Podcasts about Interaction

Kind of action that occurs as two or more objects have an effect upon one another

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Best podcasts about Interaction

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Latest podcast episodes about Interaction

Fulfilled as a Mom
155: A Framework for Any Interaction You'll Have as a PA

Fulfilled as a Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 24:32


True or False: SOAP stands for Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan. That's always been true, but today we are adding another use for the letters SOAP. The SOAP Note Framework is going to help you have smoother, more positive interactions with your patients and more satisfied patients (and yes, better Press Ganey scores!) From meeting a new patient and walking them through what to expect with the visit with you to negotiating with your practice manager and from deciding where to go on vacation and getting your toddler on board with the bedtime routine, what you've been missing is a framework for those interactions. In this episode you'll learn the new and improved SOAP Framework will help you with all of those situations as a PA, as a spouse, daughter, friend and parent. We are demystifying these interactions and giving you the tools to deploy these steps in all sorts of situations. THE PA PERSONALITY QUIZ https://tracybingaman.com/type THE SHOW NOTES https://www.tracybingaman.com/blog EMAIL themoneypa@gmail.com "I NEED THE SOAP NOTE"

Pete Mundo - KCMO Talk Radio 103.7FM 710AM
Pete's Awkward Gym Locker Naked Man Interaction | 12-1

Pete Mundo - KCMO Talk Radio 103.7FM 710AM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 10:58


Pete's Awkward Gym Locker Naked Man Interaction | 12-1See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bert Show
Moe Will Never Forget This Fateful Interaction With A Stranger

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 8:19


Have you ever had an interaction with a stranger that you'll never forget? Moe shares the conversation he had with a woman whose story affected him deeply.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bobby Bones Show
(Thurs Early Bird) What Is The Hack Bobby Learned On TikTok + Morgan2 Shares Some Crazy DMs She's Received + Mailbag: Bad Interaction With Favorite Country Artist

The Bobby Bones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 36:03


Bobby discovered a hack on TikTok that's been helping him! Find out what it is...Plus, Morgan2 shares some of the crazy DMs she's recently received. Hear what people have been messaging her and her reaction. Mailbag: A listener had a run in with their favorite country artist and the interaction was not good. They can hardly listen to their music anymore and aren't sure if they should see them in concert still. They need advice if you'd stop being a fan of someone because you had a bad interaction with them? We share our thoughts!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

UnscRxipted
45. HOW TO Kick A Yucky Interaction; Really It's Not Personal

UnscRxipted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 13:55


UGH! Do you also despise when a crappy interaction with someone sticks with you for too long? Hear about how Rachel deals with this in today's mini-episode. The key to all of these interactions is knowing it's not personal about you. Yet, how do we get there? It's all in the show. Want that Bone Broth recipe that Rachel mentioned? Just click here and the deliciousness is all yours. Or visit rachelbrumberger.com/recipe for your copy. Have a healing story to share? Are you a health and wellness expert? Email us at hello@rachelbrumberger.com to be a guest on the podcast. Message us @reallyrachelb to share what you are loving about the show. Rachel can't wait to hear from you!

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Covid Affected Social And Civic Interaction

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 8:19


According to the Toronto Social Capital Study 2022, "The experience of the COVID-19 pandemic put communities around the world under tremendous stress. In the City of Toronto, the pandemic created widespread economic hardship, while limiting opportunities for residents to connect with family, friends, neighbours and organizations..." Sharon Avery is the President and CEO of the Toronto Foundation, and joined Alex to give us the details on it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

No Fun City
No Fun City Podcast #26 - Alex Beim & Tangible Interaction

No Fun City

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 48:24


In episode 26 of the No Fun City Podcast, I chat with Alex Beim regarding interactive design and his company, Tangible Interaction, based out of Vancouver, BC, Canada. From graphic designer to digital creative to interactive artist, Alex Beim's career has been a diverse journey. His interest in moving interactivity away from the screen and into the physical world led to the launch of Tangible in 2006. Since then, he has focused on developing interactive experiences that engage people in public and commercial spaces, and his artworks have been seen by millions worldwide. His goal is to generate a sense of community through play, changing how we see and use technology to make it a catalyst rather than a barrier for social interaction. The No Fun City Podcast is a Vancouver-based podcast broadcasting to the world. Join us on each episode as a new guest takes the mic and tells their story. Hosted by Mahyar Saeedi. You can catch the No Fun City Podcast on all podcast platforms, including Spotify | Apple | Google | Amazon | YouTube Like my content? You can help grow my channel and buy me a coffee here: https://ko-fi.com/nofuncity​ Thank You to the Podcast Support Partners... Questrade - https://questrade.com/?refid=5f1e1 Loaded Boards: https://i.loadedboards.com/136.htm ShredLights: https://shredlights.com?aff=205 Use Code: MAHYAR10 Orangatang Wheels: https://i.loadedboards.com/136.htm No Fun City Podcast Social Media Links: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nofuncitypodcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/nofuncitypod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nofuncitypod/​ Anchor FM: https://anchor.fm/nofuncity​ Hosted By: Mahyar Saeedi Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mahyarsaeedi/​ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mahyarsaeedi​ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/mahyarsaeedi Guest: Alex Beim LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/beimalex Website: https://www.tangibleinteraction.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tangibleint/ Music By: Joakim Karud Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud/tr​ Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/joakimkarud​ Website - http://www.joakimkarud.com​ Bandcamp - https://joakimkarud.bandcamp.com​ Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/artist/0iAOX​ Twitter - https://twitter.com/joakimkarud?lang=en​ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/joakimkarud​ Do you know anyone who would be a great guest for the podcast? Let me know! You can connect with us on Instagram or send an email to: nofuncitypodcast@gmail.com #vancouver #podcast #canada

Finding Sustainability Podcast
109: Forests as pathways to prosperity with Daniel Miller

Finding Sustainability Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 72:35


In this episode, Divya Gupta speaks with Dr. Daniel Miller. Dan is an Associate Professor in the School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame and has been extensively working on the socio-economic, ecological, and political dimensions of forests in tropical countries.  In this conversation, they focus on Dan's projects on conservation legacy and his other project looking at the role of forests as pathways out of poverty. Later in the episode, they also discuss Dan's new role as the coordinator of FLARE, which stands for Forest and Livelihoods Assessment, Research, and Engagement.  For his project on conservation legacies, the projects that Dan started as a graduate student in the west Africa region at W National Park, a park that spreads across the countries of Benin, Niger and Burkina Faso, Dan focussed on how protected area governance interfaces with international aid. Interaction on this topic was a great way to explore the critical question of what conservation funding really does for people and protected areas in tropical countries. Dan shares that international aid has disproportionate impacts on people; while it provides new sources of income to some with the creation of jobs in the areas like park management, monitoring, and tourism, these opportunities only extend to some in the community. In fact, with the implementation of conversation projects, and many lose access to the forest, thereby creating more challenges for them.  Dan suggests that this happens because the aid has a tendency of what he refers to as— ‘missing the middle'. When implemented, he says that the aid programs often tend to partner with the national government, national park agencies, and forest departments, but rarely or never with the local governments. He says this is a problem because these local governments have a bigger impact on people's lives. As Dan continues to extend his work on conservation legacies in other countries like Bhutan, Peru, and Madagascar, he is finding that while external intervention in the form of aid in conservation in low-income countries is important, it works best when it is inculcated in the local governance structures and can bring clear benefits to people.   In the discussion on Dan's parallel project on forest-poverty relationships, where he is working with a large team of scholars looking at the impacts that forests can have on poverty alleviation in low-income countries. Dan shares that the greater vision that he has for this project is to highlight how forests can serve as pathways to prosperity. He suggests that changing the framing of forests for prosperity is important because in the larger policy discourse benefits of the forests is mostly linked to carbon sequestration when the reality is that forests provide critical socio-economic benefits to especially people in low-income countries. Dan emphasizes that it is important to mainstream these benefits.  In the end, they discuss Dan's new role as a coordinator of FLARE. He talks about how the FLARE community has been catalytic for him in establishing networks and collaboration for meaningful research. He shares that as a coordinator, he aims to retain the great sense of community that FLARE already has and grow the community by opening to new partners like practitioners, donors, activists, and local community members.  References:  Miller, D.C., Mansourian, S., Gabay, M., Hajjar, R., Jagger, P., Kamoto, J.F., Newton, P., Oldekop, J.A., Razafindratsima, O.H., Shyamsundar, P. and Sunderland, T., 2021. Forests, trees and poverty alleviation: Policy implications of current knowledge. Forest Policy and Economics 131: 102566. Miller, D.C. Rana, P., Nakamura, K., Irwin, S., Cheng, S.H., Ahlroth, S. and Perge, E. 2021. A global review of the impact of forest property rights interventions on poverty. Global Environmental Change 66: 102218. Miller, D.C., R. Hajjar. 2020. “Forests as Pathways to Prosperity: Empirical Insights and Conceptual Advances.” World Development 125: 104647. Miller, D.C. 2014. “Explaining Global Patterns of Aid for Linked Biodiversity Conservation and Development.” World Development 59: 341-359. Miller, D.C., A. Agrawal, and J.T. Roberts. 2013. “Biodiversity, Governance, and the Allocation of International Aid for Conservation.” Conservation Letters 6(1): 12-22. Agrawal, A., Chhatre, A., & Gerber, E. R. (2015). Motivational crowding in sustainable development interventions. American Political Science Review, 109(3), 470-487. Oldekop, J. A., Holmes, G., Harris, W. E., & Evans, K. L. (2016). A global assessment of the social and conservation outcomes of protected areas. Conservation Biology, 30(1), 133-141. Persha, L., Agrawal, A., & Chhatre, A. (2011). Social and ecological synergy: local rulemaking, forest livelihoods, and biodiversity conservation. science, 331(6024), 1606-1608.  

Light 'Em Up
Policing the Mentally Ill: A Matter of Life or Death. Crisis Intervention Training (CIT), Reducing the Risk of Death During Emergency Interaction Between Law Enforcement and Someone Spiraling Downward in a Mental Health Crisis.

Light 'Em Up

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 51:37


Welcome to this impacting episode of Light ‘Em Up!We are grateful to you for joining us. Please tell a friend about us!  Remind them that they can find our full catalogue here on every major platform where you get your podcasts!How often do you see or hear where a person who is suffering extremely from some type of a mental health crisis which ends with the person being killed at the hands of law enforcement? Once is too many. I've observed this far too many times to count.Tonight, we center our investigative journalistic focus on: Policing the mentally ill. This is one of the biggest challenges facing today's law enforcement officers.We'll examine the role law enforcement plays and how their responses have life or death consequences – impacting those who are most vulnerable and in the throes of a mental health crisis which is spiraling rapidly downward.It is important to note that the vast majority of people with mental health conditions are not violent and do not violate laws, but rather are more likely to be victims of violence themselves.● Individuals with severe mental illness generate less than 1 in 10 calls for police service and occupy at least 1 in 5 of America's prison and jail beds.● In the U.S. about 1 in 5 adults (20%) suffer from a diagnosable mental illness in any given year.● According to NAMI (The National Alliance on Mental Illness) 43.8 million adults in the U.S. experience mental illness annually.It is imperative for you to know if your local police force has a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT).  CIT training is a specialized police curriculum that aims to reduce the risk of serious injury or death during an emergency interaction between persons with mental illness and police officers.The lack of mental health crisis services across the U.S. means that law enforcement officers serve as first responders to most crises. A CIT program is an innovative, community-based approach to improve the outcomes of these encounters.This is especially important if you, a loved one, family member, friend or colleague may suffer from depression, anxiety, PTSD, schizophrenia, or any mental health challenges or issues.  This multi-layer patient-focused collaborative approach can often be the difference between life and death for the person experiencing a mental crisis situation.In this timely and important episode, we'll unpack:● Riveting case studies of Joshua Barre, Joshua Harvey and Daniel Prude - all African-American men.  All suffering from some form of mental health issue.  All three were killed by police.● Personal insights from having observed a mentally challenged individual unattended in public.● An in-depth analysis of Crisis Intervention Team Training (CIT).● The role police play in handling mentally ill persons.● The decision-making process from a police officer's perspective regarding mentally ill persons.● Law enforcement's formal and informal “options” for handling mentally ill persons. ● The factors contributing to the problem and the implications of criminalizing mental illness. ●Finally, we focus the conversation on some policy recommendations to help improve the overall process.We'd like to thank our friends at Feedspot, as recently we were honored by being ranked #6 in their most recent poll out of the 40 Best Criminal Justice Podcasts.  Visit their blog at www.Feedspot.com or simply follow this link:  Best 40 Criminal Justice Podcasts You Follow in 2022 (feedspot.com) And for all your news and current affairs check out our friends at Newsly by visiting https://newsly.me.  Use the promo code L1GHTEMUP to launch your 10% savings.We bring the classroom to you! We are here for you and because of you! Executive Producer,Phil Rizzo 

Aggie New Student Podcast
Fall 2022: Tips from the A-Team

Aggie New Student Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 5:07


In today's episode I revisit when I sat down on Zoom with CJ, Regan, Jarod, and Halle as they share some of their favorite tips to share with students. We are ¾ of the way through the semester and it can be tricky if you don't quite feel like you've got it figured out. These A-Team members have great tips/advice for students who are still trying to find their groove here at USU.  New Student Orientation: https://www.usu.edu/orientation/locations/logan    Orientation Office Contact Information: 435-797-0283; orientation@usu.edu; Instagram @usuateam    Guests  CJ Peragallo – Human Experience Design and Interaction; Junior; Draper, UT  Regan Luke – Environmental Studies; Senior; Middleton, ID  Jarod Bressler – Physics; Sophomore; Magna, UT  Halle Hart – Recreation Administration; Sophomore; Liberty, UT 

PK and DK
FULL SHOW: A Discord 'free for all Friday'

PK and DK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 56:59


Laugh with our daily morning show!Today:• Welcome to a #Friyay YAYYY! • We celebrate a first IVN!• Did you know “breakfast is the most important meal” was just marketing? • Andrew has a clapback for PK and Duryan!• We join our DISCORD chat LIVE in a “Free for all Friyay YAYYY!”• Josh Wong tries to stick Damion Wayans• Jax shares is 2 million view TikTok • What is the plural of “mouse” ?• Scooter chimes in and shares the time him and his wife, Sarah, were on “Wheel of Fortune”• You gotta “live life to love life”• Duryan shares why his wife made him angry• Ashley with “Schanz Sketchbook” checks in https://www.instagram.com/schanzssketchbook/ • Barman Brooks wants to stick more than Jerry• Tricia H. chats about her new small business• https://www.instagram.com/teethwhiteningbytricia/?hl=en • We make it up to guess 110 for “What's that Noise”• Duryan shares his final thought; “GO DOGO” a Mental Workout for dogs• And so much more!Subscribe for ad-free listening (plus uncensored option): https://bit.ly/3AVvltaMerch + Stickers: https://www.pkanddkshop.com/Discord: https://discord.gg/VYhrfqKDY6Home: www.PKandDK.com

IAQ Radio
Lisa White - Grid-Building Interaction, Microgrids and Passive Building

IAQ Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 70:47


This week we welcome Lisa White, Associate Director at the Passive House Institute US. This show is a great follow up to our recent discussions about the internet of things, sensors and the electrify everything movement. Lisa did a well received presentation at Summer Camp with thoughtful insights on how changes to the grid can be coordinated with changes in buildings to take advantage of the moment. Lisa White is the Associate Director and a technical lead for Phius (Passive House Institute US). Ms. White has been with Phius since 2012. She led the building certification review team for seven years and is an instructor for Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC®️) training and WUFI®️ Passive energy modeling software training. She holds a degree in Environmental Sustainability with a minor in Architecture from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a Master's in Energy Engineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Giannotto & Jeffrey Show
THURSDAY TASTING MENU: BIGGEST GAMES COMING UP PLUS ERIC HASSELTINE ON PETE PRANICA AND BREVIN KNIGHT'S INTERACTION WITH THE REFS LAST NIGHT. WHAT WAS SAID ON THE TEAM PLANE?

