Tercer Reich. Sólo quedaba Egipto del lado aliado. Egipto era un reino independiente, al menos oficialmente, desde 1922. El rey Faruq se había declarado neutral al empezar la contienda, pero el Reino Unido controlaba el canal de Suez por lo que su influencia era decisiva en la política egipcia. Contemplando como había quedado el mapa, los estrategas alemanes pronto advirtieron que, con la retaguardia cubierta, si una ofensiva lo suficientemente vigorosa avanzaba desde Libia hasta Egipto podían cortar de cuajo el contacto del Reino Unido con la India y sus colonias de extremo oriente. Sería esa una contribución decisiva que, combinada con el control del estrecho de Gibraltar y de islas como Malta o Creta, sacaría a la Royal Navy del Mediterráneo estrangulando así la economía británica. Este fue el origen de uno de los teatros de operaciones más duros de la segunda guerra mundial, la campaña del norte de África en la que se enfrentaron alemanes e italianos contra los británicos en batallas míticas bajo el sol abrasador del desierto del Sahara como el sitio de Tobruk o las dos batallas del Alamein. Winston Churchill lo consideró desde el principio como un frente prioritario sabedor de la importancia que el canal de Suez tenía para la supervivencia de la metrópoli. Envió efectivos desde Gran Bretaña y desde todo el imperio, incluyendo remotas colonias como la India, Australia o Nueva Zelanda. A su frente colocó al general de infantería Bernard Montgomery, un veterano de la primera guerra mundial. Para reforzar a los italianos Adolf Hitler envió a un cuerpo expedicionario de unos 100.000 hombres llamado Afrika Korps al mando de Erwin Rommel, uno de sus mejores generales que ya había participado en las campañas de Polonia y Francia. Tanto Montgomery como Rommel imprimieron su personalísimo sello a toda la campaña del norte de África. Trataron de hacer una guerra limpia y caballerosa en la que, en líneas generales, se respetó a la población civil. Es por ello que los historiadores la conocen como “la guerra sin odio” y esto mismo es lo que vamos a ver con más detalle en La ContraHistoria de hoy. En El ContraSello: - La cueva de Zeus en Creta - La República de Weimar - El bioscopio Bibliografía: - "El camino hacia la victoria" de Douglas Porch - https://amzn.to/38pYUL5 - "Un ejército al amanecer" de Rick Atkinson - https://amzn.to/3wawSMZ - "La guerra de Mussolini" de John Gooch - https://amzn.to/3lbtta5 - "Afrika Korps. Los guerreros de Rommel" de Juan Vázquez García - https://amzn.to/3Mc9dBk >>> “La ContraHistoria de España. Auge, caída y vuelta a empezar de un país en 28 episodios”… https://amzn.to/3kXcZ6i >>> “Lutero, Calvino y Trento, la Reforma que no fue”… https://amzn.to/3shKOlK Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM #FernandoDiazVillanueva #SegundaGuerraMundial #Africa Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

COMRADIO
103 - Bang To Reichs

COMRADIO

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 53:01


These days you can get arrested just for being Hitler.  We put recent media "gaffes" promoting the far right into historical context. Newspaper coverage of Mussolini and Hitler in the 1930s on both sides of the Atlantic - including a spotlight on the Daily Mirror's pro-Fascist and pro-Hitler content, Nazi collaboration by Associated Press, the American press and the KKK in the 1920s, reporting of the milkshaking of Andy Ngo, and more. Plus, how being hit as a child didn't do Wes Streeting any harm.   NATO shares image of Ukrainian soldier wearing Nazi insignia; deletes it later - Opindia (2022)   FC Metalist Karkhiv   Soldier with Deus Vult badge   Donald Trump retweets far-right group's anti-Muslim videos - BBC News (2017)   How a Right-Wing Troll Managed to Manipulate the Mainstream Media - EJ Dickson for Rolling Stone (2019)   Where the New York Times article on an American Nazi went wrong - Ezra Klein for Vox (2017)   How media ‘fluff' helped Hitler rise to power - Charlotte Hsu, University of Buffalo News (2015)   Interview with Dr Felix Harcourt. The media and the Ku Klux Klan: a debate that began in the 1920s - Lois Beckett and Jesse Brenneman in The Guardian (2018)   Podcast: Face the Racist Nation - WNYC Studios (2018)   Gary Younge interviews Richard Spencer - Guardian channel (YouTube)   Wes Streeting on smacking

