Podcasts about Iron Curtain

Term symbolizing the ideological-political conflict and physical boundary dividing Europe during the Cold War

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Iron Curtain

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Best podcasts about Iron Curtain

Latest podcast episodes about Iron Curtain

Global News Podcast
Indonesia football crush: President visits victims of stadium tragedy

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 26:45


Joko Widodo orders an audit of all the country's football stadiums. Also: Somalia is in the grip of the worst drought in 40 years; and is Russia's illegal annexation of eastern Ukraine creating a new Iron Curtain?

On the Holocaust - Yad Vashem
The Story of the Minsk Ghetto: Establishment and Unceasing Terror [On the Holocaust]

On the Holocaust - Yad Vashem

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 30:24


The Minsk Ghetto was the fourth-largest ghetto, but for many reasons, its story is virtually unknown. Most of the witnesses and testimonies relating to it remained behind the Iron Curtain for many years, or their words remained sealed in archives that were only recently opened. This is not a story about “another ghetto.” The Minsk Ghetto was unique in many respects: its location within the Soviet Union; its population, the majority Sovietized Jews who were joined by refugees from Poland and deportees from the Reich; and the strong underground that operated in the ghetto almost from its inception. This time on “On the Holocaust,” we will devote two episodes to the story of the Minsk Ghetto.Featured guest: Dr. Daniel Romanovsky, historian and researcher at Yad Vashem's International Institute for Holocaust Research.

כל תכני עושים היסטוריה
The Story of the Minsk Ghetto: Establishment and Unceasing Terror [On the Holocaust]

כל תכני עושים היסטוריה

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 30:24


The Minsk Ghetto was the fourth-largest ghetto, but for many reasons, its story is virtually unknown. Most of the witnesses and testimonies relating to it remained behind the Iron Curtain for many years, or their words remained sealed in archives that were only recently opened. This is not a story about “another ghetto.” The Minsk Ghetto was unique in many respects: its location within the Soviet Union; its population, the majority Sovietized Jews who were joined by refugees from Poland and deportees from the Reich; and the strong underground that operated in the ghetto almost from its inception. This time on “On the Holocaust,” we will devote two episodes to the story of the Minsk Ghetto.Featured guest: Dr. Daniel Romanovsky, historian and researcher at Yad Vashem's International Institute for Holocaust Research.

New Books in National Security
Sean Brennan, "The KGB and the Vatican: Secrets of the Mitrokhin Files" (CUA Press, 2022)

New Books in National Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 57:47


One of the greatest ironies of the history of Soviet rule is that, for an officially atheistic state, those in the political police and in the Politburo devoted an enormous amount of time and attention to the question of religion. The Soviet government's policies toward religious institutions in the USSR, and toward religious institutions in the non-Communist world, reflected this, especially when it came to the Vatican and Catholic Churches, both the Latin and Byzantine Rite, in Soviet territory. The KGB and the Vatican consists of the transcripts of KGB records concerning the policies of the Soviet secret police towards the Vatican and the Catholic Church in the Communist world, transcripts provided by KGB archivist and defector Vasili Mitrokhin, from the Second Vatican Council to the election of John Paul II. Among the topics covered include how the Soviet regime viewed the efforts of John XXIII and Paul VI of reaching out to eastern side of the Iron Curtain, the experience of the Roman Catholic Church in Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic and the underground Greek Catholic Church in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the religious underground in the key cities of Leningrad and Moscow, and finally the election of John Paul II and its effect on the tumultuous events in Poland in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This valuable primary source collection also contains a historical introduction written by the translator, Sean Brennan, a professor of History at the University of Scranton. Allison Isidore is a Religious Studies Ph.D. student at the University of Iowa and is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/national-security

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Sean Brennan, "The KGB and the Vatican: Secrets of the Mitrokhin Files" (CUA Press, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 57:47


One of the greatest ironies of the history of Soviet rule is that, for an officially atheistic state, those in the political police and in the Politburo devoted an enormous amount of time and attention to the question of religion. The Soviet government's policies toward religious institutions in the USSR, and toward religious institutions in the non-Communist world, reflected this, especially when it came to the Vatican and Catholic Churches, both the Latin and Byzantine Rite, in Soviet territory. The KGB and the Vatican consists of the transcripts of KGB records concerning the policies of the Soviet secret police towards the Vatican and the Catholic Church in the Communist world, transcripts provided by KGB archivist and defector Vasili Mitrokhin, from the Second Vatican Council to the election of John Paul II. Among the topics covered include how the Soviet regime viewed the efforts of John XXIII and Paul VI of reaching out to eastern side of the Iron Curtain, the experience of the Roman Catholic Church in Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic and the underground Greek Catholic Church in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the religious underground in the key cities of Leningrad and Moscow, and finally the election of John Paul II and its effect on the tumultuous events in Poland in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This valuable primary source collection also contains a historical introduction written by the translator, Sean Brennan, a professor of History at the University of Scranton. Allison Isidore is a Religious Studies Ph.D. student at the University of Iowa and is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in History
Sean Brennan, "The KGB and the Vatican: Secrets of the Mitrokhin Files" (CUA Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 57:47


