Podcasts about uniting

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  • 957PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about uniting

Latest podcast episodes about uniting

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast
Uniting The Country

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 11:13


Earlier today, President Biden said he is trying to UNITE the country. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Week In Property Podcast
HSPG: Two Friends Uniting For Massive Impact

This Week In Property Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 41:29


In today's show, we sit down with Guy Horne, one of the co-founders of HSPG, the UK's leading social impact real estate investment firm.   You'll hear how along with his long-time friend since school, David Searle, they have managed to unite, build an amazing team, form powerful partnerships, and make a gigantic impact in UK property that is helping so many lives...   Guy reflects back on the very first project that he and David got together on: a low-cost HMO investment project in Manchester. And how a crazy 6 and a half year journey has seen HSPG grow into working with over 30 housing providers, over 60 Local Authority partnerships, over £350m in invested funds, and over 4,000 new bed spaces created.   It's a highly-impressive journey that's been making waves in the affordable and supported housing areas that face up to the gigantic housing and homelessness crises in the UK.   Listen to Guy tell the "William Hill" story and how the changes in Permitted Development and a creative way of achieve affordable housing have brought about unique ways of solving problems.   Guy speaks of the individual human tales he saw around him, which inspired him to find ways to help so many people, and to tie into the public and private partnerships that could bring the expertise and solutions required.   Listen to Guy tell about their "Project 2000" initiative and how they're not just on track to meet it, but to blow it out of the water.   A passionate team, a demand-driven strategy, an entrepreneurial mindset, and an open and vulnerable approach to learning and working with others around them, HSPG is a formidable force that isn't anywhere near stopping in it's vision...

Bankless
TribeDAO - The Biggest Protocol Merge Ever

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 59:16


In the latter half of 2021, Jai Bhavnani of Rari Capital and Joey Santoro of FEI Protocol went to each other's governance forums and proposed the FEI RARI token merge: the biggest protocol merger that we've ever seen in the space. The concept garnered high engagement and a ton of community response, and the formal votes received overwhelming support on both sides. This unprecedented merge is a historical moment for DAOs. The verticalization of DeFi is happening with new 'mafias' emerging in several corners of DeFi. Uniting capital efficiency, values, and communities, we are right alongside Jai with his excitement to see how this all plays out. With new conversations of anti-trust and competition, it's clear that the DAO space is continuing to mature. Integrated DeFi stacks are increasingly exciting, and in this episode, we dive into the details with two pioneers of interDAO relationships. ------

Cornfield Theology
Subscription to a Confession (Part 4 of 4) 

Cornfield Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 7:22


Series Introduction Recently, I have been posting why Redemption Hill Church is confessional. The term confessional has lost its luster over the last 100 years, but prior, most churches held to a Confession of Faith. I attempt to show in these blog posts the value of confessions and why a local church should be confessional. This blog is part 3 of 4. These four blogs on confessionalism are about: The Nature of ConfessionalismThe Parameters of ConfessionalismA Vision of ConfessionalismSubscription to a Confession If you are new to confessionalism, or the term is foreign, that’s ok. The purpose of cornfieldtheology.com is to introduce people to new concepts, terms, and theological ideas. These four blogs on confessionalism have been adapted from a paper I submitted to the elders of Trinity Fellowship Churches in preparation for Theology Day before our General Assembly. This fourth blog post is on subscription to a confession of faith. If a local church pastor is a part of a denomination that holds to a Confession of Faith, then to what degree is the confession affirmed, taught, and defended? Subscription to our Confession In confessional denominations, one of the most debated issues is about subscription. But what is subscription? Merriam-Webster offers a helpful definition. Subscription is the “act of signing one’s name (as in attesting or witnessing a document).” And it is “the acceptance (as of ecclesiastical articles of faith) attested by the signing of one’s name.” Here is the question at hand: To what degree should an elder or eldership subscribe to a denomination’s Confession of Faith? A too loose subscription will result in a confession being rendered useless. What is the point of ascribing to a confession or statement of faith if you are unwilling to affirm, teach, and defend it? There will not be unity but pragmatism in a local church and across a denomination. But, the aim of a collection of churches is to be united on doctrine. As I have said in previous blogs on confessionalism, uniting around a person is unstainable. Trying to unite around a methodology will not last. Uniting around a vision is great until the vision changes, and not everyone is on board with the change. Uniting around culture has the potential to be toxic. But uniting around truth can last generations.  Uniting with truth means churches in a denomination should strive for a subscription where an exc

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 107: Lingzhi Girl - Uniting East & West, Nature & Modernity, Death & Immortality (feat. Xiaojing Yan)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 80:25