Giannotto & Jeffrey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 52:22


THURSDAY TASTING MENU: BIGGEST GAMES COMING UP PLUS ERIC HASSELTINE ON PETE PRANICA AND BREVIN KNIGHT'S INTERACTION WITH THE REFS LAST NIGHT.  WHAT WAS SAID ON THE TEAM PLANE?

Sport Horse Podcast
Sustainable Equestrianism and the Horse-Rider Interaction

Sport Horse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 45:07


What does sustainability mean in equestrian sports? What changes can be made to ensure we continue to prioritize horse welfare and high-level performance? In this episode, we talk with Dr. Inga Wolframm about her research on sustainable equestrianism, the horse-rider interaction and implications for how we build each training session, as well as discuss key anecdotes that frame the direction that our sports need to move.Sport Horse Podcast Guests and Links Episode 19:Hosts:  Nicole Lakin and Dr. Tim Worden of the Equine High-Performance Sports GroupPodcast Website:  Sport Horse PodcastPresenting Sponsor:  Equine High Performance Sports GroupGuest: Inga WolframmYouTube Link: Dr. Inga Wolframm: "What is a Piece of Tack?"

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network
Sport Horse 19: Sustainable Equestrianism and the Horse-Rider Interaction

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 45:07


What does sustainability mean in equestrian sports? What changes can be made to ensure we continue to prioritize horse welfare and high-level performance? In this episode, we talk with Dr. Inga Wolframm about her research on sustainable equestrianism, the horse-rider interaction and implications for how we build each training session, as well as discuss key anecdotes that frame the direction that our sports need to move.Sport Horse Podcast Guests and Links Episode 19:Hosts:  Nicole Lakin and Dr. Tim Worden of the Equine High-Performance Sports GroupPodcast Website:  Sport Horse PodcastPresenting Sponsor:  Equine High Performance Sports GroupGuest: Inga WolframmYouTube Link: Dr. Inga Wolframm: "What is a Piece of Tack?"Support the show

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber
TCF708: SELL UNAFRAID - Sell Like You Are Independently Wealthy

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 9:25


In this episode, Tom tells a story about one of his favorite sales calls and teaches you to sell like you are independently wealthy, which means that you should sell like you don't care if you get the job or not.   Conversation Highlights: [00:00] - Intro [01:00] - One of Tom's favorite sales calls  [02:31] - Tom's sales call, set up by the window company [03:57] - Interaction with the client [04:29] - Tom's response to the rejection from the client [06:18] - The lesson Tom learned: Sell Unafraid [08:20] - Detach yourself from the outcome    Resources:  == If you're doing above $1.5M and you're ready to scale to 8 figures and beyond, check out http://TheContractorFight.com/Empire to see if Empire might be a fit for you. == Get the FREE Contractor's Guide to Spotting a Cheap Prospect BEFORE They Waste Your Time: https://thecontractorfight.com/cheap/    == Join us in BATTLEGROUND == Everything your contracting business needs in one comprehensive program with three main focus areas: Leadership, Communication, and Numbers. For more info, check out: https://TheContractorFight.com/Battleground    == Get your questions answered and connect with other contractors building stronger businesses in The Contractor Fight: https://thecontractorfight.com/facebook    == Grab the Gear == https://gear.thecontractorfight.com/    == Find Us on Social Media == YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TomReber  Instagram: https://thecontractorfight.com/ig    == Rate the Podcast == Help your fellow contractors find the podcast! Please leave a rating/review!  Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Let's Gut Real - Easy to Digest Nutrition Science
Patient Experience of Disorders of Gut Brain Interaction with Johannah Ruddy, MEd & Dr. Doug Drossman

Let's Gut Real - Easy to Digest Nutrition Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 44:27


Two previous guest of our Let's Gut Real Podcast, Dr. Drossman and Johannah Ruddy, join us again today to talk about their newly released book. Gut Feelings: The Patient's Story Personal Accounts of the Illness Journey A Guide for Patients and Doctors Gut Feelings: A Patient's Story. Now available on Amazon.   Dr. Drossman received his M.D. degree at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and subspecialized in biopsychosocial medicine and Gastroenterology. He received his gastroenterology training at the University of North Carolina where he founded the UNC for Functional GI and Motility Disorders.  Currently he is Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Psychiatry in Gastroenterology at UNC. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a Master of the American College of Gastroenterology, Past-President of the American Psychosomatic Society (1997) and Founder and President of the Rome Foundation for 29 years. In addition, he founded the Drossman Center for the Education and Practice of Biopsychosocial Care as an entity to help train physicians in relationship-centered biopsychosocial care with an emphasis on communication skills and enhancing the patient-doctor relationship.   Dr. Drossman is joined today by co-author Johannah Ruddy who is a national expert, researcher, and writer on teaching communications skills to patients and providers. Johannah currently serves as the Executive Director of the Rome Foundation. She has 22 years of executive leadership experience working with a variety of non-profit organizations nationwide and a strong background in writing for patients as well as a speaker at GI practices, medical centers, and conferences in the area of provider communication and patient advocacy. She holds a Bachelor of science degree from the University of New Mexico in Political Science, a Masters of Education from New Mexico Highlands University and is a doctoral student at Campbell University. She lives in Wake Forest, North Carolina with her husband of 21 years and their two sons.   Dr. Drossman, Johannah Ruddy and I talk about: - Dr. Drossman's and Mrs. Ruddy's backgrounds and how they came to work together - Disorders of gut brain interaction - Typical patient experiences with these diagnoses and the reasons why they hold so much stigma - Each of their biggest learnings as practitioner and patient in doing these interviews - Common mistakes/pitfalls practitioners experience in working with patients and how this may be a disservice to our patients - The key things clinicians can take away from this book, with a focus on patient centred care. - How patients advocate for themselves to feel heard in their journey   You can find their new book: Gut Feelings: The Patient's Story Personal Accounts of the Illness Journey A Guide for Patients and Doctors Gut Feelings: A Patient's Story which is also available on Amazon: https://romedross.video/patient-story   You can find their previous book: Gut Feelings- Disorders of Gut-Brain Interactions, A Guide for Patients and Doctors which is available on Amazon: https://romedross.video/GutFeelingsWebsite   Check out the video version of the audio recording excerpt featured in this presentation: https://romedross.video/LesleyGutFeelings4X   Connect with Johannah on Instagram @johannahruddy on Twitter @JohannahRuddy or on LinkedIn.   Learn more about the Theromefoundation.org or here: https://romeonline.org

Mindset First Podcast
The Mistaken Introvert: Why You're Really Exhausted from Interaction

Mindset First Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 25:07


This is an episode I've been excited to share for some time. And as an extrovert this might seem like a bit of a funny one for me to deliver - actually I think I might categorize me more as an ambivert because I do love my alone recovery time as much as I love my energizing time out with people. But, here's something I've noticed. There are people out there who might be incorrectly diagnosing themselves as introverts - or actually might be feeling some things they ascribe to introversion that has nothing to do with being an introvert. Here's what I'm talking about today - there are a ton of you out there that are leaving networking events, small group interactions, 1 on 1 interactions - feeling exhausted. And you might say to yourself - oh, it's because I'm an introvert. But what if it's actually something else - something you can shift and feel like you can actually get energized by the interactions you have with others? Today on the podcast, I want to talk about the mistaken introvert and how you can begin to feel less exhausted from your interaction with others.

How Humans Heal
#133 Hormones Interaction with Weight Loss and Fertility with Dr. Bindiya Gandhi

How Humans Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 41:06


In today's podcast we talk about hormones, including leptin, and how hormones relate to weight loss and fertility with Dr. Bindiya Gandhi. We also discuss the effect of gluten and Celiac disease on hormones and fertility.   Dr. Bindiya is a functional and integrative doctor who specializes in helping patients to alleviate their leptin resistance, lose weight, and return to wellness.   For a long time Dr. Bindiya suffered from nutritional deficiency due to a “healthy diet”. She suffered from constipation, anemia, acne, headaches, skin rashes, irregular menstrual cycles, constant fatigue, etc. She kept looking for answers on her residency program and traditional medicine and treatments without success until she started working with a functional integrative medicine doctor.    She finally found out she had Celiac Disease, which is a chronic digestive and autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestine. The disease is triggered by eating foods containing gluten. It turns out she had severe gluten sensitivity. So she started working on healing her “Gut” and that's when she finally started feeling better.   It was a great timing for her to discover this because she had just turned 30 and was going to get married and wanted to have kids. But that represented another problem.    There is a transition in learning how to eat gluten free and it takes time for the gut lining to heal and recover. It's not just about avoiding gluten but how do we help our bodies recover from gluten damage to the gastro-intestinal tract.   There have been cases of people with fertility issues due to hormonal imbalances caused by Celiac Disease. Hormones can be such a mystery and so can fertility and weight loss for many, especially women.   -   In her practice, Dr. Bindiya was helping other women get pregnant but could not get pregnant herself due to hormonal issues. She was found to be estrogen dominant. So she started working on “rebalancing” her hormones and that is when she started learning about leptin.   Leptin is the hormone that sends satiety cues to your brain when you eat, telling you that you've had enough. Consequently, leptin resistance is a hormonal condition in which inflammation disrupts the communication between your brain's hypothalamus and your fat cells, thereby blocking leptin's messages.   Often caused by inflammation, poor sleep, an unbalanced diet, or even chronic stress, leptin resistance heightens a patient's risk factor for obesity, metabolism imbalances, and more.    Also, having high estrogen or low estrogen can impact fertility very differently. They both go hand in hand with your leptin levels and that's what makes it challenging. But we can learn how to get to the right balance sending our bodies the right signals so it can regulate estrogen, progesterone, and leptin altogether, so you don't have fertility and/or weight problems.   Leptin is a hormone that is produced by our fat cells and it communicates with our brains. It's our satiety hormone. It lets us know if we're full, if we need to eat again, etc. When this communication is off there is something called leptin resistance developing.   This is why people have weight loss plateaus where they lose weight and then their weight stalls. This is also why people have difficulty losing weight no matter what diet they're following.    Leptin is a very important hormone. You may suspect there is something going on with your leptin levels if you find yourself constantly snacking or craving sugary foods for example. Also if you feel like you're hungry all the time or if you just ate and half an hour later you feel like you need to eat again.   Unfortunately, most conventional medicine doctors do not check for this leptin level, and even if you go to an endocrinologist, which is a hormone specialist, they don't check this level either because they don't know what to do with it.   The other important thing about leptin is that it also regulates your metabolism. Leptin also communicates with your other hormones that regulate your insulin levels, it communicates with your estrogen levels and with your adrenal stress hormones so it's very important be aware of your leptin levels.   There is a trendy diet now known as intermittent fasting which can cause an imbalance of leptin by sending a starvation signal. This ends up confusing the hormone signals and can cause problems like missing a menstrual cycle, which affects your fertility.    Another impact of leptin in our bodies is mood. When your leptin levels are really low, you tend to have more anxiety.    -   Many people have gluten digestion problems as an issue or leptin problems without even knowing about it. So they need to think outside the box and look for help with the right people who are willing to help them in nontraditional ways to get to the root of the problem and really start healing.    It's about helping you and your body understand these signals so you can make different choices, make peace with your body, and learn how to feed it properly so all systems are in balance and functioning correctly.   If you want to reach out to Dr. Bindiya and learn how she can help you, please check out her website:  https://drbindiyamd.com or her Instagram: @drbindiyamd.   If you want to learn more about your specific food sensitivities, such as gluten sensitivity, and what you can do to better feed your body and heal leaky gut, you can get my IgG & IgA Food Sensitivity Home Test Kit here: https://doctordoni.com/product/igg-iga-food-sensitivity-home-testing/    I have also developed a Leaky Gut Pro Package for enhanced gastrointestinal support and recovery from gluten and Celiac disease. Find more about it here: https://doctordoni.com/product/leaky-gut-pro-package/   Find my online Heal Leaky Gut Program – available immediately – at https://doctordoni.com/leaky-gut-program    Or you can reach out to me to set up a one-on-one appointment if you prefer and I can guide you to know which tests I find to be most helpful for identifying hormone imbalances and underlying causes of weight gain and fertility issues: https://doctordoni.com/work-with-me/    We're here to help you!   Connect with Dr. Doni:    Facebook HTTPS://FACEBOOK.COM/DRDONIWILSON   Instagram HTTPS://INSTAGRAM.COM/DRDONIWILSON   YouTube HTTPS://YOUTUBE.COM/USER/DONIWILSONND   Weekly Wellness Wisdom Newsletter: HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/WWW     -   Books and Resources:    Order My New Book: https://www.amazon.com/Master-Your-Stress-Reset-Health/dp/1953295576   Stress Warrior Book (FREE)  HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/STRESSWARRIOR      Stress Warrior Stress Resiliency Facebook Group (FREE)  HTTPS://FACEBOOK.COM/GROUPS/STRESSWARRIOR     7-day Stress Reset (FREE)  HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/STRESS-RESET     HPV & Cervical Dysplasia Guide (FREE)  HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/HPV-AND-CERVICAL-DYSPLASIA-GUIDE/     -   Personalized Solutions:    If you'd like to meet with Dr. Doni one-on-one for your health, request a Health Breakthrough Session: HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/BREAKTHROUGH     To get an idea of more comprehensive options, read about Dr. Doni's Signature Consultation Programs: HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/SERVICES   Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are product links and affiliate links and if you go through them to make a purchase I will earn a commission at no cost to you. Keep in mind that I link these companies and their products because of their quality and not because of the commission I receive from your purchases. The decision is yours, and whether or not you decide to buy something is completely up to you.

Hacking Your Leadership
Ep 315: So your people want no office time, no meetings, and no scheduled interaction with each other whatsoever?