One of the greatest ironies of the history of Soviet rule is that, for an officially atheistic state, those in the political police and in the Politburo devoted an enormous amount of time and attention to the question of religion. The Soviet government's policies toward religious institutions in the USSR, and toward religious institutions in the non-Communist world, reflected this, especially when it came to the Vatican and Catholic Churches, both the Latin and Byzantine Rite, in Soviet territory. The KGB and the Vatican consists of the transcripts of KGB records concerning the policies of the Soviet secret police towards the Vatican and the Catholic Church in the Communist world, transcripts provided by KGB archivist and defector Vasili Mitrokhin, from the Second Vatican Council to the election of John Paul II. Among the topics covered include how the Soviet regime viewed the efforts of John XXIII and Paul VI of reaching out to eastern side of the Iron Curtain, the experience of the Roman Catholic Church in Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic and the underground Greek Catholic Church in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the religious underground in the key cities of Leningrad and Moscow, and finally the election of John Paul II and its effect on the tumultuous events in Poland in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This valuable primary source collection also contains a historical introduction written by the translator, Sean Brennan, a professor of History at the University of Scranton. Allison Isidore is a Religious Studies Ph.D. student at the University of Iowa and is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Sean Brennan, "The KGB and the Vatican: Secrets of the Mitrokhin Files" (CUA Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 57:47


One of the greatest ironies of the history of Soviet rule is that, for an officially atheistic state, those in the political police and in the Politburo devoted an enormous amount of time and attention to the question of religion. The Soviet government's policies toward religious institutions in the USSR, and toward religious institutions in the non-Communist world, reflected this, especially when it came to the Vatican and Catholic Churches, both the Latin and Byzantine Rite, in Soviet territory. The KGB and the Vatican consists of the transcripts of KGB records concerning the policies of the Soviet secret police towards the Vatican and the Catholic Church in the Communist world, transcripts provided by KGB archivist and defector Vasili Mitrokhin, from the Second Vatican Council to the election of John Paul II. Among the topics covered include how the Soviet regime viewed the efforts of John XXIII and Paul VI of reaching out to eastern side of the Iron Curtain, the experience of the Roman Catholic Church in Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic and the underground Greek Catholic Church in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the religious underground in the key cities of Leningrad and Moscow, and finally the election of John Paul II and its effect on the tumultuous events in Poland in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This valuable primary source collection also contains a historical introduction written by the translator, Sean Brennan, a professor of History at the University of Scranton. Allison Isidore is a Religious Studies Ph.D. student at the University of Iowa and is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Finding Sustainability Podcast
IJC#8: Blockchain networks as knowledge commons with Ilia Murtazashvili

Finding Sustainability Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 34:41


Listen to a conversation that Frank van Laerhoven had with Ilia Murtazashvili. Together with Jennifer Brick Murtazashvili, Martin Weiss, and Michael Madison, Ilia co-authored a recent IJC publication entitled Blockchain networks as knowledge commons. Block chains are distributed append-only ledgers. The purpose of blockchains is to share resources – that is, knowledge, data and opportunities to use outputs created by networks. Knowledge commons are characterized by (i) the production of knowledge and information via one or more modes of action, (ii) institutions and other formal and informal structures for sharing these knowledge- and information resources, and (iii) governance processes that depend significantly on openness. In their article, Ilia and his colleagues convincingly show the usefulness of approaching block chain networks as knowledge commons as they rely on collectively managed technologies to pool distributed information. Ilia is affiliated with the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburg. Apart from an interest in block chain and knowledge commons, he is interested in American political development and the challenges of public administration and focuses his research on the relationship governance and legal titling in the developing world. Using the American frontier as an example, he investigates current challenges developing countries face, and how they can improve their prospects for economic development and political stability. In case you want to learn more about topics akin to the topic discussed in this episode, may we suggest you check out some of the other titles in the International Journal of the Commons that look at technology-dependent and knowledge commons, such as: Berge, E., & Kranakis, E. (2011). Technology-dependent commons: The radio spectrum. International Journal of the Commons, 5(1). Henrich-Franke, C. (2011). Property Rights on a Cold War battlefield: managing broadcasting transmissions through the Iron Curtain. International Journal of the Commons, 5(1). Schweik, C., & English, R. (2013). Preliminary steps toward a general theory of internet-based collective-action in digital information commons: Findings from a study of open source software projects. International Journal of the Commons, 7(2). Sen, A., Atkisson, C., & Schweik, C. (2022). Cui Bono: Do open source software incubator policies and procedures benefit the projects or the incubator?. International Journal of the Commons, 16(1). Wormbs, N. (2011). Technology-dependent commons: The example of frequency spectrum for broadcasting in Europe in the 1920s. International Journal of the Commons, 5(1).

The Health Design Podcast
Ryan Prior, Patient Advocate.

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 32:52


Ryan Prior covered health, science, and wellness during the Covid-19 pandemic as a journalist based at CNN's World Headquarters in Atlanta. He specializes in feature writing, going deep with characters who are on a mission, and who have a message for all of us. He is fascinated by figures, large and small, who dedicate their lives to changing our world, profiling Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi, legendary journalist Ted Koppel, and New York Times bestselling author Stephanie Land, to name a few. He is most passionate about writing on politics, foreign affairs, health, and science. In 2019, Prior wrote about a college dropout, bedridden for 11 years, who went on to invent a new surgery and cure himself. The story received the highest engagement of any story published by CNN in 2019, and the third-highest for all online news outlets, according to Chartbeat. Prior has walked along the Berlin Wall interviewing an artist who transformed the symbol of the Iron Curtain into the world's longest art gallery. He stood on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange, where he interviewed entrepreneurs at the top 50 companies in the world with founders under 26. He walked the campaign trail filming Jon Ossoff, as the candidate sought victory in the most expensive House race in history. And he became a producer of the "Young People Who Rock" video series, which highlights young idealists seeking to change the world. In 2021 he was named a Journalist Law School Fellow and in 2019 he was selected for a RIAS Fellowship, traveling with American journalists to meet with EU, NATO, and German officials in Brussels, Prague, and Berlin. He is a five-time Stanford Medicine X ePatient Scholar. And he sits on the board of directors of the #MEAction Network. Prior started as a News Assistant at CNN in 2015. He has published stories for CNN's US, World, Business, Health, Style, Travel, Tech, Politics, Impact Your World, and Freedom Project sections. Prior to joining CNN, he directed, produced, and wrote a feature-length documentary called "Forgotten Plague," which the Huffington Post called a "Must-See Documentary." He has also written for the Daily Beast and USA Today. While a student at the University of Georgia, he co-founded the Georgia Political Review and served as editor-in-chief. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from UGA with degrees in English and international affairs, and was recently named to the school's 40 Under 40 list for 2018. His book, The Long Haul: Solving the Puzzle of the Pandemic's Long Haulers and How They Are Changing Healthcare Forever, is out November 15, 2022 through Post Hill Press/Simon & Schuster.

