Podcasts about Wilt

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 872PODCASTS
  • 1,440EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Wilt

Latest podcast episodes about Wilt

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

Once upon a time, there was a man sitting quietly by a pool of water. He was a very sick man, and doubted that he had very long to live. While he stared into the water, something stirred the water. It was almost as though a hand had swished the water back and forth, but no one else was there. Wondering, the man reached out his own hand and swished the water back and forth. As he did so, he began to feel better. Standing, he noticed that his pain was gone and he felt stronger. As the day went forward, he realized that he simply was not sick any longer.His friends were totally surprised at his recovery, and in the natural course of events, they learned about the pool and the moving of the water. For some time after that, all kinds of sick people went down to the pool and washed in its water, but no one else was helped...until the same season the next year, when another very sick man was healed after a similar moving of the water. A lame man, touching the water just after the first man was not helped in the least. This happened again the third year. Unfortunately, only one person was healed each year, and although it was at the same season, it was not entirely predictable. It could be on any one of several days.Many years passed and then one day a man walked into the area of the pool and looked around at all the sick people there. It was the season of the year when an angel was said to stir the waters and the first person into the pool would be healed. The name of the pool was Bethesda and the man who walked in on this day was none other than Jesus of Nazareth.And a certain man was there, which had an infirmity thirty and eight years. When Jesus saw him lie, and knew that he had been now a long time in that case, he saith unto him, Wilt thou be made whole?The impotent man answered him, Sir, I have no man, when the water is troubled, to put me into the pool: but while I am coming, another steppeth down before me. Jesus saith unto him, Rise, take up thy bed, and walk. And immediately the man was made whole, and took up his bed, and walked: and on the same day was the sabbath.John 5:5–9What lies behind this story is even more interesting than the incident itself. But that isn't what especially caught my interest. What I thought was fascinating about the encounter was the resemblance to a lottery. Year after year, only one person was healed, and the selection was absolutely random. A blind man might not see the moving of the water. A deaf man might not hear it. A lame man couldn't reach it fast enough. And even Jesus healing on this occasion had the same random quality to it. Maybe Jesus selected this one man for a reason, but if he did, he didn't say so. And more important, he only healed one man on this day, just as the waters might have done. That one man won the lottery. The rest did not. On the surface, it seems unfair, doesn't it? But at the same time, it is a lot like life...

Just Another Knicks Fan
Episode 100 - Big Dipper

Just Another Knicks Fan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 15:27


Knicks pull out the win be the Lakers !!! It wasn't pretty but we got it done. But we gotta our respect on Wilt name --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Berean Call Podcast
Get Biblical Understanding #113 - Prophecy

The Berean Call Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:44


LUKE 24:4-7 And it came to pass, as they were much perplexed thereabout, behold, two men stood by them in shining garments: And as they were afraid, and bowed down their faces to the earth, they said unto them, Why seek ye the living among the dead? He is not here, but is risen: remember how he spake unto you when he was yet in Galilee, Saying, The Son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again. LUKE 24:25-27 Then he said unto them, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken: Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory? And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself. LUKE 24:32 And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures? LUKE 24:44-46 And he said unto them, These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me. Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures, And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day: JOHN 1:45 Philip findeth Nathanael, and saith unto him, We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. JOHN 11:49-52 And one of them, named Caiaphas, being the high priest that same year, said unto them, Ye know nothing at all, Nor consider that it is expedient for us, that one man should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not. And this spake he not of himself: but being high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus should die for that nation; And not for that nation only, but that also he should gather together in one the children of God that were scattered abroad. JOHN 13:19 Now I tell you before it come, that, when it is come to pass, ye may believe that I am he. JOHN 13:37-38 Peter said unto him, Lord, why cannot I follow thee now? I will lay down my life for thy sake. Jesus answered him, Wilt thou lay down thy life for my sake? Verily, verily, I say unto thee, The cock shall not crow, till thou hast denied me thrice. JOHN 14:29 And now I have told you before it come to pass, that, when it is come to pass, ye might believe.

Wildly Disappointed Podcast
Racist AI - Season 2, Episode 3

Wildly Disappointed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 63:37


This weeks episode has continued talks about meth games. The crew speaks on Eminem's mom spaghetti, 5”10 210 is a great measurement, Delphi the racist AI, and things getting stuck in buttholes. The wildly disappointed pod remains in the “Man's” backyard with discussions also on Wilt spitting and calling it rain and a older Anglo woman spitting NWA lyrics. Shout out Blueberry is on a streak!!

Onderweg
#8 - Anne-Marie van der Wilt; over broze gezondheid, mystieke ervaringen en de relatie tussen kunst en theologie (S02)

Onderweg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:26


In Levensbepalend ontvangt Elsbeth Gruteke een veelkleurige gast. Het is kunstenaar, theoloog en predikant Anne-Marie van der Wilt. Voor haar hebben kleur en zingeving alles met elkaar te maken. Ze creëert wandkleden, stola's, glasramen, kruiswegen en nog veel meer. Ze geeft lezingen en preken bij haar eigen werken. Momenteel exposeert ze op verschillende plekken met 26 iconen. Ze heeft haar hele leven al één grote vijand; haar broze gezondheid. Toch heeft dat haar er niet van weerhouden haar roeping te volgen. In dit gesprek vertelt ze ook over de mystieke ervaringen die ze heeft gehad.  

Onderweg
#8 - Anne-Marie van der Wilt; over broze gezondheid, mystieke ervaringen en de relatie tussen kunst en theologie (S02)

Onderweg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:26


In Levensbepalend ontvangt Elsbeth Gruteke een veelkleurige gast. Het is kunstenaar, theoloog en predikant Anne-Marie van der Wilt. Voor haar hebben kleur en zingeving alles met elkaar te maken. Ze creëert wandkleden, stola's, glasramen, kruiswegen en nog veel meer. Ze geeft lezingen en preken bij haar eigen werken. Momenteel exposeert ze op verschillende plekken met 26 iconen. Ze heeft haar hele leven al één grote vijand; haar broze gezondheid. Toch heeft dat haar er niet van weerhouden haar roeping te volgen. In dit gesprek vertelt ze ook over de mystieke ervaringen die ze heeft gehad.  

