Podcasts about Ginn

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Best podcasts about Ginn

Latest podcast episodes about Ginn

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun
Ginette Jones: "Loosst eis eis Sozialaarbecht maachen, wéi Sozialaarbecht muss gemaach ginn", 20/09/2022 08:10

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022


De Message riicht d'Presidentin vun der "Entente des offices sociaux" als Invitée vun der Redaktioun un d'Lëtzebuerger Politik.

RTL - Commentaire
Roy Grotz: Mir ginn nach gewuer, wat d'Pond Kiischte kascht!, 13/09/2022 17:50

RTL - Commentaire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


D'Parteie lauden de Walkampf an, kee soll geschount ginn an d'Koalitiouns-Raison vun der Dräier-Regierung dierft och geschwënn dem Passé ugehéieren - d'Superwaljoer annoncéiert sech massiv virum Ausgang vun der Tripartite matzen an Zäiten, wou Krisen an Ängschten d'Ambiance bestëmmen - mä dovunner soll sech d'Politik net leede loossen, seet de Roy Grotz a sengem Commentaire.

The Sportlight Podcast
Jeff Ginn on How Youth Coaches are the Most Well Intended Liars on the Face of the Planet

The Sportlight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 52:55


On this week's spotlight podcast we sit down with long time soccer coach Jeff Ginn. We talk about a comment he made at one of our events that "Youth Coaches are the most well intended liars on the face of the planet". He explained what he meant by this and the benefits of being authentic and genuine but not harsh with youth athletes. Especially for Athletes: Website: https://especialyforathletes.orgFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/EspeciallyForAthletes/Twitter: https://twitter.com/E4AfamilyInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/especiallyforathletes/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmbWc7diAvstLMfjBL-bMMQ Credits: Hosted by Shad MartinProduced by Shad Martin and IMAGINATE STUDIO See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.Support the show: https://especiallyforathletes.com/podcast/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Brewing Business
What Millennials Should Know About Infertility

Brewing Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 35:48


To kickoff Season 2 of Brewing Business, we invited Emily Ginn to join our show! Ginn is a certified life coach and a masters-level Social Worker based in Austin, TX. Her cognitive-behavioral approach brings awareness, clarity, and support or her clients. Emily works with women considering, seeking, or undergoing fertility treatment who want to enjoy their lives even in the midst of infertility. Source

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Brewing Business: What Millennials Should Know About Infertility

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 35:48


To kickoff Season 2 of Brewing Business, we invited Emily Ginn to join our show! Ginn is a certified life coach and a masters-level Social Worker based in Austin, TX. Her cognitive-behavioral approach brings awareness, clarity, and support or her clients. Emily works with women considering, seeking, or undergoing fertility treatment who want to enjoy […]

Breaking Changes
The Application of the OpenJS Foundation in the API Lifecycle with Robin Bender Ginn, Director, OpenJS Foundation

Breaking Changes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 42:56


In this episode of Breaking Changes, Postman Chief Evangelist Kin Lane is joined by Robin Bender Ginn, Executive Director of the Open JS Foundation. Robin shares more about the importance of the OpenJS Foundation, open source policy, and how it applies across the API lifecycle, exploring the value delivered by the Linux Foundation and its subgroups.

Football Night in Northern Colorado
August 31 – Tom Ginn

Football Night in Northern Colorado

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 40:04


This week's guest is Tom Ginn, Business Sales Leader for ALLO Communications

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun
René Winkin: "De System fänkt u pervers ze ginn", 31/08/2022 08:10

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022


Dat sot e Mëttwoch de Moien den Direkter vun der Fedil, der Stëmm vun der Lëtzebuerger Industrie, als eisen Invité vun der Redaktioun.

Recovery After Stroke
Pontine Stroke Recovery – Ginn Thompson

Recovery After Stroke

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 76:25


Ginn Thompson is on the road to Pontine Stroke Recovery which occurred in March 2022 when she was age 38 The post Pontine Stroke Recovery – Ginn Thompson appeared first on Recovery After Stroke.

Elliot
Bass House, Electro House & Tech House Set - Elliot B2B Dr. Ginn

Elliot

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 73:55


~ Elliot B2B Dr Ginn B2B Set ~ Another energic B2B set with my man @drginnmusic from Barcelona! Follow me on my social media @elliotdeejay for more music and good vibes! ➔ linktr.ee/ElliotDJ ----- Otro enérgico B2B con mi colega @drginnmusic desde Barcelona! Sígueme en mis redes sociales @elliotdeejay para más música y buen rollo! ➔ linktr.ee/ElliotDJ ====== Follow Dr. Ginn: https://linktr.ee/Dr.Ginn ====== The 'Elliot Live' series bring you all the Elliot's live DJ sets at clubs, festivals, shows and other venues. ----- La serie 'Elliot Live' te trae todos los DJ sets en directo de Elliot en clubs, festivals, shows y otros locales. ====== * Legal disclaimer: None of the songs in this mix have been produced by me. For any copyright issues, please contact me. * Nota legal: Ninguna de las canciones en esta sesión ha sido producida por mí. Para cualquier problema relacionado con derechos de autor, por favor contactar conmigo.

The Excessive Prospect Analysis Podcast
Episode 11: Very Initial Pictures

The Excessive Prospect Analysis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 133:04


Following a bounceback week for the A's system after a significant roster restructuring, I take a look at four players who are new either to the A's organization or to health. What's behind David MacKinnon's incredible Triple-A performance, and can it translate to the majors? How do J.T. Ginn and Jorge Juan look after returning from lengthy injury layoffs? And is ninth-rounder Caeden Trenkle, fresh off hitting .400 in his first full-season series, already looking like a steal in the 2022 draft? I answer those questions in addition to going over the other developments in the Oakland system this past week. Timestamps: 0:00—Intro/General Discussion 10:54—Las Vegas 55:54—Midland 1:22:53—Lansing 1:51:08—Stockton

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun
Yves Cruchten: Déi Kéier sollt ee sech an der Tripartite déi néideg Zäit ginn, 16/08/2022 08:10

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022


Dat sot den LSAP-Fraktiounspresident a President vun der aussepolitescher Chamberkommissioun. Hie war en Dënschdeg eisen Invité vun der Redaktioun.