Hacking Your Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 24:06


Is the future of work void of scheduled interactions? Discussing an article from Forbes Leadership.Link to article by Lisa Bodell: https://www.forbes.com/sites/lisabodell/2022/10/28/can-fewer-meetings-reverse-quiet-quitting-research-says-yes/Send us a message on Community! (213) 444-5381https://link.chtbl.com/workcheck?sid=podcast.hackingyourleadership#HackingYourLeadership #StarkEngagementConsulting #LifeOfLozo #BeABetterLeaderYouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HackingYourLeadershipPodcast/featuredPatreon Account: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=22174142#Leadership #HackingYourLeadership #StarkEngagementConsulting #LifeOfLozolozo@lifeoflozo.comchris@starkengagement.com

Immanuel Baptist Church
Ben Seewald – Matthew 22:23-33 - Jesus' Interaction with the Sadducees

Immanuel Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 45:22


You can know a lot about Scripture and not really know the Scriptures. Sermon delivered at Immanuel Baptist Church in Springdale, AR on November 6, 2022

Sadhguru Wisdom Story
Sidharth Malhotra's Candid Interaction with Sadhguru

Sadhguru Wisdom Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 38:07


In a candid interaction at a park in Mumbai, actor Sidharth Malhotra explores a range of topics with Sadhguru including motorcycles, movies, Inner Engineering and #SaveSoil. #siddharthmalhotra #sadhguru 00:00 - Siddharth Malhotra learns Save Soil dance. 00:15 - Sadhguru's arrives. 00:40 - About motorcycles. 02:33 - Sidhart: What's the secret behind your energy? 05:13 - Sidhart: How do you maintain balance? 10:12 - Sadhguru - Our movies and television acts should change. 15:03 - Tender-coconut-chat. 16:12 - Nutritional content in food. More wisdom, join us in your favorite social media.. Tiktok : https://www.tiktok.com/@sadhguruji Snapchat : @sadhgurustory Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/sadhgurustory/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sadhgurustory/message

Paddle N' Fin
S5E305 Rusty Hook- Q & A Let's Get Some Interaction

Paddle N' Fin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 54:43


John goes solo.... chatting about the economy, vacations, recession and Kayak Fishing, Veterans Salute and His thoughts on what needs to be done to make Kayak Fishing Tournaments better. I hope you will chime In!!! So if you have time, join us Tuesday 11/1, 6:30pm est.  Yak Gadget-  Website:  www.yakgadget.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100057543725300 Payne Outdoors Website: https://payneoutdoors.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/payneoutdoors Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/payneoutdoors TikTok: @payneoutdoors Googan Bros. Custom Tackle  https://www.facebook.com/googanbros.fishing/ Feelfree Kayaks: Website: https://www.feelfreeus.com Email: info@feelfreeus.com Facebook: @Feelfreeus https://www.feelfreeus.com/pages/contact-us Westbrook Supply Co Website: https://www.westbrooksupplyco.com Email: fletch@westbrooksupplyco.com Facebook:  https://m.facebook.com/100063865200977/ Twitter: Westbrook Supply Co. (@WestbrookSupply) / Twitter Dale Hollow Lodging- www.eastport.info Fantasy Kayak League- www.paddlenfin.com/fantasy Waypoint TV- https://waypointtv.com Patreon-https://www.patreon.com/paddlenfin Podcast & Website- www.paddlenfin.com YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/paddlenfin Email- paddlenfin@gmail.com Social Media- @paddlenfin Yak Gadget- www.yakgadget.com Pelican Professional- www.pelican.com Rocktown paddlesports - rocktownadventures.com JigMasters Jigs- https://jigmasters.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PK and DK
FULL SHOW: The promise of a new day + LIVE callers!

PK and DK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 62:16


Laugh with our daily morning show!Today:• Welcome to a Friyay YAYYY! • We listen to your IVN's• Heather L. is ready to stick in Athens, GA for GAME DAY ! • PK updates us on his viral Reddit post about #alwaysbesticking • (2) podcast to shout out: Nerding in the Deep & The Rating Room • Duryan uses his own final thought, Playground AI, to email his sons teachers• We have MAIL!• PK and DK with Duryan PRE-show LIVE on Discord audio (join Discord link at bottom)• Today's one random question: What's your “don't knock it until you try it” product?• PK - Delta shower head and weighted blanket, DK - blackout curtains, Duryan - SPAM • We hear about Holly +, an AI that sings your songs• + SO MUCH MORE in PART 2!Subscribe for ad-free listening (plus uncensored option): https://bit.ly/3AVvltaMerch + Stickers: https://www.pkanddkshop.com/Discord: https://discord.gg/VYhrfqKDY6Home: www.PKandDK.com

Athlete On Fire
When the first interaction with your future coach really irritates you, in a good way!

Athlete On Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 28:19


Today we bring on one of Scott's friends and clients and share their origin story (it's a good one) and talk about how leadership and training for hard things have so many parallels! Shout outs to clients doing big things like running 100 miles. Shout out to the Jones' boys working hard for things they want. Introducing "Lunge Miles" as a training set for anyone but especially for runners in flat places training for mountains. Enjoy the show. Get in touch with Cale here: For Crestcom https://crestcom.com/leadership-trainer/cale-pearson/ For B2B https://b2btranserv.com/ Visit other projects: Becoming Ultra Athlete On Fire

Defected Radio
4 To The Floor Show Ep 38 presented by Seamus Haji

Defected Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:55


Podcast from Defected Records 1. Gwen McRae - Keep the Fire Burning (Roger Sanchez Remix)2. Key To Life feat Marc Evans - God's Light3. Logic – Blues For You (Hard Dub)4. Working Happily - Better Things (Workin' Dub)5. Interaction feat Michelle Weeks - Show Em How It Works (Sensible House NY Mix)6. Bobby D'Ambrosio feat Michelle Weeks - Moment Of My Life (Original Mix)7. Jamie Lewis feat Michelle Weeks – The Light8. Jazzy - Lonely (Underground Goodie Mix)9. Bobby Pruit – Tried So Hard10. Radiohead – Everything In It's Right Place (Afefe Iku Remix)11. Curious – Sun, Sun, Sun (Instrumental) + John “Julius” Knight & Roland Clark – The Underground (Accapella)12. House Of Gypsies - Sume Sigh Sey (MAW Remix) + Cevin Fisher – The Way We Used To Do It (Accapella)13. DJ Gregory – Block Party + Blaze – My Beat (David Harness Accapella)14. Latina Cafe – 200015. Sam Karlson & Luke Delite feat Michelle Weeks – Because Of You (Art Of Tones Remix)

Saving Grace
29: Max Fosh on Being Friends With Royalty, His BIZARRE Interaction With KSI & MORE!

Saving Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 48:50


Max Fosh is here to reveal all of his dirty secrets. He laid everything on the table from going for a poo up Kilimanjaro, KSI trying to buy him, and how he met his BESTIE Tom Felton.  How does a free case of wine sound? All you need to do is go to https://www.wine52.com/GRACE and cover the postage costs of £8.95, and you'll get three bottles delivered to your door. Follow Max: https://www.instagram.com/max.fosh/?hl=en 

Together Digital Power Lounge
Interaction over Interruption | Adrian Owen Jones, Chief Growth Officer at ThreeSixtyEight | Power Lounge S1E30

Together Digital Power Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 48:17


In this conversation, we discuss the ways brands must fight for attention in an oversaturated market.THIS WEEK'S TOPIC:Brands must fight for attention in an oversaturated market, with a customer base that is growing more weary of and savvy to advertising. By focusing on engaging interactions and building affection, ThreeSixtyEight has found a clear path to success.You will also learn:Interaction > interruptionYour aim should be winning affection rather than stealing attentionNo-code tools are changing the business for the betterTHIS WEEK'S GUESTAdrian Owens Jones helps teams leverage data and technology to improve their strategy and drive growth. She is known for bringing a creative approach to problem-solving, coupled with sound technical skills honed over her time as an analyst. She became a data junkie through a non-traditional path. She started as a top world-ranked player in World of Warcraft. This experience taught her the critical technical and leadership skills she uses to this day as Chief Growth Officer and EOS Integrator at ThreeSixtyEight.Adrian is a life-long learner. She has a bachelor's degree from Oklahoma State in Classical Studies and is pursuing her MALA at Louisiana State University with a focus on Leadership & Emerging Technology. Her research is exploring the relationship between millennial leadership and video games. She is also a Gallup-Certified strengths coach.Support the showBrought to you in partnership with:Agency For Change - Agency for Change is an uplifting podcast from KidGlov that aims to tell feel good stories from around the world. Every week, you'll hear from changemakers who are using their power to address real issues and improve lives through their nonprofits, programs, products or services. And you'll learn about the role each of us can play in making our own positive change.

Tore Says Show
Tue 01 Nov: Geo Dynamics - Round II - Modi's India - Sewing Divisions - Full Circle - Within Fog - Guiding Hands

Tore Says Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 123:15


Although the shape of world politics is changing rapidly, it's also mired in history. India, Asia and the power to control it all. Seeing Iran for what it is. Interaction between global player's is everything. Resource mining and controlling the masses. India's massive military and regional reach. Why all the secret bases? Muslims are on China's border. The surprise in who supports what. Developing nations that we destroyed long ago. The stone age myths. Creating radical governments to serve a purpose. And then there's Africa. A century ago freedom reigned. Infighting as a strategy, but Modi resists. Playing Muslim's against Hindus. Music, hate, blood and cultural violence. And still, it's as if hands are guiding us from out of this world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bacon Podcast with Brian Basilico | CURE Your Sales & Marketing with Ideas That Make It SIZZLE!
Episode 826 – Best Of – Envisioning Better Social Media Interaction Using Planable with Xenia Muntean

The Bacon Podcast with Brian Basilico | CURE Your Sales & Marketing with Ideas That Make It SIZZLE!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 18:40


Xenia is the CEO and Co-Founder of Planable, a content review and marketing collaboration platform used by over 5,000 teams behind brands such as Hyundai, Christian Louboutin, Viber, and United Nations. Prior to launching Planable, at 20 y.o. she built a digital marketing agency and led social for clients such as Coca-Cola. Xenia has been recognized on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list and she spoke on the Innovation Stage at Cannes Lions in 2018. Xenia graduated Tim Draper's startup academy in Silicon Valley and took Planable through the Techstars London accelerator in 2017. She has also published a book – The Manifesto on Content Marketing Teams, and has launched her own podcast – People of Marketing. Learn More About Xenia - Click Here

Relationship Matters
Ep.7 Everyday ORSC: Bringing a coach mindset to our every interaction

Relationship Matters

Play Episode Play 44 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 29:45 Transcription Available


In this episode, Katie talks with CEO of CRR Global, Marita Fridjhon, about how to take the ORSC tools and skills outside of coaching sessions and into our everyday interactions.  Across the conversation we discuss:How to make a difference in the places where we don't coachBringing a different form of collective change through these small yet significant interactionsSmall acts of kindnessThe power of positivityBringing a coaching mindset to our wider community systemsMarita Fridjhon is a co-founder and CEO of CRR Global and mentor to an ever-growing community of practitioners in the field of Relationship Systems work. She designs curriculum and operates training programs in Relationship Systems Work for coaches, executives and teams. She came to this work from an extensive background in Clinical Social Work, Community Development, Process Work, Family Systems Therapy, Business Consulting and Alternative Dispute Resolution. She has an international mentor coaching practice of individuals, partnerships and teams. Her primary focus in coaching is on systemic change, leveraging diversity, creative communication, deep democracy in conflict management and the development of Learning Organizations. For over 20 years, CRR Global has accompanied leaders, teams, and practitioners on their journey to build stronger relationships by focusing on the relationship itself, not only the individuals occupying it. This leads to a community of changemakers around the world. Supported by a global network of Faculty and Partners, we connect, inspire, and equip change agents to shift systems, one relationship at a timeWe believe Relationship Matters, from humanity to nature, to the larger whole.

The Recruitment Mentors Podcast
Chris Monticolombi - Building a recruitment business from scratch and the importance of adding value with every interaction

The Recruitment Mentors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 52:06


Podcast Partners - Claim your exclusive savings with the links below. Vincere - https://recruitmentmentorspodcast.captivate.fm/vincere (https://recruitmentmentorspodcast.captivate.fm/vincere) Sourcebreaker - https://hubs.la/Q017bVC70 (https://hubs.la/Q017bVC70) ----------------------------------------- Watch the episode on Youtube

Service Business Mastery - Business Tips and Strategies for the Service Industry
690. Talking with Clients Across Multiple Mediums in One Place with Matt Boyce

Service Business Mastery - Business Tips and Strategies for the Service Industry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 40:43


Matt Boyce from the Podium joins Tersh to discuss the various benefits that they offer their customers by providing a bird's eye view of their businesses. Their services allow customers to easily collect and organize messages from various social media. They also offer payment services without ever having to contact the technician in person through text messaging. Matt provides some great advice about becoming a business owner and shares some helpful resources for those looking to start their own business. Jump in and learn how to drive consistent reviews in your business!   [00:01 - 06:16] Opening Segment Introducing Matthew to the show Brief background and career What is Podium? Interaction management platform Allows top-down visibility on conversations Communicating with customers on the same thread   [6:17 - 32:19] Boosting Reviews through Podium Pioneering the review economy and driving consistent reviews for businesses Google knows consumer behavior around reviews and can devalue a business's relevancy if they're not driving consistency Podium is a consolidated messaging tool that pulls in messages from various social media Allows for better communication between different parts of a business Web chats are a great way to connect with customers, but they need to be marketed well to be successful Benefits of the text chat option Offers a convenient way for customers to communicate with businesses, without the fear of being disconnected or waiting on a live chat response Has a high response rate A natural progression from web chats   [32:20 - 39:01] Service Maintenance Program How lack of getting schedules lead to attrition Not spamming customers with marketing content Schedule text messages to remind customers about service appointments The rates for this service are very competitive, and there is no card present fee You can also use this service to collect payments from customers who do not have a card on site Service Titan offers bulk texting so that customers can be scheduled for service without having to wait on phone calls.   [39:02 - 40:42] Closing Segment See the links below to connect with Matt Final words Quotes:   “Reviews are great to get. But if you're not driving consistency, you're really not as relevant in those local searches.” - Matt Boyce   “If you're looking at being a message-able or text-able business, you gotta have the flexibility to facilitate that.” - Matt Boyce Connect with Matt by visiting www.Podium.com.