Xiaojing Yan is a Canadian artist whose work embraces the combination of her Chinese roots and education at Nanjing Arts Institute (B.F.A., 2000) with higher education at George Brown College in Toronto (2004) and an M.F.A. in sculpture at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (2007). Her unique point of view brings together the past and the present, encompasses culture and nature, art and science. Yan is a recipient of numerous awards and grants, including the 2014 Outstanding Young Alumni Award from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Project Grants from the Canadian Council for the Arts, the Chalmers Arts Fellowship, Mid-career Grants from Ontario Arts Council, and many more. Most recently, she has had solo shows at Maison Hermès, Shanghai, China, Art Gallery of Northumberland, Cobourg, ON, Canada, Richmond Art Gallery, Richmond, BC, Canada and Suzhou Museum, Suzhou, China, Varley Art Gallery, Markham, ON, Canada. Yan has also completed public art projects and commissions in Canada and China including her 2018 installation Cloudscape at the Royal Ontario Museum and 2019 Window display "Into the Dream" for Maison Hermès. It's my pleasure to learn more about the unique ethos behind her art and her intimate relationship with reishi mushroom, also known as lingzhi.    TOPICS COVERED:   Following the Artists' Path from China to Canada  Engaging Space in Creating Art  Inspiration from Chinese Mythologies, Stories and Iconographies  Connection to Nature in Eastern and Western Cultures  Forces of Modernization Reshaping Relationships with Nature  Rise of the “Moderners”   Weighing Human Progress and Environmental Homeostasis  Imbuing Art with Meaning Before and After Creation  Pearls and Cicadas used to make Sculptures  Roles of Artists in Communicating Balance in Nature  Making Art with Lingzhi AKA Reishi  Chinese Culture and the Mushroom of Immortality  Cocreating Art with Nature   Rise of Mycelium in Art and Design  EPISODE RESOURCES:   Xiaojing Yan Website: https://yanxiaojing.com/   Xiaojing Yan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/xiaojing.yan.studio/?hl=en   Lingzhi: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingzhi_(mushroom)   "Scholar's Stone": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gongshi   "Classic of Mountains and Seas": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classic_of_Mountains_and_Seas   

Gala Loves Everything
High Vibe 55: The Embodied Daily Challenge You've Been Searching For

Gala Loves Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 17:08


Unlike other daily challenges, High Vibe 55 is about balancing your energy. Uniting both sides of you: yin and yang, grace and power, firm and flow. Why? Because it's in bringing symmetry to these sides of you that you'll experience the fullness of who you truly are. You are multi-dimensional and delicious, and you deserve to feel it all! The practices included in High Vibe 55 are truly transformational, and will heal you from the inside out. You won't just look good, you will feel stronger and more joyful than ever before. Get the FREE quickstart guide here: http://bit.ly/highvibe55

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®
2022 The Life Partner and Soul Mission a Significant Reason for Uniting

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 9:44


The OOH Insider Show
Episode 089 - Uniting An Industry w/ Becky Smith

The OOH Insider Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 31:12


Get ready for a super interesting episode this week! Becky Smith, Enterprise Manager at IBOUSA, discusses how we can unite as an industry and secure a seat at the table.IBOUSA is a networking group of independent business operators. They are a for-profit business that operates on a non-profit basis. Their out-of-home network comes together a couple of times a year to share new technologies and ideas at IBO conferences.Takeaways IBO represents over 90,000 faces in their network. The IBO Speedway is a free platform that acts as a liaison between advertisers and the network's inventory.IBO is actively looking for a standard unit of measurement for data. The Media Rating Council is currently creating an auditing method for out-of-home.Conferences are a great way to learn best practices from other industry leaders. Twice a year, IBO organizes a three-day conference for associates to network and share experiences.Image quality is everything! Having high-quality approach shots for your inventory is a crucial visual for advertisers.LinksLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/becky-smith-4bb945162/Company: https://www.ibousa.orgEmail: becky@ibousa.orgPhone: 580-226-2234Powered by OneScreen.aiOneScreen.ai is the first free, public-access directory for all things Out of Home.Support the show (http://oohswag.com)

K'hal Mevakshei Hashem
Shulchan Aruch - Hilchos Avodah Zarah: The Ra'avid and uniting Moshiach Ben Yosef and Moshiach Ben David

K'hal Mevakshei Hashem

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 58:15


Harav Yussie Zakutinsky Shlita

The Growth Project
Episode 152: Finding Clarity in Your Calling with Coach Bob Richey

The Growth Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 45:22


Uniting passion and purpose is typically the ultimate, and often difficult, goal in achieving a fulfilling career and life. Dr. Drew Brannon and Furman University Men's Basketball Head Coach, Bob Richey, discuss Bob's path to finding clarity in his career, his commitment to developing a unique program within the college basketball world, and a focus on building a culture that aligns with his values.

New Books in History
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in National Security
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in National Security

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/national-security

New Books in Intellectual History
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

FEDTalk
Uniting the Federal Community Through the FEDforum

FEDTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 56:59


The FEDforum is an initiative at the show's sister newsletter – FEDmanager – to unite voices across the federal community. This partnership among federal workforce organizations is a space for federal employee groups to share their organizations' initiatives, insights, and activities with the FEDmanager audience. Join a discussion on federal employee associations and what's to come in 2022 among FEDforum partners. Host Jason Briefel welcomes Brenna Isman, Director of Academy Studies at the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA); Chad Hooper, Executive Director of the Professional Managers Association (PMA); Alice Mercer, National Chair of Blacks In Government (BIG); and Joseph Annelli, Executive Vice President at the National Association of Federal Veterinarians (NAFV). The show airs live on Friday, December 17, 2021, at 11:00 am ET on Federal News Network. You can stream the show online anytime via the Federal News Network app and listen to the FEDtalk podcast on all major podcasting platforms. FEDtalk is a live talk show produced by Shaw Bransford & Roth P.C., a federal employment law firm. Bringing you the insider's perspective from leaders in the federal community since 1993. FEDtalk is sponsored by the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP). The FLTCIP is sponsored by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, insured by John Hancock Life & Health Insurance Company, under a group long term care insurance policy, and administered by Long Term Care Partners, LLC (doing business as FedPoint).