Countermelody
Episode 163. Season Four Preview

Countermelody

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 84:28


Today Countermelody is in limbo: balanced between Seasons Three and Four. Over the past few months I've been planning the course of the upcoming season and this episode consists of musical tidbits (bocconcini, if you will) of some of the singers and themed series that I am planning for Season Four. Included are retrospectives of singers Judith Raskin, Roberta Alexander, Sammy Davis, Jr., Helen Donath, Hugues Cuénod, Anna Moffo, Denise Duval, and Nicolai Gedda, all of whom are “sampled” today. I'm also planning programs on; “Great Singers We've Never Heard Of;” the music of Alec Wilder; the Black male singer as European émigré; “Behind the Iron Curtain;” explorations of both Orchestral Songs and Rare Twentieth-Century Operas; and “Great Singers in Old Age;” as well as, naturally, a closer examination of many of those New York City Opera divas to whom I provided an introduction last week. The new season will also be more interactive, with livestream interviews planned with various fascinating (and legendary!) figures in the world of opera and classical music. Thanks to all for your continued support, friendship, and listenership; see you next week for the debut of Season Four of Countermelody! Countermelody is a podcast devoted to the glory and the power of the human voice raised in song. Singer and vocal aficionado Daniel Gundlach explores great singers of the past and present focusing in particular on those who are less well-remembered today than they should be. Daniel's lifetime in music as a professional countertenor, pianist, vocal coach, voice teacher, and journalist yields an exciting array of anecdotes, impressions, and “inside stories.” At Countermelody's core is the celebration of great singers of all stripes, their instruments, and the connection they make to the words they sing. By clicking on the following link (https://linktr.ee/CountermelodyPodcast) you can find the dedicated Countermelody website which contains additional content including artist photos and episode setlists. The link will also take you to Countermelody's Patreon page, where you can pledge your monthly support at whatever level you can afford. Bonus episodes available exclusively to Patreon supporters are currently available and further bonus content including interviews and livestreams is planned for the upcoming season.  

Costing the Earth
Wild Highway

Costing the Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 27:53


Running 12500km from the Arctic Circle to the borders of Greece, the European Greenbelt is one of the most ambitious conservation schemes ever devised. The idea was to use the no man's land of the Iron Curtain that divided Communist East from Capitalist West as a wildlife corridor to allow rare and endangered species to travel unimpeded across the continent. On the 20th anniversary of the Greenbelt, the writer and anthropologist, Mary-Ann Ochota takes to the road, from the industrialised peat bogs of Finland through the Baltic states and Germany's dying forests to the peasant farms of the southern Balkans. The wildlife of these borderlands is rich and varied but the conservationists feel that they're battling forces bigger than those that created the Iron Curtain in the first place. Producer: Alasdair Cross

Your New Opinion
The Russell Hustle - Ep. 13: Guns in the Heather

Your New Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 40:39


Suspense! Intrigue! Subterfuge! Stealing pies from windowsills! That's right, the boys are here to discuss the Kurt Russell Disney Irish spy adventure flick Guns in the Heather...or The Secret of Boyne Castle...or Spy Busters. This time around they talk about Disney live action remakes, The Looney Tunes, Cathal Goulding, Marxism in Ireland, spies, the Iron Curtain, mop fighting, Sherlock Holmes abilities, cowpushers, IMDB tags, and the advent of toys.

Radio German Democratic Republic
Ralph Hänel, Part I - My Father and the Stasi Lawyer

Radio German Democratic Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 67:17


Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of Radio GDR. This is your host Steve Minegar, and the next three episodes will truly be a humbling and eye opening experience for all of us. On the Cold War Conversations podcast, our good friend Ian Sanders interviewed Ralph Hänel, Kung Fu Master, actor and just plain wonderful guy, about the lengths he went to learn martial arts behind the Iron Curtain in East Germany. In an attempt to leave for the west, Ralph was arrested and spent several years in a Stasi prison in Cottbus known as the “red misery.” Ralph relays this incredible story over three episodes on Cold War Conversations, which I highly recommend you listen to before consuming this series of episodes - see the links below. Ralph is an amazing storyteller and approached me to relay even more of his tragic but triumphant tale. Inspired by objects he has collected that have reminded him of moments in his life, Ralph tells us in this first episode about his father's possible involvement in the Stasi, the lawyer he may have arranged for his son to get out of prison, and the psychological torture the Stasi inflicted on him and his mother. Just wait until you hear about how Ralph got his Kung Fu certificate into East Germany, the messages he snuck into a hole in his tooth and his Stasi handcuffs (I won't give too many spoilers away). Ralph, we appreciate these stories very much. You MUST listen to Ian Sanders' three part interview of Ralph before listening to these. They will absolutely set the context for these episodes, and are MUST LISTENS.  Episode 1 - Ralph – DJing and Kung Fu in East Germany Episode 2 - Ralph – Arrested and interrogated by the Stasi Episode 3 - Ralph – A prisoner in an East German jail Read Ralph's short stories using this link Our ability to bring you stories from behind the Berlin Wall is dependent on monthly donors like you. Visit us at  https://www.eastgermanypodcast.com/p/support-the-podcast/ to contribute. For the price of a Berliner Pilsner, you can feel good you are contributing to preserve one of the most important pieces of Cold War history. If you feel more comfortable leaving us a review to help us get more listeners, we appreciate it very much and encourage you to do so wherever you get your podcasts or at https://www.eastgermanypodcast.com/reviews/new/. For discussions about podcast episodes and GDR history, please do join our Facebook discussion group. Just search Radio GDR in Facebook. Vielen dank for being a listener!