Historia.nu
Benito Mussolini valde makten framför ideologin

Historia.nu

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 62:14


Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) var diktator i Italien under åren 1924 till 1943. Han räknas som fascismens grundare, men Mussolini var framför allt intresserad av makten och hade inga problem att kompromissa med först socialistiska och senare fascistiska principer.Fascismen växte fram i växelspel med demokratiseringen av Italien. Det fanns också en besvikelse efter första världskriget, där Italien som förlorat 600 000 man i kriget, aldrig fick de landvinningar de tidigare lovats av Ententen. Fascisterna lovade ordning i ett all mer kaotiskt Italien med generalstrejk och politiskt våld. I det första avsnittet av två om fascistledaren Benito Mussolini samtalar programledaren Urban Lindstedt med Martin Hårdstedt, professor i historia vid Umeå universitet, om Benito Mussolini åren 1883-1936. Genom slughet och politisk teater i form av den berömda marschen mot Rom blev Benito Mussolini utnämnd till premiärminister i oktober 1922. Genom att ändra vallagarna lyckades han tillskansat sig diktatorisk makt i valet två år senare.Mussolini var en av två söner till en lärarinna och en socialistisk smed. Han kom att utbilda sig till lärare, men blev känd som journalist och chefredaktör för den socialistiska tidningen Avanti. Men när han tog ställning för att Italien borde gå med i första världskriget uteslöts han ur socialistpartiet.Mussolini sårades allvarligt vid en övning under första världskriget, som han deltog i 1915–17. Han återvände från kriget som övertygad antisocialist och bildade i Milano 1919 den första fascistiska föreningen, ”kampgruppen” fasci di combattimento.Trots att våldet fascinerade fascisterna blev Italien en betydligt mildare diktatur än lärjungen och beundraren Hitlers Nazityskland. Men Mussolinis ideologiska hållningslöshet, som underlättade vägen till makten, blev också hans fall. Alliansen med Adolf Hitler, som var långt ifrån självklar, och deltagande i andra världskriget, gjorde att Mussolini slutade upphäng upp-och-ner i en lyktstolpe den 28 april 1945.Lyssna också på Italiens dramatiska enande och Ingvar Kamprads fascistiska vän.Bild: Mussolini och Quadrumviri under marschen mot Rom 1922: från vänster till höger: Michele Bianchi, Emilio De Bono, Italo Balbo och Cesare Maria De Vecchi, Wikipedia, Public Domain. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/historianu-med-urban-lindstedt.

Current Affairs
The Life and Crimes of Winston Churchill

Current Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 55:24


Tariq Ali is the author of two dozen books and his career as a public intellectual and activist stretches back to the 1960s. His new book Winston Churchill: His Times, His Crimes is an effort to demolish the "Churchill myth" that has been built up since the Thatcher years. Ali demonstrates that Churchill was: - Not actually popular among the British public, who threw him out of office immediately at the end of World War II, and voted in the socialist Labour government instead- A virulent white supremacist whose core political beliefs were the violent maintenance of the British empire abroad and the suppression of class struggle at home- Not actually an opponent of fascism on principle, having highly praised Mussolini. Churchill saw the threat that Hitler posed to Europe but would happily tolerate far-right governments to stop the spread of Bolshevism- Responsible for hideous colonial atrocities such as the Bengal famineAli's book is not just a myth-busting biography of Churchill, but a history of imperialism and the British working class movement, and a case study in how falsified myths are used to justify the maintenance of the existing social order. Today, everyone from Boris Johnson to Volodymyr Zelensky invokes the Churchill of legend, but we need to understand the Churchill of historical fact, and face up to the horrors of the British empire and the way that powerful countries rationalize their misdeeds with appealing self-righteous rhetoric and the turning of morally repugnant rulers into saintly icons. A review of Ali's Winston Churchill has been published in Current Affairs here. Footage of the British public booing Churchill and chanting "We Want Labour!" can be found here.  

The Thought Leader Revolution Podcast | 10X Your Impact, Your Income & Your Influence
EP362 - The Hon. Tony Clement: Freedom Principles - From Politics To Business

The Thought Leader Revolution Podcast | 10X Your Impact, Your Income & Your Influence

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 55:06


“We have to be compassionate as conservatives. We have to show that we care what people are going through.”   In business, your message needs to be aimed at people who have an acute problem that needs to be solved. This same principle applies to politics and there are powerful examples of this from the last several decades. The Honourable Tony Clement came into politics in his mid-teens, when free choice and free markets were being threatened by the spread of communism, before the fall of the Soviet Union. As a member of the conservative party and minister of health and industry, Tony has always worked to protect individual freedom from big government. Tony believes that big government is now on the rise again.   Expert action steps: Never give up. It's about how you step up and face adversity. Hope is not a strategy. When you have goals in mind, you have to know how you're going to get things done. Have grace in your life. Be understanding. Be compassionate. Power is good but love and compassion are even more important. Go online and register as a conservative at conservative.ca.   Check out Tony's podcast, And Another Thing. https://www.andanotherthingpodcast.ca/.   eCircle is holding a live, in-person event!! Dare 2 Win - Own Your Freedom. May 13 & 14 at the Toronto Pan Pacific Hotel. Find more information and register at https://ecircleacademy.mykajabi.com/dare-2-win-home. Speakers include: Marc Von Musser - Sales Mastery Nicky Billou - Branding & Leadership Theresa Dugwell - Health & Fitness Brian Scudamore - Founder 1-800 Got Junk - Building Billion Dollar Brands Jean Taillon - How To Scale To A $100 Million Company Dan Hill - World-renowned Singer. #1 Hit "Sometimes When We Touch" Don Bentley - Nyt #1 Bestselling Author & Branding Expert Dr. Valerie Franc - Wellness & Anti-aging Danny Z777 - Motivation & Entrepreneurship Raymond Aaron - Branding   Visit eCircleAcademy.com and book a success call with Nicky to take your practice to the next level.