Nerd heaven
Batman Begins - Detailed Analysis & Review

Nerd heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 67:21


Batman Begins is my favourite standalone Batman movie. It set a precedent for the kind of grounded serious superhero movie that I would love going forward. So let's dig in an talk about it. Over the next three episodes, I'll be covering the Dark Knight Trilogy, but it all begins here with Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins. ----more---- (Player control to listen to this podcast at bottom of page) Transcript Welcome to Nerd Heaven. I'm Adam David Collings The author of Jewel of The Stars. And I am a nerd. This is episode 92 of the podcast.   Today, we're talking about the movie Batman Begins.   The description on IMDB reads After training with his mentor, Batman begins his fight to free crime-ridden Gotham City from corruption.   The story for this movie was written by David S. Goyer The screenplay was written by Christopher Nolan. It was directed by Christopher Nolan And it first released in June 2005  In order to share my thoughts and reactions to Batman Begins, I need to very briefly talk about my past experience with Batman. Much like Superman, Batman has always been a part of my consciousness. I can't remember a time in my life before I knew about Batman. He was just always there.   The first version of the character that I actively remember engaging with was the 60s TV series, although I'm sure there was awareness before that. I wasn't alive in the 60s, of course, but I saw the show on repeats. Remember Saturday morning cartoons in the 80s? Our local TV station did their own Saturday morning show, and amongst all the cartoons, they always showed one live action show. At one point they showed the Beverly Hillbillies. At another point, it was Adam West Batman.   I enjoyed the show, but I think even at the time, I was aware that it was incredibly cheesy and silly. But to me, Superheroes were not silly. I took them very seriously.   When news of the 1989 Tim Burton movie came out, my ears pricked up. I didn't see the movie at the cinema. We just didn't really go to the cinema much when I was a kid. We watched everything on Video. And that's how I eventually saw this movie. But I remember seeing the marketing. And I had a hardcover book about the making of the movie. I remember looking at the darker aesthetic and thinking, wow. This is a gritter, more serious take on Batman. I was VERY interested. Would this movie take the character as seriously as I did?   When I finally saw the movie, I enjoyed it. It was more grounded. I liked how they explained the Joker's smile. He had to have his skin stretched after his accident, so he used makeup to make it less weird. At least, that's how I interpreted it. It wasn't until a few years ago that I realised that the normal skin tone was actually the makeup, and the white skin was real.   This movie was much closer to the kind of Batman I wanted, but it still had more campiness than I expected. Most of that came from the Joker. Seeing him prance about with his goons spray painting the museum, it felt like I was right back in Adam West land. But it was more than that. There was a thick veneer of un-realness over them, especially the second. It was the architecture, the people, the 1930s cameras, Penguin's father's monocle.   And the movies in that series got progressively more and more silly. I don't want to speak too disparagingly about that series, because there's lots of good stuff to like.   But when they announced that the Batman movies were getting rebooted, I was very interested once again.   And this time, they really were taking it seriously. Batman Begins was a more serious grounded Batman. This was a movie that took the character as seriously as I did. It treated him like a person and really fleshed out Bruce Wayne as much as it did Batman. This was EXACTLY what I'd been looking for. And to this day, Batman Begins is still my favourite stand-alone Batman movie. It'll be interesting to see if that still holds after I re-watch The Dark Knight, which I've only ever seen once. I say standalone because Batman V Superman was a multi-hero movie. But Batman Begins primed me for Zack Snyder's work. Batman Begins made me fall in love with the grounded serious Superhero movie. And I've never looked back.   So let's dig in and talk about it.   So the movie begins with a shot of the sky with bats flying everywhere, and Batman's logo revealed in the background. That logo is so recognisable that you really don't need any text. That's something the marketers knew even back in 1989.   Bruce is running around his garden as a child. Most Batman stories begin with Bruce walking through the alley with his parents at night, but this is a different take. This is Bruce before the tragedy. It's all bright colours and sunny. Bruce has a big smile on his face as he plays with his childhood friend Rachel. But he's a bit of a little ratbag. Rachel has found something cool, it's an old arrowhead, and he snatches it from her. It seems that child Bruce has developed a sense of, I can have what I want, because I'm rich. Not exactly the lesson his parents would want him to pick up, we'll see later that they're really good people. But this is an attitude that could easily develop in a child raised in an environment like this, unless much care was taken to help him unlearn that kind of stuff.   As Rachel chases him, Bruce falls through a hole into an old boarded up well. rachel runs to get help from her Mum, who is in Wayne Manor, which looks really cool. I'm surprised they didn't take more care to fence it off or something. This well connects to a cave system underground, and it is filled with bats. Young Bruce freaks out as they flap around his face, giving him a life-time fear of bats. This is an important element that will come back later in a way that I thought was really cool.   That's when we cut to Bruce waking up as an adult.   Now I've heard from some sources, some criticisms of this movie and it's realistic take. Pointing out that there are things in it that are far from realistic. Bruce's fall without apparent injury could be classed as one. Although we'll later learn that he did break his leg, but a bit more visible pain on his face would have helped.   For me, when I say I love this movie for its realistic take, it's not about every little moment being perfectly realistic. It's about the realistic take on the characters. It's about the world feeling like ours, rather than having that thick veneer of fakeness plastered over it like the previous movie series. As I said before, it's about this movie taking itself seriously.   This is a Bruce Wayne we've never seen. He's got a beard. He's lying in a foreign prison. Okay, What is going on here?   Most Batman stories do the parents' death and then cut straight to Batman fully costumed and operating in Gotham. But there's a big jump between those. How do you get from one to the other? That was the big promise of this movie. They were going to delve more deeply into Batman's origin story, a story that had never really been told on screen before. We see how Bruce as a young man goes off in search of his destiny, and finally finds it. Finds a way to deal with the pain of his parent's death, and ultimately, becomes the Batman we know. This was a story that was completely new to me, and I loved it.   We don't yet know what Bruce is in here for, but another of the prisoners has it out for him. Is bullying him. I quite like it when the bully refers to himself as the devil, and Bruce says, “you're not the devil. You're practice.”  That tells you so much about Bruce's mindset here. He's using everything around him, every experience, to learn and develop. To become what he wants to become. And that's very Batman.   We get to see a nicely done fight scene. It's fierce and brutal. When the guards drag Bruce away “for protection” and then reveal it's not for him, it's for all the thugs he beat up, I audibly laughed. A little humour, but not the kind of humour that pulls you out of the seriousness of the scene.   Somebody is waiting for him in his cell. A well-dressed Liam Neeson calling himself Ducard. He says something very interesting. “Are you so desperate to fight criminals that you get yourself locked up so you can take them on one at a time.” This gives us a lot of insight into who Bruce is at the moment, and what's going on in his head. Did he deliberately get himself locked up in here? I wouldn't put it past this version of Bruce Wayne.   Of course, Ducard has figured out exactly who Bruce is. And he says he works for Ra's al Ghul, a name I hadn't heard before I watched this movie the first time.   Bruce has been exploring the criminal underworld, but in the process, he's become lost. Rotting in a foreign prison. He may be learning about criminals here, but he's certainly not going to do anybody any good.   Ra's al Ghul can offer him a path. Something he needs but isn't yet convinced about. The path of the League of Shadows.   Ra's al Ghul shared Bruce's hatred of evil. He can provide a way to serve true justice. So a vigilante. Bruce isn't sure that's what he wants to be.   But Ducard sees al Ghul differently. A vigilante is just a man lost in the scramble for his own gratification. He can be destroyed or locked up. Kinda like Bruce right now. But if you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, and if they can't stop you, then you become something else entirely. A legend. There's some good dialog in this film.   And now he's got Bruce's attention. Because he's offering a concrete way to become what Bruce really wants. A way to truly make a difference against the kind of evil, so rampant in his home city, that destroyed his life.   This is as good a time as any to talk about a theory I have. You see, the whole idea of a man dressing up as a bat to fight crime is absurd. It's ridiculous. You might even say, it's pretty stupid. So why does it work? How do you make it work?   When you're adapting a comic book to a movie, and you come across something in the comics that's silly, there's two main ways you can deal with it.   The first is to basically hang a lantern on it. This has become quite popular in recent time, but has been for a long while. The MCU did this when Hawkeye says “I'm fighting robots with a bow and arrow. None of this makes any sense.” I really don't like this approach. It's the acknowledgement, of, this is silly, we know it's silly, but let's just go with it, yeah?   Even Zack Snyder's Justice League does this a little bit, when Aquaman derides Bruce for “dressing up like a bat” and later says “I dig it.”   At the other extreme, you've got the approach that Batman Begins takes. When you find something that's silly, you either find a way to make it work, to make it less silly, or you eject it.   An example of this is the penguin. I believe Christopher Nolan has been quited as saying that The Penguin would never have worked in his trilogy because the character just wouldn't fit with the more realistic take he'd developed.   But right here, in this scene, we're seeing that Batman Begins is going to try to explain why an orphaned boy grows into a man who eventually wears a bat costume, in a way that doesn't feel silly. And for me, personally, it works really well.   Ducard has arranged for Bruce to be released from prison tomorrow. He's instructed to find a rare flower that grows on the mountain. If he can pick one, and bring it to the top of the mountain, he may find what he's been looking for all this time.   I'm liking the character development they're already doing with Bruce. He knows he's looking for something, and he's been stumbling around the world trying to find it, but so far he's failed. This is exactly the kind of person that Ra'as al Ghul would try to recruit. And yes, Bruce may have finally found what he's been searching for.   The scenery in this next sequence is quite beautiful. The grassy plains and the snowy mountains.   He makes his way up the mountain, past villages. They warn him to turn back. I guess there are stories about the questionable people who live up at the top.   Bruce is being put through a physical challenge to reach his destination. It's one thing to want to fight injustice, but it's another to have the strength of body and will to do so. Bruce first has to prove himself capable. Which he does.   Bruce finds an old asian man sitting in a chair when he finally reaches his destination. “Ra'as al Ghul?” he asks. And you'll notice the man doesn't answer. He speaks in another language, and Duard translates. I'm not sure exactly what country this is. I get the impression it's somewhere like Tibet or maybe Nepal.   Bruce is asked “What are you seeking?” “A means to fight injustice. To turn fear against those who prey on the fearful.” Bruce sounds like somebody who has already given a great deal of thought to the answer to that question. We know he's been seeking this for some time.   He presents the flower to Ducard.   “To manipulate fears in others, you must first learn to control your own.” Which seems to make sense.   Bruce can barely stand after his climb, but is still expected to defend himself. Ducard is testing him. He learns that Bruce is afraid, but not of him. Bruce has been in fights with thugs so many times before. He used to that. When Ducard asks him what he fears, we cut back to that childhood memory. Being rescued from that cave full of bats.   We learn here but Bruce did indeed break a bone, so points back for the realism thing. We also see that Rachel's mother works for Wayne as a maid. Importantly, we see Bruce hand the rock back to Rachel as they go past. It seems he's learned a lesson of sorts through this experience. Maybe life isn't all about having everything you want, and taking the things you desire from others.   His father is trying to impart an important lesson to Bruce. “Why do we fall? So we can pick ourselves back up.” That's a lesson that adult Bruce has really taken to heart, which is how he's survived so long in this lifestyle. But he'll have to re-learn it later.   In this scene, we get our first glimpse of Michael Caine as Alfred. Superhero movies are usually cast with unknowns. That makes a lot of sense, especially for the titular heroes. But Christopher Nolan deliberately cast a lot of big name stars in this movie. Michael Caine, Liam Neeson, Morgan Freeman, Katie Holmes.  Nolan's thinking was, why shouldn't a superhero movie deserve to have the very best actors available. Of ourse, star power isn't always directly equal to acting ability, but these actors all do amazing jobs in their roles in this movie.   I was a little sceptical about someone as famous as Michael Cain playing Alfred. Would I really be able to see the character through the famous face? But it absolutely worked for me. All these actors sold me on their characters, and after this, I couldn't imagine anybody else ever playing Alfred. Who could possibly top Michael Cain? Of course, then Jeremy Irons blew me away in Batman V Superman, but that's another story.   Bruce is having recurring nightmares about the bats. They've really scared him. His father explains that they attacked him because they were afraid of him. All creatures feel fear - especially the scary ones. This conversation will really shape who and what Bruce will become.   And then his father shows him a pearl necklace he plans to give Bruce's mother. That's ominous. We know what those pearls mean. Right?   The next scnene gives us some great insight into who Thomas Wayne is. He's not only a good father, he's a good man. The people of Gotham have been going through hard times. He's used his money to provide cheap transport for the city, and he's not above using it himself, by the way. He owns Wayne Enterprises, a big successfully company, but he doesn't take an active role in running it. Instead, he chooses to spend his time working in a hospital as a doctor. In his own way, Thomas Wayne is a hero. He instilled a lot of values into his son.   There's been one or two interpretations of Thomas Wayne where he's a corrupt businessman. Not a nice guy at all. And while I appreciate the grittiness of that approach, I prefer this version of Thomas. The idealistic nice guy who established a legacy for Bruce to follow.   And notice that Thomas is wearing a tuxedo, and Martha is wearing the pearls. We know what's coming.   The actors in the opera seem to be dressed as bats. It's freaking poor Bruce out. There's a little exchange between father and son. First of all, he says “Can we go?” And that just comes across as any restless child who is bored and wants to leave. My response to that would be a quiet firm “No.” But his face shifts and he says “please” in a pleading kind of way. And Thomas sees what's really going on inside Bruce. And being the good father he is, Thomas leaves the show, something he probably spent good money on, something he was probably enjoying himself. But for the sake of his child, there's no question.   Martha hasn't picked up on it the way Thomas did. She asks what is wrong, and Thomas covers for him. I'm not sure exactly why he felt the need to do that. Maybe so as not to embarrass Bruce over his fears. I got another chuckle when Thomas said “A little opera goes a long way, right Bruce.”   So they've left early and are walking through the alley, and that's when it happens. The inevitable moment that defines Bruce's life.   When the mugger appears, Thomas is calm. He's willing to hand over whatever this guy wants. Again this shows the man's values. He cares about his family far more than money. And he's trying to calm the mugger.   But when the wallet drops, the mugger gets jumpy. The mugger wants the jewelly as well. He raises his gun toward Martha. And suddenly it all happens so fast. The previously calm Thomas reacts on instinct. It's not about the pearls. Somebody is pointing a gun at my wife. I must protect her. He stands in front of her. The sudden movement spooks the mugger and he fires. It's all so tragic. They were so close to getting out of this without anybody getting hurt.   Somewhere along the way Martha is shot as well.   And the poor kid is left there in an ally all alone, next to the dead bodies of his parents.   And it's all because they left early. It's all because Bruce was afraid of the bats. That's got to hurt. This is a good addition to the mythology because it drives that knife even deeper into Bruce's heart. And it's that pain that pushes him to become Batman.    The death scene is done pretty well here, but I have to say, after seeing the version Zack Snyder did in Batman V Superman, well, this just can't compare to that. That haunting music! And the lack of blood seems to detract from the realism somewhat.   We get our first look at Commissioner Gordon, although he won't be a commissioner at all during this movie. Right now, he's just a uniform cop. Probably a constable. I don't know exactly how police ranks work in America. You can tell right away he's a good cop. He shows a lot of compassion and empathy for Bruce.   The detective delivers the good news. They got the guy who did this. But that's got to be very little comfort to a child who has just lost his parents.   One of the Wayne Enterprise executives promises they'll be watching over the empire until he's ready. Again, that's the last thing that Bruce cares about.   Bruce breaks down and admits the guilt he's feeling to Alfred. And we see the beginnings of the father figure that Alfred will be from now on. That's a dynamic that I really like.   Back in the present, Ducard asks Bruce if he still blames himself for his parent's death. He says that his anger outweighs his guilt. Honestly, I'm not sure which is healthier.   Bruce has buried his guilt with that anger, but Ducard is going to help him confront it and face the truth.   Next we get something of a training montage. Not quite a montage because there's snippets of dialogue through it.   Bruce has come a long way with his own training, but Ducard will take what he can do and take it to new levels. There are a lot of similarities between Batman, the way he operates, and a ninja. Both use stealth. This movie digs into that and outright makes ninja training a part of Batman's background. I imagine a lot of this is drawn from comics, but I'm not familiar enough to know exactly what. I'm still pretty early the comics-reading journey I recently started.   But it's all good stuff.   One little detail that I love is that during their sword fight, Ducard is wearing armoured spikes on his arms, these are a famous part of Batman's costume.    There is an emphasis on theatricality and deception. These also lead very naturally into what Batman will be and lend believability to the whole thing that I really appreciate.   When Bruce is shown a criminal in a cage, we get some insight into the zero-tolerance that the league of shadows have for crime. Ducard says “criminals thrive in the indulgence of society's understanding.” We'll see shortly the kind of justice that they believe in.   The next conversation explores this idea of guilt and blame.   Ducards says “Your parents' death was not your fault. It was your father's. He failed to act.” Bruce defends his father. “The man had a gun.” “Would that stop you?” “I've had training.” “The training is nothing. Will is everything. The will to act.”   So Ducard is placing the blame firmly on Thomas, for not having the strength of body and will to stop the mugger. This is a very interesting perspective.   The truth is, there are a thousand different things that contributed to them being there at that moment. Bruce's desire to leave early, their decision to go to the opera, Thomas's gift of jewellery to his wife, probably many factors that lead the mugger to choose that particular night, that particular alley.   But ultimately, the blame for his crime, in my opinion, has to fall on the mugger. He made the moral choice to steal from these people, and he made the moral choice to kill them. The responsibility for that crime rests on him.   There's another nice quiet character scene with Bruce and Ducard around a campfire. Ducard displays a keen insight into the kind of pain Bruce has at the centre of his life. The anger he has wrapped around the guilt. The way it has affected him. He shares a little of his own story. He knows Bruce's pain because he shares it, because of the death of his wife.   Then he says something important. “Your anger gives you power, but if you let it, it will destroy you.” And isn't that the truth!   When Bruce asks what helped Ducard, he says vengeance. And I'm going to have to dispute that one. From what I've observed, Vengeance rarely makes people feel better. It doesn't take away the pain. We talked about this in Stargate Universe when Rush took revenge on Simeon for killing Amanda Perry and Ginn.   Bruce says vengeance is no help to him. He asks why Bruce never took revence for his parents.   And that leads us to another flashback. Bruce is now a young man, probably just out of his teens. He's been attending Princeton, which I believe is a pretty high profile university, but he's back home with Alfred for a hearing. Related to the man who killed his parents. Justice works very slowly. But that's probably a good thing. If there's one thing where you don't want to risk making a mistake, it's the justice system. Sadly, of course, no matter how slow and careful they are, there are still mistakes made.    Bruce is not returning to Princeton. Apparently, he hasn't ingratiated himself to the staff there. But he can't see Wayne Manor as his home either. This is his father's house. A mausoleum. Alfred doesn't see it that way. This house has been home to six generations of the Wayne family. Many times, it has passed from parent to child. The child becoming the new master of the home. Moving into the master bedroom is symbolic of that. The only difference is, Thomas's death happened so young, and so tragically.   Bruce doesn't understand why Alfred cares so much. But Alfred cares very much about this family, and thinks of it as his own. We see the same thing with Jeremy Irons' Alfred too. Thomas made Alfred responsible for that which was most precious to him. Bruce. Alfred takes that responsibility very seriously.   And then we find out why Bruce has little regard for his future. We see what Bruce plans to do. He has a hand gun.   But there's a lot more to it than just wanting revenge for killing his parents. We learn that Rachel works for the DA, and the DA is letting the mugger, Chill, go free. He shared a cell with Carmine Falcone. He's testifying against that crime boss in exchange for early parole. So this isn't the sentencing after all. I Guess justice doesn't move THAT slowly.   This is hard one. I understand why the justice system needs to make deals like this. You reward the small fish for helping you catch the big fish. The truth is, Carmine Falcone is a much greater threat to the safety of the people of Gotham than Chill is. If they can bring down Falcone, then a lot of lives can be saved. A lot of crime can be prevented.   But what about Bruce? What about his parents? Where is the justice for them? That's why Bruce feels somebody should be there to represent his parents at this hearing. To remind the world that Chill's crime had consequences. That his crime broke Bruce's life in a way that can never be repaired.   And this is also why he's planning to take justice into his own hands with that gun.   I'm not sure I noticed this when the movie first came out, but watching it now, as a 44 year old, Rachel almost looks too young to be a lawyer. Katie Holmes was famous as a teenage actor in the TV show Dawson's Creek. I didn't watch that show at the time, but I saw a little of it with my wife some time later. I'm still very much seeing that teenager in her face here in this movie. Of course, this movie came out in 2005. It feels like it was just yesterday, but that's actually 17 years ago. My first child was born in 2005. Anyway, I guess the moral of that, which I'm trying to say is that Katie Holmes retained her youthful look, so good on her, and … well….I'm getting kind of old.   As the DA, makes his case, he mentions a depression. To my knoweldge, the only depression that has occured in the last few centuries, was the great depression between the two world wars. We've had a number of recessions, but that's a lesser thing, right? And depression isn't something that just affects one city. A depression affects nations. Multiple nations. So that's a departure from real-world history.   Chill speaks of his regret for his crime. Yes, he was desperate, but that doesn't change what he did. I believe his remorse. It comes across as genuine. After 14 years of paying for the crime, how could you not come to regret it?   We all know regret right. I've been torn up by regret over all sorts of things. But none of them close to the severity of what Chill did.   When the judge announces that a member of the Wayne family is present, and invites Bruce to speak, the actor playing Chill does some great stuff with his face, showing the emotion that the character is feeling in that moment. The shame and guilt. The regret. How do you face the living victim of your murder?   But Bruce doesn't speak. He stands and walks out. And gets his gun ready. Bruce walks toward Chill, gun hidden in his sleeve, but he never gets the chance. Somebody else shoots Chill dead. No doubt somebody working for Falcone.   Bruce and Rachel talk about the difference between justice and revenge. Bruce posits that sometimes they are the same thing. Rachel says that justice is about harmony. Revenge is about making you feel better. But Bruce points out her impartial system is broken, which, it is. We talked about that, the imperfection of humans.   So Rachel decides to give him a real lesson. She takes him into the slums. She shows him the people living in poverty. Falcone floods the streets with violence and drugs. He makes these people desperate. The real villain in Bruce's story may not be the man who pulled the trigger. It's Falcone, who made Chill desperate enough to want to steal. (Which obviously doesn't exonerate Chill for his terrible crime). Rachel knows exactly where Falcone hangs out. He's there in that bar every night. But through corruption and threats, he keeps the police at bay. Nobody will touch him. They're all too afraid.   This scene is foundational to Bruce becoming Batman. This movie shows there's so much more to it than just the death of his parents and training to be a ninja. There's some real depth to the story in Batman Begins, and I love it.   Bruce admits to Rachel that he's not one of her good people. Shows her the gun. She gives him the slap he deserves. And she's right. His father would be ashamed of him right now.    So Bruce storms right into Falcone's bar and walks up to the crime boss. I like how the first half of this movie uses Falcone as its primary antagonist. In the grand scheme of things, he turns out to be a minor foe for Batman, but at this point in his life, Falcone is an untouchable, insurmountable foe to Bruce.   The conversation between Falcone and Bruce is fantastic. More great dialog. Falcone has the kind of power where he wouldn't hesitate to shoot Bruce in the head, right here, in front of cops and judges. That's power. The power of fear.   In a few quick sentences, he reminds Bruce how much he actually does have to lose. Rachel, his butler. He thinks he knows pain, but he knows nothing of desperation. It's ironic that Falcone is the cause of so much desperation in this city, but he understands it. He lives amongst it. Bruce doesn't yet comprehend that type of desperation.   