Big Questions with Cal Fussman
Serena, Gorbachev And The Hugs

Big Questions with Cal Fussman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 19:00


Cal takes a moment to pause and reflect on moments he had with two icons who said farewell recently in very different ways. Tennis great Serena Williams ended one of the most impactful careers in the history of any sport at the U.S. Open and the man who lifted The Iron Curtain, Mikhail Gorbachev, took his final breath at the age of 91. Cal tells two stories that showcase the origin of their influence. They both revolve around hugs. We should all take note.

Bureau of Lost Culture
Smells Like Teen Spirit

Bureau of Lost Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 60:34


*"Teenage savages go wild in a jungle of lust and lawlessness!"   *Countercultural commentator and writer JOHN HIGGS comes to the Bureau. We head out into the feverish febrile pheromone filled phase of self consciousness, sex drugs and rock'n'roll known as adolescence as we investigate the birth of the teenage in the late 40s and 50s.     *Was it all really kicked off by Little Richard's Tutti Frutti?       *We chart the rise of youth culture on both sides of the Iron Curtain and debate that while ‘all you need is love', ‘you can't always get what you want' as we trace counterculture through beats, mods, hippies, punks, ravers, grunge and britpop, touch down briefly on gender politics and the death of Kurt Cobain and wonder if 70 will one day be the new seventeen.   For more on John https://johnhiggs.com   The Bureau of Lost Culture https://www.bureauoflostculture.com #counterculture #littlerichard #teenage #rockandroll #kurtcobain #beatles #rollingstones #hippie 

The FOX News Rundown
War On Ukraine: Gorbachev's Death And What It Means To Putin's Grip On Power

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 15:03 Very Popular


While Russians over the weekend mourned the death of Mikhail Gorbachev they also remembered the reforms he made that brought down the Iron Curtain. Vladimir Putin snubbed the event and instead spoke at a forum where he continued to defend the brutal invasion of Ukraine.  FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Dr. Leon Aron, Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, about Mikhail Gorbachev's death and what it means to Putin's grip on power.   Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Arnold Schwarzenegger peels back the Iron Curtain, steps naked from a Russian sauna, and brings some Red Heat to the mean streets of Chicago in this 1988 buddy-cop action flick. Can the Soviet strongman learn the American way of implementing justice from wiseass detective James Belushi (K-9), and bring down the international drug dealer that killed his partner? And does 48 HRS director Walter Hill make their screen chemistry crackle like he did with Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy? Find out when you get on the bus with Arnie, Brock and Stuart. Listen now!

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
War On Ukraine: Gorbachev's Death And What It Means To Putin's Grip On Power

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 15:03


While Russians over the weekend mourned the death of Mikhail Gorbachev they also remembered the reforms he made that brought down the Iron Curtain. Vladimir Putin snubbed the event and instead spoke at a forum where he continued to defend the brutal invasion of Ukraine.  FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Dr. Leon Aron, Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, about Mikhail Gorbachev's death and what it means to Putin's grip on power.   Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
War On Ukraine: Gorbachev's Death And What It Means To Putin's Grip On Power

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 15:03


While Russians over the weekend mourned the death of Mikhail Gorbachev they also remembered the reforms he made that brought down the Iron Curtain. Vladimir Putin snubbed the event and instead spoke at a forum where he continued to defend the brutal invasion of Ukraine.  FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Dr. Leon Aron, Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, about Mikhail Gorbachev's death and what it means to Putin's grip on power.   Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unapologetically Abundant
How to neutralize the trauma acquired in the womb and reconnect Spirit Soul and the Body with Elena Tonetti- Vladimirova