Pam van den Berg Podcast
#116 Dit Is Waarom Jij Niet Weet Wat Jij Wilt En Hoe Je Dat Wel Kunt Ontdekken

Pam van den Berg Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 37:13


#116 Dit Is Waarom Jij Niet Weet Wat Je Wilt En Hoe Je Dat Wel Kunt Ontdekken by Pam van den Berg

Make Love Work
Krijg de relatie die je wilt via imagotherapie

Make Love Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 36:42


Hoe krijg je de relatie die je wilt? Ieder stel herkent wel dat je verliefd wordt op elkaar maar dat je op een gegeven moment in een fase terecht komt waarin het niet meer stroomt. Je mist waardering van je partner en hij/zij voelt precies hetzelfde. Je triggert elkaar regelmatig. En datgene waar je de ander om prees neem je nu diegene kwalijk. Je kan daardoor dus ook niet meer terug naar 'die verliefdheid van het begin'. Dus hoe los je dat op? Hoe groei je naar volwassen liefde toe?Imagotherapie heeft hier een interessant antwoord op. Mariëtte legt uit wat Imago therapie is en hoe je als stel de verbinding kan herstellen. Je krijgt inzicht in waar triggers vandaan komen en hoe je de vicieuze cirkel kan doorbreken. Ook bespreekt ze welke verschillende fases en verschillende dimensies je in een relatie hebt. Je krijgt een nieuw perspectief op relaties waardoor je naar volwassen liefde toe kan groeien. En de bonus: dan komt die verliefdheid opnieuw terug!

SportPsych
S3 E17: NBA Records • Lakers, Green, Wilt, Skiles, Russel plus this years contenders or pretenders

SportPsych

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 42:33


Anthony K and Jermaine discuss all-time NBA unbreakable records. Wilt's 100, Skiles 30, Green's 1192, Russell's 11, the Lakers 33 plus what fast start teams are contenders and which are pretenders. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sports-fluent/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sports-fluent/support

De Sparkle Podcastshow
#221 Als het even niet gaat zoals je wilt, doe dan dit

De Sparkle Podcastshow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 15:15


He Sparkles, soms heb je van die momenten/dagen dat het even niet gaat zoals je wilt. Je bent moe, hebt veel gegeven of bent eventjes over je grenzen heen gegaan. Wat kan je dan doen om weer terug te keren naar zelfliefde? In deze episode hoor je het. Veel luisterplezier! Voor meer Sparkle en zelfliefde zie ik je graag op instagram www.instagram.com/hienkenuninga.sparkle Kijk op www.praktijksparkle.nl voor meer info en tips

Vestavia Primitive Baptist Church
How Wilt Thou Do? (Josh Coker) - 10.24.2021

Vestavia Primitive Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 43:33


Jeremiah 12:1-5 Righteous art thou, O LORD, when I plead with thee: yet let me talk with thee of thy judgments: Wherefore doth the way of the wicked prosper? wherefore are all they happy that deal very treacherously? (2) Thou hast planted them, yea, they have taken root: they grow, yea, they bring forth fruit: thou art near in their mouth, and far from their reins. (3) But thou, O LORD, knowest me: thou hast seen me, and tried mine heart toward thee: pull them out like sheep for the slaughter, and prepare them for the day of slaughter. (4) How long shall the land mourn, and the herbs of every field wither, for the wickedness of them that dwell therein? the beasts are consumed, and the birds; because they said, He shall not see our last end. (5) If thou hast run with the footmen, and they have wearied thee, then how canst thou contend with horses? and if in the land of peace, wherein thou trustedst, they wearied thee, then how wilt thou do in the swelling of Jordan?

Sporza Podcast
Peter Vandenbempt: "Ongeregeldheden stoppen kan niet moeilijk zijn als je dat echt wilt"

Sporza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 6:10


Peter Vandenbempt: "Ongeregeldheden stoppen kan niet moeilijk zijn als je dat echt wilt" by Sporza

Dordtse Podcasts & Livemuziek | Via Cultura
#176 - Via Cultura Weekendmagazine - Praat mee over de Dordtse Spoorzone

Dordtse Podcasts & Livemuziek | Via Cultura

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 13:08


Wilt u ook meedromen over hoe Dordrecht er in de toekomst uit kan zien? Doen! We horen graag wat uw mening is. Of misschien heeft u wel super goede ideeën voor de Dordtse Spoorzone? Laat het ons weten via spoorzone@dordrecht.nl Meedoen in StadsLabs Stichting DE STAD organiseert met de gemeente tot het einde van het jaar vier zogenaamde StadsLabs, waarin betrokken Dordtenaren in gesprek gaan over de ideeën van Mecanoo en bouwstenen verzamelen voor de verdere uitwerking van de plannen. Op 15 september 2021 is het 1e StadsLab gehouden waarin tijdens wandelingen in kleine groepen gekeken werd naar door de door Mecanoo gemaakte 3D beelden die via QR-codes te zien waren. Woensdag 13 oktober volgde het 2e StadsLab waarin het ging over de Zwijndrechtse brug en omgeving. 3e StadsLab over Maasterras 27 oktober 2021 Wilt u meepraten over de plannen van Mecanoo voor het Maasterras? Dat kan op woensdag 27 oktober. Mecanoo vertelt u meer over zij op de ideeën voor het Maasterras zijn gekomen. En er is een architectuur historicus uitgenodigd om u voor het toekomstige Maasterras te inspireren met historie. Daarna komen we op een creatieve manier tot suggesties en ideeën voor de verdere uitwerking van de plannen. Wilt u meedoen? Meld u aan via stadslab@groenewegvdmeijden.nl Gast: Evelyn Jansen, Stichting De Stad Presentatie en gespreksleiding: Gert Florusse

De perfectionismepodcast
#126 Tips Voor Als Je Solo Op Reis Wilt, Maar Je Durft Niet

De perfectionismepodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:31


In deze podcast ontdek je: - Waarom solo op reis gaan zo ontzettend tof is - Wat ik er zelf zo spannend aan vond - Hoe ik hier nu mee omga En dit zijn drie manieren waarop je direct aan de slag kunt met het loslaten van je perfectionisme: 1. Volg de gratis masterclass HSP & Perfectionisme via www.doelgerichtecoaching.nl/hsp 2. Lees mijn boek! Het heet Goed Genoeg - 50 tips om je perfectionisme los te laten. Bestellen doe je via www.evelienbijl.nl/boek (Fysiek boek: €21,99, eBook: €9,99) 3. Doe mee aan Goed Genoeg, hét online programma voor perfectionisten die relaxter & gelukkiger willen worden. Meer info op www.doelgerichtecoaching.nl/goedgenoeg Volg me op Instagram voor meer tips over perfectionisme en een eerlijk kijkje achter de schermen: www.instagram.com/evelien_bijl

Monsters In The Morning
ALL APOLOGIES PUMPKIN YOU ARE BASIC.

Monsters In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 193:23


WEDNESDAY - Savannah jumps on the show today. Russ goes Victorian? Are The Monsters responsible for a horrible rumor about Bill Paxton and Helen Hunt. Dude it's just a wand. RRR - The Ricardos. How apologies work. Jana Banana. Top Florida cities to retire to. Steven Kramer. Monster Sports - NBA. Shaq vs. Wilt. To The Top with Carlos - Crypto. Fishing with D-Strong. K.O.D. -Pumpkin.

GOSSIP GUY door Ender Scholtens
Yung Mavu weet met wie hij wilt trouwen!!

GOSSIP GUY door Ender Scholtens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 65:44


Ik sprak met Yung Mavu over zijn relatiestatus, Marvel en speelgoed. Volg mij @enderscholtens of Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/enderscholtens/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/enderscholtens?lang=en Snapchat: enderrrrr YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4F3QqJ-g0HDqvyWf-6K4Sw TikTok: http://vm.tiktok.com/J61VUE/

Licht op Legal
46. Zorgfraude: Over de Wet Bibob en andere mogelijkheden voor fraudebestrijding in het sociaal domein.

Licht op Legal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:27


Dit is aflevering 46 van Licht op Legal. In deze aflevering spreekt Wouter Koelwijn, partner en advocaat Zorg & Sociaal domein, over de wettelijke mogelijkheden voor gemeenten bij het voorkomen en bestrijden van zorgfraude. Op 1 augustus 2020 is de reikwijdte van de Wet Bibob uitgebreid en kan een integriteitsonderzoek ook worden gedaan bij aanbestedingen in het sociaal domein. In deze podcast bespreekt Wouter Koelewijn op welke wijze de Wet Bibob ingezet kan worden bij de aanbesteding van overheidsopdrachten in het sociaal domein. Daarnaast legt hij uit welke juridische en praktische ontmoedigingsmaatregelen gemeenten kunnen nemen ter voorkoming en ter bestrijding van zorgfraude met persoonsgebonden budgetten (PGB's). Wilt u meer informatie over de toepassing van de Wet Bibob in het sociaal domein en de ontmoedigingsmogelijkheden van PGB-fraude? Neem dan contact op met Wouter Koelewijn. Heeft u suggesties voor een onderwerp of wilt u dat onze experts hun licht laten schijnen op uw juridische vraagstuk? Stuur dan een mail naar lichtoplegal@vbk.nl.Licht op Legal kunt u via onze website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts of uw eigen favoriete podcastapp beluisteren.Dit is een podcast van Van Benthem & Keulen. U vindt ons op:vbk.nlLinkedInTwitterFacebookInstagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

De Cor Potcast
S03E12: Vermoeden van matchfixing

De Cor Potcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:56


Wat zijn de quoteringen voor een rode buzzer voor Fockert, een VOC-pingetje en een balletje breed van Vriends? Wij hadden geen flauw idee, maar je kunt het zo gek niet verzinnen of er zijn knaken mee te verdienen. In Comedy Club Haug namen we, met onze blik vanuit de kleedkamer, matchfixing onder de loep. Worden er nu eigenlijk veel spelers benaderd? Wat zijn de motieven om het wél te doen? Waarom zijn beloftenteams hier vatbaarder voor? Hoe schadelijk is het daadwerkelijk voor de sport? En, als je het weet van een medespeler, zou je het dan melden? Via onze Easytoys Kleedkamer- en Woonkamer-panels zochten we uit hoe het zit met gokverslavingen, benaderd worden en of een matchfixertje bij jou aan de bel kan trekken. Voor we deze kansspel-materie indoken maakte Fockert nog wat Social Impact, had Verhaar zijn creatieve spelleidershoed op en doceerde Vriends over de gruwelen van Auschwitz. Ook was er een vervolg op de controversiële Pi-Air van Hooijdonk-saga met onverwacht live commentaar van een getuige. Kortom: er gebeurde weer VAN ALLES. Wilt u, geachte luisteraar, dit VAN ALLES, horen op een manier die ondenkbaar mooier kan zijn? Dat doet u dan, geachte luisteraar, met de producten van Teufel (dit spreekt u uit als ‘Toi-fel'). Die producten kunt u tevens gebruiken om een vers Cor Potcast elftal van de maand mee te beluisteren. Het allerbeste!Social MediaTwitter & Instagram Spotify ‘Cor Potcast elftal vd maand.' AanradersFockert: Het boek Ik lach om niet te huilen van Lex KroonVriends: Bezoek de rechtbank, zie: https://bit.ly/3mRfcA7Verhaar: De serie Scenes of a marriage op HBO EasytoysGebruik op www.easytoys.com de kortingscode CORPOT15 voor 15% korting op het gehele assortiment. Geldt niet op afgeprijsde artikelen.Comedy Club HaugCheck www.comedyclubhaug.com voor tickets voor stand-up comedy op een heerlijke locatie in Rotterdam!TeufelMocht je net als Bart de echte techno-beleving in huis willen halen in de vorm van de Rockster, vergeet dan niet de kortingscode 'Doelpunt' te gebruiken. Teufel geeft niet alleen over de Rockster, maar over het gehele assortiment 10% korting! Van de beste koptelefoons tot volledige stereo-installaties: ze zijn bij onze vrienden van Teufel verkrijgbaar.Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