But as we've seen earlier in the movie - he will.  This encounter with Falcone is the impetus he needs to go and start learning about desperation and fear. To begin his long training toward becoming Batman. So he can be one of Rachel's good people. A good person who won't just do nothing.   I don't know if Bruce will ever think of himself as good. He's too morally gray. But he's going to stand against the evil that has infested his city. Like his father did before him, in a very different way.   As soon as he's thrown out of the bar, Bruce begins to shed the trappings of his privileged life. His wallet, his cards. His fancy clothes. He sells his nice coat to a homeless man, exchanging it for a ratty old one. His journey has begun.   During this training, he lost a lot of assumptions about the simple nature of right and wrong. But he never fully gave in to it all. He didn't become one of them. He stole, but technically, the things he stole belonged to his company anyway. He still had a moral line.   So back in the present, Ducard is using drugs to teach Bruce a lesson. He must become more than a man. He must become an idea. He must use fear against his enemies. The drug is from that purple flower that grows on the mountain. It has hallucinogenic properties.   Ra's Al Ghul is satisfied that Bruce has overcome his fear. He's ready to join the league of Shadows and lead these men. But first, he has to prove his commitment to justice.   He has to behead a criminal in front of them all. But this is one of those lines Bruce has set. He's not an executioner. He won't kill this man. That's not justice. That's what Rachel tried to teach him.   This is where he differs from the League of Shadows. He'll fight men like this in Gotham. But he won't kill them. Ducard brings up a classic objection. “You compassion is a weakness your enemies will not share.” And Bruce has a good comeback. “That's why it's so important. It separates us from them.”   Ducard makes a point that Bruce knows well. Legal systems are corrupt. They are often not fit to dispense true justice. Bruce has seen this first hand in Gotham. The League has turned their sights on Gotham. That city has become so corrupt, it's time for it to die. And Bruce, as their “Prince” as Falcone called him, “is the perfect one to deliver that justice.” They plan to destroy the entire city. As they believe, this is necessary.   And so is born this Batman's no-kill rule.    I have no problem with this Batman having a no-kill rule. I quite like it. This Bruce still has some idealism left. I like idealism. I also have no issue with Ben Affleck's Batman having no such rule. That's Bruce at a very different time of his life, in a very different situation. Batman has certainly killed before, in comics, and in other movies. Remember that time when Michael Keaton's Batman casually murdered a minor goon and then cracked a joke over his corpse?   Bruce attacks the league to make his escape, burning the temple, and saving Ducard's life. Because he's still a good person.   Now Bruce is ready to be Batman. It's time to go home. Alfred is very happy to see him as he arrives in a private jet. People need a powerful symbol to shake them up. He can't do that as Bruce Wayne. As a man, he can be ignored and destroyed, but as a symbol, he can be indestructible.   We get a nice little moment of humour as Alfred expresses some concern over his safety with Bruce's new endeavour. We also learn that Bruce was declared legally dead by the Wayne Enterprise shareholders. They wanted his majority share, but luckily, he left everything to Alfred, who is now a wealthy man in his own right. The overhead view of the Gotham skyline shows us a very realistic looking city. A place we can well believe exists. A far cry from the gothic cartoonish Gotham we've seen in previous Batman movies. This was a breath of fresh air to me. I could never really connect with the setting of the previous movies. The city just felt so overwhelmingly fake and non-real.   Now, before we see the birth of Batman, we need to meet a new character, One who will be an important villain in this movie going forward. Doctor Crane. The psychologist that gets all of Falcone's thugs declared insane, and transferred to his care, rather than facing criminal justice.   Rachel is onto him, of course, as probably everyone else is. But she's the only one with the courage to do something about it. Interestingly, Rachel seems to be taking on something of the role that Jim Gordon generally fills in the comics. The one brave good person who is willing to stand up when everyone else just looks away, either for money, or out of fear.   Of course, we see Jim Gordon doing that as well in this movie, but so far, he's been largely absent.   Rachel is warned to back off by one of her colleagues. You can't take on somebody like that. You just have to pretend it's not happening.   Bruce's first step is research. And that's a very Batman quality. Preparation. He needs to know if he'll have any allies out there. He finds some newspaper clippings about Gordon.   And that's when he sees the bat. And after all that Ducard taught him, he has an idea. He goes down the well that he fell into as a child, and finds the cave.   The cave is very rustic. It's not a habitable place, as caves generally aren't. I love the waterfall. As Bruce stands up, allowing the bats to flap all around him, he finds that he has overcome his fear of them. Now that he has it under control, it's time to share that fear with his enemies.   Despite his bravado, Rachel actually has Crane a little spooked. He has a deal with Falcone. He gets his thugs off the hook, and Falcone brings in a shipment of something for Crane. Falcone is more interested in favours than money, and for somebody like him, that makes a lot of sense. Falcone has plenty of money, but it's the favours, the connections, that make him who he is. That's the basis of his power. Other people doing what he wants so he remains untouchable. Anyway, Falcone is gonna take care of Rachel for him.   We see in the board meeting, that they are wrestling with the idea of going against the kinds of business practices that Thomas Wayne believed in. One of them argues that after 20 years they should be able to stop thinking about what Thomas Wayne would have done. And …. In part….. I think he does have a point. Thomas is no longer alive and hasn't been involved in this company for two decades.  They're the ones running this business. They need the freedom to take it in their own direction.   But, in terms of values, that's a little different. Thomas Wayne clearly set precedent for the kinds of moral and ethical values that Wayne Enterprises stands for. And those values are something that perhaps should endure. Especially when you're carrying on the legacy of your founder.   Bruce says he's not here to interfere with the company. He just wants a job to get to know the company his father built. He's interested in the applied science division. Of course, he has something of an ulterior motive here.   And this is where we get to meet Lucias Fox. Now as I understand it, this character was created for the movie, and he became so beloved, that they actually added him into the comics. This kind of thing has happened before. Batgirl was first created by the Adam West TV show, and later became part of the comics. Harley Quinn, as well. I think it was an animated series for her.   Anyway, I like Lucias Fox, and it's hard not to when he's played so warmly by the one and only Morgan Freeman.    Fox is surprised Bruce would want to be here. This division is a dead end, to keep Fox from causing any trouble for the board. A whole bunch of prototype technologies, not in production. Exactly what a young Billionaire needs when he wants to come a superhero vigilante.   This scene is great because it legitimises all of Batman gadgets. His suit is an advanced body armour, not used in active duty by the military because it's too expensive. But perfect for a vigilante who only needs one or two.   I've often heard the criticism that Batman can't have body armour any more advanced than what the US Military use in real life because they always have the best that has been invented. I think this scene goes some way to help address that.   This is what I was talking about earlier. You find something that's kind of silly in a superhero's story. In a movie like this, you either make it feel believable, or you dump it.   And that's the key. Making it feel believable, even if it's not strictly 100% realistic. That's not the point. It needs to feel sensible, not silly. It needs to give you enough to help you suspend your disbelief.   And for me, Batman Begins does that perfectly.   I love how Fox sees completely through Bruce's excuse. But all this stuff belongs to him. If he wants to use it, why not?   Alfred gives us another nice little bit of texture. Back in the civil war, Bruce's great-great-grandfather was involved in the secret railroad, helping free slaves. The caves under the mansion came in handy. There is already a passage down into them. Another nice touch that adds an extra veneer of believability to this whole thing.   Bruce is now making his suit. Painting the body armour and adding the arm spikes he learned about with Ducard. Alfred helps him figure out the logistics of ordering the materials he needs to assemble everything without raising suspicion.   We check back in with Jim Gordon. He's in an interesting situation. He's not that courageous good man standing against corruption yet. He refuses to take bribes himself, but he does sit idly by while his partner Flass collects his money. He even assures Flass that he's no rat. He won't tell anyone about the bribes. He's resigned to the fact that there's nobody to rat to.   Gordon is in a small way still part of the problem. He's definitely not yet a part of the solution.   But Bruce pays him a little visit.   I like how on Bruce's first time out, he doesn't have the full cowl. He's just wearing a balaclava. I kind of like it when origin stories do that. The slow build-up to the real suit.   Jim needs a little push. It's not until Bruce tells him about Rachel that he really considers taking a stand himself. Bruce wants to take Falcone down for the drug shipments he brings in each week. The shipments that nobody does anything about.   Bruce definitely lacks the elegance we'll come to expect from Batman as he clumsily falls and crashes around the city. He's gonna need more stuff from Fox.   The memory cloth that will form the basis for Batman's cape is pure science fiction. But couching it in science fiction terms once again gives it that sensible believability to me.   I like the exchange between Bruce and Fox. Fox is happy with the plausible deniability of it all. He knows Bruce is up to something. Bruce knows he knows. They don't have to keep pretending otherwise.   And that's when Bruce notices the tumbler.   I love the tumbler.   Designed as a bridging vehicle. They could never get the bridge to work, but the vehicle itself is fine. Perfect for Bruce's needs. I love how they introduce the batmobile in this way. I love how you first see it in Army cammo colours, but Bruce asks if it comes in black. I love everything about the tumbler. The batmobile is one of the silliest things about batman. That name especially. Thank goodness that term is never spoken aloud in this movie, or in the Synder movies. You don't need to call it that on screen, it just needs to be present. I always thought the idea of Batman driving around in a car was pretty silly. But this thing? Now you're talking!   Now, there are some issues with the tumbler in the second movie, which we'll get to. But just looking at Batman Begins in isolation, this is absolutely perfect.   You can see a defined difference between the way Bruce is approaching Falcone now, as opposed to how he did it as a young man. Back then, he was hot-headed. He burst into Falcone's bar armed with nothing but anger and emotion. And he was humiliated. Now, he's taking his time. Doing surveillance. No longer a child, Bruce has become a man. There's still a lot of emotion driving him, of course, but that emotion is no longer in the driver's seat. Bruce has learned to control it.   In reality, this isn't just a drug shipment. There are drugs, but there's also something special for Crane. Flass is actively helping Falcone protect the shipment. And he's all but offered to kill Rachel. And this is where we first see Batman in action. I love this scene. It takes all the tropes of a horror movie and inverts them. It's the bad guys that are being terrorised, and Batman is the monster. In a lot of ways, this scene defined for me, who and what Batman is. I remember playing the Arkham Asylum game. This scene was in my mind as I played that. It impacted how I played the game.   The crooks are vanishing one by one. Being taken by something in the shadows. It's creepy and it's cool. Possibly the best scene in the movie. I love when the crook screams “where are you you?” And then we hear that gravelling voice behind him, as an upside-down Batman says “here.”   They actually use the “hide the monster” trope here, but in the way I like, not in the way I hate. Because the crooks don't get a good glimpse of Batman. Not until right at the end, we finally see Batman in all his glory, as he pulls Falcone out of the car.   Bruce saves Rachel's life, and gives her the leverage she needs to get the judge to do the right thing.   It seems everything is all wrapped up. In one night, Batman has taken down Carmine Falcone, something the police in Gotham haven't been able to do in 20 years.   So Falcone is strapped to a massive floodlight. Making the image of a bat on the clouds. It's this movie's take on the bat signal.   This is a moment that gets criticism. Those floodlights get extremely hot. In reality, Falcone would be burned to a very dead crisp. And I can't argue against that. First of all, I'll point out that this light is hardly at full strength. You can tell just by looking at it that the light is pretty dim. But then, there's no way it'd be able to project that image up into the sky to be visible like that. This scene is a cheat. I'll admit that.   I always found the bat signal pretty silly. I never liked the idea that Gotham police had Batman on speed dial. Gordon, sure. But he needs a much more subtle way of getting in touch with him.   I'll admit this moment doesn't quite work, but given the overall tone of the rest of this movie, I kinda don't care.   The point is, we've established just how powerful Bruce has become, in his new persona. Up until this point, Falcone has been the big bad of the movie. He was the primary villain. And he seemed a very powerful, very intimidating villain. How can one man bring down somebody like that?   But Batman has done what that young Bruce could never have conceived of. He's brought down Falcone, and it feels kind of effortless.   Bruce Wayne has come of age.  But they've already laid the seeds of a greater challenge that Batman will face. This movie actually has an escalating scale of villains, three different levels. Bruce has just cleared level 1.   And the way the movie has done it, taking all of this time to establish Bruce's journey, it convinces me. The idea of a man dressing up as a bat and running around with a cape at night no longer feels ridiculous and preposterous. The journey has sold it. That's really important to me.   I've always been primarily a Superman fan, but looking back, while I'd always liked Batman, I think it was this movie that really made me love Batman. This movie gave me a version I could believe in. This movie finally delivered on the promise that I first saw when they started advertising the 1989 movie on TV.   Rachel has a rock-solid case. Batman has given her everything she needs.   But the police chief wants Batman off the streets. This is the tension I like. Batman is doing the right thing, he's getting the job done, and Gordon sees the value in that, but officially speaking, Batman is a criminal, pursued by the police just as much as any of his rogues are. That's what Batman was designed to be.   Alfred has some good advice for Bruce. If he's going to live this double life, he's going to have to put some effort into his Bruce Wayne persona as well. Just as Supermam cultivates an akward nerdy Clark Kent, Batman needs to cultivate a frivolous playboy Bruce Wayne to throw people off his scent. Now we introduce a new but important element. A microwave generator has been stolen from Wayne Enterprises. Designed for desert warfare, it vaporises an enemy's water supply. This is more science fiction. But again, I'm okay with science fiction. This is still a superhero movie, after all. And that's what this movie does so right. You establish the silly elements of the story in a believable sensible way, and then you have room to suspect disbelief over things like this. I don't mind a little science fiction, in fact, I welcome it. What I don't want is silliness and cheese. That's why when people criticise the realism of elements like this, I think they're missing the point.   Bruce's appearance at the hotel, with the weird skinny-dipping ladies goes a good way to establishing Bruce as a frivolous playboy, the last person you'd expect to be Batman. Why those women decided to get naked and hop in the water feature I'll never comprehend. Maybe Bruce paid them to do so.   Bruce is willing to be seen in this light in order to protect his true self. But there's one person whose good opinion he doesn't want to lose. Rachel. He tries to tell her, without telling her. “Inside, I am more.” But she's not buying it. “It's not what you are underneath, it's what you do that defines you.” And this is a very thematic statement for the whole movie. I partially agree with what Rachel says here. While, I think we are defined by more than just what we do, What she's getting at is the whole idea of putting your money where your mouth is. You can have the best of intentions inside, but if your actions don't match your intentions, then those intentions aren't worth much, are they? It actually reminds me of James chapter 2 in the Bible. Faith without actions is dead.   Falcone wants Crane to get him off on the insanity plea, just as he has with his goons. But more than that. He wants in one whatever Crane and his mysterious boss are up to.   But this is the moment that Crane replaces Falcone as the primary villain. Crane gases Falcone and Falcone goes genuinely insane from whatever is in that gas.   It's obvious at this point, that Crane is the Batman villain Scarecrow.   And this is the moment it really becomes a comic book movie. Weird gas that makes people go crazy? But because everything has been established in such a grounded sensible way up until now, I'm willing to buy it, I mean fully buy into it.   We won't be seeing Falcone again. He's done with. But we've learned how sinister Crane is. He's doing experiments with his patients, using whatever was in that shipment Falcone brought him.   Bruce already knows some of the shipments went elsewhere. He wants to know where. He'll get it out of Flass. Which he does. Batman is a pretty effective interrogator. And Flass is a coward.   So he tracks the shipment to Crane. The shipment is what he uses to make that gas, not to mention the microwave generator. We see that the gas amplifies people's fears. Makes them see what they're afraid of.   Bruce jumps out of a window many stories up, while on fire. And miraculously survives the fall without even a broken bone. That's not realistic. I call valid criticisms on this moment. But the funny thing is, they have their explanation for that. The memory cloth can turn his cape into a glider. Why didn't this scene use that device?   Under the influence of the gas, Bruce becomes that scared helpless little boy again. He cries out to Alfred for help. And of course, Alfred is there for him.   Bruce recognises the hallucinogen. He's felt it before, but this is more concentrated. Weaponised.   Fox has invented an antidote.   Bruce is supposed to have a birthday party tonight, but Rachel is heading to Arkham Asylum to figure out what's going on with Falcone. And she's gonna need backup from Batman to keep her safe.   Why does Crane show Rachel the truth of his whole operation? I know he drugs her afterwards, but why show her what he's doing? He's pouring that hallucinogen into the city water supply.   Batman crashes the party and uses Crane's own gas on him. I love how he sees Batman as a weird human/bat hybrid creature. The gas allows this movie to do some crazy sci-fi/fantasy looking stuff that would otherwise not fit in a movie like this at all. And we learn that Crane's mysterious boss is none other than Ra's Al Ghul. But isn't he dead? Didn't he die when that temple turned?   Bruce calls in the bats presumably using pheremons to attract them, so he can get away wtih Racel, to give her the antidote. Not sure the bats would smell the pheromones from that distance, though.   This is when we first get to see the Tumbler in action. Bruce uses the bridging vehicle's ability to jump to his advantage.   There are a couple of moments of humour that work for me in the chase. It's a pretty cool action scene. Anyway, he gets Rachel to the cave in time to the cave, where Fox has left the antidote waiting.   Crane has dumped his entire supply of this stuff into the water supply. Been doing it for weeks. But it hasn't affected anyone because it needs to be absorbed through the lungs. So why dump it in the water?   Crane is in custody. Bruce uses Rachel to get the antidote to Gordon so he can protect himself and mass produce it.   Level 2 cleared. The final ultimate villain will soon be fully revealed.   Alfred is concerned that Bruce is losing himself in this monster. Bruce argues he's using the monster to help others. But this can't be personal or else he's just a vigilante.   The mansion is full of guests. Bruce wants to get rid of them. There's too much going on right now. Alfred doesn't want Bruce to destroy his father's name. It's all that's left of him. The playboy persona is one thing. But Thomas's legacy is important and shouldn't be tarnished. And, Bruce agrees, for now.   Fox figures it out. The microwave emitter would allow somebody to disperse the toxin into the air supply. He's just been fired for asking too many questions about it.   And now we meet the final boss. The true villain of this entire movie. Bruce is introduced to a Mr. Ra's Al Ghul. It's Ducard. He was Ra's all along. The man Bruce watched die was just a decoy.   Bruce wants Ra's to let the guests go. They're innocent. His only reply “You can explain the situation to them.” And so, in order to save their lives, he must offend them. Dragging his father's name through the mud. They'll never know what he sacrificed to save their lives.   Crane's toxin was derived from the blue flowers on the mountain. He wasn't a member of the league of shadows, just a pawn. Ra's plans to vaporise the toxin and watch Gotham tear itself apart. He said near the start of the movie that he planned to destroy Gotham. He was serious. The League of Shadows has been a check against human corruption for thousands of years. They sacked rome, released plague rats, and burned London to the ground. When a civilisation reaches the peak of decadence, they come in to return the balance.   But you can't fight evil with evil. They may think they're the good guys, but they've murdered billions of innocent people along the way. Bruce believes Gotham isn't worth saving. He wants more time. Ra's rgues the very fact they've been able to do what they're doing is proof of its corruption.   We're seeing here that everything from the start of the movie is coming full circle. It's almost poetic. I love it.   As his goons burn the mansion to the ground, Ra's drops another bombshell. They tried to destroy Gotham in the past, through economics. Create so much hunger that everyone becomes a criminal. See them rip themselves apart.   But Bruce's parents got in the way of that plan, by helping alleviate the poverty where they could. It was Ra's al Ghul who created the circumstances that lead to his parent's death. Falcone was only a piece of that.   We see here how alike Bruce and his father are. Both, in Ra's opinion, are misguided idealists trying to save the city that deserves to be destroyed. There's a lot of symmetry in this movie, and I love it.   Alfred saves Bruce from the burning house. Bruce feels he's destroyed everything his father left behind, but Alred reminds us what we've just learned. The Wayne legacy isn't bricks and mortar. It's that idealism that tries to save Gotham. Ultimately, Thomas failed, and now so has Bruce. And then that line from his childhood returns. “Why do we fall?”  “So that we can learn to pick ourselves up.”   I think Thomas would be proud to see what a fine father figure Alfred has become.   Ra's activates the microwave generator and the gas bursts out of the ground. Right under the narrows - the worst part of Gotham.   Fortunately, Gordon has the antidote.   Everything has gone to hell. All the riot cops are on the island already, and they've been affected by the gas. There's nobody left to send. And just as Commissioner Loeb says that, the tumbler bursts through the air behind him. That's a very effective shot. Love it.   The monorail follows the path of the water mains. They're gonna load the generator on the train and infect the entire city.   Batman is going into battle. He may die. Rachel at least wants to know his name. He replies with that same line “It's not what I am underneath, but what I do that defines me.” And this, of course, has a double meaning. In one sense, it means, it doesn't matter what my identity is under this suit. It only matters that I'm trying to help. But, of course, by using that phrase, he's letting her know exactly who he is.   The shot of Batman gliding in like a giant bat and landing is awesome.   A lot of people are getting infected while Bruce struggles to catch the train. More with every metre. This brings us to the climactic fight scene. It's suitably tense. I like it. Gordon uses the tumbler to take out part of the monorail. It's interesting that ultimately he's the one that saves the day. Bruce is there to make sure Ra's doesn't go on to cause havoc another day.   And now we reach that controversial moment. Has Bruce finally learned to let go of his compassion? Ra's asks. “I won't kill you, but I don't have to save you.” Many people feel this is a betrayal of the “no-kill” rule that Bruce established for himself early in the movie. And strictly speaking, it is. Bruce is cutting that moral hair mighty thin.   But I don't see this as a negative to the movie. Bruce is a morally gray character. This is when he really steps into that. This is why he and Superman never get on, because they are different. Yes, Batman may be an idealist compared to the likes of Ra's al ghul, but he's not as cut and dry as Superman. And even Superman is forced into some of those gray areas, which I'm also fine with.   The train is stopped, and Ra's al ghul is finally dead. But there's still a lot of people out there who will need that antidote. A lot are gonna get hurt and killed before they get it. It's Batman. It's messy.   The next scene is very satisfying. The company went public, but Bruce bought up most of the shares through various charities and trusts. He's placed Lucious Fox in charge as the new CEO, the previous one, who fired Fox, is out.   Rachel comes to see Bruce, who she has newfound respect for. Bruce thanks her for giving him that first lesson that started him on his journey of transformation.   Now that she knows the type of man Bruce truly is, she's started to hope. They grew up as childhood friends, but there's a lot more between them than just friendship. They've loved each other for years, in some form. The movie probably could have done a better job of portraying that romantic undercurrent of their relationship, though. But there's a problem. Bruce has changed. He's a good man, but the real Bruce that she remembered is gone. Maybe he'll come back someday when Gotham no longer needs the Batman. And that line perfectly sets up the primary conflict of the next movie.   Bruce is going to rebuild his father's house, but it might be a good opportunity to do some work on the foundations.   The bat signal re-appears at the end. Gordon is going to use it when he wants to summon Batman. There's a lot of trouble still out there.  Gordon teases the villain of the next movie by mentioning a thief and murdurer who leaves a calling card - a joker.   And the credits roll.   This movie changed everything. It created a new era for DC comics movies, and started the journey that would eventually lead us to the Snyder Cut.   Without Batman Begins, there would be no Man of Steel. No Batman V Superman.   This movie presented a new way of portraying superheroes. They were no longer something to laugh at or make fun of. They were something to take seriously.   This movie made realistic, those things it could, which made the speculative elements all the more easy to accept. It was a perfect balance.   It's like Christpher Nolan reached into my soul and said “Let's create the perfect Batman movie for Adam Collings.”   There was a lot in this movie. Heaps to talk about. And there'll be plenty more to talk about next time, in a movie I've actually only ever seen once. The Dark Knight.   Have a great two weeks, Live long and prosper, Make it so.  