Anchored In The Lord
Personal Interaction, Personal Invitation

Anchored In The Lord

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 8:28


31st Sunday in Ordinary Time In our familiar Gospel story of Zacchaeus, Jesus does something that might entirely change how you see Jesus' life, and what that means about how you are called here and now to live as disciples of Jesus!  In our Gospel today, we hear that Jesus came to Jericho and "intended to pass through the town"...Jesus intended to pass through the town, but when he sees Zacchaeus he changes his mind and decides to stay.  For Jesus, following his Father's will didn't look like having a checklist in his head of every single pre-planned-from-all-eternity thing that had to happen on that particular day to achieve our salvation...Jesus changed his mind and his plans during his days with the nudges of the Holy Spirit (and in this case the Holy Spirit moved him to change his plans and have dinner with Zacchaeus - and this interaction changed Zacchaeus' life).  God's plan to change the world is not primarily through heady knowledge of theology, nor is it primarily through large-scale events that normal folk like us are unable to bring about.  God's plan to change the world is to change it primarily through normal, personal interactions, when we as individuals (as the hands and feet of Christ here and now), inspired by the Spirit, reach out and touch the lives of particular people that God has us come in contact with.  Personal interaction, personal invitation - that's how Jesus lived and that's how we are called to live, too! 

The Sentience Institute Podcast
Kurt Gray on human-robot interaction and mind perception

The Sentience Institute Podcast

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 59:10 Transcription Available


“And then you're like, actually, I can't know what it's like to be a bat—again, the problem of other minds, right? There's this fundamental divide between a human mind and a bat, but at least a bat's a mammal. What is it like to be an AI? I have no idea. So I think [mind perception] could make us less sympathetic to them in some sense because it's—I don't know, they're a circuit board, there are these algorithms, and so who knows? I can subjugate them now under the heel of human desire because they're not like me.”Kurt GrayWhat is mind perception? What do we know about mind perception of AI/robots? Why do people like to use AI for some decisions but not moral decisions? Why would people rather give up hundreds of hospital beds than let AI make moral decisions?Kurt Gray is a Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he directs the Deepest Beliefs Lab and the Center for the Science of Moral Understanding. He studies morality, politics, religion, perceptions of AI, and how best to bridge divides.Topics discussed in the episode:Introduction (0:00)How did a geophysicist come to be doing social psychology? (0:51)What do the Deepest Beliefs Lab and the Center for the Science of Moral Understanding do? (3:11)What is mind perception? (4:45)What is a mind? (7:45)Agency vs experience, or thinking vs feeling (9:40)Why do people see moral exemplars as being insensitive to pain? (10:45)How will people perceive minds in robots/AI? (18:50)Perspective taking as a tool to reduce substratism towards AI (29:30)Why don't people like using AI to make moral decisions? (32:25)What would be the moral status of AI if they are not sentient? (38:00)The presence of robots can make people seem more similar (44:10)What can we expect about discrimination towards digital minds in the future? (48:30)Resources discussed in the episode are available at https://www.sentienceinstitute.org/podcastSupport the show