Ohio Ministry Network
Synergy 2021 - More Than Tolerating - Uniting Generations To Lead

Ohio Ministry Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 55:24


Imagine what serving together would look like if generations could understand, honor and communicate together in order to lead well! We will take a practical look at what this means for kids ministry (and other ministries)!   Meghan Boyle Children's Pastor, Journey Church

No Title
C16/07a Uniting at the “Conscious Cafe”

No Title

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 67:58


ConsciousCafe is a social network and community. We aim to raise global consciousness, one conversation at a time, and to inspire profound connection. Based in London UK, the Conscious Cafe is a safe haven for those seeking and embracing the divine consciousness. Our purpose is to raise awareness by encouraging rich, nurturing and thought-provoking dialogue which creates deep connection and promotes conscious expansion both internally and externally. https://selfdiscoverymedia.com/2016/01/29/c1607a-uniting-at-the-consciouscafe/

Rising Laterally
Coaching in the Present Moment with Bill Small

Rising Laterally

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 55:09


Bill Small has helped hundreds of clients achieve new levels of success and fulfillment over the last 15 years in his role as a business and personal coach. He is also a musician, creator of the Awareness Advantage Workshop, and co-host of a new podcast, “The Subtle Art of Not Yelling.”In this wide-ranging conversation we discuss the art of coaching, the importance of uniting mindfulness with action, our culture's strained relationship with aging, and personal accountability as an antidote to groupthink. ====================0:00 Intro 0:39 The many roles of Bill Small 1:44 The difference between mentoring, teaching, and coaching3:39 How long does it take a coach to get to know their client?6:13 What are some of the questions Bill asks his clients?9:17 Seeking objective advice as a business owner10:45 How “The Secret” influenced Bill's coaching14:11 Uniting mindfulness with action  19:07 The importance of staying present with clients21:19 The need for more compassion in our interactions25:24 Our culture's “weird” relationship with aging28:28 Building deeper, more authentic connections with customers, users, and clients  32:04 The art of storytelling through songwriting 35:22 Taste and preference is subjective 37:53 Not everyone is a fit for entrepreneurship  40:38 Building a skill set before building a client base42:51 The future of groupthink 46:51 Pinning our anger on larger narratives 49:37 What's a book you reopened recently?52:33 “One Final Question”====================Bill's coaching website Bill's music Bill's podcastBook Recommendation!The Domain of Being: Ontology by Celestine Bittle ====================LinkTree to support us and leave an Apple Podcast review (thank you!)Let's get in touch!Join the discussion in the episode comments on our YouTube channel or social media pages...InstagramTwitter

Pastors in Quarantine
Does Uniting Mean Intellectually Affirming The Same Ideas?

Pastors in Quarantine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 46:10


This season is all about how to disagree in a healthy way. We all struggle with disagreement(some more than others!) and we hope this season helps you navigate this divisive topic.  Thanks for listening to Pastors In Quarantine! If you haven't, give us honest feedback in the ratings sections. -Stephen, Seth, Sean, Matt and Daniel. 

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1584 Scott Adams: On the Plus Side, China is Finally Uniting Americans. And More News

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 59:00


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Why no hunt for Charlottesville marchers? Suspicious Patriot Front march Dean Obediala's shock at Massie joke Pete Buttigieg, Presidential candidate? Maxim Lott on COVID myths Should we vaccinate against Omicron? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1584 Scott Adams: On the Plus Side, China is Finally Uniting Americans. And More News

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 59:00


Content: Why no hunt for Charlottesville marchers? Suspicious Patriot Front march Dean Obediala's shock at Massie joke Pete Buttigieg, Presidential candidate? Maxim Lott on COVID myths Should we vaccinate against Omicron? If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build … The post Episode 1584 Scott Adams: On the Plus Side, China is Finally Uniting Americans. And More News appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

K'hal Mevakshei Hashem
Zos Chanukah - uniting Beis Shamai and Beis Hilel

K'hal Mevakshei Hashem

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 49:32


Harav Yussie Zakutinsky Shlita

FBC Lowell Podcast
Dividing the Land, Uniting the People

FBC Lowell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 51:15


11/28/21 - Part 9 of a series on the book of Joshua and how we can apply it to ourselves in today's battles. Taught by Pastor Aaron Matthews for FBC Lowell, AR.