Unapologetically Abundant

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 35:10


On this episode, we talked about: Doing only what you love None of us are fools Following the original impulse of the spirit Borning into agony Every soul has its own journey The spirit is our divine masculine We are so closely intertwined Learn to be mindful Find your boundaries and be responsible Doing our best to who we are Dissociation: disconnecting body from the soul Maintaining connection with the source Finding a place where you can be content   "When people are done with dealing with trauma, what do they do? They dance and sing"   "When we are born into agony, the agony becomes our basic setting, that becomes the norm, that becomes the habit"   "The soul is our divine feminine and the body is their child, the essential product of the alignment and union"     About Elena: Elena Tonetti-Vladimirova is the founder and Director of the constantly expanding international organization, Birth Into Being, which is dedicated to Conscious Evolution and the creation of a thriving future social structure based on Love, Compassion and Common Sense.     Speaker, filmmaker and author, Elena artfully uses multi-media to share her message with the world. Since 1982, Elena's tireless commitment has earned her the status of "spiritual midwife" to thousands of people. Elena's curiosity and passion have been her guiding force in life, helping to gather experiences that eventually culminated in the Birth Into Being Method.  It began in Russia in 1982 when she joined the Conscious Birth Movement.  While studying under Igor Charkovsky, the Russian Waterbirth pioneer, Elena was exposed to alternative birth practices, including birth camps at the Black Sea where babies were born in the presence of wild dolphins.  Here, Elena witnessed firsthand that birth complications are preventable. ​ The 80's were a deeply formative period for Elena.  She was simultaneously leading business management seminars called, "The Games," which were extremely effective in bringing socioeconomic changes in, then, the USSR.  She was also involved in "Citizen Diplomacy," an underground organization dedicated to ending the Cold War and lifting the “Iron Curtain,” creating open lines of communication with the West.  ​ In 1986, Elena immersed herself in the Sustainable Community Movement, called MJK (a Russian abbreviation for ‘Living Space for the Young).  The first community in Siberia, by that time, had over 30 000 residents and was an oasis of safety, democracy, a healthy lifestyle, and progressive farming. Elena's first documentary, "How Dreams Come True" (1995, 58 minutes), is a detailed account of her experiences with this community. ​ The impact of Elena's work has been recognized at various conferences, and more recently in the U.N.-sponsored book, “A Force Such as the World Has Never Known”.  Published in 2013, the book features Elena's chapter, along with articles from 30 other woman leaders of grassroots movements around the world. Now, more than ever, Elena is focusing her work on conscious creation. She plans to retire from leading the workshops, and pass the torch onto her highly trained facilitators, so she can make space to birth new projects. In the meantime, she offers one 16-day training per year in Germany, every August. Elena's life took an unexpected turn in 1989 when she came to the U.S. for what was supposed to be a short visit.  Five days after her departure, the Eastern Block collapsed and she found herself completely cut off from the world she knew.  She was 3 months pregnant, did not speak English, had no money, no friends or a place to stay, and had a rapidly expiring visa. ​ From that place, Elena slowly built herself up; creating a new life and community that empowered her to continue her crusade for Conscious Evolution.  She has since created “Birth Into Being” (1999, 25 minutes) and “Birth As We Know It” (2006, 73 minutes), written articles for countless international magazine editorials, and led 20 Birth Into Being Method workshops and trainings internationally each year.  Now she has trained over 200 facilitators in 22 countries, who use the Method in all major languages. 

Talking Freedom Podcast
Gorbachev: Exposed NWO Warrior | JBS News Analysis

Talking Freedom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 7:12


Former Soviet Union leader Mikhail Gorbachev died this last week.  While he is largely credited with helping the so-called Iron Curtain come down, much of his resume has been swept under the rug. We'll take this episode to partially expose what you're not hearing in the news and how Gorbachev's efforts helped to lead the world to its current state of dysfunction. And please be sure to share this information on your social media platforms. SUGGESTED ACTION: Join The John Birch Society

Analysis Behind the News
Gorbachev: Exposed NWO Warrior | JBS News Analysis

Analysis Behind the News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 7:12


Former Soviet Union leader Mikhail Gorbachev died this last week.  While he is largely credited with helping the so-called Iron Curtain come down, much of his resume has been swept under the rug. We'll take this episode to partially expose what you're not hearing in the news and how Gorbachev's efforts helped to lead the world […] The post Gorbachev: Exposed NWO Warrior | JBS News Analysis appeared first on The John Birch Society.

New Books in Economic and Business History
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in World Affairs
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in History
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in European Studies
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in American Studies
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

The CircuitPython Show
Radomir Dopieralski

The CircuitPython Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022


Radomir Dopieralski, aka deshipu, joins the show. He shares his interest in computers growing up behind the Iron Curtain, developing games with CircuitPython, robots, and more.Show Notes:00:15 Welcome and getting started with computers behind the Iron Curtain1:45 Discovering MicroPython via its Kickstarter2:50 Handheld games - the Pew Pew family4:30 Learning Pew Pew in workshops6:22 How does CircuitPython make it easy to program games?7:42 What are the challenges in using CircuitPython to program games?10:30 Robot building13:30 Fluff bug14:30 Which microcontroller?

New Books in Diplomatic History
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Diplomatic History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Fritz Bartel, "The Triumph of Broken Promises: The End of the Cold War and the Rise of Neoliberalism" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:34


Why did the Cold War come to a peaceful end? And why did neoliberal economics sweep across the world in the late twentieth century? In this pathbreaking study, Fritz Bartel argues that the answer to these questions is one and the same. The Cold War began as a competition between capitalist and communist governments to expand their social contracts as they raced to deliver their people a better life. But the economic shocks of the 1970s made promises of better living untenable on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Energy and financial markets placed immense pressure on governments to discipline their social contracts. Rather than make promises, political leaders were forced to break them. In a sweeping narrative, The Triumph of Broken Promises (Harvard University Press, 2022) tells the story of how the pressure to break promises spurred the end of the Cold War. In the West, neoliberalism provided Western leaders like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher with the political and ideological tools to shut down industries, impose austerity, and favor the interests of capital over labor. But in Eastern Europe, revolutionaries like Lech Walesa in Poland resisted any attempt at imposing market discipline. Mikhail Gorbachev tried in vain to reform the Soviet system, but the necessary changes ultimately presented too great a challenge. Faced with imposing economic discipline antithetical to communist ideals, Soviet-style governments found their legitimacy irreparably damaged. But in the West, politicians could promote austerity as an antidote to the excesses of ideological opponents, setting the stage for the rise of the neoliberal global economy. Fritz Bartel is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Patented: History of Inventions