Bright Side
What Rita Montalcini Did to Get a Nobel Prize

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 12:28


The heroine of this story lived a very long life; the longest among Nobel prize winners. She was an amazing woman who became a scientist, despite her father's objection. Not even the cruel dictates of Mussolini would interfere with her intention to advance science.  Rita Levi-Montalcini was the most extravagant Nobel Prize winner, and one of only a few women who have done so. She lived to be 103 years old and devoted her whole life to science. She was a neurobiologist and brain specialist who gained international recognition and legendary fame, making history with science, despite all the obstacles she faced...  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Fritz Boyz Podcast
Ep. 33: Oskar Schindler

The Fritz Boyz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 130:40


The true story about the man behind Speilberg's Schindler's List!! This week the boyz examines the rise of Mussolini, Hitler, and the rise of The Third Reich, before diving into the life and questionable beginnings of Oskar Schindler, the man who would one day save 1,200 Jews from the gas chambers. It's another heavy one this week, but this one has a happy ending that might just remind you that there is still good in the world.

Antena Historia
La República de Saló, la caída de la Italia Fascista - Acceso anticipado - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Antena Historia

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 111:46


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Benito Mussolini había sido depuesto y arrestado, la Italia fascista se disolvía como un azucarillo en un café. Una operación por parte de los alemanes liberaba de nuevo al Duce, todavía quedaría el canto del cisne del fascismo italiano, La República Social Italiana (RSI), o como fue más conocida, La República de Saló Antena Historia te regala 30 días PREMIUM, para que lo disfrutes https://www.ivoox.com/premium?affiliate-code=b4688a50868967db9ca413741a54cea5 Produce Antonio Cruz Edita ANTENA HISTORIA 🔊Antena Historia (podcast) forma parte del sello iVoox Originals 🌐web……….https://antenahistoria.com/ 📧correo.....info@antenahistoria.com 🔵Facebook…..https://www.facebook.com/antenahistoria1 🔴Twitter…...https://twitter.com/AntenaHistoria ⚪Instagram...https://www.instagram.com/antenahistoria/ 🔷Telegram…...https://t.me/foroantenahistoria Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Booknotes+
Ep. 60 Deborah Cohen, "Last Call at the Hotel Imperial"

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 66:44


The book is called "Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War." The author is Deborah Cohen, a professor at Northwestern University. Prof. Cohen primarily focuses on four American journalists who traveled the world in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s: H.R. Knickerbocker, Vincent "Jimmy" Sheean, Dorothy Thompson, and John Gunther. These reporters landed exclusive interviews with Hitler, Mussolini, Nehru and Gandhi and helped shape what Americans at the time knew about the world.       Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Charter Cities Podcast
Charter Cities Atlas: Venice with Thibault Serlet and Corey Tazzara

Charter Cities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 141:33


Today's episode is a bonus episode, where we take a deep dive into the Italian Renaissance (with a focus on Venice) with world-renowned expert, Professor Corey Tazzara. From the fall of the Roman Empire to the formation of independent city-states, to the financial and political ramifications of the crusades, to the rise and fall of Venice as an economic powerhouse, this conversation has it all! We start at the beginning, with a comment on the role of the Middle Ages in the formation of society as it is today, and how the literature of the times contributed to the maintenance of the Roman Empire as a power. Despite this, there was decentralization across Europe in the 800s, and independent city-states arose. Rome regained its power from tourism and through regaining the seat of the papacy, while Florence formed the birthplace of the Renaissance through its art, culture, and adoption of investment banking. Milan became an authoritarian state, and we hear how the condottieri contributed to this. Unexpectedly, Genoa gained wealth in the loss of the War of Chioggia, while Venice was created from the marshes by refugees. The focus of the conversation shifts to the role of Venice in the Renaissance, and how it influenced society as we see it today. We learn how venture capital was created to profit from the Crusades, and how links to other cultures and societies benefitted the trade between Venice and the rest of Europe and the Middle East. Tune in to find out how the Venice of today differs from the Renaissance era Venice, and so much more, in this incredible discussion!   Key Points From This Episode:   •   Welcome to Corey Tazzara, professor of history at Scripps College and the world's leading expert on medieval and early modern freeports. •   Background into the decentralization of the Roman Empire, and why we owe today's society to the Middle Ages. •   How the literature of the Middle ages maintains the Roman Empire's power. •   The formation of independent city-states across Europe, and how they worked. •   The role of the papacy in reviving Roman law. •   What the 12th Century Renaissance is, and how it impacted the European economy. •   How the crusades altered the trade done at the port city-states: sea vs land travel. •   Why the Fourth Crusade was the first example of venture capital. •   The radical democracies that started in the Byzantine era across Italy. •   A quick tour of the major houses at play across the city-states in the 1300s. •   The revival of Rome: from the center of an empire to a tourism hotspot. •   How Florence became a republic, and why Corey feels it is the birthplace of the Renaissance. •   Why the adoption of investment banking fueled Florence's prosperity and the rise of the Medici family. •   Turning to Genoa: how the loss of the War of Chioggia lead to the gain of Western wealth in the centuries to come. •   The role of the condottieri in Milan's authoritarian government and war-based economy. •   Who Francesco Sforza was, and how he served as an example of the dangers of the condottieri to political powers. •   A few honorable mentions of other city-states that had tumultuous histories throughout the Renaissance. •   The formation of Venice: how it was formed, and why its history is so different from other city-states. •   The story of St. Mark's remains, why Mussolini hated the church of San Marco, and what these anecdotes say about Venice. •   Why Venice is the birthplace of investment banking and its role in the Fourth Crusade. •   How making Venice the gateway to the Levant drove up profit and Venetians who changed the world....