Saint Louis Real Estate Investor Magazine Podcasts
The Thunder From Down Under with Graham Solomon and guest Zach Ginn of Flip with Rick

Saint Louis Real Estate Investor Magazine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:18


Interview with Zach Ginn from Wholesaling Houses for Real FB Group and the Flip with Rick YouTube channel. Zach is a highly energetic, highly motivated 22-year-old guy running a 7-figure wholesaling business out of Florida as well as several virtual US markets. Zach shares how he started and tells us about his journey from cold calling after classes in his dorm room to operating a multi-million dollar real estate business. He also shares how he loves creating free content and courses to help people learn how to wholesale real estate and change their life. Go to https://freewholesaling.com to get Zach's free wholesaling course. Go to https://youtube.com/flipwithrick to watch hundreds of free YouTube REI content videos. This is a United States Real Estate Investor Joint Venture Partnership Interested in being a Joint Venture partner? Contact us now for information: https://www.unitedstatesrealestateinvestor.com/contact/ If you'd like to get started in real estate investing, download our free guide, 5 Step Beginners Guide To Real Estate Investing, at https://unitedstatesrealestateinvestor.com/freeguide/ Follow us on social: Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/UnitedStatesREI/ Instagram, https://www.instagram.com/unitedstatesrei/ Twitter, https://twitter.com/unitedstatesrei LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/company/unitedstatesrei TikTok, https://www.tiktok.com/@unitedstatesrei? Spotify, https://open.spotify.com/show/6f2Xz83KMZA43OUIUmuJ34?si=DxWjeG6ESOmRii9Eivvb8Q&dl_branch=1 Helping you achieve financial freedom through media, networking, and knowledge. Enjoy listening to United States Real Estate Investor content to gain more knowledge and strategies of real estate investing and real estate investment in finance, landlording, property wholesaling, property rehabbing, entrepreneurship, to build wealth, learning, teaching, professional networking, property law, tips and tricks, inspiration, motivation, and creating true financial freedom. United States Real Estate Investor https://unitedstatesrealestateinvestor.com Universe Media Mastering Your audio, more listenable. https://universemediamastering.com/ #australia #ZachGinn #RickGinn #FlipWithRick #Florida #PortStLucie #WestPalmBeach #EastCoast #Miami #GrahamSolomon #VirtualRealEstateInvesting #TheThunderFromDownUnder #RealEstateInvesting #RealEstate #FinancialFreedom #CashFlow #VirtualWholesaling #LearnRealEstateInvesting #USREIjointventure

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun
Gilles Reckinger: Bild vum "kriminelle mannerjärege Refugié" soll dekonstruéiert ginn, 01/08/2022 08:10

RTL - Invité vun der Redaktioun

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


E Méindeg de Moie war de Kulturanthropolog eisen Invité vun der Redaktioun.

Freak Outdoors- The Daily Okra
E13 - Public Land Tips With Steven Ginn

Freak Outdoors- The Daily Okra

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 72:48


In today's episode I sit down with Steven Ginn to discuss his hunting background and public hunting tips. We talk turkey call making, to faulty guns causing turkey misses, to what to look for when scouting public land. Folllow us: Instagram- @freakoutdoors & @freakoutdoorshuntTik Tok- @ freakoutdoorsSnapchat- @freak_outdoorsVisit us at www.freak-outdoors.com and use coupon code: dailyokra for 30% off. 

Fotbolti.net
EM Innkastið - Færi í súginn og þörf á Krísuvíkurleið

Fotbolti.net

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


Aftur varð niðurstaðan 1-1 jafntefli, núna gegn Ítalíu. Ísland þarf að komast Krísuvíkurleiðina ef sæti í úrslitakeppninni á að nást. Elvar Geir, Sæbjörn Steinke og Guðmundur Aðalsteinn fá sér sæti á hótelbarnum fræga í Crewe og gera upp leikinn og skoða möguleika Íslands. Í lok þáttarins er svo farið yfir víðan völl og rætt um Evópuleiki og Lengjudeildina.

The Pull Request
Aaron Ginn of Hydra Host, Founders Fund's latest bet

The Pull Request

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 62:57


On making the Internet resilient to censorship, all the way down the stack Download the Callin app for iOS and Android to listen to this podcast live, call in, and more! Also available at callin.com

The Comic Source Podcast
Lesser Evils Spotlight with Ian Grody

The Comic Source Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 46:35


Jace chats with writer Ian Grody about the world of Lesser Evils. A series of stories set in Brooklyn that capture the heart and culture of New York and encompass the reader with a sense you only get from the infinite possibilities of the diverse city.     AWA had this to say about the Lesser Evils universe; AWA Studios, the independent developer of bold and relevant stories from the world's most outstanding artists, writers, and artisans, announced today the introduction of Lesser Evils, an all-new original shared universe set in and starring Brooklyn. The universe is kicking off with a slate of series, EMMETT, GINN, THRIFTR and TAILS - stories created by and for people on creative culture's cutting edge. From comic books to short films and webtoons, the Brooklyn-based adventures debut today with the digital release of EMMETT #1: A LESSER EVILS STORY.   Lesser Evils invites readers to “Brooklyn Through the Looking Glass,” where a golem with benefits, a spiraling genie, a demon who feeds on bad vibes, and a promising young mermaid collide with heartbroken, hard-living, and hype-obsessed humans. Set in the booming and action-packed city of Brooklyn, NY, Lesser Evils is a hilarious, pop culture-filled universe created by Ian Grody (writer) and Justin Fair (director), along with artist Yishan Li (illustrator), that explores what intimacy, spite, selflessness, and friendship mean today.   “My aspiration from the jump has been to create a comic through the lens of contemporary culture. And reflect it back to readers through relevant, relatable stories filled with references to their favorite music, movies, and memes,” said Ian Grody, co-creator and writer of Lesser Evils. “Brooklyn was the perfect backdrop because it's not only a cultural hub, it's a place of becoming. Where people actively go to transform and reinvent themselves. Any place where there's that much hope and desperation and frustration is already full of magic. No better venue for our eerie and eerily familiar tales.”   Justin Fair, co-creator and director/producer of Lesser Evils, added, “As a seminal rocker and voice of a generation, Gavin Rossdale (Bush, Institute), sang: ‘It's the little things that kill.' Lesser Evils are the less obvious, often self-inflicted, more insidious evils that threaten our well-being. They are the pitfalls we all must avoid and the obstacles we all must navigate within ourselves to achieve a successful place in our social circles, in our neighborhoods and in the world. Our hope is that through the drama, the humor, and the thrills and chills, Lesser Evils is a guided tour for the reader through some of the lesser-known exotic microcosms of Brooklyn and the frighteningly familiar exotic microcosms of themselves.”   “It's kind of slightly chilling, slightly funny, but more of a mystery, everyday life kind of thing,” said Yishan Li, artist of Lesser Evils. “That's definitely something I like to draw.”

Better Eyesight Podcast
037: July 1922 with Esther Joy van der Werf and Gloria Ginn

Better Eyesight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 47:32


In the thirty-seventh episode of the Better Eyesight Podcast, Esther Joy van der Werf and Gloria Ginn read through the thirty-seventh Better Eyesight magazine that was originally published in July 1922 by Dr. William H. Bates. Exactly 100 years later, these two natural vision educators breathe life back into the words of Dr. Bates, and also provide some modern commentary on the topics brought up in each article. Better Eyesight, July 1922 "A monthly magazine devoted to the prevention and cure of imperfect sight without glasses" Article 1 [] "Page Two" Discussion 1 [] Article 2 [] The Story of Violet by W. H. Bates, M, D. Discussion 2 [] Article 3 [] Better Eyesight Discussion 3 [] Article 4 [] The Meaning Of A Leaguer by Ross Varney Discussion 4 [] ---BETTER EYESIGHT LEAGUE ONLY--- Article 5 [] How Children Have Helped Their Parents by Emily C. Lierman Discussion 5 [] Contact us at bettereyesightpodcast@gmail.com Esther's website - https://visionsofjoy.org/  Gloria's website - https://schoolofbettereyesight.com/   Join the Better Eyesight League! - https://patreon.com/bettereyesight

Status: Pending Podcast
Case Overview: Garnet Ginn (1950)

Status: Pending Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 72:27


When school teacher Garnet Ginn failed to report for work in Portland, Indiana, her co-workers knew immediately something was wrong. Garnet was found in her garage hanging from the passenger side door of her Pontiac. Police immediately determined the case was suicide, but the persistence of Garnet's family forced authorities to take another look.The mystery of Garnet Ginn's death remains 72 years later.Thanks for listening!Email us: statuspendingpodcast@gmail.comSupport us for early access and exclusive content: www.Patreon.com/StatusPending

2 Ales and Hockey Tales with Wally
Episode 178 Matt Ginn

2 Ales and Hockey Tales with Wally

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 64:16


-Becoming the Head Coach of the Manchester Storm at age 31 and preparing to run a muck -Getting broken and groomed by Finner, one of the best recruiters and shed guys the UK has seen -The similarities of small town Ontario boys trying to make it and doing it for the love -Being named Captain by your peers as a goalie & sociology -Bringing in good guys by asking good guys who's good guys

The HoneyDew with Ryan Sickler
Paige Ginn - HoneyPaige

The HoneyDew with Ryan Sickler

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 66:28 Very Popular


My HoneyDew this week is comedian, Paige Ginn! (The Viral Podcast) Paige Highlights the Lowlights of multiple suicides and her fear of death. SUBSCRIBE TO MY YOUTUBE and watch full episodes of The Dew every toozdee! https://www.youtube.com/rsickler  SUBSCRIBE TO MY PATREON, The HoneyDew with Y'all, where I Highlight the Lowlights with Y'all! You now get audio and video of The HoneyDew a day early, ad-free at no additional cost! It's only $5/month! Sign up for a year and get a month free! https://www.patreon.com/TheHoneyDew  SPONSORS: Athletic Greens -Get a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D and 5 free travel packs with your first purchase when you go to https://www.AthleticGreens.com/HONEYDEW  Everlywell -Get 20% off an at-home lab test at https://www.Everlywell.com/HONEYDEW  SoFi -Visit https://www.SoFi.com/HONEYDEW to learn how you can win up to $1,000 in stock when you open an account

Oakland A's Podcast
A's Cast - The Farm - Ep. 46 Ft. Gil Patterson

Oakland A's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 25:37


A's Minor League Pitching Coordinator Gil Patterson joins A's Farm Editor-in-Chief Bill Moriarity to share his insights on some of the A's top pitching prospects like Jared Koenig, Adrian Martinez, Jeff Criswell, Colin Peluse, Jack Cushing, Ryan Cusick, J.T. Ginn and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

AFA@TheCore
Wesley re-joins Walker today to discuss the Dobbs case with special guest Judge Phil Ginn, President of Southern Evangelical Seminary