The Contact Lens. The humble Contact Lens. Oh boy, do we have a rip-roaring episode for you about the humble contact lens.Nazi villains, arrests by secret police, chance encounters on trains and fear of Soviet invasion. And in the middle of it all, an unlikely hero: a Czech chemist called Otto Wichterle.On Christmas Eve 1961, Otto Wichterle created the world's first soft contact lens at his kitchen table with the help of his son's toy mechanics set.Who was Otto?How did he manage to create the world's first contact lens behind the Iron Curtain, despite political opposition?Why is his story not better known?Our guest today, Riikka Palonkorpi, works at the University of the Arts in Helsinki and wrote her PhD thesis on Otto Wichterle back in 2012. As part of her research, Riikka met Otto's wife and visited their home, so naturally is the perfect person to help us answer these questions as we unravel Otto's story.The episode was produced by Freddy Chick.The editor was Anisha Deva.The senior producer was Charlotte Long.For more History Hit content, subscribe to our newsletters here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!You've been listening to a History Hit podcast. Please take a couple of minutes to fill out this survey with your feedback, we'd really appreciate it. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
'A Monsoon on Steroids'

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 28:35


Stories about the floods that have submerged a third of Pakistan; the violent clashes in Iraq; Brazil's bizarre bicentennial and farewell to the last Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. In Pakistan, heavy rains and floods have submerged a third of the country. UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres called the calamity “a monsoon on steroids". At least 1100 people have been killed, and an estimated 33 million are now displaced or homeless. Shahzeb Jillani reports from the southern province of Sindh, the worst affected, where victims are disappointed with their politicians, but young people have sprung into action. At least 23 people were killed, and many injured, in some of the worst violence in the Iraqi capital Baghdad in years. Supporters of Muqtada al-Sadr, a powerful Shia Muslim cleric, political leader and militia commander, clashed with Iran-backed armed groups. There'd been a long stand-off following inconclusive parliamentary elections, and then al-Sadr announced his retirement from politics. Shelly Kittleson in Baghdad explains. Next week, it'll be 200 years since Brazil became an independent country, breaking free of its colonial ruler Portugal. There'll be military parades – and more. But one ceremony has already taken place, held to receive a bizarre royal relic from Portugal. Reactions to this occasion seem as divided as the views about what to celebrate, if anything. Julia Carneiro reflects on her country's bicentennial. Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, was liked and admired in the West, for bringing about the end of the Cold War, lifting the Iron Curtain that kept Eastern Europe under Communism, and dissolving the Soviet Union. But in Russia, he is reviled by many for breaking up the Soviet Union. Steve Rosenberg met Mr Gorbachev on several occasions - and got to hear him sing. Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Arlene Gregorius Production coordinator: Iona Hammond Editor: Hugh Levinson

Earth Ancients
Dr. Edwin Barnhart: Breaking The Maya Code

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 148:37


The inside story of one of the great intellectual breakthroughs of our time―the first great decipherment of an ancient script―now revised and updated.In the past dozen years, Maya decipherment has made great strides, in part due to the Internet, which has made possible the truly international scope of hieroglyphic scholarship: glyphic experts can be found not only in North America, Mexico, Guatemala, and western Europe but also in Russia and the countries of eastern Europe.The third edition of this classic book takes up the thorny question of when and where the Maya script first appeared in the archaeological record, and describes efforts to decipher its meaning on the extremely early murals of San Bartolo. It includes iconographic and epigraphic investigations into how the Classic Maya perceived and recorded the human senses, a previously unknown realm of ancient Maya thought and perception.There is now compelling documentary and historical evidence bearing on the question of why and how the “breaking of the Maya code” was the achievement of Yuri V. Knorosov―a Soviet citizen totally isolated behind the Iron Curtain―and not of the leading Maya scholar of his day, Sir Eric Thompson. What does it take to make such a breakthrough, with a script of such complexity as the Maya? We now have some answers, as Michael Coe demonstrates here. Dr. Edwin Barnhart is director of the Maya Exploration Center. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin and has over 20 years of experience in North, Central, and South America as an archaeologist, explorer, and instructor. In 1994, Professor Barnhart discovered the ancient city of Maax Na (Spider-Monkey House), a major center of the Classic Maya period in northwestern Belize. In 1998 he was invited by the Mexican government to direct the Palenque Mapping Project, a three-year effort to survey and map the unknown sections of Palenque's ruins. The resultant map has been celebrated as one of the most detailed and accurate ever made of a Maya ruin. In 2003, he became the director of Maya Exploration Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the study of ancient Maya civilization. The center leads study-abroad courses for college students and tours for the general public in the ruins of the ancient Americas, among its other research and educational activities. Professor Barnhart has taught archaeology and anthropology at Southwest Texas State University, and currently teaches University of Texas travel courses for college professors on ancient Andean and Mesoamerican astronomy, mathematics, and culture. Over the last 10 years, he has appeared multiple times on the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, and Japanese NHK Public Television. He has published over a dozen papers and given presentations at eight international conferences.