Radio La Pizarra
#RadioLaPizzara| Programa completo #181| 30 abril 2022

Radio La Pizarra

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 109:47


Análisis preelectoral de Colombia, Boric enfrenta sus primeras protestas, hablamos de los primeros viajes de presidentes, de Benito Mussolini en Cada loco con su tema y mucho más.

Radio La Pizarra
#CadaLocx| Benito Mussolini, dictador italiano| 30 abr 21

Radio La Pizarra

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 18:10


Crismar Lujano nos cuenta todo sobre el 'Duce', su origen socialista, sus cuestiones personales en torno a parejas y relaciones familiares, y mucho más.

We Have Ways of Making You Talk
Spies, Germans and Invading Malta

We Have Ways of Making You Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 60:43


Eighty years after Mussolini and Hitler discussed a plan to invade Malta, Al and James debate the chances of its success. Also, Al describes Neville Chamberlain's unorthodox domestic espionage and James reports from a remarkable trip to Dresden.A Goalhanger Films productionProduced by Harry LinekerExec Producer: Tony PastorTwitter: #WeHaveWays @WeHaveWaysPodWebsite: www.wehavewayspod.comEmail: wehavewayspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr
Episode 366-Interview with Brandon Gauthier about his book Before Evil

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 71:07


Professor Brandon Gauthier comes on to discuss his book Before Evil, where he examines the making of 20th Century's greatest tyrants. He reminds us to never forget that the world's monsters are humans too, with dreams, fears, ambitions and childhoods. That they were the hero in their own story. Stalin was trying to bring Russia up to date, Hitler was carving out an empire for himself and the German people, Mussolini wanted to be great and at the head of a new roman empire. And Mao wanted to bring order to the chaos around him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Fundación Juan March
Presentación por Fernando Lara: "Premio de belleza" (1930) de Augusto Genina

Fundación Juan March

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 28:49


Cine en la Fundación: Los orígenes del cine musical (VIII). Presentación de "Premio de belleza" (1930) de Augusto Genina. Fernando Lara. Premio de belleza (Prix de beauté, 1930, Francia) de Augusto Genina, con Louise Brooks, Georges Charlia, Jean Bradin y Fanny Clair (88') Presentación: Fernando Lara La mecanógrafa Lulu Garnier decide enviar su fotografía para participar en el concurso de belleza de Miss Francia, a pesar de que su novio André desprecia ese tipo de certámenes. La joven comienza así una fulgurante carrera hacia el estrellato, al tiempo que se arriesga a perder su relación con André. Miss Europa es uno de los primeros ejemplos del sonoro francés, pero en el fondo sus raíces son marcadamente internacionales. Aunque fue dirigida por Augusto Genina (cineasta italiano afincado en Francia, y firmante de cintas propagandísticas para el fascismo de Mussolini), su guion lo firmaron dos directores clave del cine galo y alemán, respectivamente: René Clair (Bajo los techos de París) y G. W. Pabst (Bajo la máscara del placer). El sábado se proyecta el vídeo de la presentación del día anterior. Explore en canal.march.es el archivo completo de Conferencias en la Fundación Juan March: casi 3.000 conferencias, disponibles en audio, impartidas desde 1975.

Prevail with Greg Olear
Strongmen as Young Men (with Brandon Gauthier)

Prevail with Greg Olear

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 74:06


Should we humanize the inhumane? Brandon Gauthier, author of the new book “Before Evil: Young Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao, and Kim,” talks to Greg Olear about his travels to North Korea and his impetus for writing the book, and shares incredible stories about Hitler, Mao, and Lenin as young men. Plus: a new Nashville Twitter alternative. Follow Brandon Gauthier: https://twitter.com/bk_gauthier Buy his book: https://www.amazon.com/Before-Evil-Hitler-Stalin-Mussolini/dp/1948954613 Subscribe to The Jordan Harbinger Show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, wherever you listen or at jordanharbinger.com/subscribe Subscribe to the PREVAIL newsletter: https://gregolear.substack.com/about

Tatort Geschichte - True Crime meets History
Mussolini ante portas: Der Marsch auf Rom 1922

Tatort Geschichte - True Crime meets History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 47:07


Im Oktober 1922 steht die italienische Hauptstadt Rom kurz vor der Belagerung. Nicht jedoch von einer feindlichen ausländischen Armee, sondern von ca. 50.000 gewaltbereiten Schwarzhemden, auf Italienisch Squadristi, die auf den Befehl eines Mannes hören: Benito Mussolini. Er ist der Anführer einer Bewegung, die Europa und die Welt verändern wird. Und er hat einen weiten Weg zurückgelegt, vom Grundschullehrer zum Sozialisten und schließlich zum ersten Faschisten der Geschichte.

La Hora de la Verdad
Hoy en la Historia abril 28 de 2022

La Hora de la Verdad

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 7:17


En Hoy en la Historia recordando que el 28 de abril 1945, en Dongo (localidad del norte de Italia) son ejecutados Benito Mussolini y su amante, Clara Petacci.