AFA@TheCore

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 54:12


Nerd heaven
Stargate Universe ”The Hunt” Detailed Analysis & Review

Nerd heaven

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 21:13


In a slightly more standalone episode of Stargate Universe, we go hunting for an alien creature that has taken two Destiny crewmembers. Varro and his Lucian Alliance people want to join, as they have much more experience with this, but can they be trusted? And what's going on with Greer? ----more---- Transcript Welcome to Nerd Heaven I'm Adam David Collings, the author of Jewel of The Stars And I am a Nerd. This is episode 87 of the podcast Today, we're talking about  the Stargate Universe episode “The Hunt”   And if you'd like to check out my original science fiction books, head on over to AdamDavidCollings.com/books   The description on Gateworld reads “The crew organise a desperate rescue mission after a predatory creature attacks an offworld team and takes two people captive.”   This episode was written by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie It was directed by Andy Mikita And it first aired on the 3rd of May 2012.   We're on an alien planet. One of those nicely forested Canada planets we visited so often in SG-1. They spot animals that they refer to as space deer. Greer points out they'll look ever better roasting on a spit. Park is shocked. “You're kidding, right?” she says with a look of amazement on her face. Greer gives an amusing response. “Well, how would you cook them?” Turns out Park is a vegetarian. Nothing wrong with that, at all. But I'm a little surprised at her shock.   They're on a spaceship, stranded far from Earth. No way to get supplies. They've been scrounging for anything they can find to eat on planets they visit, that might have nutritional value to keep them alive. And Park is shocked that a non vegetarian would consider eating these animals? Her surprise shocks me. Most of what they've eaten in the last two seasons has been extremely unpalatable vegetables. They probably haven't had access to much protein. It makes sense.   Park does raise a legitimate point. What if these creatures are intelligent? I was actually thinking about that myself before she said it. You better make sure they're not sapient beings. Exactly how you do that is up for discussion. But you can get a pretty decent level of accuracy just by observing their behaviour. As Scott says, he saw one of them eat their own vomit. Not proof, by any means, but certainly one piece of evidence.   They look pretty cool up close. The CGI is a little dated by today's standards, but still very artistic, and certainly a lot more than they could have done in the early days of SG-1.   But before Greer can make the shot, the animals run away, spooked by something. That's when they hear the roar. They're not on another T-Rex planet, are they?   Something jumps out and attacks them. We see the encounter from the point of view of the creature. Then we cut to credits. When we come back out, we're looking at Kino footage, which still seems to be shot from the creature's point of view, which is really weird and hard to explain.   There's a trope often used in horror or sci-fi and fantasy. It's the idea of ‘hide the monster'. And it can work sometimes. But I think I've said before, that this annoys and frustrates me in situations where the characters can see the creature, but it's artificially hidden from us, the audience. That REALLY bugs me.   Plenty of the away team have been injured from the attack, and two are missing =- TJ and Reynolds. Scott wants to go down and find them, but Young is going himself, and leaving Scott in charge on Destiny., Young is a little concerned that Greer hesitated when he had the animal in his sights. He didn't take the shot. If it's just a moment of indecision, then that happens. It's cool. But if there is a bigger problem, Greer needs to figure out what it is and fix it. Greer gives a very compliant “Yes, sir.”   Eli and Brody are exploring new parts of the ship. Rush wants them to take a cautious approach. Not looking inside boxes. Fair enough, I guess. But at some point, somebody needs to look in the box or you'll never know what's inside.   Brody thinks that Eli is afraid of Rush. Eli denies it, but when they reach Rush, he goes all quiet and awkward.   And after last week's episode, this feels wrong. Eli is really upset with Rush right now. When we last saw him, he'd just sacrifice Ginn to save Rush's life. Eli stood up to Rush and spoke in a very affirmative and almost aggressive way. At this point, I think Eli is done being intimidated by Rush, and has had enough of his crap.   Anyway, they find a room filled with slots in the wall. They look kind of like Borg regeneration alcoves. Eli calls them stasis pods. It makes sense that a long-range ship like Destiny would have them, but they're empty. And there's a lot of them.   Rush wants to check the computers for information before spending any time studying these pods. He wants to move on, to Eli's dismay.   Rush is basically cataloguing. Exploring the ship, see what you find, note it, and move on. Come back later to do detailed examinations of the things you noted. And that's a valid way to explore. Possibly even a wise way. It keeps you on task, without getting distracted by each new shiny thing.   But when you find something significant like this, it's hard to just walk away. And it seems that Rush's approach and attitude is being significantly influenced by the recent tragedy. He jumped in head first because he wanted to be with Perry, and got trapped in the computer.   Greer is letting his guilt over not firing cause him to make poor and rash decisions. Yes, they need to hurry, but as Young points out, they need to hurry in the right direction. There's no point running ahead if you're going the wrong way.   Young is concerned that Greer hasn't had enough time to recuperate after his surgery. It seems in the last few episodes, we've really been delving into Greer's flaws.   Varro wants to volunteer to help with the rescue. The Lucian Alliance people have been hunting most of their lives. They could do this more efficiently and effectively than Young and his team. Scott agrees and sends them down.   Volker goes to the sick bay to see how Park is doing. The other patient, a loud-mouthed guy, is being really self-absorbed. Volker admits that he's here to express concern for both of them, but Park clearly has more of his attention right now. And loud-mouth doesn't help matters with his attitude. I wonder, does Volker have some feelings for Park? It's entirely possible that this is just concern driven by friendship and working closely together, of course. That's completely normal and appropriate. But stories have a tendency to focus more on romantic feelings, so I'm just wondering. We've seen Park and Greer have a physical relationship in the past. Is it still going on? I'm not sure.   TJ and Reynolds are still alive. They're in a cave. The fact that they're still alive is a good sign, but not as good as Reynolds is hoping. The creature is saving them for later. To eat. But that, at least, buys them time to be rescued.   Once Rush is out of the way, Eli decides to hell with what Rush thinks. He's gonna go look at the stasis pods. Brody decides to go with him. When TJ looks out of the cave mouth to see where they are, we get our first real glimpse of the monster. We don't see it fully, just a quick shot. We see a tail and the back end of  a large muscled body. And that's fine. I'm cool with that. That's enough. Just show us little half glimpses at the start and fully reveal the monster at the end. I'm fine with that. But we should have seen this glimpse, at least, at the beginning.   So Chloe comes to see how Volker is doing. She tries, subtly at first, to suggest maybe he should tell Park how he feels about her. When that doesn't work, because subtly rarely works on us blokes, she asks outright. “Does she know how you feel?”   Volker denies anything beyond friendship between them, but his awkwardness pretty much confirms that feeling that he does have. And has no idea what to do with it. He's a nerd like me. I totally get it.   Eli is really starting to vent about his issues with Rush now. This is what I was talking about at the beginning of the episode. These are the feelings I'm expecting him to have. He's tired of Rush taking charge of everything and cutting the others out of decisions and even knowledge.   Rush WAS lead scientist on Icarus, but this is personal. This is about what Eli had to do to save Rush. This is about Rush keeping the bridge secret for so long.   He confirms that he doesn't want to be head scientist, but he does want more of a say. And that's when Brody accidentally gets locked into one of the stasis pods. As Eli tries to free him, he activates the pod, putting Body into cryogenic suspension. That's not good. But Eli doesn't know is that Rush already knows they're there. He was watching. And he's the one who activated the pod. He's screwing with them.   Varro learned to hunt as a child. But he also learned to respect nature. Those two things seem to go together. But Greer sees nothing to respect in this creature. He calls it a monster. Varro points out that animals don't know hate, only fear and hunger. Which is true. So what exactly is a monster? Really, that's just a word we use to demonise a creature. And I can totally understand doing that. If an animal killed someone I love, I'd totally demonise it. I'd be filled with hate for this creature, which had acted out of fear and hunger.   Anyway, the creature ambushes them. It's a pretty frantic scene. Several of them were badly injured. Varro has determined this creature is very intelligent. It's been hunting them while they've been hunting it.   And Greer is still acting rashly. He is really not himself.   James has noticed that Greer is freezing under pressure. It happens to people, but not to Greer. He shares that he thinks he died. He woke up after the surgery and there was nothing. Couldn't see, couldn't hear. For the first time, he's experiencing fear.   James thinks it was just Greer's brain waking from the heavy sedation a little ahead of his body. Greer thinks it was something darker. Death. Maybe hell.   Young can't go on, because of his injuries. He'll only slow them down. He knows this. Varro knows he knows this. He doesn't want to give up on his people, but he's a CO. He knows the right call here. So he chooses to trust Varro.   Interesting that young doesn't say “Bring them back.” He says “bring her back.” Despite everything, Young still has very close personal feelings for TJ. He had pushed those feelings aside, refusing to acknowledge them, out of respect for his wife (although that doesn't make up for his past unfaithfulness), but she still obviously means a great deal to him. More than just one of his crew. I do wonder, if now that his wife has asked him for a divorce, whether he is reconsidering the possibility of something happening with TJ. But she seemed to be tired of being toyed with, and with all she's gone through this season, it's hardly the time to try to start something.   Volker comes in to see PArk again. She asks him if he was watching her sleep. His response is so awkward that I think his feelings are probably pretty obvious to Park now. Rush has some work for Park. She's going crazy just laying there.   Rush has noticed Volker's interest in Park. But he believes nothing could ever happen with them. Not because she's so attractive, and he's not, but because Volker isn't the romantic type. He's the good friend type. And that's just life. We all have our pre-destined roles (which does not actually sound like Rush at all). Volker is destined to live the single life and pursue science. I think he might be using a little reverse psychology here. See, Rush does sometimes like to help others, but he does it in a very Rush way.   Varro has set a trap for the creature, which they know is stalking them as much as they're stalking it. This is when Greer decides to speak up with what's on his mind. Greer has never liked any of the Lucian Alliance. Varro has been one of the good ones for quite a while, but not good enough for Greer. He doesn't trust Varro, and he's concerned about what may be starting to happen between him and TJ.   Varro doesn't deny it, he simply says “why don't we let her decide that.”   When the creature attacks, Greer is still not thinking well. He yells out “I'm right here.” He's being driven by all sorts of emotion.   They blow up the creature. They can now hike to the lair without further threat. And that's when two of the hunters get taken by creatures. There are more of them. The way this is done is pretty good. You see them just kind of disappear into the brushes, really quickly, like they've been snatched by something.   Why didn't they use that effect at the start of the episode, instead of the monster-POV allowing the characters to get a good look at the monster, while hiding it from us. The effect used here would have been much better. It's creepy. It's very effective. IT evokes fear, not only of the power of this creature, but of its unknown nature.   Reynolds is pretty scared. The creature is too strong to kill. And he can't stand the thought of being eaten alive. When the time comes, if he doesn't have the guts to do it himself, he asks TJ to kill him.   TJ has some harsh words for him, which he seems to take onboard. She managed to make radio contact with Varro and Greer. That could greatly improve their odds of rescuing them. With nobody else to turn to, Eli asks Chloe to help with Brody. He can't tell Rush. He wants to solve this without Rush. Chloe may still have some residual alien knowledge. That might be helpful.   They've found the lair, but Varro is hesitant to go with Greer. He doesn't think Greer is up for it. He's no coward, but he's second-guessing himself, and they don't have time for him to work through whatever issues he's working through. Varro has a point. But Greer will never accept that because he doesn't trust Varro.   So Varro has little choice but to go along with Greer's plan.   We get a really good look at the creature when it enters the lair. I think this is one of the babies. Anyway, it looks good. I like it.   When Greer arrives, TJ tells him not to shoot. She thinks the creature is recognising intelligence in TJ for using the fire.   Greer has the shot. He second-guessed himself last time, and now he's being told not to shoot. This is not going to be helpful with the things he's trying to work through.   TJ and Reynoldfsd leave the lair. The creature allows them. Greer bets that the creature is smart enough to know he can kill it, but is choosing not to. It's a bet he's making with his life.   The bet pays off. All three of them are able to leave unharmed, without harming the creature.   I have to wonder, just how intelligent is this thing? Is it a sapient being like us? There is no sign of civilisation. It lives like an animal. Hunting prey. It doesn't build anything. No evidence that it has tried to develop technology. But then, it doesn't have the tools in its body like we do.   It's a good reminder that intelligent alien life won't necessarily look like us. Which is actually the caution that Park raised at the start of the episode.   So Rush finally lets Brodgy out of the stasis pod. Seems this was more than just him playing a joke on Eli and Brody. He was testing the pod to see how it worked, and has evidently decided they shouldn't use them.   So…he's conducted human experimentation without the consent of knowledge of his test subject.   That's a new low for Rush, I think.   And nobody will ever know because it'll all be blamed on a mistake by Eli. But in the end, Rush has achieved what he wanted with those two. They are now much more cautious, which is what he wanted them to be.   Greer has put in a good word for Varro, who is now a free man, allowed to roam the ship again. That's the thing about Greer, he's not one to trust, but if you prove yourself to him, he'll back you up.   A romantic moment was about to happen between Varro and TJ, and it was very much mutual. But they're interrupted by somebody at the door. It's Young, inviting Varro to lend his expertise to tonight's dinner.   After Young leaves, TJ looks really troubled, emotionally. I'm not quite sure what's going through her head. Is she torn between Varro and Young? Or is it just about Varro, wondering if she should pursue him or not. I'm really not sure. So Volker has finally worked up the courage to tell Park how he feels. He walks into the sick bay, flower in hand, and he sees Greer there with her, practically lying on top of her. It seems there is still very much something going on between those two.   He walks sadly away. He can't compete with a strong, brave tough guy like Greer. I really feel for Volker. I know how he's feeling in that moment. I've been there. It's the feeling of ‘how could anyone possibly love me? I'm just a nerd. I'm nothing. No one could ever want me.' I remember feeling those things deeply.   And yet, by some miracle, it worked out for me. I'm married to a wonderful woman and we love each other deeply.   There is always hope.   Of course, the odds are much harder for someone like Volker, on a spaceship with a very small sample of human beings.   The episode ends with the crew enjoying some tasty alien venison at Becker's Barbecue.  Airman Becker, being the ship's official chef.   I really enjoyed this episode. It's mostly a standalone, after a whole lot of episodes that have followed directly one from another, but it still has a lot of connective tissue. But the standalone elements were very entertaining.   Next time, we'll look at the first of two episodes that delve into what happened when the alternate timeline crew went through that wormhole in Twin Destinies.   I'll see you then for Common Descent.   Only 4 more episodes left of Stargate Universe. We better enjoy every minute of it, because it'll be over before we know it.   Have a great two weeks Live long and prosper Make it so  

The Naked Eye Podcast: Exploring Natural Alternatives to Glasses, Contacts, and Surgeries
061: Free Your Mind and Shift Your Eyes with Gloria Ginn

The Naked Eye Podcast: Exploring Natural Alternatives to Glasses, Contacts, and Surgeries

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 80:07


In this episode, Certified Bates Method Teacher, Nathan Oxenfeld interviews Gloria Ginn who has been teaching natural vision improvement for over 40 years. Gloria tells us the story of how she improved her own vision, overviews the different levels of vision improvement, recounts the collection of Gary Gunter's talks into her book Free Your Mind to Improve Your Eyesight, explains what a Shifter is and the benefits of using it properly, and provides plenty of powerful vision tips along the way. You can get your own Shifter and learn more about Gloria's work at her website https://www.schoolofbettereyesight.com/ You can also hear her on Episodes 13, 22, and 37 of The Better Eyesight Podcast at https://bettereyesightpodcast.com/  More information at https://integraleyesight.com/  Thank you!