Cornerstone Houston Sermons
The Divided Church Uniting

Cornerstone Houston Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 33:29


Part 12 of our series in 1 Corinthians: Division Among Us  1 Corinthians 16 | Rev. Blake Arnoult

CWCM Podcast
Ep 26 - Kate Madigan & Jaime Simmons

CWCM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:15


The Michigan Climate Action Network, or MiCAN, connects and amplifies individuals, communities, and organizations confronting the climate crisis in Michigan. Uniting a ​​network of over 70 organizations and 30,000 individuals, MiCAN partners with coalitions and campaigns working for climate solutions and justice. They host the annual Michigan Climate Action Summit, the first and largest statewide public gathering focused on climate action. From conferences to rallies and marches, they facilitate dozens of events each year, and support organizations in advancing equitable climate solutions with the urgency science demands. In this inspiring interview, Seth Bernard sits down with MiCAN Executive Director Kate Madigan and Engagement Director Jaime Simmons. The three provide an in depth look into MiCAN's vital work, discuss bringing equity to the forefront of this movement, and share how they keep themselves charged and renewed as they forge ahead with activism. /// State of Water is a program of the Michigan-based non-profit organization Title Track, and is powered by the Clean Water Campaign for Michigan. The podcast is made possible through a generous contribution from the Esperance Foundation. /// EPISODE 26 / Kate Madigan and Jaime Simmons interviewed by Seth Bernard / Produced, edited and mixed by Dan Rickabus / Narrators - Alex Smith, Ben Darcie, Dan Rickabus, Jenny Jones, Angela Gallegos, Rachel Marco-Havens / Graphic by Dani Renwick of Charmellow Design / Theme Music - Mike Savina, Seth Bernard & Dan Rickabus / Featured Music - "Authors (instrumental demo)" by Dan Rickabus

Teaching Yourself to Learn
Evolving, Elevating and Emerging into Fashionable Existence with Dr Shelley Nash

Teaching Yourself to Learn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:14


Join Holly alongside Dr Shelley Nash this week as they talk about feeling confident from the inside out. The clothes and styles we choose run a lot deeper than just the clothes in our wardrobe. Clothes help you feel more confident and become part of you when working in synergy with each other. Dr Nash explores this concept and her transformational coaching system that helps women break free from their past, inner blocks, and self-criticism. Helping them to the become the woman of their dreams.   Listen as Holly and Shelley discuss: Childhood patterns and programs that keep us stuck in comfortable ways of thinking and feeling. Keeping up with technology as a way to keep yourself young. How clothes can lift your moods and sense of self. Uniting your passion and changing your mindset.   To find out more about Dr Shelleys 5- day Elevate Your Confidence and Style to Claim the Success You Deserve!  as mentioned in this episode please visit: http://bit.ly/ElevateYourConfidenceandStyle and visit the Facebook group for Women, Living Powerfully Community: http://www.facebook.com/groups/livingpowerfullycommunity/.   To explore more transitions in life through first hand wisdom, experiences and hope in the 3rd half of life, find out more about Holly https://teachingyourselftolearn.com

According to Kallas
Ep# 158 Moral Contradictions Monday

According to Kallas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 36:11


Hot topics for today. 1. Uniting the "right" 2. We are all the same 3. White Africans 4. Anti-American Americans 5. Anti-Christ Christians

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E62: The Uniting Power of Story | Angus Fletcher | Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 95:56


This episode was recorded on September 7, 2021. Angus Fletcher and I discuss creativity, the link between literature and resilience, what makes for compelling narratives, the different kinds of stories, and much more. Angus Fletcher is a Professor of Story Science at Ohio State's Project Narrative, the world's leading academic think-tank for narrative theory. He is also the author of Wonderworks: The 25 Most Important Inventions in the History of Literature. Find more Angus Fletcher on his website: https://AngusFletcher.co [00:00] Intro [01:21] What is Project Narrative? [02:27] "Stories are the most powerful things ever invented. They're the most powerful tool we possess" Angus Fletcher [03:04] "When you realize stories have the power to change how our mind works, to troubleshoot it, to make it more resilient, more creative, more scientific—to do all these things... When you couple the power of stories with the human brain, you throw open the doors to anything" AF [03:53] The problem with literary studies. How stories empower us and improve performance [07:06] Wonderworks and the story of courage in Homer's Iliad [12:40] "Literature and scripture are synonyms. They mean 'that which is written.' So [something] more fundamental than any technology... Is simply that sense of spiritual experience" AF [13:18] The Neuropsychology of Anxiety by J. Grey [14:44] What are the 2 kinds of stories? [19:12] Story thinking [19:22] "Human cognition is largely narrative. We process the world narratively" AF [22:12] "The wonder of being on this earth... is to build stories and [empower people] to tell their own" AF "And to unite us in a collective story so we can work towards the same ends" JP [23:00] Why are certain stories so compelling? [24:48] The zone of proximal development [25:44] "Being enthralled is a manifestation of the instinct that specifies the zone of proximal development" JP [31:24] The ideal spirit transcending the individual; Jung's Pleroma [32:14] "The flip side of anxiety is creativity—they're both about restless energy" AF [33:31] What's the source of dreams? [33:55] "We have this vast knowledge in embodied action." A great storyteller takes "images that reflect a compelling pattern of behavior [and verbalizes them]” JP [34:56] Abstract representation of patterns as a dream-source [38:43] Computational power, stories, and the differences between the abstract and particular [38:48] "Much of what drives the demand for higher computational resources is... producing artificial realities for fantasy simulation" JP  [45:51] Christianity and Star Wars [46:35] "Star Wars is Christianity for atheist nerds" JP [46:56] "We are most happy when we don't perceive ourselves as inheriting an archetypal story" AF [48:16] "We see in stories, and this is partly why our eyes are adapted... so that people can see [the white in] our eyes. It's really important because [our eyes point at] what they're interested in. We can see what they value [and] infer their motivation" JP [50:36] Literature and psychedelic experiences [51:27] "In psychotherapy... you're trying to hammer the person's narrative into a single... functional unit" JP [55:31] Trauma, unconscious mapping, and dream analysis [56:56] "Any territory you cannot perceive through the overlaid projection of a narrative map is traumatizing" JP  [59:59] Jung, Joseph Campbell, and Erich Neumann [01:02:51] Jung vs Darwin on stories [01:10:18] "Literature can build emotional and intellectual resilience" AF [01:14:55] Being adaptive is “to be emotionally and intellectually resilient" AF [01:15:54] Creative training; measuring creativity #Creativity #Stories #Jung #Literature #Darwin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass - The Moving Elegies For Abraham Lincoln