Les Grands Récits
Pollastro - Girardengo, le bandit de légende et le premier Campionissimo

Les Grands Récits

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 33:22


LES GRANDS RÉCITS - Si Eddy Merckx l'a dépossédé du record dans les années 70, Costante Girardengo reste une légende de Milan - Sanremo avec ses six victoires au sortir de la Première Guerre mondiale. Il fut même le tout premier "Campionissimo" de l'histoire du cyclisme italien. Mais son histoire, c'est aussi celle de son amitié avec Sante Pollastro, le bandit ennemi juré de Mussolini.Ecrit par BENOIT VITTEKRaconté par Florian BAYOUXMonté par CELIA BRONDEAUProduit par BABABAMVous aimez Les Grands Récits ? Abonnez-vous sur Apple Podcasts et soyez alerté lors de la publication des nouveaux épisodes chaque semaine. Ecoutez d'autres épisodes des Grands Récits :Perdu sur les parquets, disparu dans les abysses : la vie et la fin tragiques de Bison DeleKen Norton, l'homme qui a brisé la mâchoire d'AliSurvivant du Titanic et roi de l'US Open, le destin pas commun de Dick WilliamsDaniel Elena, le roi d'à côtéEverton - Liverpool, le faux derby de l'amitié Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Penguin Audio
Audiolibro: "La orden" de John Dickie

Penguin Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 4:51


Esta es una muestra de "La orden". La versión completa tiene una duración total de 15 h 15 min. Encuentra este audiolibro completo en: https://bit.ly/laorden-audiolibroNarrado por: Germán GijónAunque la masonería esté envuelta en un halo de misterio, su historia la pueblan algunas de las personas más importantes de los últimos siglos, como Churchill, Disney, Mozart, Franklin o Kipling. Fundada en Londres en 1717 con una clara vocación de hermanamiento entre hombres, la Orden se expandió con rapidez. Durante el mandato de George Washington, se convirtió en el credo de la nueva nación americana. Tanto la Iglesia mormona como la mafia siciliana le deben sus orígenes. Y para Hitler, Mussolini y Franco fue una absoluta obsesión aplastar a estas redes y a sus miembros, que percibían como adoradores del diablo. En este libro, John Dickie realiza una fascinante exploración de un movimiento cuya influencia no solo fue clave en la forja de la sociedad moderna, sino que se extiende hasta el presente. Con más de seis millones de miembros en todo el mundo, comprender hoy el papel de la masonería en la historia es fundamental. La crítica ha dicho:«Un libro magnífico que se lee como una novela de aventuras. La investigación es asombrosa, pero lo que destaca en este libro es la comprensión visceral del autor de lo que constituye una buena historia».The Times «Un relato fascinante. Dickie ha convertido la leyenda en historia».The Economist «John Dickie aborda el tema con una prosa irónica, el juicio frío de un buen historiador y una mirada amplia y penetrante».Sunday Times «Convincente y entretenido».The Wall Street Journal «Una obra arrolladora, sintética, finamente elaborada y de fresca concepción».Literary Review «Una historia de la modernidad en la sombra. Ingeniosa y extraña. Bien elaborada y sensata».The Spectator© 2022, Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S. A. U.#penguinaudio #audiolibro #audiolibros #dickie #johndickie See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Big Gay Podcast from Puglia
LGBT+ History Month Italia

The Big Gay Podcast from Puglia

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 30:36


As Italy's first ever LGBT+ History Month draws to an end we speak to one of its co-founders and organisers, Alessio Ponzio. Alessio talks about Italy's fascinating queer history. From the decriminalisation of homosexuality in the late 19th century that led to Italy becoming a destination for same sex tourism to the reshaping of men and Italian masculinity in the second half of the 1930s under Mussolini's fascist regime We also consider Puglia's dark history. In 1939 gay men were sent to an internment camp on the beautiful Island of San Domino in the Tremiti Islands, where they suffered harsh conditions. Mussolini unwittingly created Italy's first openly gay community. Find out more about LGBT+ History Month Italia on their website. More information about the podcast episode and links to futher information can be found on our podcast page for this episode.

Intergenerational Politics
135: Ruth Ben-Ghiat

Intergenerational Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 51:57


Jill and Victor are joined by Professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an expert on the politics and history of strongmen and authoritarians from Mussolini through Trump and Putin.  They discuss how these leaders play to toxic hypermasculinity, and use grievance politics, propaganda, and kompromat to take power and maintain control.  She also emphasizes the need for prosecution and justice, then explains what happens when they fall. Get More From Professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat: Twitter | NYU | Website | Substack | Author of “Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present” & Other Books Get More From Victor and Jill:  Jill Wine-Banks: Twitter | Facebook | Website | Author of The Watergate Girl: My Fight For Truth & Justice Against A Criminal President | iGen Politics Victor Shi: Twitter |Medium | Blog w/Jill Wine-Banks |  Former Biden Delegate: @Bideninaugural | iGen Politics Email iGen Politics at igp@politicon.com Or tweet using #iGenPolitics

History Daily
The Capture of Benito Mussolini

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 22:34


April 27, 1945. Benito Mussolini is captured by Italian resistance fighters, marking the end of his twenty-three year Fascist regime. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

On Point
What happens to women's rights when democracy backslides

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 47:15


From Nazi Germany to Mussolini's Italy, fascists worked to repress the rights of women by restricting education and abortion rights. Now, there are echoes of that past again. Anne Wingenter and Erica Chenoweth join Meghna Chakrabarti.