Street Photography Magazine
Dan Ginn – Travel Street Photography

Street Photography Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 55:05 Very Popular


I first met Dan Ginn about seven years ago when Ashley Riffo and I interviewed him for this podcast. At the time he was a young guy about to leave on a big adventure with his girlfriend to travel through the Americas learning the culture and making photographs along the way. Less than a year […]

Mission: TimPossible
Frank Ginn

Mission: TimPossible

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:01


The District 47 Senator wants another term

Nerd heaven
Stargate Universe ”Seizure” Detailed Analysis& Review

Nerd heaven

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 24:54


Who doesn't love a good crossover? In this episode, we get to see not one, but two beloved characters from Stargate Atlantis (both of whom got their start on Stargate SG-1). Richard Woolsey and Dr. Rodney Mackay assist the crew of Destiny in their attempt to convince the Langaran government to let them dial Destiny from their planet. The only thing missing is Jonas Quinn. But are they putting the people of Langara at risk? While all that's going on, we also get more insight into what life is like for Perry and Ginn as disembodied data structures. Rush goes on a journey that ends in heartbreak. I have a lot to say about both plots in the episode, so let's dig in. ----more---- Transcript Welcome to Nerd Heaven I'm Adam David Collings, the author of Jewel of The Stars And I am a Nerd. This is episode 86 of the podcast   Today, we're talking about the Stargate Universe episode “Seizure”   And if you'd like to check out my original science fiction books, head on over to AdamDavidCollings.com/books   The description on GateWorld reads Homeworld Command tries to convince an ally occupying a naquadria-rich planet to let them try to dial Destiny, but suspects that they have already been infiltrated by the Lucian Alliance.   This episode was WRITTEN BY: Rémi Aubuchon It was DIRECTED BY: Helen Shaver And it first aired on 27th February 2012   The episode opens with a very familiar face. Richard Woolsey, played by Robert Picardo. No longer in his Atlantis uniform, he's back in suit and tie. He's negotiating with an ambassador from the planet Langara. That's Jonas Quin's world. The place where Naquadria was first discovered. This planet has a naquadria core. The perfect place for dialling Destiny.   It's a bit of a shame that Jonas doesn't appear in this episode. It would have been cool to bring back Corin Nemmick, but then, there's already so much in this episode that I don't think they would have done him justice. It would probably have been little more than a cameo.   It seems word got through from Senator Michaels. Chloe convinced her that they should go ahead with trying to dial Destiny so as to provide supplies and personnel.   But this is a big risk. The last two planets they dialled destiny from were destroyed. Langara is a populated world with millions of humans. If this goes badly, the loss of life will be catastrophic.   Telford argues there were mitigating circumstances in both of those cases. Personally, I'm not so sure. I wouldn't be inclined to try doing this from a populated world.   But Woolsey assures the ambassador - Ovirda, that they have a new solution for dialling the gate. And with that, the door is opened, and in walks Doctor Rodney Mackay.   Okay. We need to pause for a minute so we can scream with nerdy glee. Two popular characters from Stargate Atlantis are appearing in this episode. And both of those characters got their start on SG-1. So this is a huge crossover event. I'm fanboying all over the place.   Before Mackay can say more than a few words he's interrupted by Ovirda. He isn't a scientist. He's not interested in hearing Mackay's speech. He'll let his own science people decide. If they think it's safe, then he'll consider allowing Earth to use his planet to dial Destiny. He's not going to risk his world on the hearsay of people from Earth with their own agendas.   And quite frankly, I don't blame him. If I was in his position I'd be saying the exact same thing.   But there's a catch. The Lucian Alliance still want Destiny. That's speculation, but well-educated speculation. They know there are few worlds where the dialling can be done. They'll be coming for Langara, and they won't care if they destroy the planet or not.   Ovirda says it sounds like Earth's protection is becoming conditional. And Woolsey doesn't exactly deny it.   Mackay is very sure of his science. But then that's always been his problem. He's overconfident in his own abilities and superiority. Remember that time Mackay accidentally destroyed a solar system?   Telford thinks the Lucian Alliance have already gotten to Ovirda's people. I find that an extraordinary statement. I mean, it's probably true, knowing how story-telling works, but as I've said, I feel that Ovirda is acting just the way you'd expect somebody in his situation to act.   But Telford has further evidence the others don't know about. Something about satellites. Honestly, what he says is a bit vague and the episode rushes through it very quickly. The point is, it's looking like Langara has sided with the Lucian Alliance in this war, undeclared though it may be. That means the Alliance can launch an assault on Destiny at any time. Without Mackay's solution. But my question is how. Are we to believe they've come up with their own solution? How have the alliance convinced Ovirda's people that they can safely dial without destroying their world? This seems quite unbelievable to me.   Young, who is visiting Earth with the stones, says they're launching a fact-finding mission to Langara. Call it a proof of concept. Mackay is delighted when Young wants him to go through his presentation. But before he can start, Young says, not here.   Now, there's a big elephant in the room of this episode. We don't know what happened to Atlantis. Is it still on Earth? Or did they take it back to Pegasus? What are Woolsey, Mackay, Shepherd and the rest doing when they're not helping with this project? We don't get any answers to these questions, and maybe we never will. Back on Destiny, Rush is playing chess with Perry. Of course, he has to move the pieces for her, since she has no physical substance. And we learn that Perry may have been the only person who Rush could never beat at chess.   Things are actually looking really good for these two. Perry is no longer trapped in a broken body, and Rush gets to have the woman he loves around all the time. Previously, he only got to see her occasionally when she visited the ship using the stones.   It turns out, in her new non-corporeal form, in the ship's computer, Perry can concentrate on multiple things at once. She is also studying the ancient pattern and reviewing the ship's sensor readings. Rush argues she is more now than she was. She is better than a human. I think Rush may actually be jealous.   But Perry dreams of having a flesh and blood body. And he dreams of that two. Because then, well, they could be closer physically, in a number of different ways.   Perry surprises us all by saying “there is a way.” So Mackay arrives on Destiny. He's in Brody's body, but he was expecting Rush. The plan was that Rush would go to earth and look over Mackay's notes while Mackay explained his theory, not to Rush, but to Eli. If Eli is convinced, then Young is convinced.   But apparently, Rush has taken the day off. He's in the interface chair running a program.   I'm sure most viewers were expecting a lot of interaction between Mackay and Rush in an episode like this. Certainly I think that would have been intreresting.   I wonder how that conversation would go. In some ways, Rush and Mackay are so similar. They are both insanely intelligent, but they also both have very similar personal flaws. And yet, they have just drastically different personalities.   If anything, I think Mackay would want to try to prove that he was the smartest, whereas Rush would even lower himself to that. He'd see such petty competition as beneath him.   Anyway, TJ says that Rush is basically in a sleep-like state in the chair. He's actually in what Perry calls an immersive simulation. It was already in Destiny's database. Perry just had to find a way that they could experience the program together. So…what are they doing in this simulation? Well……I'm sure you can guess what they'd be doing. They appear to have just finished making love.   So the chair is now basically Stargate's holodeck. They can create any simulated scenario  with hyper-realistic sensory input. and experience it. Maybe The Matrix is a slightly more accurate analogy.   Greer just donated a kidney, and he's already running around the ship, trying to get some exercise. C'mon mate. This is a bit silly   Mackay and Eli are arguing passionately. They can't seem to agree. But not about the dialling program. They confirmed that was good and moved on a while ago. We don't actually get to learn what they were discussing. Probably something wonderfully nerdy. Rodney actually likes Eli. Says he reminds him of himself at that age. He's about to make a disparaging comment about Eli's weight but before he can finish, Eli mentions Rodney's hair.   Young says Rodney can go back to earth now. He's a little disappointed, but if this works, he can always come back in person.   And when he appears back on earth, the first thing he says is “He didn't eat any citrus while in my body did he, because I don't feel great.” Ah, classic Rodney Mackay. He is, of course, allergic to citrus, which is a serious matter, but Atlantis and SG-1 often took delight in making jokes about it.   So it's time to talk about the plan. Woolsey has reservations. And frankly, so do I. The first few times I watched this episode, I was focussed on how cool it was to have Woolsey and Rodney on the show. This time around, I'm really thinking deeper about what they're doing. They're going to go to another planet, and enact this plan against the will of the inhabitants. And no matter how much Rodney and Eli say the plan is safe, I don't think I'd be willing to risk this on a populated world - at least without their consent. If it goes wrong, they murder billions of people. And let's not forget, there are three main countries on Langara. Stargate Command are probably negotiating with the Kelownans. Even if they agree, Terrania and Andari are at just as much risk.   Woolsey wants to make some kind of peace offering. According to intelligence, the alliance are likely to make their move on Langara in a few days, invited or not. So O'Neil believes the Langarins would prefer to side with earth rather than the alliance. The idea is to prove that Rodney's dialling program is safe, to make Earth's said more palatable. Woolsey won't support a mission to take the Langaran stargate by force, but Young says they won't be doing that, and they do have a peace offering.   Greer is fighting another fever. He says he'll fight harder, but TJ explains it doesn't work that way. Greer remains unconvinced, which is unfortunate. I think Greer's unwavering belief in his strength is his greatest weakness. A certain pig-headedness is probably advantageous for a marine, but Greer is so afraid of losing his macho image, not just in other people's eyes, but in his own eyes, that he's making unwise decisions. Doing stupid things. Greer's smarter than that. But he's blinded by his desire to be strong at all times.   Eli has figured out that Rush has uploaded his consciousness into Destiny's computer. Amanda finds life as an incorporeal thought pattern lonely. I wonder where Ginn is in all of this? Have these two tried interacting with one another at all?   Amanda wants Rush to keep their little simulation a secret. Rush was actually open to making it public. But it's not gonna stay a secret. Eli is already on the case. Rush is being pretty responsible about this whole thing. He knows there's a real world out there where he's needed. He can't just lose himself in this simulation.   When Rush tries to wake himself up, it doesn't work. Amanda taps away at a console, but Rush reminds her that nothing she does in here means anything. These are not real controls. They're in a simulation that is isolated from the real ship. The only option is for her to appear in the real world and talk to someone.   Meanwhile, Eli is trying to get a hold of Ginn, who doesn't seem to want to appear. He knows what Rush has done. He just doesn't know how to fix it. He and Ginn actually had the exact same idea. But Ginn didn't want Eli to try it because uploading a human consciousness into a computer and back again is pretty dangerous. Which makes perfect sense.   Eli points out that on their way toward ascension, the ancients did a lot of work into transferring human consciousness. The communication stones were one example of that. And that makes a great deal of sense to me.   The reason Ginn is hiding is because she got annoyed at Eli when he tried to convince her he should take the risk.   Amanda says the problem was that Ginn's disapproval manifested in preventing Rush's wake-up from working, but it should be good now.   This time, when he tries, Rush wakes up surrounded by Eli, Brody, and Park.   Evidently, they have convinced Woolsey to go along with their plan. He gates to Langara and presents a gift for the ambassador. A carved ancient artefact. When the soldier touches it, he is immediately body-swapped with Scott. Because, of course, the artefact is the communication stone.   Young takes over the administrator Halperin's body in much the same way.   Young and Scott give a decent performance. Not all of the Langaran's are entirely convinced. But they've prepared the way for the team from Earth to come. They are going to attempt to dial the gate.   I'm gonna say it again. It's awesome to see Mackay in SGU.  He's busy being Mackay about everything. And Young just says, “Shepherd's right.” Oh what  I would have given for a big crossover event stories with characters from SG-1, Atlantis, and Universe, as a way to finish off the story when this show was cancelled. Pity that never eventuated.   Whoolsey has a second objective. He's searching the commander's office.   Telford really wants Rodney on the new team that travels to Destiny, assuming they successfully dial the gate. Rodney is excited by the possibilities, of course, but he's hesitant about the whole maybe never getting home thing. But he's taken that plunge before. He knowingly left Earth for Atlantis, knowing less about the place than he does Destiny, with the very real possibility they may never come back.   Rodney picks up on some of the tension between Telford and Young. Not so much personal tension anymore, but there's still professional tension. Telford would like to be the one calling the shots. Then again, he was the first in line to come home when Eli was running his dialling program from within the star.   I think what it comes down to is that Young has Rush. Telford wants his own socially inept genius. But Telford asks the question “what is it with genius and lack of social skills?” And that has me wondering. It's a cliche in fiction, but is there a correlation in the real world? Is it common for real geniuses to lack social skills? I have a feeling that is the case, but is that just because I've been exposed to this trope so often in my fiction?   Woolsey has found evidence that the Langarans have refused to work with the Lucian Alliance, for fear of jeopardising their relationship with Earth. Time after time they've been offered more, and each time they've refused. It looks like their spy satellites were wrong. The langarans are not working with the enemy. Telford thinks this changes nothing. Woolsey is not so sure. Young gets a phone call for Administrator Helperin. There are concerns from the higher ups. They're on their way. Perry appears to Rush, to make sure he got out okay. Then she vanishes. We cut to Eli. Ginn appears and tells him she's performed an emergency shut down of the FTL drive. She needs a distraction. Rush is still in the chair. What he thinks the world is not actually real.   Perry made a mistake and there is no way out of the simulation. Ginn doesn't think Perry did it on purpose. She's deceiving Rush to buy time until she can solve the problem. But if this isn't deliberate, why doesn't she reach out to Eli like Ginn did? And why suppress Ginn was reaching out?   Anyway, Rush is not easily fooled. He figures out he's still in the simulation and sets the ship to explode. This is Rush's way out. If this doesn't work, nothing will. Perry insists that this is real. He'll kill everyone on the ship.   Young says they need to reconsider. Telford is going by the adage “It's better to ask forgiveness than permission. It'll all be okay once it's done and their point is proven.”   This is about to turn into a disaster. Armed guards enter. So they have two options. They stand down, or they defend themselves, with force, until the gate is dialled. That means they fire on their allies. They kill innocent Langaran soldiers. Young is not prepared to do that. Telford is.  It's a very tense moment as they wait for the countdown to the 8th chevron. In the end, it's Rodney, of all people, who speaks the voice of reason and convinces Young to shut it down. This mission is already a failure and it's only going to get worse.   But the observed data so far suggests it probably would have worked.   Eli has everyone working on the problem. Which is good because Rush's plan didn't work. Destroying the ship didn't get him out, but it did prove that he's in a simulation. Now Perry has to face Rush's disappointment that she lied to him.   Then we get the bombshell. Perry programmed a parameter into the simulation. Rush can come and go as long as he and Perry love each other. She loves him but she has concluded that he doesn't love her. Because he can't leave. Rush insists that he does love her.   This was all very unfair of Perry, which she admits to. Love is a complex thing. It can't be quantified as simply as Perry is trying to do. Perry is head over heels for Rush. She's been in love with him most of her life. The feelings Rush has for Perry are different, because he is different. His feelings for her are much newer.  He is a more self-sufficient and selfish person by nature. And he is still filled with grief over the death of his wife. All of these factors, and probably many more, are causing the software to return a false value, rather than a true, to whether Rush loves her. But you can't encapsulate love in a boolean value like that. Relationships start very shallow. And they grow. They continue to grow over a lifetime. The love my wife and I share now is different from the love we shared when I asked her to marry me. It's stronger now. More mature. Deeper. Perry is writing Rush off because she's further along in her feelings than he is. And that's not just unfair, it's stupid and naive. I suspect Rush could love her in the way she wants. He was well on the way to that. Right now, he's in the infatuation stage. But you can see it growing.   But there's an even bigger bombshell. The only way to get Rush out of this simulation now, is for Eli to delete the area of memory where it's all stored. The area of memory where Perry and Ginn are stored.   For Rush to escape, both Perry and Ginn have to die.   So Perry plays Juliet, and childishly kills herself rather than live without the love she perceives Rush doesn't have for her, and in the process, she murders Ginn.   Rush may be selfish, but he's got nothing on Amanda Perry.   You can tell by the look on Rush's face as she vanishes, that Perry was wrong about him. Young and Scott are back. The Langarans have agreed to release Earth's people in exchange for defence against the Lucian Alliance. And the removal of the stargate from their power generation facility. I guess they want it somewhere else, nowhere near their naquadria.   This has been an episode of massive screw-ups.   The one good decision made in this episode was by James. She showed her Langaran prisoners around the ship. Let them have a glimpse of the life those stranded crew are experiencing.   Rush wakes up from a coma after a few days.   We get one little bit of good news. Perry and Ginn aren't gone forever. Not deleted, but quarantined. Cut off in a part of memory where they can no longer interact with the crew. So while Ginn is not technically gone, she and Eli can't see each other any more. Maybe they can find a way to bring them back some day. It's a small sliver of hope.   Eli made a huge sacrifice for Rush. He's not going to be able to forgive Rush quickly for this, if ever.   In the last moment of the episode, we realise Greer has finally started listening to TJ, as he urges Rush to do the same.   So I bring you back the question I asked at the end of last episode. Ginn and Perry are now gone.   If you could bring your loved one back again, to speak with them one more time, but then have to go through the pain of losing them a second time,  would you do it? It's an even more difficult question to answer now, isn't it.   This was a powerful episode. I always remember this for the Langaran stuff. The coolness factor of seeing Rodney and Woolsey in Stargate Universe. But in reality, I think that element is almost overshadowed by the emotional intensity of what has just happened, with the Amanda Perry plot.   We all feel insecurity at times. I certainly have, but Perry's insecurity has taken everything from Eli, Ginn and even Rush.   I think the biggest takeaway from all of this is simply this. In your insecurity, don't do stupid things.   Next time, we're getting into some old fashion Stargate planetary action, in The Hunt.