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Nasty neighbors in the Great Unraveling, The Rest MovementLet Me Run This By You: RejectionInterview: We talk to Tina Huang about soap opera acting, LaGuardia High School, the Playwrights Horizon program at Tisch, breaking down barriers for Asian actors, Ammunition Theatre Company, Revenge Porn or the Story of a Body by Carla Ching, Bay Area Theatre, Pig Hunt, starting a fake management company,  Word for Word Performing Arts Company, Intersection for the Arts, Campo Santo, Amy Tan, 1:1 Productions, Karla Mosley, Jeanne Sakata. FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth Ramirez this, and I'm Gina Pulice.2 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of2 (20s):It all. We survive theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?0 (34s):You2 (35s):Part of the building.1 (36s):Okay,2 (37s):Great. I don't know how it's gonna go.1 (41s):I mean, nobody knows how it's gonna go. It's unknowable until we know it.2 (45s):That is true. Good morning.1 (48s):Good. Margie,2 (50s):Your makeup looks amazing.1 (53s):Thank you. I'm not doing well, so I'm acting opposite. You know that skill?2 (59s):Oh, I know. Oh, that's like, I would say like 90% of adulthood. Anyway. What's happening? What, what is, if you wanna get into it, like what's the overall arching shittiness,1 (1m 10s):The overarching thing is just, Well, my neighbor I told you about.2 (1m 15s):Okay. And I just wanna put it out there and we'll get into the story, but I wanna put it out there that I, we are in, and we've said this before on the podcast in what I would call, and others like Gina would call probably similar, the great unraveling of our society. So it's like Rome is falling and I, I don't even say it, it sounds so cavalier the way I'm saying it, but I literally every day see evidence of the great unraveling of the American sweater. You know what I mean? Like it's coming out. Yes. Yeah. And we, it's okay. And I think one of those things is terrible neighbors, right? Like, people who are terrible are just getting more terrible.2 (1m 58s):So Gina has a neighbor that is very terrible.1 (2m 0s):Yeah. People just over the last several years do seem to feel way more comfortable just being extremely hor. Horrible. Horrible. So what, So this is the same neighbor that I've talked about before. And basically the deal with her is it's like she's obsessed with us. And, and like, what she doesn't understand is that we just work very hard to avoid her, you know, avoid interacting with her at any cause. I realized yesterday after she screamed at me that she has screamed at three fifths of my family members.1 (2m 40s):She only hasn't screamed at the nine year old and the, and the 14 year old. It's so insane. She's the one who Aaron was walking the dog and he had a flashlight and the dog was really young and he was trying to train him. So he kept like stopping and starting screens out. It's very disconcerting to be sitting in my living room and seeing a flashing light in front of my house, house. Like, he's like, I'm walking the dog. And the same one who when she was walking her dogs and he was walking our dog, she's like, It's not a great time to be walking your dog because her dogs are out of control. And she's yelled at my son a few times. Anyway, so what happened was, I walked the dog, I picked up the poop, I had the little baggy. If it's anybody else's house, I feel comfortable putting it in their trash2 (3m 23s):Can. Yeah. Here's the deal. Here's the deal. I hate to tell you people, but poop is trash. There's like nowhere else to put it. So if you, if you are like not okay with pooping in your trash in a bag tied up, then you don't need to live in a society where there are dogs or where there are trash. Cause that's what it1 (3m 44s):Is, Honestly. Honestly. And it's like, I feel like a big part of what's driving all this bad behavior is just like, so much entitlement. Like, I'm entitled to have only my trash in my trash can. And it's like, okay, you've never lived in New York City, right? Cause you don't understand anything about cooperative living. And anybody, whether they live in my neighborhood or not, is welcome to put their poop2 (4m 6s):Back. Yeah, dude.1 (4m 7s):So I'm walking by and I'm talking on the phone stuff, somewhat distracted, and I see this trash can, and I go, I like reach out ever So tentatively, not tentatively, but like, I had barely started to reach out, realized it was their house didn't. And within milliseconds, she is out of her house screaming at me. And I hadn't even, you know, put the poop in there. And I, I'm talking about misbehavior. I mean, I've, I don't think I've ever done this except for like having road rage in the car where the other person really can't hear me. Like I just screamed every obscenity Yes.1 (4m 48s):In the book. I, I hope nobody else, I'm sure somebody else heard, but nobody, nobody's contacted me. And, you know, I'll say this, I'm much better about taking a beat. Like, I really wanted to blast her. I really wanted to like write a horrible message to her. I really want, and I, and I don't, I'm not refined enough, well enough evolved enough to like get right to like, what's, what's the need of the matter? But I have figured out that I should probably just not say anything until, until I've thought about it. I had a good long think she messaged me on social2 (5m 22s):Media. What1 (5m 23s):She said, I'm sorry, I accused you of throwing trash in our trash can. And I just blocked her. I'm just like, you know, I, I, I wanted, what I wanted to say is like, you have no idea how much time we spend trying to avoid you. You are unwell. You have yelled at three fifths of my family, like, never speak to me or my children ever again. Forget I exist. Forget I live right across the street from you because that's what I'm trying to do about you. So2 (5m 50s):Instead you just blocked her. Well listen that, that, because when you told me this story yesterday that she, the the reach out on social media hadn't happened. So now I'm like, I think what, before you said that part, I was gonna say like, I think our only recourse is what people do, which is start videotaping the insanity. And I'm not sure that's a really a good solution. Like, I think that like, oh sure, people put it on social media and then there's a laugh, but then we're really laughing at sort of the horribleness and the, and the mental illness of others. And it's their person and who knows how that's gonna negatively affect them or their job or their family. So I don't, like, I understand the, the urge to videotape everything, but I'm not sure that's really the answer with, with non-criminal behavior.2 (6m 40s):If it's a crime, then it's something else. But if it's just to embarrass or ashamed someone I, I'm, I have second thoughts about the videotaping now, but good for you for just blocking it. It, you know, what it is, is if to say, we are done with this, we are done with this.1 (6m 57s):Yeah. Yeah. And you lie down with dogs and you get fleas. Yes. And I don't really wanna bring that energy into my life. And sometimes, you know, if you get, if you're like a person who consumes as much media as I do, you get this false sense of like, what I would do in that, you know, in a certain situation when it's theoretical, I feel very, like, not even brave, but just like aggressive and entitled. And I can get to a point where I feel like I could hear myself saying like, Oh, I would kill that person. Or I would, which of course I would never do. In fact, I don't even wanna like, say anything unkind about them in a very public way. So knowing me and knowing my values, and you could just never go wrong if you stick with your own values. Like, it's not my value to, it's not my value to tell people, You know what, here's a thing you need to know about yourself.1 (7m 43s):And it's not my val even though I do that with people, people that I know, but not strangers. And it's my value to like, keep as much peace in my life as possible. And it's not my value to engage with toxic people with whom I could only ever have a toxic Yeah. You know,2 (8m 0s):Interaction. Right. It's not gonna get better. It's like a legit never gonna get better because it's just, that's not how, that's not how it works if you engage in that. So anyway, that okay. But that, that has nothing to do with the overarching shitty No,1 (8m 14s):The overarching thing is just like, wow, parenting is so hard. People, people are really, people learn at different rates. People learn lessons at different rates. People mature at different rates. Like, and having patience for somebody who's really behind in so many ways is exhausting and overwhelming to me. So there's that piece. There's like, you know, a relative with having a health crisis, there's,2 (8m 45s):Oh,1 (8m 46s):There's just stuff going on. Yeah. And, but this is what I'm doing differently this time. Okay. I am trying to stay with myself, which is to say, yes, things are terrible, things are going wrong, but I am not gonna abandon myself in the process. Yeah. Of like, feeling my way through it. And in fact, that's another new thing, is I'm feeling my way through it and I'm really trying to apply this thing about taking a beat and like how crazy, you know, Aaron is also having, we're simultaneously having this growth moment. And, and you know, he recently made a big stride with somebody in his family who's having a health crisis, and he, he said, You know something I like, I'm not gonna go to crazy town.1 (9m 32s):Like I, he, I saw the light bulb for him. Like, I have a choice about whether or not I wanna go to crazy town on this. And actually I don't, because actually it's bad for my, because you know, I was thinking about this when I was at Costco today and I was doing some something small and I was wanting to like, do it really fast. And I thought, why do I wanna do everything so fast? Like, my shoulders are tense all the time. Like, I don't wanna do anything so fast anymore. There's no reason I'm not in any rush. Like I, there's, it's, it's just a habit from youth. I feel like just doing everything in a big rush, rush, rush. Yeah. And I think it's time to let that go.2 (10m 9s):Oh, I mean it's, so I feel like it's such an intense and like right on timing because there's this whole movement about rest. Have you heard about this? Like rest is radical, Rest is as a revolution. So there's a black woman and I believe I, I I I, I am ignorant to what her like specialty is area. And I just started hearing about it. And Miles my husband was listening to her an interview with her about how rest, not napping, not, but like r really snatching and holding dear to the idea of rest as, as radicalism, rest as a revolution opposite of hustle.2 (10m 50s):Culture is like gonna be the way that we, this is my interpretation of what she's saying. Like, the way that we sort of fight injustice and in fight racism, all the isms is by really embracing rest culture as opposed to hustle culture. So1 (11m 8s):I love that. And by the way, black women are spawn every good thing there is in the world. Like, you find a trend that's happening in society that you like and think is really positive. You can definitely trace it back to a black woman who, who, who, who started, who started it. So that's great. I'm pro rest, I'm, and I'm also trying to do less of like I'm a human being, not a human doing. And like, if I don't cross everything off of my to-do list, that doesn't, you know, it's not, it's not like I'm, it's not a wasted day if I didn't get all my little tasks done, you know, especially I was emotionally dealing with something else.2 (11m 45s):Yes, yes. That's the other thing. It's that the, the emotional, you know, I think like if it's become such sort of a, I don't know, buzzword or whatever phrase, emotional labor, but I do think that the time that I spend thinking, feeling and, and, and doing internal work, I've never counted as anything. And I think the way, and, and watching, especially having watched in white male dominated Hollywood for so long, Let me tell you something, Those motherfuckers rest okay. They rest when they, when, So don't you think for one second that the people who are on top or seemingly running shit or whatever or are running shit are not resting because they are, they can, they may set the trend for hustle culture, but they're really talking ultimately about the rest of us hustling because they have yachts and vacation homes.2 (12m 43s):They rest. I don't care what you say. You know what I mean? Yeah.1 (12m 46s):It's, it's such a, it's such a, I don't even know how to describe it. It's such, it's like a comical notion that these masters of the universe are really hustling all the time because all of their work is built on the backs of people who are oppressed in one way or another. So really everybody under them is hustling. Correct. Much, much more than they are,2 (13m 8s):Right? Yes.1 (13m 9s):And we've been able to outsource all their, you know, a domestic, everybody we've been able to out Yeah. Everything. Yeah.2 (13m 16s):And like, I think, I think the other, the other sort of weird shit is that like, you know, the older I get, and we've talked about this a lot on the podcast, is the more I realize like it's all a pyramid scheme, right? Like, so any capitalism thing that you are into, whether it's Hollywood, whether it's Wall Street, whether it's, I don't care, like anything, whether you work in tech, anything is all basically a pyramid scheme because that is what capitalism is. And so I feel like there are just more and more subtle ways in which I am seeing that the, you know, the rules are never fair and the what's behind the curtain is always the same, which is a select few who tend to be, you know, white males are really running the show.2 (14m 10s):And we shall see what if it, if it changes with, without a civil war. Like, I, I don't know.1 (14m 17s):Yeah. Yeah. And you know, I I I always think of like great ideas for memes, but then I never make them. But we should do one of like, you know, a picture of that, of the Wizard of Oz and, and when we see the curtain and you know, what the internet is what has opened the curtain really, you know, kind of exposed and reality TV to some degree has exposed and documentaries have exposed like the truth of what's going on. The great unraveling is also like the great discovery of what the actual truth is.2 (14m 48s):Sure. Yes. I mean, when you, when you unravel the sweater, it's like what is under there is is like this old decrepit white dude who's flabby and, and not in shape telling the rest of us that we're fat lards and need to get it together. And that is what's happening. So I'm not, and the other thing I'm not doing, it's really interesting. It's like I've made a conscious decision to literally stop following up with people who are not following up with me.1 (15m 22s):Yes. Yeah.2 (15m 23s):I'm not following up, I'm not circling back. I'm not, I'm not hitting you up again. I'm not waiting three months and then putting it on my calendar to circle back. I'm done, I'm done with all that. I don't, I don't have anymore resources to circle back. Like, I'm not willing. Yeah. So if we have a thing and we're supposed to meet and you can't do it, or you, you keep putting it off, it's over. Unless you wanna come out of the blue and say, Hey, I realize that like we never met. Are you interested in meeting on this day at this time? And then I am okay. Because it is just my following up is taking up too much time. I'm not, I'm not1 (15m 58s):Interested taking too much time. It's, that's emotional labor too. And also, like I've gotten to the point in life where I, if, if I reach out and somebody says, Yeah, and then we go, you know, we try to firm it up and they, they ghost me, which by the way, I have done bajillions of times me to, I just understand it as the way that you're communicating to me non-verbally that you actually don't wanna be part of this thing. Correct. Which is totally fine because a lot of us over commit and can't, you know, carry out our commitments. It's fine. But I'm less inclined even after like one interaction that because the person is telling me who they are, if not who they are, how they actually feel. You know, because you make, you make, you make time for whatever you want to make2 (16m 38s):Time for. That is absolutely true. And I also feel like I am so like, okay, so we bought this house, we bought, I don't know if you know this, but we bought the second house. We didn't buy the first house. The first house was got invested with no, Oh yeah. I forgot to tell you this because I was waiting for the podcast. But, and then, anyway, that first house, I have to send you the pictures of our real house. The first house was owned by Open Door, which is a horrible private equity company that just bought up all the houses in southern California. And anyway, they communication is horrible. They treated my realtor and us like crap. And, and so we just walked away from the deal, got our earnest money back because they would not fucking fix their fucking $8,000 termite problem.2 (17m 23s):So we were like, bye, I'm done. So then we found this other house built in 1980 that I fucking adore. And so it is so dope and I am restoring it to its 1980s glory. So it's gonna be an eighties. Like every room, every room is gonna have sort of an anchor of 1980. It's a very specific year because it's like the, the seventies are still, which is why I was like, can you make my neon sign1 (17m 48s):Pink? Yes, By the way, which I did look into and I would love to do for you, but to get what we wanna put on it is like a minimum thousand dollars.2 (17m 57s):Yeah, let's not do that. Don't do that. We'll do it. Yeah. We1 (18m 1s):Could slash I was trying to do like fa slash o you know, as a, as an acronym.2 (18m 9s):Let's just do people do it all the time. People put f fa Yeah, yeah, just do that. Don't worry about it. Okay. But so, okay, so what I'm saying is like, I'm obsessed now with picking out pieces for this new home that we, we, we close on the 7th of November and we move at the end of November. And so all this to say is like, I've realized I would much rather look at giant pink velvet sectionals that are retro refurbished from the 19, from 1980 than fucking follow up and circle back with your motherfucking whatever you're gonna help me with. Yeah. I would much rather look at, oh my God, they made what in the eighties.2 (18m 51s):That is, I I would much rather like focus it on my life and like how to bring creativity and art to this our first home that we're gonna own. You know, And then fucking track you, your ass down. Who doesn't wanna hang out with me in the first place? Bye bye.1 (19m 13s):Hey,2 (19m 14s):Let run this by1 (19m 15s):You today is about rejection.2 (19m 25s):I love it.1 (19m 26s):I'm sure we've talked about it here. Oh, I'm sure we run it by each other before here. But, you know, it's one of those perennial topics. So I, I liked truly by happenstance learned about an opportunity to direct something. Not with a theater company that I used to work with, but a different or organization. And it just so happened they were doing this play and, and the person who was producing it was like, Oh, we're looking for a director who's this and this? And I go, Oh my God, that's me. Yeah. So she says, Great, you know, and submit. And I submitted and, and I had, I submitted and four months before I got a call from anybody saying, Can you come in for an interview?1 (20m 10s):And then when they did, not a call, an email from somebody who emailed me at 2:00 PM asking me if I could come at 7:00 PM2 (20m 18s):Yeah.1 (20m 19s):Now I wanted to do this. So I, I did, I hustled, I got it together. I wrote up like my, I wrote like a thesis basically on who I am as a director. And then I went to the interview with, with eight, eight or nine people there.2 (20m 35s):Oh my god.1 (20m 37s):Yeah. And you know, there was one qualification for this job that I was missing, but it wasn't something, It wasn't, to me it wasn't a deal breaker. And I was, I was very upfront, I said it right in the beginning anyway, this theater is not necessarily that high profile, which is an understatement.2 (21m 0s):I just can't believe that's too many people in a fucking interview. No, I literally wrote eight person It's too scary in person.1 (21m 8s):Yes, in person. And honestly, like even that wasn't bad because I, you know how you can just get in there and be in the zone and turn it on. And I was charming and I was, you know, an answering questions like honestly, but in a way that I felt demonstrated my competence, et cetera. Now I didn't exactly have it in my mind, like they'd be lucky to have me, but when I got rejected, I thought they would've been lucky to have me. Like, that was a mistake. What2 (21m 32s):The fuck? Did they reject you? What the fuck? Who'd they pick? What the fuck?1 (21m 36s):They, I don't know. And I've, you know, I'm trying to be politic here cuz there's people that I like who are part of this group, but it just, it just didn't work out that way. They, they, so, I don't know, I don't know who they picked, but they, but at the end of her email she said, We'd like you to re resubmit for like, this next opportunity. And so I'm working on, you know, like, it's not that if I had to do it over again, I would've done it differently. But when I really got clear with myself about things, I, you know, I was not that excited about this opportunity because it wasn't going to do anything for my career.1 (22m 21s):It really was just gonna be like an opportunity to direct and flex my muscles, which I would've loved to do. And so I, I, you know, as an actor you have to deal with rejection all the time. I just would love to know, like, actors do seem to have amazing strategies, seasoned ones, and the thing I hear the most often people say is like, after the audition, just forget it. Don't ever think about it again. But I would love to hear what your strategy2 (22m 45s):Look are. I think that for people that are, that are working and auditioning or interviewing all the time that you, that that is a really good strategy. The Brian Cranston method, which is you, you just do it and forget it. However, for those of us who don't do that every day, all day long, where it's like the one thing is more important because it's the one thing that we go out for. Like, I, like for me, I don't audition all the time. So like, when I get an opportunity from my agent, I take it really seriously and I wanna book it. And I'm, I really put in a lot of work in time. Okay, fine.2 (23m 24s):So I, it's so easy to say one and done, like forget it. But I think that that's great if that's where people are, like Brian Cranston, Okay, does he even have to audition for things anymore? I don't know. But for me, the thing that really works is what something you just said, which is to really go through and say, did I, what, what did I want about this thing? Because did I just wanna be picked? Because of course that's really valid. Like who the fuck doesn't wanna be special and picked if you say you don't, you're a sociopath like that, I don't care. You know? So I wanna be loved and picked, so that hurts on that level.2 (24m 6s):And then if I go deeper, I'm like, okay, but what is the thing that I liked about this particular interaction? Possible collaboration. Okay, well I really wanted to get more practice on what for me would be like practice on set, working out how not to be nervous on set. Okay. So I I'm gonna miss that opportunity, but like if I look at the text, did I really connect to it? Not really. So it's not that. So I think it's just like literally like what you said before, which is giving yourself and myself the time to feel my way through and think, okay, like what is upsetting about this? What is upsetting for me? It would be, if I was in your shoes, it would be like, I spent a lot of time and energy interfacing with these people.2 (24m 50s):Even if it was like, so if you, from when you submitted, even though that you weren't like thinking about it all the time, it was still hanging in the air for four months. Right? It's a four month long. Even if it's in the back of your, of, in the ethos, it's still there. Okay. So it's still like on the table. And then you finally have an interview with all these people, lovely people, whether or not it doesn't matter, you're still give, putting out so much fucking energy. And so what it feels to me, like, I would feel like, oh, like I did my best. I put myself out there, I made a case for myself and my work in front of a lot of people and I didn't get the thing.2 (25m 31s):And that just feels shitty.1 (25m 33s):It does. It just, and there's no way around it. Like sometimes things just feel shitty. And I did definitely wanna be picked the, the idea that somebody would, you know, the, like I'm a sucker for an opportunity to be picked for something. I don't, I don't necessarily like avoid things. I don't avoid things that could, you know, possibly lead in rejection. I, I, I approach those things or I try to, but it was the thing I said earlier, like, I just wanted, I just thought, oh, it'd be so fun to, to work on this, but upon reflection there are 1 million things I could be working on and would love to work on. And that would've prevented me from do, you know, for a period of time that would've prevented me from working on those things.1 (26m 16s):So it's a blessing and I what's for you will not go by you. I totally believe in that. And it was my, in fact it was my mantra that, you know, yesterday when I found out. So,2 (26m 26s):And, and, and, and to be fair, like you just found out. So like, if it was like three months from now, like I've had friends who, and I, I mean I may have had this too, where like it lasts more than 24 hours. This feeling of why did I get rejected? Why, why, why? What could I have done? Why didn't they like me? Look, it's been less than 20, you know, you're fine. Yeah. Like, you're not, Yeah. So I, I but rejection is something that is like the, the true, the true greats that I love seem to, their take on rejection is like, it gets easier the more you get rejected.1 (27m 13s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to Tina Wong, You are in for such a treat. Tina is amazing. Not only does she star and has starred on almost all of the soap operas, you've seen her in television film, She's an actor, a writer, a director, a producer. She does film television. She's a voiceover artist too. She does theater. She truly, truly, truly does it all. We really loved talking to her and we hope you enjoy our conversation with Tina Juan,0 (27m 47s):I'm2 (27m 47s):Not totally losing, losing it. Anyway, you survived and you went, you did a lot of things. I, I mean, first we're gonna get to it all, but can I just say, and I can because this is, this is, this is the platform to say it. I love that you were on two soap operas and more people, maybe more than two. Were you on more than two or just4 (28m 7s):Yeah, yeah,2 (28m 8s):Because Yeah, go ahead.4 (28m 11s):No, most recently just two, but yes.2 (28m 13s):Okay. So here's the thing about that is that I don't care. We went to theater school and I know a lot of people think that that is, or some people talk shit about soap operas in terms of acting. Yeah. I have never seen or heard actors work as hard as my friends that have been on soap operas. And in terms of the pace and the pacing and the, the amount of work that is required of, of, of actors at soap operas a stunning. So I just love it because I think that it is like, from what my, what I know about it, it's like a gymnastics routine that people are doing on those sets. So we'll go, I just wanna say that I like give full props to that because it's not a joke soap opera work.2 (28m 55s):It is not a joke. Thank4 (28m 56s):You. Yeah, thank you. I appreciate that. Shut2 (28m 58s):Out. Yeah, thank you.1 (29m 0s):So I'll just ask then, pursuant to that, because I think you are the first person we're interviewing who was on a soap opera, and I would love to know everything about the process of your audition and how you, Cause I've heard, I, I used to, I used to, when I was in high school, my show was days and I read soap, Opera Digest and everything. But I would love to know, like I've heard some people describe it as more of a, it can sometimes have a feeling of more of a regular job since it's like daytime hours, et cetera. But I would love to hear what your experience of just the work of being on a soap opera.4 (29m 34s):Well, first of all, I love everyone that I work with. I'm, I'm on days, so, but you're2 (29m 40s):Still on it. Oh my, my gosh.4 (29m 41s):I'm still on it. I'm still on it. So in fact, I'm like shooting six episodes next week. So I'm, I'm on a little break in Canada, just like here having a little vacation before we go.2 (29m 54s):Good for you. Oh my gosh. Six in a week. It's like Saturday Night Live. What's happening? Okay. How did you get on these? What was your first one that you were on, first of all? Was4 (30m 2s):It the first one? The first one I was on was I think days. And then when I first came to LA and then I did General Hospital and then I did Young and the Restless, and then I did, then I was on Bold and the Beautiful and Days at the same time during the Pandemic. And then now I'm on days Doing days.2 (30m 24s):Oh my Tina, Tina Bow Tina. This is, this is, this is incredible because what this tells me is that you are extremely obviously talented, but we know that because I've seen you on Rezo and aisles, all the things, but it's also, you are, it must be really wonderful to work with because people keep bringing you back and back and back. So you must be like a real sort of team player, which I bet is part of your theater tra like you are an ensemble. Yes. Right?4 (30m 53s):Yes. I think the best part about doing any of this is the collaboration part. You know, when people don't want, it's funny when people don't like notes and don't like getting notes. I'm always like, I love notes. Like I can't just do this on my own and act in a bag. Like I need, I need you to like tell me what's going on. What do you see that I don't see, you know, all of that is, that's the best part. The collaboration. Yeah.1 (31m 14s):So I'm still eager to know a little bit more about like how you, how it started with your audition and how you experience the day to day work of being a soap opera for actor Sure. As opposed to any other type of actor.4 (31m 26s):Sure. Well, I, I got the audition to, to go in for days and I read for Marni Satya, who, I hope I'm saying her name right, who's the casting director. And it went well. And she said, you know, we have a call back. And I said, great. I can't remember if that was the next day or if that was the same day. It may have been the same day. And she told me to just wait, I can't remember. Cuz the producers were upstairs and they wanted to do producer sessions right away and, or it may have been the next day and she, they sent sides, you know, again, but I just assumed they were the same audition and it was like 14 pages. It was like a lot of pages. But just so you know, soap scripts are, you know, one and a half spacing.4 (32m 9s):Oh yeah. So it's not single spacing, but2 (32m 11s):Still, still it's a dialogue. Listen, I, I'm like an under 10. I like always do an under 10 because that's my jam. I have trouble with that. I don't, Oh my, you must be, you're okay. So you get all these pages and you assumed it was the same, but I'm guessing it wasn't the same.4 (32m 27s):So I show up and she wanted just read all of us ladies that came back in to, to for the producer session and just like talk to us and all that kind of stuff. And she said, So you got the new scenes? And I said, New scenes, No. And then she said, Oh well we gotta go, we gotta go up to the producers right now. So we all walked up and she goes, Don't worry, I'll put you last, you know, don't hear the new scripts.2 (32m 51s):Oh my god. The new scripts. I'm peeing my pants right here. Okay, go ahead. And I4 (32m 56s):Don't remember how different it was, but I, I think it was quite different.2 (32m 60s):Like,4 (33m 1s):And she said, just take, you know, whatever time we'll put you last. And there was like maybe four, four women that, excuse me, my nose is running, but four women ahead of me and I just studied. Oh2 (33m 12s):My God. You were like, okay, nyu. Okay, tons of Shakespeare, memorization don't fail me now. Right. So, okay, so you go, were you nervous? Which it's4 (33m 23s):Harder when you get older.2 (33m 25s):No shit. Okay. Right. So you go in the room and there's producers there, obviously it's a producer's session. And is the casting lady still in the room with you?4 (33m 34s):She, she's still in the room and it was only one producer, the executive producer, so it's just him. But it was a big conference room. Anyway, when I was waiting to go in, one of the actresses, like, I guess they overheard what had happened and this, this another actor said, You didn't get the sides? And I said, No, you didn't get the new scenes. I said, No. And she said, That's sucks. That's terrible. I'm like, Yeah, I'm just gonna study. Yeah, I'm2 (34m 3s):Just studying like, be quiet. Like leave me alone. Right,4 (34m 7s):Right.2 (34m 7s):Not helpful. Not helpful. Not helpful.4 (34m 10s):I'm, I'm not that person. I don't compete with anybody in the audition room. I compete with myself and I think maybe that's part of my success. I just, I'm hard enough on myself. I don't need to add like everyone else has a distraction. But it was really interesting. So, so then he, they called me in and it went really well. I mean, it was just this huge conference room with a giant table in between us. So it was like, not like a theater setup or an audition room, A normal audition room. And it went really well. I mean, I think I sobbed, I think I was shaking, I think like all of those things. And maybe it was from the, that cold read sort of nerves that just let me just go with my, just go with my intuition, you know?4 (34m 53s):Yeah,1 (34m 54s):Right. No time to think and obsess and, and worry about it. Right. Do you get to, like, considering how much dialogue you have to memorize every single day for the next day's work, is there any room for improvisation or do you, are you supposed to say it word for word?4 (35m 9s):Supposed to say it word for word? I think there's a little bit of leeway. You know, the longer you've been on the show, they, they don't, you can't improv for sure. It's all written, but, you know, if you get a the instead of and or you know, those little things, the pace is so quick that they're not gonna redo the, and we usually get one to two takes. Right. We don't get multiple takes.2 (35m 30s):Oh my, my God.4 (35m 32s):It moves at an incredible speed. So when you said what you said about soap acting and soap actors, I really have a tremendous respect. I think a lot of people like to put judgment on high art and low art. And I, I don't really get the point of that, but, but they, people love it. People watch it, it gives them a sense of comfort. And the actors that I've met are so hardworking and so talented, like very good actors. They're just in the job that they're in. You know what I mean? And a lot of it's a lot of this soap acting is soap work has gotten better. So1 (36m 5s):Absolutely. I would go so far as to say that's probably a sexist thing that soap, soap operas have whatever reputation that they do because you know, anything that a lot of women like people tend to denigrate. Right. Okay. So did you always want to be an actor? Did you always want to go to theater school? What was your journey when you were picking colleges?4 (36m 33s):Wow. You know, I, being a Asian American woman, I didn't really see that it would be a possible career path for me. I was like a secret artist, you know, like inside I really wanted to be on the stage and I really wanted to act and all of that. But I didn't have examples really. I think growing up I had like for a short stint Margaret Show and, and Lucy Lou and you know, very few and then like Chinese actresses that I knew of. But it was a tough journey. So I secretly auditioned for LaGuardia music and art and performing arts in New York City. You know, the fame high school? Oh2 (37m 12s):Yeah. Oh yeah. I know that you went there and I'm wondering, like you seek, what does it mean to secretly audition where you didn't tell your folks and you were like, I'm out.4 (37m 20s):Didn't tell my folks. Yeah, I mean, how old are you when you start high school? I mean, I was probably, Oh yeah, what are we, 12? No, 13. 