We Made This
Free With This Months Issue 32 - Esmé from Hide From Time podcast selects Melody Maker Born To Do It Better

We Made This

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 73:59


In episode 32 we're joined by Esmé from the fantastic podcast Hide From Time, and the black metal bands Penance Stare & Petrine Cross to talk about the Melody Maker's thoroughly controversial "Born To Do It Better" from October 2000. The CD's full tracklisting is - 1 – JJ72 - Desertion 2 – King Adora - The Law 3 – At The Drive-In - One Armed Scissor 4 – Lauren Laverne - If You Phone 5 – My Vitriol - All Of Me 6 – Brassy - B'cos We Rock 7 – Dilated Peoples - Ear Drum Pop 8 – Hundred Reasons - Change Of Season 9 – Queens Of The Stone Age - Mexicola (Live) 10 – Papa Roach - Infest 11 – Lowgold - The Feelings 12 – Wilt - I Found Out 13 – VAST - Blue 14 – A Perfect Circle - Magdalena (Live) 15 - Raging Speedhorn - Mandan Listen to Esmé's podcast Hide From Time, where Esmé will introduce you to some excellent noisy music from the worlds of Metal, Noise, Goth, Industrial, Ambient, Post Hardcore & More at https://anchor.fm/hidefromtime Check out her music at https://petrinecross.bandcamp.com/ and https://penancestare.bandcamp.com/ Listen to all available songs on our ongoing Spotify playlist - https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1mzWOWEfQ5LklJyUZkpfs2?si=LbWBi9-oTl-eXjkUJbpx2Q You can buy a copy of the cd from Discogs here - https://www.discogs.com/release/2665202-Various-Born-To-Do-It-Better Hosts - Ian Clarke & Colin Jackson-Brown Recorded/Edited/Mixed/Original music by Colin Jackson Brown for We Dig Podcasts Part of the We Made This podcast network. https://twitter.com/wmt_network Twitter – https://twitter.com/thismonthsissue Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/freewiththismonthsissue/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/freewiththismonthsissue/ Find our other episodes at www.wedigpodcasts.com Find other We Made This shows & writing at www.wemadethisnetwork.com

CCPhilly Wednesday Teachings

7:23 And when he was full forty years old, it came into his heart to visit his brethren the children of Israel. 7:24 And seeing one of them suffer wrong, he defended him, and avenged him that was oppressed, and smote the Egyptian: 7:25 For he supposed his brethren would have understood how that God by his hand would deliver them: but they understood not. 7:26 And the next day he shewed himself unto them as they strove, and would have set them at one again, saying, Sirs, ye are brethren; why do ye wrong one to another? 7:27 But he that did his neighbour wrong thrust him away, saying, Who made thee a ruler and a judge over us? 7:28 Wilt thou kill me, as thou diddest the Egyptian yesterday? 7:29 Then fled Moses at this saying, and was a stranger in the land of Madian, where he begat two sons. 7:30 And when forty years were expired, there appeared to him in the wilderness of mount Sina an angel of the Lord in a flame of fire in a bush. 7:31 When Moses saw it, he wondered at the sight: and as he drew near to behold it, the voice of the LORD came unto him, 7:32 Saying, I am the God of thy fathers, the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. Then Moses trembled, and durst not behold. 7:33 Then said the Lord to him, Put off thy shoes from thy feet: for the place where thou standest is holy ground. 7:34 I have seen, I have seen the affliction of my people which is in Egypt, and I have heard their groaning, and am come down to deliver them. And now come, I will send thee into Egypt. 7:35 This Moses whom they refused, saying, Who made thee a ruler and a judge? the same did God send to be a ruler and a deliverer by the hand of the angel which appeared to him in the bush. 7:36 He brought them out, after that he had shewed wonders and signs in the land of Egypt, and in the Red sea, and in the wilderness forty years. 7:37 This is that Moses, which said unto the children of Israel, A prophet shall the Lord your God raise up unto you of your brethren, like unto me; him shall ye hear. 7:38 This is he, that was in the church in the wilderness with the angel which spake to him in the mount Sina, and with our fathers: who received the lively oracles to give unto us: 7:39 To whom our fathers would not obey, but thrust him from them, and in their hearts turned back again into Egypt, 7:40 Saying unto Aaron, Make us gods to go before us: for as for this Moses, which brought us out of the land of Egypt, we wot not what is become of him. 7:41 And they made a calf in those days, and offered sacrifice unto the idol, and rejoiced in the works of their own hands. 7:42 Then God turned, and gave them up to worship the host of heaven; as it is written in the book of the prophets, O ye house of Israel, have ye offered to me slain beasts and sacrifices by the space of forty years in the wilderness? 7:43 Yea, ye took up the tabernacle of Moloch, and the star of your god Remphan, figures which ye made to worship them: and I will carry you away beyond Babylon. 7:44 Our fathers had the tabernacle of witness in the wilderness, as he had appointed, speaking unto Moses, that he should make it according to the fashion that he had seen. 7:45 Which also our fathers that came after brought in with Jesus into the possession of the Gentiles, whom God drave out before the face of our fathers, unto the days of David; 7:46 Who found favour before God, and desired to find a tabernacle for the God of Jacob. 7:47 But Solomon built him an house. 7:48 Howbeit the most High dwelleth not in temples made with hands; as saith the prophet, 7:49 Heaven is my throne, and earth is my footstool: what house will ye build me? saith the Lord: or what is the place of my rest? 7:50 Hath not my hand made all these things? 7:51 Ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Ghost: as your fathers did, so do ye. 7:52 Which of the prophets have not your fathers persecuted? and they have slain them which shewed before of the coming of the Just One; of whom ye have been now the betrayers and murderers: 7:53 Who have received the law by the disposition of angels, and have not kept it.