A History of Italy » Podcast
F100: Before Evil - Interview with Brandon Gauthier on Benito Mussolini

A History of Italy » Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 42:12


As we finish celebrating the 77th anniversary of our liberation from the Fascist government and Nazi occupiers, I talk to author Brandon Gauthier about his new book, which explores the early lives of notirious dictators such as Hitler, Stalin and Kim.

THE STANDARD Podcast
8 Minute History EP.112 อิตาลีภายใต้เผด็จการ Benito Mussolini แห่งพรรคฟาสซิสต์

THE STANDARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 17:40


เอพิโสดนี้จะพาย้อนรอยประวัติศาสตร์อิตาลี ในฐานะรัฐชาติภายใต้การนำของเผด็จการมุสโสลินี ที่ต้องการเดินหน้าสร้างความยิ่งใหญ่ของฟาสซิสต์ ผ่านการปลุกเร้าประชาชน และสร้างความหวังในการที่จะพาอิตาลีให้ยิ่งใหญ่เสมือนเป็นจักรวรรดิโรมันที่ 2 กระบวนการรวมอิตาลี หรือ ‘Risorgimento' กินเวลายาวนานหลายสิบปี จนกระทั่งมุสโสลินีสามารถรวบอำนาจเบ็ดเสร็จ สถาปนาอิตาลีเป็นระะบอบการเมืองพรรคเดียวเด็ดขาดโดยมีกษัตริย์เป็นประมุขได้ในที่สุด รายละเอียดการก่อตั้งราชอาณาจักรอิตาลีจะเป็นอย่างไรบ้าง ติดตามได้ในเอพิโสดนี้

Supertanker
Supertanker: Mand dig op og bliv en stærk og rigtig statsleder

Supertanker

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 56:12


Bertolt Brecht skrev: "Ulykkeligt er det land der ikke føder nogen helt" - "Nej, ulykkeligt er det land der har brug for en helt". Vi har set dem i historien og vi ser dem i dag. Stærke mænd der fremstiller sig selv som helte, som Stærke Mænd, i deres statslederroller; Stalin, Mussolini, Bolsonaro, Trump og Putin. De bestiger hesten i bar overkrop, flexer musklerne og rider ud for at tage affære. Og de omtaler deres modstandere som "tøser" eller kvindagtige for at nedgøre dem og derved give sig selv magt og status. Medvirkende: Kathrine Bjerg Bennike Ph.d. i køn og militære identiteter, AAU. Mikkel Thorup professor i idéhistorie, AU. Bettina Ohlsen: tilrettelægger. Astrid Pedersen: tilrettelægger. Carsten Ortmann: tilrettelægger og vært.

The Windsurfing Podcast
#53 – Alex Mussolini - Pro Windsurfing is Dying!!

The Windsurfing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 75:44


This week we get the inside scoop from Ex PWA tour rider and world tour challenger – Alex Mussolini

História em Meia Hora

A origem do fascismo está num socialista? Separe trinta minutos do seu dia e aprenda com o professor Vítor Soares (@profvitorsoares) sobre quem foi Benito Mussolini. Se você quiser ter acesso a episódios exclusivos e quiser ajudar o História em Meia Hora a continuar de pé, clique no link: www.apoia.se/historiaemmeiahora - PIX e contato: historiaemmeiahora@gmail.com Apresentação: Prof. Vítor Soares Roteiro: Prof. Vítor Soares e Prof. Victor Alexandre (@profvictoralexandre) Edição: Victor Portugal. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historiaemmeiahora/support

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it Resolved: it's time we cancelled Winston Churchill

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 45:39


In 2002, Winston Churchill was voted the greatest Briton who ever lived, beating Darwin, Shakespeare and Elizabeth I to take the top spot. Just 18 years later, a statue of the former British Prime Minister was defaced in London, spray painted with the words “Churchill was a racist”. As the west reckons with the misdeeds of history's heroes, Winston Churchill's long-time critics are eager to shine a spotlight on his dark past. To them, he was a racist, imperialist warmonger whose bombastic speeches during World War II have overshadowed the atrocities he oversaw during his decades in government: from using excessive force to crush dissent at home, to carpet bombing German cities during the war, to his role in the 1943 Bengal famine that killed 3 million Indians, his disregard for the suffering of others and penchant for violence has left a dangerous legacy. An advocate for British colonial rule, a well-known racist, and an admirer of Mussolini did not deserve praise when he was alive, and he certainly does not now. Churchill's supporters, meanwhile, regard him as a wartime hero whose bravery and leadership during Britain's darkest hour saved the country and western civilization. Churchill's powerful rhetoric inspired his countrymen to fight the Nazis when the rest of Europe had surrendered to Hitler's army. Domestically, he reformed Britain's prison system, introduced a minimum wage and improved social welfare systems. Like every hero in history, they argue, Churchill made mistakes. But his extraordinary leadership helped save western democracy, proving himself to be worthy of every accolade, every statue, and every memorial dedicated in his memory.  Arguing for the  motion is Geoffrey Wheatcroft, author Churchill's Shadow: An Astonishing Life and a Dangerous Legacy Arguing against the motion is Michael F. Bishop, writer, historian, and the former Executive Director of the International Churchill Society. SOURCES:  Dr. Shashi Tharoor Official, Politics and Prose, The international churchill society, Channel 4 News   The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events.This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ Senior Producer: Ricki Gurwitz Editor: Reza Dahya