13.1 (37m 28s):13. I, No, 13. Really young, really4 (37m 30s):Young.1 (37m 31s):13. Do that on your own.4 (37m 32s):So I, you know, I grew up in New York City, so I took the subway up. I I applied to audition and, well first I was in the, the fine arts program, so, which they also didn't like. And I had an amazing art teacher in junior high school who mentored me to make, make a portfolio and all this kind of stuff. So I'd gone up and did the art test without telling my parents. And I, and I got into the art program. Wait a minute2 (37m 55s):Differently. You didn't get into the, you went for fine art. For, for and you, what do you mean the art test? What the hell is that? That sounds horrifying. What do you mean an art test?4 (38m 7s):So, well I didn't, I didn't audition yet for theater cause I think it was too scary at that moment for me. So first I did the art program because I was encouraged by a grown up teacher who was like, thought she saw talent in me, which was very amazing to have a teacher like that. And the art test was, you had to have a full portfolio, like at least 10 or 15 pieces in a portfolio. So you carry that big old thing. Like imagine a 12 year old kid carrying a portfolio uptown. I mean it's just, it's, it's crazy when I think about it. And then you get there and there's like a still life setup and there's all the, everybody sits around on desks and you have to draw, you have to draw the still life,2 (38m 48s):My god, all the pressure. And4 (38m 49s):Then they bring in, and then they bring in a model and then you have to draw the model2 (38m 55s):A. This is like my nightmare of like any kind of that where you're like, it's a test. Anxiety, high pressure, pressure, creativity, high pressure on the spot, creativity. I would've been passed out. I would've passed out.4 (39m 10s):I don't think so. I mean, look, we we're all, it's a good prep for like auditioning and callbacks and just we're al you're always under pressure. We're under pressure right now doing the podcast. But, but yeah, I mean I think growing up in New York you're constantly under pressure. So I, I maybe I was used to it for that reason. But2 (39m 30s):I do have to say Tina, Tina, there is something about you. Yes, ma'am. That is like super badass, tough, even just the way you present and your voice in the best possible way. So like, and I wonder if that is a mix of, you know, New Yorker, Asian American parents. My, my guess is I'm the par a daughter of an immigrant. Your daughter of an immigrants. Right. Of immigrants. Yeah. Okay. So there's like a toughness about you and like all I could, like you're a badassery. Do you think it is New York? What is it? Where does that come from? Because you should play, you, you should play an assassin and a like a, like an action hero in, in like huge films.2 (40m 13s):Why isn't that? We gotta make that happen today anyway,4 (40m 16s):So let's just call Kevin Fig and just let him know like, I'm available. Well, I, I think you touched on it. I think it's all those things that make up who I am. I, I, I am tough. I am tough but I like, I I, but I don't see myself necessarily that way. I'm like, you know, I think we've, I think I spent actually a lot of years trying to counteract that tough expectation by being like smiley and sweet and doing the things that I think women tend to do. Women identifying women tend to do, like by softening themselves and being smaller in the room. And I think over the years as you get older you hit 40 and you're like, fuck that.4 (40m 56s):Oh, am I allowed to curse on this? Okay. You just kinda like, absolutely, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm fucking over this. But I think it's all those things. I think definitely New York and always having your defenses up and always having an awareness around you and having parents that worked extremely hard and sacrificed a lot and knowing that I could sacrifice more. I think that's also part of like surviving as an artist. Like do I need to eat that fancy thing today? Do I need to have that new outfit? Like no, I, if I want to succeed then those are the things I need to let go of in order to invest in my career.4 (41m 36s):So yeah, I think a lot of it is identifying as an Asian American female, I think having immigrant parents for sure that work really hard. I think New York City and all of its dangerous that I survived. So I survived theater school and New York City and now I'm trying to survive LA1 (41m 56s):Yeah, yeah. Right, right. Lot of surviving happening. So at what point did you, well obviously you told your parents that you applied and that you got in for the fine arts program. Yeah. They obviously had to get on board with that at some point, cuz you're still doing it. But then tell us about the switch into acting.4 (42m 17s):So it was my first year as a, as the, you know, a drawing, painting, sculptor. And I just found it really lonesome. Like I, I I was like a little emo kid, you know what I mean? Like all this angst I had just had so much angst cause I grew, I had a rough childhood and I, I just found, found myself in a little bit of a depression as a freshman in high school, which is I guess not that rare, but I just kept looking at the theater department and seeing these kids getting to like fully express themselves and be around others like them. You know, painting is a solitary thing I think like writing, I don't know if you have that experience, the two of you. Cause I read that you're both writers and I write as well and it's a very different world you're in.4 (43m 3s):So I decided to just do it apply to the theater department and that process first it's like two monologues, right? Contemporary and a classic.2 (43m 14s):Do you remember what you did? Do you remember what you did? Oh, it's okay.4 (43m 18s):Oh boy.2 (43m 19s):I bet was great. Whatever it was.4 (43m 22s):The modern piece, I don't remember the name of it or, or where it was from, but it was, it was a girl witnessing her parents', her parents' divorce and, but going through her house and talking about how the home represented the family, you know, and, and like where things belonged in the house and how those things are gonna be moved and that means their family no longer existed, exists. So it was a really beautiful piece. I can't remember where it was from. And then the other one was Shakespeare and I'm sure I did a terrible job. It may have been1 (44m 2s):Saying4 (44m 2s):I don't remember the Shakespeare. Yeah, I don't remember the Shakespeare. That's funny.2 (44m 6s):Yeah. But I bet you know, you go, you know, you know4 (44m 10s):It was Porsche, the quality and mercy is not strange.2 (44m 14s):Oh yeah, that's1 (44m 15s):Exactly what I did. Terrible.2 (44m 20s):Wait a minute. So we have, wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute. I'm just picturing both you two for Gina. I'm wondering, I'm thinking it was to get into DePaul's theater school, right? Okay. And Tina, yours was even younger cuz you were, you were like 15, 14 playing Porsche. Yes. Oh that's fantastic. 14 year old Porsche's all around. Okay, so you must have, okay, so then what did you did, did it go on from there? Like you did your monologues? Oh,4 (44m 46s):So yeah, so then you do that and then there's a call back. So you go to another room with a different auditor and I'm trying to make sure I don't blend my high school audition to my college audition. But then we went from that callback to a screen test. So you to do a screen test and then wait,2 (45m 4s):Wait, A screen test for LaGuardia? Yeah. Like4 (45m 8s):At, at the time. At the time, Yeah. I remember that because I remember they said you have to go to good screen, so there's like a camera and you whatever on camera audition. And then from there, oh I, I remember there was five steps. I can't remember what the, I remember we may have had to go into the theater and do like a, like the theater exercises and movement stuff and then we had to do a interview one-on-one interview with the head of the department. So it was, you know, a lot of steps to,1 (45m 39s):This is so far tougher than it was for our, the audition. Like we had to do those other things you're describing. But we did not, I don't think we did a one-on-one interview.2 (45m 48s):No. Was1 (45m 49s):It nerve wracking?4 (45m 51s):Yeah, I mean as a kid I, I guess I didn't really like, I didn't, maybe didn't sink in that I was, that that's what was happening. But I just, you know, followed the line. I, whatever they told me where I needed to go, I just went and did it. So. Yeah. Yeah, I think it was a lot more steps than my college audition as well as well.2 (46m 9s):So, So you got in, did they just tell you I'm the spot Tina or were you, how did it work? And then were you, did you tell, did your parents know you were switching?4 (46m 20s):No, they didn't know. No, they didn't know. No, I think I, I think I just got a letter. I don't, I don't know if, I don't think they, I think they gave me the sense that it was a good fit, but I don't think I knew until later. Cause it's like thousands of kids in New York City, you know what I mean? Right, right. Yeah. Auditioning. So,2 (46m 39s):So1 (46m 40s):I'm curious about whether the, like what, what the pipeline situation was from LaGuardia to conservatories. Cuz a lot of kids who get training young or get working young don't go for theater school because they figure like, well I already know what I'm doing. So like what, what, how was it at LaGuardia? Did mostly kids go and pursue performing arts in college or what?4 (47m 5s):You know, I think a handful of us did. But honestly I, I think a lot of people didn't continue on. So it was kind of a weeding out process. You know, a lot of people went into who poli political science. A lot of people went into, you know, a lot of different things. I mean a lot of people I, I remember I went to high school with are doing amazing things currently. I mean, one of, one of the girls I was friends with, she's like a pundit on cnn, like, like one of the leading, she went into politics and then became like a on camera. So those two worlds sort of merged. But yeah, no, I, I think I ended up applying to four schools.4 (47m 45s):Four conservatories. So SUNY purchase Rutgers, I don't remember nyu. And what was,2 (47m 55s):I'm gonna just throw out Carnegie Mellon.4 (47m 57s):Carnegie Mellon. I think it was Carnegie. I, no, no, it was Boston University. I actually, it was interesting. I didn't, I didn't, I was so, I don't know. I just, I didn't do Julliard and I didn't do Carnegie Mellon. I don't know why. Oh, I know why Pittsburgh. I didn't wanna go to Pittsburgh. Sorry if, if either of you have a fondness for Pittsburgh, but I didn't wanna be there.2 (48m 23s):Never been. And also, I have a friend that went to the Carnegie Mellon program in NI started in 1993 and they weighed them at the, in their acting classes, they weighed them. So I'm glad we didn't go. I mean, you know, whatever. We missing, not missing out. Forget, forget Pittsburgh. Also the weighing, Fuck you. So, okay, so you, you auditioned, Did you do like the urda, like all of them at once, Tina? Or did you go, how did it work for your colleges? And then tell us how, how you made your choice.4 (48m 57s):So yeah, I think I did do them. You know, they, they set up the appointments to the different places. I remember that I really wanted to go to SUNY purchase. I do remember that because Israel Hicks was the head of the department then. And I remember thinking, oh he's an amazing teacher to study under. And it was such a small conservatory program. So I went up there that, that, by that point I did tell my parents I was gonna theater school and they were not happy about it. I mean, imagine they're immigrants, right? They came across the world not speaking the language, giving up everything, working very, very hard to make a better life for their children. And then their one child that didn't go to CO that is going to college wants to be an artist.4 (49m 38s):I mean that's like pretty brutal for them to absorb. But yeah, I, You were saying when you leave high school, like why, why go into the theater school? I, because I, both my brothers had not gone to college. My older brothers and my parents were, you know, had immigrated here. And like, I just, I felt like college was really important. I felt like getting an education was really important. And maybe, I remember thinking at the time, imagine being 17 and thinking I'm ruining my career. Cuz I thought it was gonna slow down my career because I did have one. We have an industry night at the end of high school and I got a manager, a New York City manager and I was freelancing with all these different agents and for like, the few months that I was not gonna leave New York.4 (50m 25s):And wait2 (50m 26s):A minute, wait a minute, wait. A I gotta go back here cuz I'm in awe. Gina, are you in awe? Cause I'm in awe that you, you had an industry night in high school and you got a manager from that. You're how old it did? 17.4 (50m 41s):17, Yeah.2 (50m 42s):You have a manager and you're freelancing. What did that feel like? I mean I'm like that. I'm like in awe. Were you like I am the shit? Are you like, this is just what I do. You're like a young, like a 17 year old professional actor. What in the hell?4 (50m 57s):I think, I think I was kind of like feeling like my dreams were coming true in a lot of ways, but I don't think I was secure in it. I definitely for sure was like, this could go away tomorrow. Am I doing the right things? You know, that manager at the time, she was lovely, but it, she did say to me like, you should move to Los Angeles. And at that point I just wanted to go to college and it, and most of the options were on the east coast that I wanted to, to, you know, except for Boston University. Well, Boston's east coast too. But she just said like, Well I just feel like if you move to the west to LA like later you're gonna be over the hill. I was 17, oh my god I was 17. God.4 (51m 36s):And2 (51m 37s):That's, that's such projection. It's such projection. It's all, I mean they mean even if they mean well, it's still projection. So you had this manager, but you were, and you were auditioning, I'm assuming in New York City. Yeah, Yeah. But then, but you really wanted to go to college and so4 (51m 55s):I really wanted to go2 (51m 56s):To college. Okay, so you wanted to go to suny. What happened there? Why, how did you end up at nyu?4 (52m 2s):Oh, so I got in to purchase, which was, which was a tough choice because SUNY purchases, like at the time was so cheap for in-state, like residents. And then, but I, I can't explain this to you at all, but I went, when I went and auditioned for nyu, I fell asleep at the audition. I remember in the waiting room. I just like, kind of not at often, I just think I just needed to be relaxed, you know? So cuz there was2 (52m 31s):All these like, what a power move.4 (52m 35s):I don't know if I was just like, you know, overwhelmed or, I don't think it was overwhelming, but I just felt like I just needed to relax. And there was like, you know, a bunch of young act New York City actors. And at the time NYU was a top conservatory. And I think I, there was like all these young actors that were like, like doing all the warmups, which I believe in a hundred percent. I do it before shows, but like, but it intimidated me in some way cuz I was like, well I didn't start acting until I was much older. I mean, I was young, but you know, in New York it felt like everybody's a kid actor that was enacting. So, I don't know, I, I fell asleep and then they woke me up and said, it's your turn.4 (53m 18s):I was like, Oh, okay. And I went in and I remember in all my auditions I did this weird thing, which, which I don't know if it's an an i, I took my shoes off in every audition. Like I, I felt like I needed to be grounded. Oh my2 (53m 31s):God. It's a power move. It's a power move. Listen to me, anyone, this is how I feel now watching youngsters. I mean, I don't hold auditions, but when, when someone has a specific bold take on, on how they're going to enter a room, they, they're yards ahead of everybody else. You made a bold move, Tina and I, I support it. I support it. You, it's like you, you had a take. Good for you.4 (54m 1s):I, I think I just needed to take care of myself. And I, I think at the time I didn't really have a lot of protection and people taking care of me in that way as a young artist. So I think I just had my own process, but part of that was being weird and saying, I need to take my shoes off and taking off my shoes. I've never told anyone that before. So Yeah, I did all my, It's1 (54m 23s):So related. This is some related to you being tough and a badass, because I think kind of what I'm hearing is however, the, I mean, I don't know necessarily the right way to say this, but you haven't waited for permission. Like you didn't wait for permission from your parents to audition for this school and you didn't, you know, ask them. Is it okay if I take you, You just did a lot, You've done a lot of things and maybe it's because you have felt like you've had to do it this vein on your own since you didn't have any family members who, who, who pursued this career. But I wanna know, Oh, sorry. You were actually, I interrupted you, you were in the middle of finishing your audition story.4 (55m 3s):No, I, I don't Where were we? I don't off.2 (55m 6s):Okay, so you That's ok. That's ok. We, I'm, I'm clocking. So you are there, you, you, you did all your auditions and you said you don't know how to explain it, but when you got into nyu, when you did your NYU audition?4 (55m 20s):Well, when I was waiting in the waiting room, when I fell asleep, that's where I was going. I just felt like I belong there. I just felt like I belonged there. I was just like, this is where I need to be. Even though purchase was my first choice and purchase at the time was very competitive. They took like 10 people in that year. And I, and it would've been cheap. Really ch that's one thing, NYU's not cheap, but I for sure, I just had this overwhelming sense that this is where I needed to be. And yeah, I, I did the audition for Beth Turner, who was amazing, amazing, I think she was a dean at the time, but auditor. And then she asked me what studio I wanted to be in and I told her Playwrights Horizons, or I think Adler is what I chose.4 (56m 11s):And she asked me why playwrights cuz she thought I should be placed in experi what was then called experimental theater wing, which is very physical. So I understand it now. She saw in me that I'm a very physical person and I told her, this is the hilarious part, I told her playwrights was my number one choice because you can study, directing, acting and design, which is what I ended up doing. And I said, I need a fallback plan, which is2 (56m 38s):Like4 (56m 39s):Directing and design, like great fallback. But2 (56m 43s):Here's, here's the thing, here's the thing, The other thing that I'm seeing is that you knew fallback plan or not, you wanted to study more than one thing. And most people go in there saying, Oh, I just wanna be a movie star so I have to go into Atlantic cuz David Mammo will cast me in. Like, you wanted a more broad sense of Yeah. You, you were like, we have several actors on the show like this where it's, they're like more renaissance people in terms of writing, acting, directing, and they're, and they're true. Like for me what it is, is a true artist instead of an actor. It's a, it's more of a collaborator and doing, making art in a collaborative setting.2 (57m 23s):And it happens to be for you right now, acting and maybe writing and maybe directing if you have or something. So I, I love that. And also my NYU audition, I went without having picked a, a studio. So they asked me where you wanna go? And I said, I have no idea. Well, they didn't let my ass in, nor should they have.4 (57m 45s):Oh, no, I, you know, I appreciate you saying that. I mean, I think when I say fallback plan, I don't really think that is what it is. Cause I didn't think, obviously, you know, it's all a risk that we're taking. It really is true that I was very, I'm very interested in all aspects of storytelling. And I did tell her that, She asked me why directing, and I said, I am, I am incredibly stimulated in a different way when thinking about directing and how a story can be told and how it's structured and, and all of that. And, and I said, but it's not necessarily my heart. My heart is acting, but my mind is very connected to directing when she asked me that question.4 (58m 29s):So yeah. So cool.1 (58m 31s):Yeah. So you mentioned earlier your manager and saying you're gonna be over the hill and so forth. So we spent a lot of time talking about the whack messages that we got, especially being, you know, nineties, mid nineties, late nineties about like what you can and can't do and who you are and who you aren't and how you come across. And, and sometimes those opinions are wildly off base and sometimes there's smack Right on. What, what about you? Where did you fall on that with terms of like the, the feedback people was were giving you?4 (59m 3s):You know, it's, I think I'm still dealing with that today. I mean, I I, the feedback was people couldn't tell if I was a leading lady or if I was a character actor. And I will say they probably thought I was a character actor just because I was a woman of color. You know what I mean? Like, you're gonna be the best friend,2 (59m 27s):Right? It's because they couldn't see beyond their own biases and the biases of the industry. And look, I think some of that is a product of the environment those people are in, but also nobody challenged. And that's what I'm ask. I feel like people are at least starting to do now challenged why someone couldn't do something. So Yeah, sure. So they told you, Oh, we think you're gonna be like, you know, Sandra Bullock's best friend or like, whatever, what the sidekick, because probably because you, you were an Asian American woman, you know? Yeah.4 (1h 0m 2s):Nice. Or you're the nerd or you know, put on some glasses and now you're like, network nerdy, you know? So it's, it's, it's, How did you ask me? How did I deal with it? Is that the question?1 (1h 0m 15s):I'm just curious. Like, people usually have an anecdote or two about like, you know, I just told it on the podcast last week that, you know, I went to this thing when I was in high school, like how to get in the business. And the only thing I remember the guy saying is, thin is in, and you're either gonna get thin or you're not gonna be in, Like, it was just very binary. And by the way, that was true. Like he wasn't, he wasn't saying anything that wasn't true, but it doesn't matter because I internalized that message and then I never wanted to be in film. Then I was like, I'll, okay, that means I can never be in film and tv. Yeah. And I never even thought twice about it until like two weeks ago. That's when I remembered that.4 (1h 0m 55s):That's so heartbreaking. That's so heartbreaking. Yeah. I mean, my parents even honestly said, you can't be an actor. You're, you're Asian, you know, there's nobody like you. There's no, there's not many women like you, you're not gonna be successful. You're gonna be hungry all the time. You're never gonna, you know, and you know, they weren't totally wrong. They weren't trying to hurt me. They, you know, they, I think they were trying to protect me, but ultimately it hurt me. Do you know what I mean? It hurt my confidence, it hurt, you know? So a lot of my defense mechanism is to have confidence, if that makes any sense.2 (1h 1m 28s):Well that's, that's what I'm getting is that in response to the binary, you were able to go, Well, no, I'm gonna actually take care of my own self and take my own shoes off if I want to. Actually, I'm still gonna move forward and be like, I just love the idea of a woman of color being on a soap opera as one of the, like a recurring main characters. Because soap operas to me, in terms of casting, have not in the past been known to really embrace all kinds of things. But here you are on like Americana, which is soaps to me. And I mean, you have telenovelas and whatever, but the, but American soap operas are a thing and you're on one.2 (1h 2m 10s):So I know the word trailblazer is so overused, but I feel like you're a trailblazer. And what people fail to remember about trailblazers is, is that it's dirty, sweaty, hard work because you're literally in the dirt forging a path for yourself and perhaps those that come after you. Do you feel like that when you're working, that you're, and it's not fair to put it on people like women of color or women or othered people, but do you feel like in some way you're blazing a trail for other folks? Or do you just are just like, No, I just, I wanna work fuck the rest.4 (1h 2m 46s):No, I'm, I appreciate that question. I, I feel hopeful that that's what's happening. Do I think about it consciously when I'm working? Not necessarily, but I do intend to, if I can give other people opportunities, like if I don't suit a role, if they're like, Well this person's Vietnamese, will you audition? I pass. And I usually, you know, I've played other Asian races before because there are limited amount of roles. But I also believe like you have to get to a certain level and have a certain level of accomplishments in order to open the door for other people. So I will, I have, like I said, I'm passing on this, but this is this actress that you should look at. And I've sent names and you know, things, little things like that within my power.4 (1h 3m 30s):And I'm not trying to say like I'm a trailblazer or anything like that. I'm just trying to do the work, like you said, and take the opportunities when I can and try to do my best at it. And then hopefully set as some kind of example. I don't know what, but it is a lot.2 (1h 3m 45s):And I think that like trailblazing is, is is done primarily because there is something doesn't exist, which we want to see existing. And so then we have to do it on our own. Like, I agree that like I never woke up and thought, Oh, one day I'm gonna be like, do doing all this work. I just thought, no, like why doesn't this exist? Why can't plus size or Latinas do this? And then I went ahead and tried to make that space. But yeah, I feel like most trailblazers I know and iconic class or whatever don't like have that intention, right?2 (1h 4m 25s):We're not like, Oh, I'm gonna change. It's more like, No, this shit is wrong. It should exist and I'm gonna participate in change, right? Like a change maker.4 (1h 4m 34s):I'm gonna take, I'm gonna take space basically and not be apologetic for it. And, and that's a very hard thing to, to come to, you know, It's like, it's still, I wanna apologize all the time, you know what I mean? But that's my instinct. But because I wanna be a fair person. But I think ultimately it's like, no, I, I should claim the space and not be apologetic for it. I mean, I had a teacher in theater school and you're saying, What did people put on you who said to me, Tina, he said something very complimentary about a project I had just finished and something like, you know, good marks or something and said like, you're, you're very talented or whatever. And then he said, What I love about you is that you shatter stereotypes and on the, the face of it, you would think that's a positive thing, but I think it put a heavy weight on me.4 (1h 5m 24s):I think I felt this sort of, that's not what I'm, you're you're putting, that means you're putting so much on me when you even look at me, there's a, there's an expectation of you have to be excellent all the time. You have to be so good all the time. And if you not, if you're not excellent, people are gonna go, Oh, Asian women can't act, or Asian women shouldn't be doing this. And so there was a pressure, like I felt, wow. Like I guess he was trying to say something nice, but ultimately it just put this sort of,2 (1h 5m 51s):No, it puts more work. It's more work,4 (1h 5m 54s):More work. And it also puts like, you see me as a certain lens. You can't just see my work. You're seeing something else. Yeah. You know what I mean