Five Dirty Bikers
S3 | EP 38 - Staci Wilt with Ride to Food

Five Dirty Bikers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:38


Who doesn't love motorcycles, food and adventures? Well you get all three with this episode's guest. Staci Wilt with Ride to Food joins us to talk about her high mile food runs, travel experiences and the direction of her passion in an episode that will certainly leave you wanting tacos.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Go here to join our FREE DiscordVisit Five Dirty Bikers on social media!FacebookInstagramTikTok- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Visit the website: www.fivedirtybikers.com

Tony & Dwight
Tuesday's Tool. Cards Cruise. Lamar v. Teddy. Elvira & Wilt. Jada & Will. And August. And...

Tony & Dwight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 26:03


Tony & Dwight
Tuesday's Tool. Cards Cruise. Lamar v. Teddy. Elvira & Wilt. Jada & Will. And August. And...

Tony & Dwight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 26:03


Glory Baptist Church
Wilt Thou Also Abandon God

Glory Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 59:00


Wilt Thou Also Abandon God

Bedrock Talks
Wat je als vrouw wilt weten over vruchtbaarheid met gynaecoloog Annemiek Nap

Bedrock Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 45:51


In deze podcast hebben we het over alles wat je als vrouw (en dus ook als man) wilt weten over vruchtbaarheid. Wat zijn fabels, taboes en de dingen die je écht wilt weten als je aan kinderen wilt beginnen? En gaat dat wel zo makkelijk als je denkt er klaar voor te zijn? In deze podcast willen we alle feiten rondom vruchtbaarheid op tafel krijgen. Daarvoor gaan we in gesprek met gynaecoloog Annemiek Nap.  Deze podcast maken we niet alleen, dat doen we in samenwerkingen met Merck: een farmaceut die zich inzet om het taboe rondom vruchtbaarheid bespreekbaar te maken. Samen gaan we in drie afleveringen op zoek naar alles over vruchtbaarheid, zwanger worden en de keuze om aan kinderen te beginnen. Want een super groot onderdeel van het leven is voortplanting, maar waarom is het dan toch zo'n lastig onderwerp en weten we er stiekem zo weinig vanaf? In deze derde - en laatste - aflevering van bespreken we alle feiten (en fabels!) rondom zwanger worden en vruchtbaarheid. In de vorige podcasts bespraken we al het taboe rondom vruchtbaarheid en de keuzestress rondom een kinderwens. Meer weten? Ga naar: https://merckfertiliteit.nl/podcasts/. 

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

tv canada russian canadian oakland business roscoe california american fuck berlin ucla star wars man indiana colorado north god new york city war football baseball nfl mit new york times knoxville magic opportunity house super bowl hawaii hill house hell michael jordan research washington tennessee nba world series ladies league public wind greyhound nebraska indianapolis holy pirates captain nyu hunt mississippi spring buffalo pittsburgh titanic iowa fairfield microsoft sunset strip tom brady teacher bottom fivethirtyeight boston globe vic winning plug espn vanderbilt cuban angels ewing oracle march madness mutual john kennedy damn kentucky elvis presley new haven usa today yale makes jeopardy athletic wall street journal iu penn state kansas city throw louisville sports illustrated punching pc hells angels ev ymca excel bloomington ball state orlando magic hoops labor day fort wayne wilt necessity insider channel nine new york knicks berliner dunkel ncaa bcs correct tonya harding announcers unlv wilt chamberlain defensive romer red october willingness 10x my god lou gehrig references mark cuban georgetown chamberlain bye boston celtics redmond raptor gregorian nit ncaa tournament lsu nc state purdue pete rose princess diaries whoo new york yankees comet crap rpi los angeles dodgers dorchester jack ryan fortran walla walla physically magic johnson ramy los angeles lakers oregon state pro football fibonacci game theory pacers grade b mike vick chris lawson dallas mavericks loyola marymount scylla laettner michael vick x2 spry intuitively tony romo pittsburgh pirates nancy kerrigan patrick ewing nate silver bob knight william wallace kyler murray christian laettner dictate raw data magnavox sam white drew bledsoe frank deford louisville courier journal pauley pavilion glen grunwald andy glockner unitas valkenburg connie hawkins johnny unitas jerry tarkanian paul silas january 6th
Hoop Heads
NBA "Would You Rather...?" - Episode 529

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 60:09


Mike and Jason play a game of NBA "Would You Rather...?" featuring Wilt, James Harden, LeBron, some iconic arenas, and NFL Quarterback Baker Mayfield. Visit our Sponsors! https://www.drdishbasketball.com/ (Dr. Dish Basketball) Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! http://www.fastmodelsports.com/ (Fast Model Sports) Use Code SAVE10 to get 10% off the number one play diagramming software for coaches https://gripspritz.net/ (Grip Spritz) Grip Spritz revitalizes and cleans the soles of your basketball shoes to stop you from slipping and sliding on the court! Better Grip, Better Game! Twitter Podcast - https://twitter.com/hoopheadspod (@hoopheadspod) Mike - https://twitter.com/hdstarthoops (@hdstarthoops) Jason - https://twitter.com/jsunkle (@jsunkle) Network - https://twitter.com/HoopHeadsPodNet (@HoopHeadsPodNet) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hoopheadspod/ (@hoopheadspod) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/ (https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/) YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ) Support this podcast

OVT Fragmenten podcast
Het Spoor Terug: Het oor van miljoenen

OVT Fragmenten podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 38:12


'Het Oor van Miljoenen', over de geschiedenis van de microfoon. Radiomaker Marten Minkema trok een tijdje op met microfoon-expert Marco C. van der Hoeven, die één van de mooiste microfoon-verzamelingen ter wereld bezit. Sommige microfoons zijn wel een eeuw oud, veel doen het nog en ze klinken allemaal anders. Maar bovenal: ze hebben allemaal een verhaal: ze vertellen de geschiedenis van de twintigste eeuw. Van der Hoeven maakte een opstelling van een aantal exemplaren, waaronder de legendarische Reisz-microfoon en microfoons gebruikt door Hitler en koningin Wilhelmina. Ook reisden Minkema en Van der Hoeven naar Duitsland, op zoek naar de historie van de microfoon. Techniek: Alfred Koster. Wilt u nog meer microfoongeschiedenis horen: bij dit Spoor hoort ook een 'Spoor Terug extra' podcast, met een wandeling langs de microfoonverzameling van Beeld en Geluid in Hilversum.