Coffee and a Mike
Dr. Reni Moon Gateway to Freedom #485

Coffee and a Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 28:07


Dr. Reni Moon has practiced pediatric medicine for over 20 years and is board certified in both general pediatrics as well as in pediatric hospital medicine. She talks to me during the Gateway to Freedom Conference of being born in the United States to parents who fled from communism from behind the Iron Curtain, the education system needing a complete overhaul, how hearing a different perspective can be traumatizing for students, being accused of student mistreatment and much more. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE LIKE AND SHARE THIS PODCAST!!!   Social media Website-  https://globalcovidsummit.org/   Follow Me  Twitter- https://twitter.com/CoffeeandaMike Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/coffeeandamike/ Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/CoffeeandaMike/ Truth Social- https://truthsocial.com/@coffeeandamike Gettr- https://gettr.com/user/coffeeandamike   Support My Work  Venmo- https://venmo.com/code?user_id=3570365208987017385&created=1658667789.4661531&printed=1 Website- www.coffeeandamike.com Email- info@coffeeandamike.com  

The Daily
How Gorbachev Changed the World

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 41:57 Very Popular


Few leaders have had as profound an effect on their time as Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, who died this week at 91.It was not Mr. Gorbachev's intention to liquidate the Soviet empire when he came to power in 1985. But after little more than six tumultuous years, he had lifted the Iron Curtain and presided over the dissolution of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, ending the Cold War.Guest: Serge Schmemann, a member of The New York Times's editorial board.Background reading: Adopting principles of glasnost and perestroika, Mr. Gorbachev weighed the legacy of seven decades of Communist rule and set a new course, decisively altering the political climate of the world.With the war in Ukraine, Russia's current leader, Vladimir V. Putin, is trying to unravel Mr. Gorbachev's legacy.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

Amanpour
Mikhail Gorbachev from the archives: 1991, 2012

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 55:08


The tributes have been pouring in as the world marks the passing of Mikhail Gorbachev, who died last night at 91. A titan of the 20th century, he was the last leader of the Soviet Union, who raised the Iron Curtain and – along with his American partner President Ronald Reagan – ended the Cold War. Ten years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Christiane spoke with President Gorbachev about the dissolution of the Soviet Union and his reflections a decade on. They had another, very different conversation in 2012, just after Vladimir Putin's re-election, during which he expressed worries about the authoritarian tendencies taking shape in Russia.  Also on today's show: Nina Khrushcheva, historian and great-granddaughter of Nikita Khrushchev, who put up the Berlin Wall in 1961; former US Ambassador to Russia Thomas Pickering; Adam Entous on his New Yorker piece, The Untold History of the Biden Family.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Intelligence
Iron Curtain call: Mikhail Gorbachev

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 26:15 Very Popular


The leader who oversaw the Soviet Union's collapse had only intended to reform it. But the propaganda and repression he abhorred were what held it together. A speed bump lies ahead for electric vehicles: manufacturing and mining capacity may not keep up with battery demand. And visiting a vast landscape sculpture in Nevada's desert ahead of this week's public opening.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Todd Huff Radio Show
Former Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev Dies

The Todd Huff Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 38:56


A Russian & Soviet politician, Mikhail Gorbachev died on Tuesday at the age of 91. He helped to take down the Iron Curtain and end the Cold War in 1991.  Join the Community! https://community.toddhuffshow.com/c/stack-of-stuff/

Todd Huff Show
Former Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev Dies

Todd Huff Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 38:56


A Russian & Soviet politician, Mikhail Gorbachev died on Tuesday at the age of 91. He helped to take down the Iron Curtain and end the Cold War in 1991. Join the Community!https://community.toddhuffshow.com/c/stack-of-stuff/

MRCTV's Podcast -Public Service Announcement
Episode 302: NewsBusters Podcast: Reagan Gets No Credit for Ending the USSR, Only Gorbachev

MRCTV's Podcast -Public Service Announcement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 30:57


When they announced the death of the last dictator of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, the liberal media elite broke out the valentines, giving Gorbachev all the credit for tearing down the Iron Curtain of communism. Ronald Reagan dared Gorbachev to tear down the all, and Gorbachev is painted as a “towering international hero” for just letting it happen.

Economist Radio
Iron Curtain call: Mikhail Gorbachev

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 26:15


The leader who oversaw the Soviet Union's collapse had only intended to reform it. But the propaganda and repression he abhorred were what held it together. A speed bump lies ahead for electric vehicles: manufacturing and mining capacity may not keep up with battery demand. And visiting a vast landscape sculpture in Nevada's desert ahead of this week's public opening.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Kan English
Gorbachev was good for Israel, immigration and world peace

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 7:50


A former and the last leader of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev has passed away at the age of 91 after a long illness. It was during his rule that the gates of the Iron Curtain began to open and large numbers of Soviet Jews immigrated to Israel. Galia Golan, a professor emeritus from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said Gorbachev's legacy unleashed forces that led to the collapse of the Soviet empire, was widely despised at home but his moves led to the end of the Cold War.  (photo: Steve Linde) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CNN Breaking News Alerts
5:23 PM ET: Mikhail Gorbachev dies

CNN Breaking News Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 0:35


Mikhail Gorbachev, former Soviet president who took down the Iron Curtain, dead at 91. Listen for more details.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Ezra Klein Show
Best Of: Margaret Atwood on the Bible and the Future