Guru Viking Podcast
Ep172: Kundalini Therapist - Tara Springett

Guru Viking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 75:37


In this episode I am once again joined by Tara Springett, a Buddhist psychotherapist who specialises in treating Kundalini Syndrome. Tara reveals how she works with her private clients, including how she assesses kundalini symptoms, her 5 step kundalini test, and emergency strategies for acute distress. Tara discusses the 3 part foundation for psychological and spiritual health, as well the essential role that relationship plays in the enlightenment process. Tara also shares her experience working at the intersection of kundalini with narcissism and other cluster B disorders, why it is that kundalini magnifies one's latent negative tendencies, and why paranormal experiences and entity contact are inevitable for those with an awakened kundalini energy. … Video version: https://www.guruviking.com/podcast/ep172-kundalini-therapist-tara-springett 
Also available on Youtube, iTunes, & Spotify – search ‘Guru Viking Podcast'. … Topics Include:
 00:00 - Intro 00:54 - How Tara assesses a kundalini patient 05:20 - The 5 Step Kundalini test 05:57 - How rare is kundalini awakening? 08:37 - Criterion 1: An extreme interest in spirituality 09:00 - Criterion 2: Intensified emotions 09:54 - Criterion 3: Feeling energy movements in the body 10:30 - Criterion 4: Hypersensitivity 11:24 - Criterion 5: Paranormal experiences 12:55 - The most important symptom 13:15 - The anti-anxiety technique 16:21 - Enlightenment happens in relationship 18:30 - Bringing spirituality and psychology together 21:03 - Cultivating self love 22:29 - The 3 parts of an essential foundation 22:59 - Applying the anti-anxiety technique 27:54 - The importance of the client-therapist relationship 31:24 - Healing emotional attachment issues by relating to a divine being 33:31 - Tara's approach to the relationships with her clients 34:58 - Challenges working with narcissists 35:39 - Interaction of kundalini awakening and cluster B personality disorders 40:17 - Religious conversion as a medicine for narcissists 42:12 - Kundalini and Borderline Personality Disorder 42:59 - Awakened gurus with personality disorders 45:33 - 5 chakra enlightenment 47:00 - Reckoning with one's sexuality 47:44 - Cult leaders and spiritual power 49:59 - Kundalini magnifies one's tendencies 52:10 - Advice for when choosing a guru 59:29 - How Tara keeps herself grounded and morally straight 01:04:05 - Tara's history of being hard on herself 01:05:27 - Kundalini and different demographics 01:07:23 - The #1 cause of kundalini awakenings 01:08:53 - Paranormal experiences are inevitable 01:10:11 - Entities attachment and possession 01:13:00 - Dealing with horror visions … Previous episode with Tara Springett: - https://www.guruviking.com/podcast/ep137-kundalini-awakening-tara-springett To find out more about Tara Springett, visit: - https://www.taraspringett.com/ … 
For more interviews, videos, and more visit: - www.guruviking.com … Music ‘Deva Dasi' by Steve James