MOOD & MIND PODCAST
#39 Waarom je jouw emoties niet langer als positief of negatief wilt beoordelen

MOOD & MIND PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 22:36


Emoties en geloof. Ze lijken soms elkaars tegenpolen. Zeker als je leert dat je uit geloof moet leven en denkt dat je dan geen negatieve emoties mag voelen. Dat je woorden van geloof moet denken en spreken en dat die vooral positief moeten zijn. Dat negatieve emoties een indicatie zouden zijn van ongeloof. Ik ben persoonlijk van mening dat de Bijbel ons dit niet leert. Nergens spreekt de Bijbel op deze wijze over het hanteren van positief of negatief denken tov ons geloof. Wel leert de Bijbel ons te leven vanuit Waarheid in relatie met God en leugens in ons denken neer te halen. Daarbij zie ik nergens dat de Bijbel ons zou leren emoties weg te drukken, maar veelleer te erkennen en er in het licht van Gods liefde en waarheid op de juiste wijze, vol geloof en vertrouwen in Hem, mee om te gaan. Waarbij veel emoties die we kaderen of labelen als negatief niet moeten wegdrukken, maar moeten erkennen en doorworstelen als onderdeel van ons proces in het leven. Toch zijn er momenten dat we moeten opstaan tegen emoties die ons overweldigen of meeslepen in bitterheid, afgunst, zelfmedelijden en andere disfunctionele patronen. Hoe onderscheid je dat en wat zegt de Bijbel hierover?

Off the Court with Coach Jack
Do Limits Exist?

Off the Court with Coach Jack

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 27:31


Do limits exist? This is a question everyone should be asking themselves quite often. Without knowing it, you put limits on yourself constantly throughout your day and life. The impossible is being broken every single day. 99.9% of people put limits on themselves and their abilities. The other 0.01% of people are the ones breaking what was thought to be impossible. We will be on mars soon. We have self-driving cars. Wilt's 100 point record will be broken. Anything is possible, as long as you have the right mindset. It's only impossible until someone does it. The only limits are the ones you put on yourself! Remember that.Download our FREE 25 page EBook: How to Unlock the Mental Side of the Game: https://ctghoops.com/free-ebook/ Website: https://ctghoops.com Off The Court: Basketball Training Podcast With Coach Jack: https://ctghoops.buzzsprout.comYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPvfp1wvkCwIchIEQw1O8rg Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ctghoops?lang=en Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ctghoops/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/closethegatehoops Twitter: https://twitter.com/CTGHoops LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/74617465/admin/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ctghoops/_created/ 

Players Choice
Should Kevin Durant & Steph Curry Be On The Mount Rushmore of NBA Assassins? | Players Choice Episode 52

Players Choice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 157:55


On this episode of Players Choice, we are joined by Big Rone and Basketball Genius from our clubhouse(link below). All they did was join the club on the app, come and give sound takes and soon after we invited them on to the show.  But Anyways, in this episode, we got into a lot. We discussed our Mount Rushmores for both skillsets and assassins! We talked about what Gary Payton, Kevin Garnett, and Charles Barkley would average in today's era. Then we had a start bench cut with Klay Thompson, Kyrie Irving, and Trae Young, and also Luka(kinda). We had a this or that with a bunch of players! Kobe VS. Bron, Wade vs Chris Paul, Blake Griffin vs Kevin Love, Allen Iverson vs Kyrie Irving, Hakeem VS. Tim Duncan. We also dived into the latest news about Ben Simmons, Damian Lillard, Joel Embiid, Deandre Jordan, Lamarcus Aldridge,  Anthony Davis, and Giannis, with a hint of Covid News(Warriors, Knicks, Nets). Also discussed if these players should make the Hall Of Fame! Derrick Rose, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Jamal Crawford, Nikole Vucevic, Bam Adebayo, Lamelo Ball, Lonzo Ball, Deandre Ayton, and Domantas Sabonis. Also, we had the topic of which one of these duos would win the most championships if you only had 10 trophies to give out. Hakeem And Luka, Steph and Shaq, Larry and Magic, Harden and Yao, Kawhi and KD, Kareem and Allen Iverson, Kobe and Giannis, MJ and AD, Lebron and Klay, Wilt and Russ! And much, much, more!!Players Choice airs live on Twitch (link below) every Sunday and Wednesday. Make sure you follow the channel to be notified when we go live.---------------------------------#PlayersChoice #NBAHotTakes #Casuals ---------------------------------

Superiority Complex
Episode 370 -If Thou Wilt, Marry A Podcaster

Superiority Complex

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 85:02


This week the gang tries to wrap their brains around Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.

Don't You Know Who I Am? Hosted by Josh Earl
Top 5 Patreon Preview - with Marcel Blanche-de Wilt

Don't You Know Who I Am? Hosted by Josh Earl

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 12:39


Marcel blanche-de Wilt joins me as we countdwon our favourite ad jingles. Look out Gruen!Hear the full episode at patreon.com/dykwiaAlso come join the live zoom show August 31 and see guests Urzila Carlson, Nick Cody, Mel Buttle and Kirsty Webeck. Tickets only $5 at joshearl.com.au See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Best Minutes Podcast
Minute 166: Wilt Thou Have This Man?