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 68:21 Very Popular


Today we're revisiting one of our favorite episodes from this year, with the prolific writer Margaret Atwood.A good rule of thumb is that whatever Margaret Atwood is worried about now is likely what the rest of us will be worried about a decade from now. The rise of authoritarianism. A backlash against women's social progress. The seductions and dangers of genetic engineering. Climate change leading to social unrest. Advertising culture permeating more and more of our lives. Atwood — the author of the Booker Prize-winning novels “The Blind Assassin” and “The Testaments,” as well as “The Handmaid's Tale,” “Oryx and Crake” and, most recently, the essay collection “Burning Questions” — was writing about these topics decades ago, forecasting the unsettling world that we inhabit now. Pick up any one of her 17 published novels, and you will likely come across a theme or a quality of the setting that rings eerily true in the present day.This is especially true of Atwood's magnum opus, “The Handmaid's Tale,” which takes place in a future America where climate change, droughts, a decaying economy and falling birthrates lead to the rise of a theocracy in which women called Handmaids are conscripted into childbirth. The repressive regime she created in that novel, Gilead, has been endlessly referred to and reinterpreted over the years because of the wisdom it contains about why people cooperate with — and resist — political movements that destroy the freedom of others. And as recent weeks have shown, we're far from the day when that wisdom becomes irrelevant to present circumstances.We discuss the deep human craving for stories, why Atwood believes we are engaged in “an arm wrestle for the soul of America,” what makes the stories of the Bible so compelling, the dangerous allure of totalitarian movements, how the shift from coal to oil helped to fuel the rise of modern consumerism, why she thinks climate change will cause even more harm by increasing the likelihood of war than it will by increasing the likelihood of extreme weather, how our society lost its capacity to imagine new utopias, why progressives need to incorporate more fun into their politics, why we should “keep our eye on the mushroom,” Atwood's take on recent U.F.O. sightings and more. She even sings a bit of a song from the 1950s about the Iron Curtain.Mentioned:Art & Energy by Barry LordBook recommendations:War by Margaret MacMillanBiased by Jennifer L. EberhardtSecrets of the Sprakkar by Eliza ReidCharlotte's Web by E. B. WhiteLord of the Rings by J. R. R. TolkienThoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.This episode of “The Ezra Klein Show” was produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin, Kristina Samulewski, Coral Ann Howells and Brooks Bouson.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security
29. The Musicians Who Came In From the Cold

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 35:02 Very Popular


At a time when Vladimir Putin is attempting to redraw the Iron Curtain, we take a trip back to the Soviet Union circa 1985 when four American musicians smuggled messages in and out of the Soviet Union — with music. Plus, DefCon's answer to those alien transmissions.

The RunOut Podcast
RunOut #86: Climbing is in Seb Bouin's DNA

The RunOut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 71:02 Very Popular


Our guest today is Seb Bouin, one of the best rock climbers on Earth and the author of DNA, one of three 5.15d rock climbs established thus far. We talk to Seb about grades, how he measures success, the benefits of climbing outdoors vs. training indoors, and where the future of rock climbing is heading next. But first, we take a somber look at a recent accident on Half Dome, in which a young woman fell 80 feet and badly injured herself. In the aftermath of this terrible accident, calls are sounding to add bolts to one of Half Dome's more historic climbs. We consider the contours of the debate and attempt to arrive at some ideas for how to proceed in the wake of an accident. Today's final bit comes from the band Rebelle, a Quebec-based band whose drummer, Joey Kane, is a sport climber who first discovered climbing during the pandemic and has been hooked ever since. This is their new song, Head on Fire. Show Notes Seb Bouin on Instagram: DNA (9c), Iron Curtain (9a+/b), Change (9b+), Nordic Marathon. Who Cares about the World's Hardest Route on Evening Sends. 80-foot Slab Fall Leaves Yosemite Climber Critically Injured Student hit with $1.2m medical bill after falling in Yosemite Donate to Anna's Recovery Rebelle on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Spotify Become a RunOut Rope Gun! Support our podcast and increase your RunOut runtime. Bonus episodes, AMA, and more will be available to our Rope Guns. Thank you for your support! http://patreon.com/runoutpodcastContact us Send ideas, voicemail, feedback and more. andrew@runoutpodcast.com // chris@runoutpodcast.com

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever
JF2906: JV vs. Syndication — Why Not Both? ft. Vessi Kapoulian

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 26:30


Vessi Kapoulian grew up in Bulgaria behind the Iron Curtain, where the only concept of investing she knew involved hard assets like silver and gold. When she arrived in the U.S., she earned her graduate degree and began her corporate career. Then in 2017, she stumbled upon a real estate seminar that changed everything. Today, Vessi is the founder of DBA Capital Group, LLC, which focuses on operating multifamily investments under both a JV and syndication model. In this episode, she discusses what motivated her to get involved in syndication, her underwriting strategy, and the lessons she learned about persistence, strength, and sticking to her core investment criteria. Vessi Kapoulian | Real Estate Background Founder of DBA Capital Group, LLC, which focuses on operating multifamily investments under both a JV and syndication model. Portfolio: GP of 161 units across seven properties, totaling $13M in AUM A small portfolio of residential properties including a duplex and two short-term rentals Based in: Los Angeles, CA Say hi to her at: dbacapitalgroup.com LinkedIn Email: vessi@thevessik.com Best Ever Book: The ONE Thing by Gary Keller Greatest lesson: Loyalty does not always pay. Shop the deal with multiple lenders, especially in the current environment. Join the newsletter for the expert tips & investing content.   Sign up to be a guest on the show. FREE eBook: The Ultimate Guide to Multifamily Deals & Investing Register for this year's Best Ever Conference in Salt Lake City Stay in touch with us! www.bestevercre.com YouTube Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Click here to know more about our sponsors:  Trevor McGregor Coaching | Cash Flow Portal | Cornell Capital Holdings | PassiveInvesting.com

Rich Zeoli
The Iron Curtain of Agencies

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 11:23


Rich discusses the Presidential Records Act and how it has been used over the years. There is an iron curtain surrounding the different federal agencies.