Stories with Rusty
That Indian Geek & Vedant Rusty Hate On Mumbai For 90 Minutes

Stories with Rusty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 92:13


Raghav Anand ( @That Indian Geek ) is an Indian YouTuber with a unique style of humour and presentation. He also runs a media agency working with brands like Netflix, and helping top YouTubers like Tanmay Bhat, Samay Raina & more.    In this podcast Vedant & Raghav talk about his life in Mumbai, struggles of creating content, college life, making friends, memories of the lockdown and more.   Watch till the end, or skip around from the timestamps below, and subscribe for new podcasts every Friday. In this podcast:  *Raghav's Podcast timestamps* 00:00 Random chats 02:00 "Kya matlab ye delhi nhi hai"? // Delhi's geography goes over the head 05:30 Moving out after school 09:00 Outsider's POV of Living in Mumbai 17:00 Commuting in Metro Cities 19:30 Introvert building Social skills // Introvert Creator's social life 22:00 School debates & council Stories // School stories 27:00 College commute isn't easy 29:00 Building Startup while managing college 32:00 Bhai ke sath business competition 34:30 Exposure to pop culture 36:00 What's popping on the internet // Commentary genre is dying! 38:00 Indian's POV on Creators doing brands 40:30 Youtube ads are getting WILDER // Warikoo ads are getting WILDER 43:30 Are online courses worth it? 45:00 Videography journey 47:30 What defines a good EDIT? 50:00 Youtube Burnouts & brand deals // The Creator's ANXIETY 53:00 Interaction with other Creators 59:00 Short form Creator's PROBLEM 1:02:30 Raghav & Rusty ki Social Life 1:08:00 Traveling Without Ticket 1:11:00 More on- Life in Mumbai 1:14:30 Earning at an Early Age 1:15:30 Tuition ki Kahaniyan 1:18:15 Raghav's Content Journey 1:21:00 Delhi Temperatures are BEST // Delhi vs London weather 1:23:45 Are Creators really Artists? 1:27:30 What is WINNING the Content Game 1:30:00 Signing off

WhatCulture Wrestling
AEW Dynamite Preview - A MASSIVE World Title Match, A Fascinating Potential Interaction Between MJF & William Regal, And Fantasy Booking A Potential Heel Turn...

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 47:23 Very Popular


Check out our #AEWDynamite preview! We discuss...A MASSIVE World title matchA fascinating potential interaction between MJF and William RegalFantasy booking a potential heel turn...@MichaelHamflett@MSidgwick@WhatCultureWWE Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dating without the BS
Episode #77 - Connect from the first interaction

Dating without the BS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 18:49


We're back with another episode on communication! How we communicate has been one of the biggest bonuses for my clients. They finally attract men who appreciate communicating in the same way she does, they feel confident to communicate what's on their mind, AND they get more of the RIGHT information about men in a shorter amount of time! Who doesn't want all of that?! On this episode I break down some of the concepts from my most requested training Communicate to Connect, so that you can start implementing them right now! And don't miss out on the bonus offer at the end!

The Bert Show
We Owe An Apology To Listeners After This Awkward Interaction!

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 9:42 Very Popular


Moe & Producer Keity might owe an apology to a member of #BertShowFam after a super awk interaction and even worse picture...they'll explain! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daily News Brief by TRT World
October 13, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 2:35


*) UN condemns Russia's 'illegal annexation' of Ukraine territories The UN General Assembly has voted overwhelmingly to condemn what it called Russia's "attempted illegal annexation" of four Ukrainian regions.. It demanded that Moscow immediately reverse its actions. The vote in the 193-member world body was 143-5 with 35 abstentions, the strongest support from the General Assembly for Ukraine and against Russia. *) Saudi Arabia rejects framing OPEC+ oil cut decision as political Saudi Arabia has rejected as "not based on facts" statements criticising the kingdom after an OPEC+ decision to cut its oil production target despite US objections. The OPEC+ decision was adopted through consensus, took into account the balance of supply and demand and was aimed at curbing market volatility, the Saudi foreign ministry said. US President Joe Biden pledged earlier that "there will be consequences" for US relations with Saudi Arabia after oil production's cut. *) Türkiye's aim is to stop bloodshed in Russia-Ukraine conflict: President President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said that Türkiye's aim is to stop bloodshed in the ongoing Russia-Ukraine conflict as soon as possible despite hurdles. Speaking at the sixth summit of the Conference on Interaction and Confidence-Building Measures in Asia, Erdogan said "Our goal is to continue the momentum gained despite the difficulties on the ground.” He added that Türkiye's intensive efforts with the UN and the two parties to the conflict to curb the negative effects of the war have gained the appreciation of the entire world. *) North Korea's Kim warns 'enemies' after cruise missile tests North Korea has test-fired a pair of strategic long-range cruise missiles in the latest of a flurry of drills to highlight its tactical nuclear capability. The country's leader Kim Jong-un expressed "great satisfaction" as he oversaw the test firing of these missiles that travelled 2,000 kilometres over the sea. Kim said the country should continue to expand the operational sphere of the nuclear strategic armed forces to resolutely deter any war crisis at any time. And finally… *) Football ace Salah sets Champions League record with fastest hat-trick Mohamed Salah has come off the bench to score the fastest-ever hat-trick in Champions League history as Liverpool routed Rangers 7-1 at Ibrox. The Egyptian came on in the second half with his team-leading 3-1 and proceeded to fire a stunning treble in just six minutes and 12 seconds to set a new benchmark in the competition. Bafetimbi Gomis previously held the record from 2011 when he took eight minutes to complete his hat-trick.

Agent Power Huddle
Using Events to get NOW Business | Jess Williams | S9 E7

Agent Power Huddle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 32:52


Jess brings the bling on today's Agent Power Huddle as she shares how Events can help you in your Now Business. Interaction with your SOI is vital if you want your brand to remain relevant, From different styles of events, Jess shares ways how to determine what event to organize and the checklist you need to have for your event to be successful.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.11.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 61:36


VIDEOS: Serious Adverse Events & Side Effects: Silence is inexcusable (4:51) Words From Aaron Siri on CDC Data On Covid Vaccines – (1:10 – 2:47) Bill Clinton and Blackrock team up to ACCELERATE the great reset | Redacted with Clayton Morris Neil Oliver – ‘…digital enslavement is coming…' (4:46-19:06) Tulsi Gabbard leaves Democratic Party, denounces it as ‘elitist cabal' (0:20 – 2:49)   Resveratrol supplementation linked to better blood lipids Southeast University (China), October 10 2022. A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials published in the journal Nutrients found an association between lower lipids and supplementing with resveratrol, a nonflavonoid polyphenol compound found in grapes, knotweed and other plants. Researchers at Southeast University in Nanjing, China identified 17 trials that included a total of 968 men and women for their meta-analysis. Resveratrol doses ranged from 10 to 3,000 milligrams per day administered from 4 to 48 weeks. The meta-analysis revealed a significant association between resveratrol supplementation and reductions in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The reduction in LDL cholesterol associated with resveratrol was significantly greater in trials of at least 12 weeks duration, trials that administered dosages of 500 milligrams resveratrol per day or more and among people with type 2 diabetes. The researchers did not find an association between supplementing with resveratrol and “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. “This meta-analysis indicated that the supplementation of resveratrol could significantly affect the serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, but not the level of HDL-cholesterol,” they concluded. “Findings from this meta-analysis could be helpful for providing suggestions for the use of resveratrol as nutraceutical.” A Mulberry Component, Prevents SARS-CoV-2 Infection by Blocking the Interaction between SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein S1 Receptor-Binding Domain Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, September 28, 2022 Despite the recent development of RNA replication-targeted COVID-19 drugs by global pharmaceutical companies, their prescription in clinical practice is limited by certain factors, including drug interaction, reproductive toxicity, and drug resistance. Natural products are a potential source of molecules with therapeutic effects against COVID-19. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory efficacy of mulberrofuran G (MG), a component of mulberry, which has been used as food and traditional medicine, on the binding of the spike S1 receptor-binding domain (RBD) protein to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, which is the initial stage of the SARS-CoV-2 infection. In competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, MG effectively blocked the spike S1 RBD: ACE2 receptor molecular binding, and investigations using the BLItz system and in silico modeling revealed that MG has high affinity for both proteins. Finally, we confirmed that MG inhibits the entry of SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped virus and a clinical isolate of SARS-CoV-2 into cells, suggesting that MG might be a promising therapeutic candidate for preventing SARS-CoV-2 binding to the cell surface during early infection. Positive childhood experiences of blue spaces linked to better adult well-being Sapienza University (Italy) & University of Exeter (UK), October 10, 2022 New research based on data from 18 countries concludes that adults with better mental health are more likely to report having spent time playing in and around coastal and inland waters, such as rivers and lakes (also known collectively as blue spaces) as children. The finding was replicated in each of the countries studied. Mounting evidence shows that spending time in and around green spaces such as parks and woodlands in adulthood is associated with stress reduction and better mental health. However, we know far less about the benefits of blue spaces, or the role childhood contact has in these relationships in later life. The research, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, found that individuals who recalled more childhood blue space experiences tended to place greater intrinsic value on natural settings in general, and to visit them more often as adults – each of which, in turn, were associated with better mental wellbeing in adulthood. Valeria Vitale, Lead author at Sapienza University of Rome, said: “In the context of an increasingly technological and industrialized world, it's important to understand how childhood nature experiences relate to wellbeing in later life. “Our findings suggest that building familiarity and confidence in and around blue spaces during childhood may stimulate an inherent joy of nature and encourage people to seek out recreational nature experiences, with beneficial consequences for adult mental health.” New survey: 91% of parents say their family is less stressed when they eat together American Heart Association & John Hopkins University, October 10, 2022 Survey Highlights: 91% of parents notice their family is less stressed when they share family meals together. 65% of surveyed adults say they are at least somewhat stressed, and more than a quarter (27%) are very or extremely stressed. 84% of adults wish they could share a meal together more often. Overall, respondents reported eating alone about half of the time. Stress reduction, connecting with other people and taking time to slow down are identified as top benefits of mealtime. Of the 1,000 U.S. adults nationwide surveyed in September 2022 for the American Heart Association's Healthy for GoodTM movement by Wakefield Research, the vast majority (84%) say they wish they could share a meal more often with loved ones, and nearly all parents report lower levels of stress among their family when they regularly connect over a meal. “Sharing meals with others is a great way to reduces stress, boost self-esteem and improve social connection, particularly for kids,” said Erin Michos, M.D, M.H.S, American Heart Association volunteer, associate director of preventive cardiology at Johns Hopkins . “Chronic, constant stress can also increase your lifetime risk of heart disease and stroke, so it is important for people to find ways to reduce and manage stress as much as possible, as soon as possible.“ Connecting with friends, family, coworkers and neighbors benefits people beyond stress relief. In fact, the survey found 67% of people say sharing a meal remind them of the importance of connecting with other people, and 54% say it reminds them to slow down and take a break. Those surveyed say they are more likely (59%) to make healthier food choices when eating with other people but have difficulty aligning schedules with their friends or family to do so, according to the survey. Overall, respondents reported eating alone about half of the time. Study says zinc can halt the growth of cancer cells University of Texas at Arlington, September 28, 2022 Zinc supplements can significantly inhibit the proliferation of esophageal cancer cells, according to a new study co-authored by a University of Texas at Arlington researcher. Previous studies had shown that zinc is essential for maintaining human health and protects the esophagus from cancer. However, it has never been fully understood why zinc has the ability to prevent cancer in the esophagus. In this study, a team led by Zui Pan, discovered that zinc selectively halts the growth of cancer cells but not normal esophageal epithelial cells. “Zinc deficiency has been found in many cancer patients,” said Pan. “But previously we didn't know why the same physiological concentrations of zinc inhibit cancer cell growth but not normal cells. Our study, for the first time to our knowledge, reveals that zinc impedes overactive calcium signals in cancer cells, which is absent in normal cells, and thus zinc selectively inhibits cancer cell growth.” said Pan. “It now appears that zinc and calcium can have a cross talk, meaning that they can be linked.” Zinc enriched foods include spinach, flax seeds, beef, pumpkin seeds and seafood like shrimp and oysters. Meditation Could Protect Older People Against Alzheimer's, Study Says Caen-Normandy University (France), October 9, 2022 Meditation may protect older people against Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia, according to new research. The ancient relaxation technique boosts brainpower among people over 65 years-old, scientists in France say. It can boost attention, awareness, and emotional health – faculties that decline with dementia. French participants assigned to an 18-month course did better than those given English lessons instead to keep their brains busy. “Meditation was superior to non-native language training on changing a global composite score and two of its subscores reflecting attention regulation and socio-emotional capacities,” says corresponding author Dr. Gael Chetelat from Caen-Normandy University in a statement, according to SWNS. “The attention regulation subscore increased after meditation only,” Dr. Chetelat tells SWNS. “In the context of meditation practices, this capacity allows a heightened awareness and monitoring of the contents of experience without becoming absorbed by them. Socio-emotional capacities decreased substantially after non-native language training, suggesting the difference observed may be due to maintenance of skills by meditation.”

Lucky Paper Radio
Turbo Cube Draft Primer

Lucky Paper Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 82:10 Very Popular


View all cards mentioned in the episode → If you don't yet have tickets to CubeCon, you can now sign up for the wait list Andy and Anthony talk about how they approach drafting Anthony's novel Turbo Cube where all spells and activated abilities cost less. The Cube will be featured at the inaugural Cube Con. Our hosts talk about the themes and individual cards that define the format. They talk about the ramification of the rules modification and what to look out for when approaching the format. Discussed in this episode: The Turbo Cube Cube Con Live Paper Gameplay of The Turbo Cube Lucky Paper's Channel on YouTube Check us out on Twitch and YouTube for paper Cube gameplay. Timestamps: 4:42 — Overview of the Turbo Cube 9:59 — Detailed Rules Interactions 13:17 — Cards Most Impacted by the Rules Change 16:49 — Draft Format 20:03 — Individual Cards: “Turbo Power” 25:46 — Individual Cards: Contentious S-Tier 33:00 — Individual Cards: Barely Sub “Turbo Power” A-Tier 39:01 — Individual Cards: Anything For Free 49:57 — Drafting the Turbo Cube “Archetypes” 1:01:32 — Interaction in the Turbo Cube 1:06:48 — Under and Over Performers 1:13:07 — Void Mirror Corner You can find the hosts' Cubes on Cube Cobra: Andy's “Bun Magic” Cube Anthony's “Regular” Cube If want us to do a pack 1, pick 1 from your cube submit it on our website. Send in questions to the show at mail@luckypaper.co. You can also find both your hosts in the MTG Cube Talk Discord. If you'd like to show your support for the show, please leave us a review on iTunes or wherever you listen. Musical production by DJ James Nasty.