The Best Minutes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 25:55


Everyone knows the answer

Workology
Episode 305: TA Insights Featuring Jamie Starner, Marsha Lacey and Shelly Wilt

Workology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 30:59


It's a good time to be in talent acquisition. Right now there are more recruiting job openings than programmer openings in the U.S. Everyone is hiring and every company needs talent acquisition leaders to reach candidates, hire, and scale quickly. But the market to hire great talent continues to be a challenge especially in certain […] The post Episode 305: TA Insights Featuring Jamie Starner, Marsha Lacey and Shelly Wilt appeared first on Workology.

Miracle Internet Church Radio
Our Witness to the Nations / Dr. Sabrina Sessions / Marshall Perot

Miracle Internet Church Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 182:00


Romans 13:1-4  King James Version 13 Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. 2 Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation. 3 For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same: 4 For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.

Ag PhD Radio on SiriusXM 147
08 11 21 Goss's Wilt in Corn

Ag PhD Radio on SiriusXM 147

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 59:01


08 11 21 Goss's Wilt in Corn by Ag PhD

Huikala Baptist Church - Honolulu, Hawaii
Four Principles of Intercession - Pastor Chris Chadwick

Huikala Baptist Church - Honolulu, Hawaii

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 51:52


"And the Lord said, Shall I hide from Abraham that thing which I do; seeing that Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation, and all the nations of the earth shall be blessed in him? For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, to do justice and judgment; that the Lord may bring upon Abraham that which he hath spoken of him. And the Lord said, Because the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and because their sin is very grievous; I will go down now, and see whether they have done altogether according to the cry of it, which is come unto me; and if not, I will know. And the men turned their faces from thence, and went toward Sodom: but Abraham stood yet before the Lord. And Abraham drew near, and said, Wilt thou also destroy the righteous with the wicked? Peradventure there be fifty righteous within the city: wilt thou also destroy and not spare the place for the fifty righteous that are therein? That be far from thee to do after this manner, to slay the righteous with the wicked: and that the righteous should be as the wicked, that be far from thee: Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right? And the Lord said, If I find in Sodom fifty righteous within the city, then I will spare all the place for their sakes. And Abraham answered and said, Behold now, I have taken upon me to speak unto the Lord, which am but dust and ashes: peradventure there shall lack five of the fifty righteous: wilt thou destroy all the city for lack of five? And he said, If I find there forty and five, I will not destroy it. And he spake unto him yet again, and said, Peradventure there shall be forty found there. And he said, I will not do it for forty's sake. And he said unto him, Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak: Peradventure there shall thirty be found there. And he said, I will not do it, if I find thirty there. And he said, Behold now, I have taken upon me to speak unto the Lord: Peradventure there shall be twenty found there. And he said, I will not destroy it for twenty's sake. And he said, Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak yet but this once: Peradventure ten shall be found there. And he said, I will not destroy it for ten's sake." Genesis 18:17-32

The Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Coop
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Like You've Never Heard Before

The Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Coop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 34:00


On this episode of Showtime With Coop sponsored by betonline.ag, Michael Cooper welcomes Kareem Abdul Jabbar to discuss their legacy on the game and reminisce on their time together. 1:28 Kareem on how his family is doing through the COVID-19 pandemic. 3:26 Kareem's thoughts on the 1980 season after the Lakers drafted Magic. What was it like to have Magic join an established team? 4:27 Did Kareem think Magic was going to be great from the start? 4:00 BOL Ad Read 4:57 What was it like to play for a legendary head coach like UCLA's John Wooden? 6:05 How influential was John Wooden in Kareem's life overall? Not just in basketball, but in life. 7:20 How easy was it for some of those Showtime Lakers teams to defer their personal egos for the betterment of the team? 8:05 Coop: Magic was not a great individual defender, but he was very good defensively at one thing. 8:52 What would The Last Dance or camera crews following around the '87-'88 Lakers look like? Kareem: "I see these guys as my brothers still now, thirty years later. Those guys as my brothers we did something that will last a lifetime." 9:46 The birthday trick Coop and other Lakers played on Kareem in the mid 80's. Kareem: "You sow the wind, you reap the whirlwind." 12:17 Kareem: "Those were good times Coop. I remember one time we had to circle around back a half hour later to pick you up from the airport, because you got left at the airport." 13:01 How Kareem got into jazz and his dad's influence. 14:29 Kareem on the house fire that destroyed his famed record collection and how fans helped him to restore the collection. 15:35 Of the six championships, which one is Kareem's favorite title? Kareem: "We're the only team to win a world championship in Boston Garden other than the Boston Celtics and they got to live with that forever." 17:10 In the early 80's what was Kareem's favorite memories of the Lakers. 18:38 Kareem's thoughts heading into his final year with the Lakers when Byron Scott got injured before the NBA Finals vs. Detroit Pistons. Coop: "Every game [in that series] getting swept, we were ahead at halftime. They just had more than we did going down the stretch." 19:57 Kareem on his farewell tour and gifts that he received. Kareem: "It was draining in a lot of ways because I had to go out there and be genuine and that will take something out of you." 21:40 Kareem on being an English Major in college and how writing became a big part of his life. Kareem: "When I got into my retirement and realized 'you have to do something creative and positive with your life. You can't just stop living' and writing has always been something I've wanted to pursue." 22:38 Kareem on his relationship with Wilt. 23:43 Kareem on Kobe's passing. Kareem: "Kobe was an incredible athlete and parent. He really set an example in both areas that would be hard to emulate." 24:45 What makes Kareem laugh now. Kareem: "Sometimes I'll go passed the court and people will go: 'Take your shot,' and I can't even reach the hoop man, it's like 'Did I ever do that?'" 26:44 Does he get satisfied more from playing basketball, writing or acting? 27:15 Lighting round: One sentence each Herbie Hancock Bill Russell James Wilkes Barack O'Bama Langston Hughes Larry Bird 30:26 Deborah Morales is Kareem's manager and Coop asked her what it's like to manage his schedule and Deborah shares an incredible story about managing Kareem's schedule. 31:40 What's the oddest request Deborah Morales has ever had for Kareem. Listen and Subscribe to the Showtime Lakers Podcast with Michael Cooper and Ari Temkin on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and the CLNS Media Network mobile app.