History Author Show
Deborah Cohen – Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War

History Author Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 52:59


   April 18, 2022 - If a group of World War Two-era journalists invited you out for drinks, ready to open up about their interviews with everyone from Gandhi and Neru to Mussolini and Hitler, what would say? Readers get that opportunity with Deborah Cohen who brings us Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War. In this episode, our time machine welcomes aboard journalists John Gunther, H. R. Knickerbocker, Vincent Sheean, and Dorothy Thompson, who have do their job before and during the war, confronting the likes of Hitler and Mussolini, but also isolationist forces who think dictators might not be so bad. Deborah Cohen is the author of The War Come Home: Disabled Veterans in Britain and Germany, 1914-1939, Household Gods: The British and Their Possessions, and Family Secrets. She is also the Richard W. Leopold Professor of History at Northwestern University, focusing on modern Europe. Visit her at DeborahCohen.com or @DeborahACohen on Twitter. Special thanks to Cara Robertson for sending this great book our way. In our archives, you can listen to Cara chatting about her book The Trial of Lizzie Borden: A True Story.

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: "Guilty Men" and the long slow US escalation to World War, 1939 and 2022? H.J. Mackinder, International Relations #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 22:05


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Ukraine: "Guilty Men" and the long slow US escalation to World War, 1939 and 2022? H.J. Mackinder, International Relations #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety In his preface to the 1998 reissue, Michael Foot wrote, 'Guilty Men was conceived by three London journalists who had formed the habit of meeting on the roof of the Evening Standard offices in Shoe Lane, Fleet Street, just after the the afternoon paper had been put to bed and, maybe, just before the Two Brewers opened across the road.' The book's genesis and publication could hardly have been swifter. Its writing took four days from the 1st to the 4th June 1940: it was published on the 5th July. It is an angry book, indeed, a devastatingly effective polemic. Its target was the appeasers of the 1930s, the leading culprits being Baldwin, Chamberlain and Halifax who had left the country so ill-prepared, and who, by their pusillanimity, had emboldened Hitler and Mussolini; and in the case of the last two still favoured some accommodation with the fascist dictators. In today's parlance, it would be called a wake-up call. It was very successful selling about 200,000 copies.  Kenneth Morgan, Michael Foot's biographer, describes the book as consisting of 'a series of brief vignettes of key episodes or personalities, the latter invariably foolish or dishonest.' Michael Foot wrote eight of the chapters, the first and most powerful one being on Dunkirk.  Although Michael Foot was the main contributor, and the one who suggested 'Cato' as the umbrella pseudonym, the other two, as Michael Foot would be the first to admit, Peter Howard and Frank Own should not be forgotten. 

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr
Episode 364-Mussolini's PR Nightmare

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 27:47


As 1942 opens up the Axis have the upper hand. Still, those in London make plans to invade Sicily. What follows only fills up Davie Jones' locker all the more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Russian Rulers History Podcast
Episode 216 - Before Evil - An Interview with Author Brandon Gauthier about Young Lenin and Stalin

Russian Rulers History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 45:28


Today, I interview the author of the book Before Evil- Young Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao, and Kim, Brandon Gauthier. Professor Gauthier and I have a spirited discussion about what made Lenin and Stalin the monsters they were to become