The Dale Jr. Download - Dirty Mo Media
380 - Ricky Carmichael: The GOAT

The Dale Jr. Download - Dirty Mo Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 127:59 Very Popular


"The GOAT" Ricky Carmichael sits down with Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis for a fascinating discussion about his decorated career as the greatest motocross and supercross, rider of all-time, his brief go at NASCAR and much more. Dale Jr. admits that when Carmichael enters a room, the room changes. Ricky brings much more than an impressive resume to the Bojangles Studio. He brings honesty and openness about the ups and downs of his career. From dirt to riches, he details his humble beginnings in Florida and how a 5-year-old went from riding a three-wheel bike to becoming a 2-wheel racing icon. Carmichael admits, he didn't race for himself, but his parents. They were the motivation he used to succeed in his early riding days. He reveals that for years, he actually hated dirt bikes. Racing MX / SX takes more than just God-given talent, it takes bravery. Dale Jr. and Mike get Ricky to talk about the mindset that it takes to make it in such a wild sport. At first came failure, than a dedication to his craft that led him to finally beat the great Jeremy McGrath in 2001. Then, in 2002 and 2004, Carmichael did the unthinkable. He was perfect. 24 wins in 24 races, for two seasons, solidified his status as a legend of the game. But in between the success' was heartache, tough business decisions and injuries, that threatened it all. Hear how Carmichael raced through a torn ACL to try to progress his racing career. RC talks about his current life as a broadcaster and how the passionate and vocal Supercross fanbase makes his job even more of a challenge. He opens up about the business side from the various perspectives he's had as a rider, a broadcaster and a team owner in the MX/SX ranks. Do present-day riders get paid what they should? "Someone's making money," says Carmichael. Ricky's retirement form motorcycle racing in 2007 sent shockwaves across the sport. But it wasn't the end of his racing career, he just added two wheels! A conversation with Kasey Kahne and a test session in a Ray Evernham Late Model at Hickory Speedway in North Carolina, led to the start of his Stock Car Racing career. Ricky details why he made the decision to sign with Ginn racing over the Joe Gibbs development program. The move put him running Super Late Models in his home state of Florida under the tutelage of NASCAR Hall of Famer Mark Martin. When the Ginn team collapsed, the next move put him in an ARCA racecar for the legendary Ken Schrader's team. Their success led to a call from Kevin Harvick and a shot at the big leagues in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. In three years he racked up four top-five finishes in the Trucks and a handful of Xfinity Series starts. With long-time partner Monster Energy, the next step in his career was just one signature away. The plan had Carmichael splitting the seat with Kyle Busch in a Kyle Busch Motorsports Xfinity Series car. Just how did two separate Busch brother controversies lead to the collapse of a deal in the final hour? For the first time, Carmichael opens up about what happened and how it pretty much ended his NASCAR career. OPEN SEGMENT Before Ricky Carmichael came into the studio, The Download welcomed Trackhouse Racing team owner Justin Marks to the table. They touch on the sudden success of the new team. But, what Marks really came for, was to reveal the Darlington throwback scheme for both of his NASCAR Cup Series cars. The announcement and execution of the liveries had Dale Jr. breathless. ASKJR PRESENTED BY XFINITY Hannah Newhouse brings fan questions from Xfinity Twitter and the Dirty Mo Media YouTube about: JRM's 1,2,4,5 finish and how Door Bumper Clear is the Kyle Busch of Motorsports media. Monday Night Racing and how it has led to an increase in "wreck avoidance". How to achieve a Throwback Eclipse in NASCAR How Ross the Renter is a bona fide contender for the child. Oh, and Dale gives insight into Chastain's post-race talk with Martin Truex Jr. A possible DEI racecar graveyard Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Nerd heaven
Stargate Universe ”Hope” Detailed Analysis & Design

Nerd heaven

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 25:33


Today's episode of Stargate Universe delves deep into a lot of character emotions with two plots, neither of which presents great danger to the ship. Volker is facing a medical issue that could be managed on earth, but is life-threatening on Destiny. And the crew are shocked by the sudden re-appearance of a friend they thought was dead. Lots of great things to talk about in this one. Find my original science fiction at http://www.AdamDavidCollings.com/books ----more---- Transcript Welcome to Nerd Heaven I'm Adam David Collings, the author of Jewel of The Stars And I am a Nerd   This is episode 85 of the podcast.   Today, we're talking about the Stargate Universe episode “Hope” And if you'd like to check out my original science fiction books, head on over to AdamDavidCollings.com/books   The description on Gateworld reads Chloe's body is taken over by the mind of someone the crew believed was dead. Meanwhile, T.J. must perform a dangerous transplant when Dr. Volker is diagnosed with an illness that threatens his life.   This episode was written by Carl Binder. It was directed by William Waring And it first aired on the 20th of February 2012 So they're still waiting to get a stone connection from Earth. After 6 days, still wondering what happened to their home. Does Washington DC still even exist? Are all their superiors dead? Will they ever have contact with their loved ones again?   It's got to be a hard thing to live with. That waiting. And of course, your mind is going to invent the worst possible scenario and play it over and over again. Anybody been there?   We get a throw-away line that Volker's leg has fallen asleep. The first little bit of foreshadowing that something is wrong with him.   Eli can't understand how Rush can not be worried about everything. Rush is actively trying to take Eli's mind off things with the chess games. And probably trying to distract himself as well. But Rush is good at hiding away those pesky human feelings most of the time. It doesn't mean he doesn't feel the same things we do, he just liked to give the impression he's got it all under control.   Brody and Volker are having a little argument about the theme from 2001 A Space Odessy. Volker insists on referring to it by its proper name. Sprach Zarathustra. It's actually a piece of music composed by Strauss in 1896. Brody's point is that everybody knows it as the 2001 theme. Most people don't even know it existed before that movie.   It's a pointless and juvenile thing to be bickering about. But again, it's a way of distracting themselves from everything. From the problems on earth, and honestly, from the pain Volker is feeling right now.   But finally. Finally. They have a connection.   Somebody connects to Chloe's body. Young walks in and asks, who are you? Eager for news of Earth.   The response is the last thing he could ever have expected.   “I'm Ginn. What happened?”   As you can imagine, Eli comes running when he hears the news. And he so desperately wants this to be true. The others are a little sceptical, Rush probably most of all. Ginn is telling her story. At first, she found it hard to breathe, because she was in Amanda Perry's body. She was asked a lot of questions about the Lucian Alliance, and then …. Nothing. One minute she was answering questions and the next she was standing here.   When she looks in the mirror, she has a little moment of panic. What happened? Why didn't I return to my own body? She doesn't know yet.   No point beating around the bush. Young tells her the truth. That Simeon killed her body and they received word that Perry's body died at the same time.   What a thing to hear! How do you respond to that? What do you do with that? David Blue does a great job of letting a whole lot of emotions show on his face.   Volker reports to TJ. He's feeling a bit off. Having trouble sleeping. While she's preparing something to calm him down, he collapses on the floor. There is clearly something wrong with him. More than he's been letting on.   Eli thinks all of this makes no sense, but Young rightly points out, clearly, they don't know as much about how the stones work as they think they do. Remember, it's alien technology. It diodn't come with a user manual. When Ginn's body was murdered, the connection wasn't properly severed. Her consciousness could have been floating around in the system like a stray radio signal since then. So why did she enter Chloe's body now? Rush speculates. Maybe because Chloe fell asleep while on stone duty. It's a good theory, but they can't know for sure.   Scott raises a concerning question that nobody has thought about yet. Whose body is Chloe connected to?   After waking him up, TJ takes some tests. His blood pressure is high. He used to take pills for that. He's been experiencing these symptoms for about a month.  He didn't bother mentioning it to TJ because he thought there was nothing she could do about it, without the resources of Earth. But, there were other things she could have tried.   After doing some more tests, TJ has found that Volker is suffering from kidney failure. The problem with kidney disease is that by the time there are symptoms, it's already too late. On earth, the next step would be dialysis. But out here, what are they supposed to do? This is a very real problem that I'm glad they addressed in Stargate Universe. When you're remote and cut off from the rest of the world, health problems become a much bigger deal.  Volker's only option at this point is a transplant.   Eli explains the history to Ginn about Simeon and Rush's revenge. Ginn is glad that Eli didn't seek revenge in the same way. She didn't want him to get hurt, which he kind of takes as a slight on his macho-ness, but before he can defend himself, she kisses him.   It takes a few minutes, but Eli realises he has to practice what he preaches. This is Chloe's body. Not Ginn's. He didn't approve when Rush and Perry were going to use Ginn's body inappropriately. Now he has to respect Chloe in the same way.   Of course, it's a little harder when you're the one who is going to miss out on the intimacy with someone you love.   To Ginn, this isn't so much about the kiss. This is an uncomfortable reminder that she's a disembodied spirit without a body. “What's going to happen to me,” she asks. “Is there any way to get back into my own body?”   Eli tells her about the funeral they held for her. They buried her body on the next planet they found after her death.   This is a difficult situation for both of them. For Eli, he had to grieve her loss, and now, he finds she's not entirely dead. But she's not entirely back, either. He gets to have what so many others have wished for throughout history. He gets to talk with his loved one. He gets to hear what she has to say back to him. But having that only makes him want more. If some part of her is alive, he wants her back permanently, in a body of her own.   And that's when she starts choking. That's not good   TJ can't find anything physically wrong with Ginn. She really has her work cut out for her in this episode, doesn't she? One patient with a life-threatening illness she probably can't cure, and another going through something she can't begin to comprehend.   Rush speculates it might be related to her death by strangling. She died while she was still connected to the stones. I'm not sure exactly how this is supposed to work. Rush's explanation of energies didn't make a lot of sense to me. But it's interesting.   Scott wants to get her disconnected as soon as possible, to prevent risk to Chloe. Eli wants to further study this phenomenon. Disconnecting Chloe might mean losing Ginn forever. Rush agrees there are scientific reasons to keep studying. Whatever his reasons, at least Rush's agreement helps Eli convince TJ.   TJ explains the issue with Volker to Young. They can't bring in a surgeon from Earth right now, as they've lost contact, even if they did have a donor. TJ is going to have to read up on organ transplants and try to perform the surgery herself. It must suck being the only medic on board, but not actually being a doctor. So much is expected and required of her. So much more than she is technically capable of. But if not her, then who?   To find a compatible donor, she'll need more than blood type. She'll need tissue samples. With such a small group to pull from, it's very unlikely she'll find someone.   Scott and Greer are both possibilities. They at least have the right blood type. And we learn here that Greer is a marine. Most of the SGC personnel are air force. It makes sense they'd bring some marines in, though. They're supposed to be the best fighters, right?   So Rush is being Rush. He goes to Young's office to tell him the transplant surgery is fraught with danger. And Young's first question is, “Is your blood type compatible.” He knows Rush and his selfish ways too much. But this isn't about preventing risk to himself. He points out that a transplant will risk not just one life but two. And that is very true. And it's a good point. A sobering one. But what's the alternative? Just let Volker die?   I don't think that's an option. Not if there is somebody willing to take the risk to try to help him.   Ginn tells Eli that this time it feels different to the last time she used the stones. And then she starts choking again. And suddenly, it's not Ginn speaking but Chloe. So she's still in there somewhere.   When she wakes up, she's Ginn again. Ginn doesn't have any memory of being anywhere else while Chloe was in control. And Scott has confirmed that the connection was not cut at any time.   Rush doesn't think that Chloe is connected to anyone or anything at the other end. He thinks that Chloe and Ginn are both battling for control of the body. Not in a literal sense, but more subconscious. Ginn is supplanting Chloe.   Scott wants to disconnect the stones more than ever. It's not worth risking Chloe's life. Not even for Ginn   Rush still advises against it. Who knows what that will do?   Imagine being in Eli's shoes. The woman you love, versus another woman that you love, as a close friend. He doesn't want to lose either of them. That's gotta be tearing him apart.   Young orders that next time Ginn has an attack, they'll pull the stones.   I think part of the reason Rush is so against this is because of Amanda Perry. If Ginn's consciousness was preserved, what about Amanda? Could she be stuck out there in cyberspace somewhere as well? It's a long shot, but when it comes to somebody you love, you'll take the longest shot there is.   Ginn on the other hand, doesn't want to hurt Chloe. Because she's a decent person. She agrees with Young.   Chloe appears again but without any attack. It seems they are randomly and rapidly changing now.   Eli speculates that Ginn's energy is dissipated like a radio signal getting more and more distant. That means, even without disconnecting, they may be running out of time before they lose Ginn completely.   Park, Brody and Volker are all helping TJ investigate options for making the transplant more successful. There's an amusing moment when Park mentions one of the side effects of a particular option. And then it gets even more amusing when Volker asks “Why id that funny?” If you've seen the episode recently you know what I'm talking about. You kinda have to be there.   TJ has found two matches. Greer and Dr. Morrison. The best match is 6 antigen, which usually happens in families. Both of these guys are a 4 antigen match. A surprisingly good match given the circumstances.   Morrison angrily demands to know how accurate TJ's tests are because he doesn't want to risk himself for nothing. But before Morrison can even finish, Greer says “I'll do it.” Because he's Greer. And of course, he will.   I swear, every episode he's in, I love Greer more and more.   TJ needs to take some bone marrow from Greer. She offers to put him to sleep. He says the drugs are too important to waste on this. He'll just endure the pain. And while I admire him for this, I think that maybe he's being more of a hero than he needs to be. I'd be taking the darn medicine. But then, he's a marine, and I'm a wimp.   As Greer lies down to have the procedure done, Volker thanks him. Greer says “no big deal.” Volker rightly points out that it is a big deal. And Greer just says “You'd do the same for me.” And he genuinely believes that. Greer is a good person and he believes in the goodness of others.   Does Volker agree? Would he do the same for Greer? I think he's like most of us. He's probably thinking something like “I hope I would.”   I mean, it's easy to say “Yes, I'd risk my life and endure great pain to help you.” And I firmly believe that we should all be prepared to do that for our fellow human. But to take the plunge in that moment, that would take courage.   Greer tries to lighten the mood with a fake-out scream of pain. Now I don't usually agree that serious stories always need “lightening up” in tense moments, but in this case, yeah, I actually appreciated that moment of levity. I'm pretty squeamish about medical stuff.   When TJ does the procedure for real, you can see Greer fighting against the pain, holding back the scream. Some wonderful acting from Jamil Walker Smith.   Eli and Rush haven't had any luck disconnecting the stone device. Chloe and Ginn are switching rapidly now.   Both Chloe and Ginn have expressed concern for each other, even at the risk to themselves. Now there's a thematic link between the two plots in this episode. Nicely done.   Scott assures Chloe they won't do anything that will harm her. And Eli assured her that neither of them want her to come to any harm. Given the closeness between him and Ginn, he kind of needs to make that assurance. To remind her how much he cares about her too.   The plan is to try to find a safe place to store Ginn's consciousness.   Scott is really concerned. He doesn't want this to go on. He approaches Eli and basically tries to tell him he needs to sacrifice Ginn. “I know you miss her..but…” he begins.   And then the big surprise. Suddenly, the body is controlled not by Ginn, or by Chloe. It's Amanda Perry!   Now Rush gets to have the same reunion with his loved one that Eli has had. Ginn and Chloe are both fading, and Perry is becoming more prominent.   That means that Eli is suddenly in the same boat as Scott. Now he has a sense of how Scott's been feeling this whole time.   Now as much as Eli wants to save all of them, I can we can safely assume that Rush's priority is Amanda Perry, and he'd sacrifice both Chloe and Ginn in a heartbeat to save her. He's probably already formulating an argument about how important to the stargate program Perry is, and why she has greater value.   Rush does have an idea. Use the interface chair to upload the disembodied consciousness into the computer, removing them from Chloe's body.   And you just see them all roll their eyes. Not the chair again. It's always the chair. And this is when Rush has to come clean that he's seen Franklin as a kind of ghost. Rush reveals that he managed to separate his mind from the projections a while back, which is why we haven't seen Franklin or Rush's dead wife in some time.   Scott reminds them all that the chair didn't work on Chloe last time they tried it. Then, Rush was trying to remove the alien influence from her. This is different. And he's right about that. I'm not sure Rush ever expected the chair to work last time. But this is something he knows it can do.   Scott wants assurance that there is no harm to Chloe. Rush can't give that. In fact, he'll have to remove some of the safeguards he put on the chair to it usable. And that's kind of scary.   Rush thinks the chances of her being harmed are minimal.   And Scott reminds them all it's not their decision to make. It's Chloe's. But … do Ginn and Perry get a say as well? That's an interesting ethical question.   TJ is nervous about the surgery. She's not even close to qualified to perform it. So is Volker. For him, I don't think it's a lack of faith in TJ, he just doesn't like hospitals and doctors. Greer jokes that this is no hospital, and TJ is no doctor. And that got a laugh out of me. Our Volker too.   Chloe has decided to try the chair. She doesn't want them to risk disconnecting the stones, in case Ginn and Perry are lost.   When we next see TJ, we realise she's not just nervous. She's very scared. If she does this surgery, both patients could die. Of course, if she doesn't Volker will die. Young is not going to order her to do it. She knows what needs to be done She'll do the right thing.   Rush is explaining to Perry the plan to temporarily store her consciousness in the computer. He promises to find a way to get perry into a new body. That has been her dream since the accident. A dream that nobody could ever have thought could be remotely possible.   TJ is finally ready but Volker and Greer have gone to the hydroponic dome. It's the closest thing to a backyard they have. Greer is trying to calm and comfort Volker. I think from here onward, there's gonna be a special bond between these two characters. I'll be keeping a specific eye out for that from here on, this time.   Greer tells Volker “we're gonna be fine.” He's very optimistic. At least, that's what he shows on the outside. Who knows what's going on inside.   With them all in the medical bay, ready to go, Brody tries to comfort them all by playing some music. It's the theme from 2001. Volker's favourite. But he quickly realises that the bombastic melody is hardly relaxing and not very appropriate. He tries to stop it but drops his music player, which proceeds to play some very funny-sounding silly music. Perhaps a guilty pleasure of Brody's. He looks incredibly embarrassed as he fumbles to stop the music. Another amusing scene. Stargate Universe is doing a good job incorporating some humour into the show, in a way that doesn't pull you out of the seriousness of the story. It doesn't get enough credit for that. As you know by now, I'm fine having a serious show without any humour, but I'm also fine with this type of humour. But some people just seem to want everything to be a Marvel movie. I like Marvel, but I don't want their tone in everything, especially stories I take very seriously.   Now it's Eli's turn to talk to Ginn before the procedure. He encourages her that this will only be temporary. Eli and Rush both believe that, although neither of them has any clue how they could possibly get these consciousnesses into new bodies. This isn't Star Trek Picard.   That's when Ginn stars choking again   TJ is already in the middle of surgery. Young tells her they need to do the transfer now. She can't leave. She'll be in this surgery for a good 4 hours. So Young is gonna have to do it without her.   But something weird happens with the computer. Everything is offline. Putting Volker's operation at risk as well as the chair transfer.   After a little argument about which consciousness is which, Rush and Eli manage to upload two minds from Chloe's body into the computer. But which ones?   TJ can't do the surgery without the computer to guide her. Then Amanda Perry appears, as a mental projection from the ship. She can help. She is a scientist and she has access to all the ship's medical knowledge. Once again, Destiny is helping her crew.   Brody and Park question TJ who seems to be talking to herself. But when she says “I'll explain later,” they take it at face value and go with it. After all the weird things they've seen, that's the correct thing to do. And TJ has this authority in the way she says it. She doesn't have time to explain. She's the doctor here. She needs them to trust her.   Rush has confirmed there are two new programs on the computer. One is active - that's Perry. Looks like both of their mental patterns have been saved.   The surgery is complete. With Perry's help, TJ has saved Volker and Greer. Now they've just gotta wait to see if Volker's body rejects the kidney. Greer is insistent. He won't.   And Communication is back online. Finally. Telford appears to tell them there were some issues with the stones at their end which took a few days to fix, but the bomb was diffused. Washington is safe. That's gotta be a big relief.   Rush goes to the bridge, hoping to see Perry. He does. She's projected there.   Brody and Volker have a very close bond, but it's a typical male friendship. They'd do anything for each other, but they find it difficult and uncomfortable to express that care verbally.   Greer has a little infection but it should be fine   Ginn finally appears to Eli. She says that seeing him, hearing his voice. It's enough for now. But as she tries to touch his face, and her hand passes straight through his body, I'm not sure either of them truly believes that.   And that brings me to my big question for the episode. If they hadn't succeeded with the chair, Ginn and Perry would have been lost.   If you had lost a loved one, and you had the chance to bring them back temporarily, to speak one last time, but after that's you'd have to lose them all over again, would you do it?   I'm not sure. It's hard to put myself in the position of having lost of a wife. Maybe it would depend on how things ended. Did I get closure? Did we get to say goodbye? I suspect I'd do anything to see and hear her again, but then that pain of losing her a second time, I don't know if I'd be able to bear that.   Anyway, hold this thought, because we may come back to this in a few episodes.   Hope was another fantastic episode of Stargate Universe, delving into themes of selflessness and self-sacrifice. Wonderful character story.   Next time, we'll be talking about a very exciting episode. And we'll see a couple of familiar faces. I can't wait to delve into Seizure.   Until then, have a great two weeks. Live long and prosper   Make it so.    