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 42:06


I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.  And I am Garry Shriver.  This is the How to Love Lit Podcast. This is our second episode discussing the bard of democracy, the great Walt Whitman.  Today we will feature one of his four poems honoring President Abraham Lincoln, but in order to understand why Whitman and many of us admire this great man, we want to revisit the  original 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass and listen to some of Whitman's observations of African Americans and slavery.  Christy, let's start this episode by reading and discussing two extracts from “I sing the Body Electric” , the ones where Whitman describes an African man and then an African woman at auction.    A man's body at auction,  (For before the war I often go to the slave-mart and watch the sale,)  I help the auctioneer, the sloven does not half know his business.    Gentlemen look on this wonder,  Whatever the bids of the bidders they cannot be high enough for it,  For it the globe lay preparing quintillions of years without one animal or plant,  For it the revolving cycles truly and steadily roll'd.  In this head the all-baffling brain,  In it and below it the makings of heroes.  Examine these limbs, red, black, or white, they are cunning in tendon and nerve,  They shall be stript that you may see them.  Exquisite senses, life-lit eyes, pluck, volition,  Flakes of breast-muscle, pliant backbone and neck, flesh not flabby, good-sized arms and legs,  And wonders within there yet.  Within there runs blood,  The same old blood! the same red-running blood!  There swells and jets a heart, there all passions, desires, reachings, aspirations,  (Do you think they are not there because they are not express'd in parlors and lecture-rooms?)  This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,  In him the start of populous states and rich republics,  Of him countless immortal lives with countless embodiments and enjoyments.  How do you know who shall come from the offspring of his offspring through the centuries?  (Who might you find you have come from yourself, if you could trace back through the centuries?)    8    A woman's body at auction,  She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers,  She is the bearer of them that shall grow and be mates to the mothers.  Have you ever loved the body of a woman?  Have you ever loved the body of a man?  Do you not see that these are exactly the same to all in all nations and times all over the earth?  If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,  And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,  And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful than the most beautiful face.  Have you seen the fool that corrupted his own live body? or the fool that corrupted her own live body?  For they do not conceal themselves, and cannot conceal themselves.  Whitman was raised a New York democrat, but his sympathies were with the Free Soil party that condemned the extension of slavery as a sin against God and a crime against man.  The Republican party would not exist until 1854, and Lincoln would be their presidential candidate in the election of 1860.  Of course, bear in mind, that the issues of those days are different than the issues of today, so the party names shouldn't be taken to represent modern day politics.      For Whitman it was undeniable for anyone with eyeballs that all men are born human and that implies certain things regardless if they are born  free or slave- of any race, creed or gender.  It is obvious to a man so aware of the physical body, that we are of the same atom-  the magnificence of the body proclaims our humanity- and ironically where on earth could this magnificence be most easily seen than at a slave auction like what he witnessed during his New Orleans days. In all of its ruthless degradation it ironically showcased the magnificence of the human body.  It's why Whitman could say, almost sarcastically- I am a better salesman of slaves than the auctioneer-I know and understand the beauty and value of what you are selling and you don't- you fool.   Whitman was the poet of the democratic soul- we are after all leaves of grass, but he was also the poet of the body- that physical form we are all chained to.  For Whitman, to be a human was to understand and be okay with one's physical body- and it is a holy thing. Our souls inhabit a sanctified space on earth- that of the body- be it man or woman- the pigmentation of flesh was just one of many individual and unique features- for Whitman our bodies is the starting point for equality- we are all wedded to one.      It doesn't seem radical to us now, but at that time in history- even talking about the body like that was revolutionary- almost vulgar- Whitman democratically equates the man with the woman with the black with the white.  In 1855, this was not self-evident anywhere else in the United States of America or really anywhere on planet earth.      By 1855, Walt Whitman knew his country was falling apart.  He understood that the ideals on which the great American experiment were founded were being overwhelmed by all kinds of forces, not least of which was plain ordinary corruption.  In his mind, what the world needed was repentance- a total course correction- a return to the original ideals and this was going to happen through conversion to a different set of moral ideals- he wanted to convince America to revisit and embrace all these original self-evident democratic ideals by reading and absorbing Leaves of Grass.  He really truly believed if people would just read his book, they would stop hating each other.    Well, it's a nice thought, however slightly unrealistic…especially in light of the single digit sales of that first edition.  But even if he had gotten everyone to read his book, it was a tall order.  By 1860, any kind of peaceful coming together seemed unrealistic.  America was on the brink of war and violence was springing up.  John Brown is one notable example; in an attempt to free slaves through violence he and a small gang stormed Harper's Ferry.  They were captured, tried and condemned to death, but this event inflamed the country and raised the stakes for the upcoming presidential election.  A few months after Brown was executed, the democratic party, split between pro and- anti- slavery factions, was to confront a new political party- one that had never existed before, the Republican party. It had nominated a Southern born anti-slavery man from Illinois, a lawyer who had never attended school but who was known as honest Abe.  