La ContraHistoria
La Italia fascista

La ContraHistoria

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 70:24


El 23 de marzo de 1919 Benito Mussolini, un veterano de la primera guerra mundial que antes había ejercido como periodista de varias publicaciones de izquierdas, fundó los “Fasci Italiani di Combattimento” (Fasces Italianas de Combate), una organización nacionalista que aseguraba que los aliados de la Triple Entente, en cuyas filas había luchado Italia durante la guerra, les habían robado la victoria. El movimiento nacía en un momento especialmente convulso. Los dos años que siguieron al final de la guerra fueron muy difíciles en Italia. Se sucedieron las huelgas obreras y en algunas zonas del país se llegaron a ocupar tierras y fábricas. En ciudades como Milán se constituyeron incluso consejos obreros a imagen y semejanza de los soviets que habían provocado poco antes la revolución de octubre en Rusia. Los “Fasci Italiani di Combattimento” de Mussolini explotaron con éxito la situación excitando los ánimos de los nacionalistas italianos y de una burguesía que se sentía acogotada ante lo que parecía una reedición de la revolución bolchevique. En 1922 ese primer movimiento ya se había convertido en un partido, el Partido Nacional Fascista, y tenía apetitos de poder. Mussolini organizó una marcha sobre la capital con unos 30.000 hombres ataviados con camisas negras alegando que los fascistas eran los únicos capaces de garantizar la ley y el orden. Una vez en Roma los fascistas exigieron la dimisión del primer ministro y que ese puesto fuese ocupado por Mussolini. El rey Víctor Manuel III accedió y entregó el poder a Mussolini con la esperanza puesta en que el sistema domaría sus ímpetus y terminaría por fagocitar a los propios fascistas. Pero no sucedió nada de eso. Mussolini no tardó mucho en hacerse con el control del parlamento y luego fue desmontando poco a poco la frágil democracia italiana. Sobre el nació un nuevo régimen que rompía por completo con el sistema liberal parlamentario que había caracterizado a la Italia reunificada desde sus orígenes en 1861. Todos los partidos políticos fueron prohibidos y se eliminó el propio parlamento, que fue sustituido por el denominado Gran Consejo del Fascismo, una cámara monocolor designada por el propio Mussolini. Libertades típicamente burguesas como la de expresión, prensa y asociación también desaparecieron. A pesar de que Mussolini había convertido su país en una dictadura, la Italia fascista se puso de moda en la escena internacional durante parte de los años 20 y los años 30. Mussolini llegó a ser muy popular en Italia y también en el extranjero. Muchos le veían como un reformador y el régimen que había creado pronto encontró imitadores en otros países de Europa como España, Rumanía o Alemania. El fascismo se veía entonces como algo moderno que acababa con el liberalismo decimonónico y cerraba el paso a revoluciones comunistas como la rusa. En el exterior Mussolini desplegó una activa política exterior porque quería reconstruir de forma un tanto fantasiosa el imperio romano y transformar Italia en una potencia colonial. Lo primero nunca estuvo en su mano, lo segundo lo intentó con la invasión de Etiopía, una campaña que ocasionó una gran crisis internacional. Los nazis alemanes se inspiraron en la estética fascista. Hitler admiraba a Mussolini y le consideraba el precursor de su propio movimiento. Los dos regímenes se hermanaron y fueron juntos a la guerra a partir de 1940. Eso marcaría el final de la Italia fascista y del propio fascismo, que sucumbió en 1943 poco después de que los aliados desembarcasen en el sur de Italia. Hoy en La ContraHistoria vamos a profundizar en estos años de la historia de Italia para entender qué fue este movimiento que tanta influencia tuvo en toda Europa, cómo nació, cómo se desarrolló y por qué desapareció con la guerra. Para guiarnos visita el programa por primera vez (advierto ya que no será la última) Aitor Aurrekoetxea, profesor de la Universidad del País Vasco y todo un experto en esta materia. >>> “La ContraHistoria de España. Auge, caída y vuelta a empezar de un país en 28 episodios”… https://amzn.to/3kXcZ6i Bibliografía: - "El fascismo" de Stanley G. Payne - https://amzn.to/3O80LEu - "El fascismo y la marcha sobre Roma" de Emilio Gentile - https://amzn.to/3JLWWBs - "Mussolini y el fascismo italiano" de Álvaro Lozano - https://amzn.to/3JHXicf - "La guerra de Mussolini" de John Gooch - https://amzn.to/3KChFsJ - "Duce! Duce!: Ascenso y caída de Benito Mussolini" de Richard Collier - https://amzn.to/37gXfqN Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

The Bulwark Podcast
Ruth Ben-Ghiat: Fascism 2.0

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 43:35


Like Hitler and Mussolini before him, Putin's acting with hubris and arrogance because he's been in power for too long. And to save face, he'll likely escalate his terror tactics in Ukraine. Today, the amorality of strongmen — including Trump. Ruth Ben-Ghiat joins Charlie Sykes. Bulwark+ members can access an ad-free version of this show and carry on the conservation we started today over on the site at https://bulwarkpodcast.thebulwark.com/. Try a Bulwark+ membership FREE for the next 30 days at thebulwark.com/charlie.

Thinking Allowed
Strongmen

Thinking Allowed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 27:56


Strongmen – what accounts for the global rise of authoritarian leaders? Laurie Taylor talks to Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University, and analyst of the blueprint which autocratic demagogues, from Mussolini to Putin, have followed over the past 100 years. What lessons might be learned to prevent disastrous rule in the future? They're joined by Christophe Jaffrelot, Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at King's College, London, whose recent study of Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India, examines how a popularly elected leader has pursued Hindu nationalist policies, steering the world's largest democracy towards further ethnic strife and intolerance, according to many observers. Producer: Jayne Egerton

Rogues Gallery Uncovered
You Dirty,Dirty Rat - Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel 1947

Rogues Gallery Uncovered

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 15:53


Charming the dames, killing the opposition and taking care of business with the 1930s most glamorous gangster - "Bugsy" Siegel.Its a tale of Hollywood extravagance, contract killing, high society and the birth of Las Vegas.What happened when "Bugsy" caught someone cheating at cards?What did he try to sell Benito Mussolini?Why was his girlfriend so popular?Who was the only actor who stood up to him?All the answers and more to be found in episode 17 of Rogues Gallery Uncovered - the podcast of bad behaviour in period costume.This podcast has just reached 10,000 downloads - thank you to all "Lovable Rogues"Visit the new online store HEREEmail me at simon@roguesgalleryonline.com  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/RoguesGallery)

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: French Presidential Election 2022: A Warning To All Democratic Nations?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 3:36


The early results in the French presidential election have exposed seismic shifts in the political culture of France, shifts that are good news for Putin but a wake-up call for those leaders who don't get what it takes to get an economy to grow. Steve Forbes on the first-round results in France's election and why these results should sound alarms and be a warning to all Democratic nations.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.