Fertility Wellness with The Wholesome Fertility Podcast
EP 177 Navigating the Trauma of the Fertility Journey | Emily Ginn

Fertility Wellness with The Wholesome Fertility Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 48:17


Emily Ginn is an IVF warrior, coach, fellow podcaster and Mama to 2 boys.  She gives tools to women so they can learn how to cut their overwhelm and anxiety in order to get love and laughter back into their lives. With 15 years in social work and certification from The Life Coach School, Emily has taught so many women going through IVF how to heal shame, trauma and become more mindful during one of the most intense processes in their lives. Podcast - open.spotify.com/show/2UF1unuOUwDnL48T3LUrF9 Instagram - www.instagram.com/ivfthiscoaching/  Website - www.ivfthiscoaching.com/    Book mentioned in the episode: The Art of being a Healing Presence: https://amzn.to/3M95LHQ   For more information about Michelle, visit www.michelleoravitz.com The Wholesome Fertility facebook group is where you can find free resources and support: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2149554308396504/ Instagram: @thewholesomelotusfertility Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewholesomelotus/  

KCMI's The Coffee Break
04.06.22 - Phil Ginn

KCMI's The Coffee Break

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 46:28


The Coffee Break is the daily Christian talk and local events program on Hope Radio KCMI 97.1FM serving the Scottsbluff, NE area. Tune in for interviews with authors, musicians, pastors, and others in the Christian community and our local area! Visit our website: www.kcmifm.com Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/kcmifm

Radical Research Podcast
Episode 78 – Enslaved’s Monumension: Floating Diversity & Monumental Dimensions

Radical Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 58:31


We love Enslaved. They are a rare long-running band that, in our estimation, have not released a bad album. Of their 15 full-lengths to date, your Radical Research hosts highly rank their sixth album, 2001's Monumension: it's Ginn's #2 (just behind Eld, 1997) and Wagner's...

Hunting Roots Podcast
No Excuses with Russell Ginn of Rolling Thunder Game Calls

Hunting Roots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 52:12


Russell Ginn lost his legs in a work accident years ago. It's slowed him down a bit, but he's still chasing turkeys in the spring, climbing up treestands in the fall, and wading flooded timber in the winter for ducks. Listen to his story on this latest episode of the Hunting Roots Podcast. Episode NotesRussell Ginn's hunting rootsPlaying arena footballGetting started in the call making businessLosing his legs in a work accidentSeeing the light at the end of the tunnel Learning to walk againHunting with fake legsBuilding calls for Rolling Thunder Game Callswww.rollingthundergamecalls.comThe Hunting Roots Podcast is powered by OnX Hunt. www.onxmaps.com 

IT in the D
Episode 430 with Jeff Ginn and Bryce Levin of Slalom Build

IT in the D

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 51:53


This week, we got to chat with Jeff Ginn and Bryce Levin with Slalom Build. (Disclaimer: Bob works at Slalom, but in a completely different division.) We chatted about a day in the life as a developer, having empathy as a leader, building a team, and—most importantly—they are hiring. Check out the Detroit openings. Then got into some fun stuff: Jeff built a very cool virtual smart home and dabbles in 3D printing, and Bryce is continuing a 30-year NCAA basketball tradition by building a custom app just for his friend group. These guys were a great chat and we hope you enjoy listening.

RotoWire Prospect Podcast
Prospects on the Move (2022)

RotoWire Prospect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 52:31


Prospects On The Move Brandon Williamson, Jake Fraley, Justin Dunn to the Reds for Jesse Winker and Eugenio Suarez. Chase Petty traded to the Reds for Sonny Gray. Gunnar Hoglund, Kevin Smith, Zach Logue to Oakland for Matt Chapman. Shea Langeliers, Cristian Pache, Ryan Cusick, Joey Estes to Oakland for Matt Olson. J.T. Ginn and Adam Oller to Oakland for Chris Bassitt. Quick Hitters Adley Rutschman shut down with triceps strain How does new CBA affect service time manipulation, if at all? Twins clear space for Jose Miranda. Don't overrate the “DL Hall could move quickly” news Sixto Sanchez, Emerson Hancock continue to trend down Get in the Beat James Anderson and Beat Clay Link leagues Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

RotoWire Fantasy Baseball Podcast
Prospects on the Move (2022)

RotoWire Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 52:31


Prospects On The Move Brandon Williamson, Jake Fraley, Justin Dunn to the Reds for Jesse Winker and Eugenio Suarez. Chase Petty traded to the Reds for Sonny Gray. Gunnar Hoglund, Kevin Smith, Zach Logue to Oakland for Matt Chapman. Shea Langeliers, Cristian Pache, Ryan Cusick, Joey Estes to Oakland for Matt Olson. J.T. Ginn and Adam Oller to Oakland for Chris Bassitt. Quick Hitters Adley Rutschman shut down with triceps strain How does new CBA affect service time manipulation, if at all? Twins clear space for Jose Miranda. Don't overrate the “DL Hall could move quickly” news Sixto Sanchez, Emerson Hancock continue to trend down Get in the Beat James Anderson and Beat Clay Link leagues Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On A's - Daily Podcast On The Oakland Athletics
A's Trade Matt Olson, Chris Bassitt

Locked On A's - Daily Podcast On The Oakland Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 30:31


Episode 418 -- It's been a long time coming, but the Oakland Athletics finally started their fire sale, trading Chris Bassitt to the New York Mets over the weekend, and then Matt Olson to his hometown Atlanta Braves on Monday. Jason gives little tidbits on J.T. Ginn, Adam Oller, Shea Langeliers, Christian Pache, Ryan Cusick, and Joey Estes, as well as some thoughts on what it's like to be an A's fan during a churn. Subscribe to our YouTube page! Get social with us: @ByJasonB + @LockedonAs Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline– Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dynasty’s Child
Episode 165: News, Notes, and Rule Changes

Dynasty’s Child

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 102:56


Kyle (@cavghtlooking) and Taylor (@TCasesLoaded) take up the DC mantle to discuss some recent free agent signings, Top Podspects, and how they feel about some upcoming rule changes.

Locked On Mets - Daily Podcast On The New York Mets
Mets Trade for Chris Bassitt Giving Them MLB's Best Rotation

Locked On Mets - Daily Podcast On The New York Mets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 19:18


The New York Mets made a blockbuster trade on Saturday, acquiring All-Star starting pitcher Chris Bassitt in a trade with the Oakland Athletics. Bassitt becomes the final piece of a Mets rotation that already included two aces with Jacob deGrom and Max Scherzer, which now may be the best staff in all of MLB. Host Ryan Finkelstein breaks down why this was a no-brainer of a trade for Mets, even with the steep price they paid in giving up two of their top pitching prospects in J.T. Ginn and Adam Oller. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mechanista in G – Scanline Media
Mechanista in G – ZGMF-1017 GINN

Mechanista in G – Scanline Media

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 109:23


Dylan blew off my GINN and tonic joke, and that’s fair. But that just means I make it again in…

Pratt on Texas
Episode 2891: Replay: Economist Vance Ginn on the dangers of inflation – Pratt on Texas 3/8/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 40:06


On today's Pratt on Texas, I talk with economist Vance Ginn on the dangers of inflation. This originally aired on 17 December 2021.Vance Ginn, PhD, is the chief economist at the Foundation. Ginn works to unlock poverty through relational, inclusive changes in institutions that expand opportunities to let people prosper. He is a prolific writer and a leading free market economist.Ginn works on many policy areas that support human flourishing. He leads the Foundation's development of policy recommendations to limit government spending and eliminate burdensome regulations so that taxpayer dollars can be directed to effective programs and to those targeted for help, while strengthening inclusive institutions at the state, local, and federal levels. Ginn also develops and leads a multi-state welfare improvement initiative, known as the Opportunity Project.During four Texas legislative sessions, Ginn fought for and won many good-government reforms to let people prosper: several Conservative Texas Budgets, stronger spending limits, lower business margin tax, property tax relief, and fewer occupational licensing barriers.Ginn was the associate director for economic policy of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) at the Executive Office of the President during the Trump administration. In this capacity, he advised the OMB's director on economic and fiscal policy matters. He managed a team who sought evidence of good government and modeled the economic assumptions in the president's FY 2021 budget. They proposed to cut a record $4.6 trillion in debt over a decade, made the Trump tax cuts permanent, and noted the need for a fiscal rule. Ginn also provided in-depth analysis during the COVID-19 pandemic.Prior to his work as an economist, Ginn taught multiple economics courses at Sam Houston State University and at Texas Tech University, where he won a teaching award.Ginn earned his doctorate in economics and a BBA in economics and accounting from Texas Tech University. He received the Defender of the American Dream award from Americans for Prosperity—Texas; the Champion of Freedom award from Grassroots America—We The People; and the Bob Williams Award for Outstanding Policy Achievement from the State Policy Network.www.PrattonTexas.com

Crime, Wine & Chaos
Ep. 73 – The Unsolved Murder of Garnet Ginn & D.B. Cooper

Crime, Wine & Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 86:30


In this episode, Erika covers the 70-year-old unsolved murder of 33-year-old Garnet Ginn, a high school Economics teacher at Portland High in Portland, Indiana.  Garnet was found murdered on the morning of February 28, 1950, when she didn't show up for classes and the City Superintendent went to check on her at her apartment.  When the superintendent couldn't find her at her apartment, he went to the garage where she parked her car. That is where he found Garnet hanging from her passenger side door by a sewing machine belt. Law enforcement ruled her death a suicide, but her parents knew better. An investigation of their own points to murder.Erika was drinking Cape Red, a 2020 Vintage South African Wine from Western Cape Vineyards, Amber doesn't particularly like this one, but I think its pretty good.  Erika pulled her sources from:www.wane.com / New suspect and details emerge, but Portland cold case may never be solved / October 24, 2019www.wthr.com /New evidence emerges in 1950 cold case murder of Indiana Teacher / Rich Van Wyk / October 25, 2019 www.wthr.com / After 69 years, Indiana cold case has new life / Rich Van Wyk / October 22, 2019 www.reddit.com / Garnet Ginn – Portland, Indiana, USA – 72 year old case / u/_heidsterThen Amber covers the mysterious case of D.B. Cooper. Cooper. D.B. Cooper, also known as Dan Cooper, hijacked a commercial plane traveling from Portland, Oregon, to Seattle, Washington, on Thanksgiving Eve (November 24th) in 1971.  He  parachuted out of the aircraft with the ransom money and was never seen again. Amber was drinking a Pinot Noir from Straight Shooter, by the sounds of it, she really liked it!  LOLAs promised on the episode, here is a partial lists of suspects that were considered:Kenneth Peter ChristiansenLynn Doyle CooperBarbara DaytonWilliam GossettJohn ListTed MayfieldRichard McCoy Jr.Amber pulled her sources from:www.en.wikipedia.orgwww.fbi.govwww.crimemuseum.orgwww.history.comwww.rollingstones.com / The Missing Piece of the D.B. Cooper Story–Tina  Mucklow-Flight Attendance Article / Ricardo Nagaoka / January 12, 2021www.washingtonpost.com  /  D.B. Cooper's skyjacking continues to fascinate Americans half a century later / Katrina Gulliver / December 22, 2021 www.seattlepi.com / The mystery of D.B. Cooper's hijacking and disappearance lives on 50years later in the Pacific Northwest / Callie Craighead & Daniel DeMay /  November 24, 2021   

AFA@TheCore
(A "Best of" from February 28, 2022) Judge Phil Ginn, Pres., Southern Evangelical Seminary, enters “The Core” to discuss the Dobbs (MS) bill; Planned parenthood and the modern abortion movement

AFA@TheCore

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 54:11


Avery & Friends
#19 Gaby Ginn & Brooke Martel

Avery & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 91:04


Avery sits down with his friends, Gaby Gin and Brooke Martel, to talk about the origin of their friendship, animals, music and much more. Please subscribe to the podcast and tell your friends!

AFA@TheCore
Judge Phil Ginn, Pres., Southern Evangelical Seminary, enters “The Core” to discuss the Dobbs (MS) bill; Planned Parenthood and the modern abortion movement

AFA@TheCore

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 54:11


The Junk Drawer (The Interest)

S2E6 - Students of The Junk Drawer, along with Mr. Ginn, discuss various things that make people feel uncomfortable from the feeling you get when you hear forks on plates to mild annoyances like when the light above you puts a glare on the television. 

The Ginn Podcast
2021 POD RECAP, GUEST SHOUTOUTS, & 2022 GOALS!! THE GINN PODCAST EP. 70

The Ginn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 46:18


Ending the year with another episode. If you're reading this just know I appreciate you so much, especially for making this one of my dreams come into fruition. As always, enjoy :) https://youtu.be/U7_RMwvJHj0 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theginnpodcast/support