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Morning Ag News, July 26, 2021: Some corn fields experiencing disease pressure

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 3:05


Dr. Andrew Friskop, NDSU Extension Cereal Crop Pathologist, says the Plant Diagnostic Lab at NDSU has received a few samples of Goss's Wilt. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DW Sports
Was Wilt Chamberlain's 100 point game real or fake?

DW Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 30:25


What do you think? Did Wilt really score 100? --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/will-feller1/message

Joshua Generation Ministries Audio Podcast

When Jesus saw him lie and knew that he had been now a long time in that case he saith unto him Wilt thou be made whole

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre
Giannis is More Wilt Than Shaq, Bucks are a One Night Stand & CP3's Future

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 36:54


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with a full breakdown of the Milwaukee Bucks' NBA Finals series victory over the Phoenix Suns. First, kudos to Giannis Antetokounmpo for putting on an epic performance in Game 6. With this ring and Finals MVP award, the Greek Freak has joined some elite company in NBA History. That said, as great as his performance was, let's pump the brakes on all the Shaquille O'Neal comparisons. Shaq was bulldozing through defenders back in his heyday while Giannis is more likely to explode around them. In many ways, Giannis is much more like Wilt Chamberlain than he is like Shaq. Later, Jason looks into his crystal ball to determine whether or not the Bucks have any chance at repeating as champions next season. In a word: No. In a few words: Hell No. This is not the start of a Bucks Dynasty; It's the culmination of a One Night Stand. Milwaukee had a magical run where everything seemed to break in their favor, and credit to them they were able to capitalize. Just don't' expect them to have such a charmed path again. Finally, Jason closes the show by sharing a quick thought on Chris Paul's future with the Phoenix Suns. NBA Twitter is clamoring for CP3 to join forces with LeBron James in Los Angeles, but that's hard pass on J-Mac's end. Paul – and the Lakers – would be better off if he just stayed in Phoenix.   Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

No Dunks
Beach Steppin' | Is Giannis Wilt 2.0, New Wilson Basketballs & Leigh's Adventures At Legoland

No Dunks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 83:29


No Dunks hit the beach to answer your questions and comments! Topics include: Whether Wilt Chamberlain would dominate today's game like Giannis, the NBA switching to a new Wilson basketball next season, two hours of your life you wish you had back, comparing current players to exotic animals, the wedgie's popularity, Leigh's adventures at the original Legoland park in Denmark, and more. Subscribe to No Dunks on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/NoDunksInc Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Liberty Baptist Church of Rock Falls, IL
If Thou Wilt Be Perfect - Audio

Liberty Baptist Church of Rock Falls, IL

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 47:14


7/18/2021 Sunday Morning

NBA Storytime
Post-Game: Langston Kerman talks Wilt's Lovemaking Prowess

NBA Storytime

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 33:52


Jamel Johnson is joined by actor, writer and comedian Langston Kerman. Langston is known for his role as Jared on HBO's Insecure. Langston Kerman also appeared on Season 2 of 'The Boys' on Amazon Prime. We discuss the question you're all wondering: Did Wilt Chamberlain actually sleep with 20,000 women? Even though he's been retired for nearly 50 years and dead for 20, Wilt Chamberlain still looms large over the NBA. Nicknamed the record book, which admittedly isn't as whimsical as the big dipper or as lyrical as “Wilt The Stilt” Chamberlain has 72 NBA records that still stand to this day. But there is one of Wilt's records that Will never be touched no matter what rules come or go. In his memoir “view from above” Wilt Chamberlain claims to have slept with 20,000 different women from the ages of 15 to 55, but is that even possible? Could one man have really had 20,000 lovers? If yes, did he cum that many times as well? Or is it a tale as tall as Wilt the Stilt? Langston and Jamel break it down. ⏰ CHAPTERS ⏰  (00:00) Intro to 20,000 Lovers (01:26) Langston Kerman Doesn't Buy It (04:27) Mathematically Impossible (07:45) We've Never Met These Women (10:11) There's No Way It Was Enjoyable (12:31) No Diseases? (16:29) Wilt's Grotto  (20:10) We Feel Bad For Wilt (21:51) John Stockton's Body Count (24:06) Wilt Played Pro Volleyball After Retiring  (26:13) Which Insecure Character Would Bang Wilt? (29:19) Red Auerbach Hanging Out With Wilt (31:27) Closing Thoughts

NBA Storytime
The 20,000 Lovers of Wilt Chamberlain

NBA Storytime

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 10:56


In his autobiography Wilt Chamberlain claimed to have slept with 20,000 women. Is this even possible or is it a tale as tall as Wilt the Stilt?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Over and Back: Stories About NBA History
NBA Playoff Buzzer Beaters: Episode 2 (2nd Round, Semifinals & Conference Finals Series Clinchers)

Over and Back: Stories About NBA History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 64:42


Our series on NBA playoff buzzer beaters continues with a look at second round, semifinals and conference finals series clinches.  Shots discussed in this episode include: Tom Heinsohn concluding the very first Russell vs. Wilt playoff series in 1960 Kawhi Leonard's baseline jumper hits the rim four times before finally falling in and moving the Toronto Raptors past the Philadelphia 76ers in 2019. JoJo White's anti-climatic free-throw series clincher in 1974 against the Buffalo Braves Michael Jordan puts a dagger in the Cleveland Cavaliers' hearts again. This time in 1993. Ralph Sampson helps the young Houston Rockets upset the juggernaut Los Angeles Lakers in 1986. After years of failing to clinch their ticket to the NBA Finals, John Stockton hits a wide-open three to give the Utah Jazz their first finals berth in 1997.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Championship Ringside
NBA Rivalries

Championship Ringside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 90:17


Wilt crawling over women to battle Kareem! Bird criticizing Dr. J afro! Gobert a top 10 all-time rim protector?! Blizzy Blaze and Keem this episode talk about these topics along with NBA's greatest rivalries. Happy Basketball. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app