A newspaper in South Carolina put it this way “the irrepressible conflict is about to be vised upon us through the Black Republican nominee and his fanatical diabolical Republican party.”    Walt Whitman did not see Lincoln as an instigator of a conflict.  Whitman saw him almost as an extension of himself- a mediator.  He really believed Lincoln was going to bring healing  and unity through politics something he had tried and failed to do through poetry.      I'm not sure which is the greater challenge= trying to unify  a group of people through poetry or politics!!      Ha! True but Whitman was paying attention to what Lincoln was saying and he identified with him.  He saw himself in Lincoln.  They both came from poor families. Neither had formal education.  One thing that is interesting, Lincoln was from the West, and Whitman believed the hope of America was in the West.  Both men believed in democracy to the core, but also- both believed in unity.  Whitman saw Lincoln as America's hope.    Although, he was likely the most hated man of his age in some corners, but the only hope of America in others.  Lincoln wanted first and foremost to be a unifier.  He had been elected with only around 40% of the popular vote, although he did get a majority of the electoral college votes.  There was no question America was deeply divided.  He wanted not just to save the physical boundaries of America, but he wanted to heal the wounds that were making people hate each other.  Lincoln's father was anti-slavery and raised in an anti-slavery Baptist congregation.   Lincoln But his mother was from a Kentucky slaveholding family.  Lincoln later recalled that the reason his father left Kentucky and the South because of his strong feelings about slavery. Lincoln himself saw many cruel things while visiting his grandparents, not the least of these being once when an African-American family was separated on a boat and sold to different owners.  He later recalled that ‘the sight was a continual torment to me…having the power of making me miserable.”  However, Lincoln's mother's family were people he knew intimately, and somehow he understood how someone could support slavery and not be an evil person.  This sounds crazy to us and difficult to understand, but Lincoln expressed on more than one occasion to men across the North that if they had been born in those circumstances in that place and in that world, they likely would have had those same views.  This way of seeing one's fellow man is more radical than most of us can even comprehend.  It's a strange idea to assert that a person could believe something is morally wrong so strongly that he would be willing to lead a nation to war to end it, but simultaneously judge the perpetrators of this evil redeemable human beings.  95% of humans today can't think like that-       Well, it's something Whitman could do as well.  Whitman didn't fight in the Civil War, but his brother George did.  His brother fought for the Union.  Whitman's significant other fought for the Confederacy at one point.     The first shots of the Civil War were fired by the South on Fort Sumter in Charleston, SC, in April of 1861.  Lincoln had been president for just a few weeks.       In December of 1862, Whitman saw his brother's name on a list of casualities.  He got on a train and headed South to look for him. He ended up in Fredericksburg.  The good news was his brother had only suffered a flesh wound.  But outside the hospital Whitman saw something that struck horror and terror into his being.  Let me read his words after he came to the building being used as a hospital, he saw, “a heap of amputated feet, legs, arms, hands, etc….a full load for a one-horse cart…human fragments, cut bloody, black and blue, swelled and sickening…nearby were several dead bodes each covered with its brown woolen blanket.”  Now you have to remember, think about Leaves of Grass and “I sing the Body Electric”.  This is a man who had been trying to convince America to celebrate our bodies- all of our bodies- we read just the excert about African-Americans, but he celebrated all bodies and wanted us to see ourselves in other people's bodies- to recognize the sanctity in all bodies- and here he's staring at these body parts scattered around, cut off and thrown into piles.  I can't even imagine how things would smell.      Whitman's reaction to what he saw on the battlefields and field hospitals of Frederickburg, led him to a decision that altered the course of his life.  It would lead him to move to Washington DC and honestly, his war actions to me make him something of a saint.  Just in Frederickburg, he stuck around to visit and help bury the dead of the over 18,000 dead soldiers that were just lying on the ground.  But, then he started visiting hospitals.  These visits deeply affected him.  He had planned on going back to New York after he found his brother, but he couldn't do that anymore.  Instead he changed courses and went to Washington DC.  He got a job as a clerk where he would work during the day, but then he would spend the rest of his time in the hospitals.  And he would just sit with soldiers.  He didn't care if they were union of confederate.  He brought  with him bags of candy.  He wrote letters to their parents.  He played twenty questions.  If they wanted him to read the Bible, he read the Bible.  If they wanted a cigarette, he'd scrounge up a cigarette. Many of them were teenagers.  He kissed  and hugged them; he parented them in their final moments of life.  For many, he was the last tender face they would see on this earth.  The numbers range, but documentation reveals he visited and helped anywhere from 80-100,000 soldiers.      Let me interrupt you for a second to highlight how bad it was to be in a hospital during this time period.  No one at this time understood the importance of anticeptics or the need to be clean.  The Union Army lost 300,000 lives in combat.  But, they experienced an estimated 6,400,000 cases of illnesses, wound and injuries.  Hospitals were filthy and dangerous places.      For many of those young men, Whitman was the last touch of kindness they would ever experience on this earth.  He said later that those years of hospital service were and I quote, “the greatest privilege and satisfaction..and, of course, the most profound lesson of my life.”  He usually left the hospital at night and slept in a room he rented but if a soldier needed him or asked him to stay, he would often stay up all night with wounded and dying men and then head from the hospital to the office.  Here are his words "While I was with wounded and sick in thousands of cases from the New England States, and from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and from Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and all the Western States, I was with more or less from all the States, North and South, without exception… "I was with many rebel officers and men among our wounded, and gave them always what I had, and tried to cheer them the same as any. . . . Among the black soldiers, wounded or sick, and in the contraband camps, I also took my way whenever in their neighborhood, and did what I could for them.”        Well, let me also say that Washington DC was a nasty place to be living at that time.  Physically, it was a construction zone, nothing like the beautiful collection of buildings and streets designed by the French architect Pierre L Enfant that we see today.   It was muddy; it noisy; it was full of the noises of building and killing.  It was political.  Abraham Lincoln stated that during those days, “If there is a worse place than Hell, I am in it.”      Dang, because DC, the city, was so bad?    Because being president in the Civil War was so bad.  Lincoln had a different view of his role of leadership than most people today understand.  And we need to go back to when he was elected in 1860.  The country was divided- and even if you didn't believe in slavery, the question of how to get rid of it wasn't something people agreed on.  Many thought it should just be abolished. Others thought you should just keep it from expanding and let it die slowly.   Lincoln was surrounded by people on all sides who all wanted him to have “bold leadership”- do radical things- whatever those were to them- but Lincoln liked to respond to his critics by referencing an entertainer who was known for tight walking over water.  Sometimes, he even would push a wheelbarrow across these ropes; one time he stopped in the middle of the river to eat an omelete on his tightrope, sometimes he'd carry someone on his back- all crazy stunts that didn't seem survivable.  Lincoln had seen him perform walking a tight rope across Niagara falls and he thought it was a perfect metaphor for how he saw himself.  Let me quote Lincoln here- the artist went by the name Blondin. Suppose,” Lincoln said, “that all the material values in this great country of ours, from the Atlantic to the Pacific—its wealth, its prosperity, its achievements in the present and its hopes for the future—could all have been concentrated and given to Blondin to carry over that awful crossing.” Suppose “you had been standing upon the shore as he was going over, as he was carefully feeling his way along and balancing his pole with all his most delicate skill over the thundering cataract. Would you have shouted at him, ‘Blondin, a step to the right!' ‘Blondin, a step to the left!' or would you have stood there speechless and held your breath and prayed to the Almighty to guide and help him safely through the trial?”    Lincoln saw himself on a tight rope and going too far one way or the other would make the entire thing collapse.  He wasn't trying to crush and destroy his fellow man, even his Southern brother,  although he was trying to win the war and emancipate the slaves, which he did do.  He was trying to heal a nation- to bring brother back to brother.  And we must never forget that brothers WERE literally killing their brothers.  Uniting and building a country that was this morally divided was a seemingly impossible task- and he could see from his perch in Washington that this was hell.    Whitman would stop to see him going in and out of the White House.  This was in the days when you could do that.  They didn't even have secret service for the president. Whitman looked at Lincoln and saw sadness in his eyes.  But Whitman always believed Lincoln was the right man.  If anyone could bring America together, it was Lincoln. Lincoln didn't hate his enemy.  He loved his enemy.  Just like Whitman.  This was the attitude where Whitman saw hope and a future as he sat with both confederate and Union soldier, black soldiers and white soldiers, mending their wounds, writing their final farewells.      But make no mistake, Lincoln was committed to emancipation and as the war came to the end and reconstruction was in sight, he was preparing America to grant full citizenship that included voting rights to All American males- including African-American ones.  In one letter he said, “I am naturally anti-slavery.  If slavery is not wrong; nothing is wrong.  I cannot remember when I did not think so, and feel so”.     And yet this is the same man who could say during his second inaugural address, one month before General Lee will surrender at Appomatox and 41 days before he will be murdered…     With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan -- to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with the world. to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with the world. all nations.    There was one man in the crowd that day, who was actually so close to Lincoln he shows up in the inauguaration picture.  This man heard those words and was committed to stopping Lincoln from fulfilling this pledge.  John Wilkes Booth was standing not far from Lincoln that day.  On April 11, what we now know was to be his last speech, Lincoln called for black suffrage.  Booth was in the audience that day as well, after hearing Lincoln make that statement Booth is known to have said, “that is the last speech he will ever make.”    On that fateful day, April 15, 1865 Whitman was visiting his family.  However, his significant other, Peter Doyle was in Washington DC and heard that the president was going to Ford's theater to see a performance of the comedy “My American Cousin.”  It was Good Friday, the sacred day where Christians celebrate the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.  This is what Peter Doyle  said later about what happened that evening.     I heard that the President and his wife would be present and made up my mind to go. There was a great crowd in the building. I got into the second gallery. There was nothing extraordinary in the performance. I saw everything on the stage and was in a good position to see the President's box. I heard the pistol shot. I had no idea what it was, what it meant—it was sort of muffled. I really knew nothing of what had occurred until Mrs. Lincoln leaned out of the box and cried, "The President is shot!" I needn't tell you what I felt then, or saw. It is all put down in Walt's piece—that piece is exactly right. I saw Booth on the cushion of the box, saw him jump over, saw him catch his foot, which turned, saw him fall on the stage. He got up on his feet, cried out something which I could not hear for the hub-hub and disappeared. I suppose I lingered almost the last person. A soldier came into the gallery, saw me still there, called to me: "Get out of here! we're going to burn this damned building down!" I said: "If that is so I'll get out!"     Whitman used Doyle's account to help pen the only poem that I know of where Whitman  used traditional poetic forms.  It is an Elegy for the death of Abraham Lincoln, titled “O Captain My Captain”.  He actually wrote two elegies- one speaking for the nation- in the voice of a common sailor- it he wrote in a formal style of poetry acceptable to the people of his day.  The second, in some ways more personal because it is in a style similar to what we see in the rest of Leaves of Grass.  The second poem, When Lilacs …”is often thought be be written after O Captain” Although I'm not sure it is.  It is more epic in its feeling- it uses symbols that are more archetypal and timeless- although that term wasn't invented in his day.  In O Captain my Captain, Whitman takes on the persona of a soldier, a sailor.  In the second, he uses his own voice- that universal “I” like we see in Song of Myself.  We don't have time to read the entirely of “O Lilacs When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom' , it has over 200 lines, but we can Read a little bit of it.  Instead we will focus on the only poem anthologized during Whitman's lifetime- O Captain my Captain.    The one I know from that famous scene in Dead Poet's Society where the students stand for their fallen teacher, John Keating, immortalized by Robin Williams.     Agreed- I can't read this poem without thinking of Robin Williams, but we should probably try since we spent quite a bit of time setting up the image of Lincoln.       O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,  The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,  The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,  While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;                           But O heart! heart! heart!                              O the bleeding drops of red,                                 Where on the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;  Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,  For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,  For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;                           Here Captain! dear father!                              This arm beneath your head!                                 It is some dream that on the deck,                                   You've fallen cold and dead.    My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,  My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,  The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,  From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;                           Exult O shores, and ring O bells!                              But I with mournful tread,                                 Walk the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    As we have clearly expressed, Whitman the defender of the common man, does not usually elevate one person over another- but For Lincoln he makes a notable exception.  O Captain my Captain is written from the point of view of an insider. We can imagine a young soldier, a sailor.   He's on the ship- Of course, the captain is President Lincoln- the ship is the country.  The tone is one of exultation then distress.  We had finished- the fearful trip was done!!!  We had made it then….    Christy, and it's important to note that it WAS done.  Lincoln did bring that ship to harbor.  On April 2, right before he died on the 11th The confederacy vacated Richmond.  On April 4, President Lincoln together with his ten year old son Tad walked through the streets and into Jefferson Davis' office.  “Admiral Porter who was with him had this to say, “No electric wire could have carried the news of the President's arrival sooner than it was circulated through Richmond.  As far as the eye could see the streets were alive with negroes and poor whites rushing in our direction, and the crowd increased so fast that I had to surround the President with sailors with fixed bayonets to keep them off.  They all wanted to shake hand with Mr. Lincoln or his coat tail or even to kneel and kiss his boots.”  Later on Admiral Porter said this, “I should have preferred to see the President of the United States entering the subjugated stronghold of the rebel with an escort more befitting his high station, yet that would have looked as if he came as a conqueror to exult over a brave but fallen enemy.  He came instead as a peacemaker, his hand extended to all who desired to take it.”  Christy, at one point, it is said that an older African American gentleman bowed before Lincoln and Lincoln went to the man, took him by the hand and raised him up and told him he didn't need to kneel to anyone, he was a free man.  I cannot imagine the emotion.    And so we try to imagine the emotion – after so much carnage, who could walk the tightright and heal the utter hatred still inherent in the heart of both victor and defeated.  Notice there is meter, each stanza is composed of iambs which may or may not mean anything to you.  It just means there's a beat- like a drum beat, like a heart beat- “The ship has wethered every rack, the prize we sought is won.  The people are exalting.    But then he dies…in the first two stanzas, the boy addresses the captain as someone still alive, but by the third stanza he has accepted the reality.  And of course, this is exactly has grief strikes.  We never accept it initially, at least I have that problem.  I'll share my personal experiences in a different episode, but it's natural.  He says, “Rise up, Father.”  We feel a sense of desperation- the idea- of = no,  no, no, this can't be happening.  It's not possible.  Not now. Not after all of this.   But by the third stanza, the sailor unwillingly switches to the third person.  My captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still.”   There is a sense of intimacy, “MY father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will”.  We also see that that formality of the meter breaks down in that last line, “Fallen cold and dead”.  The sailor has broken down.   America is not just devastated because their leader is dead, but they are now vulnerable- what's going to happen to us.  Who can lead us?  Who can walk the tightrope?    And that of course, is the ultimate tragedy.   We will never know what might have been had he lived to complete his second term, but one statesman grasped fully the tragedy when he predicted that “the development of things will teach us to mourn him doubly.”  And of course he was right, even Jefferson Davis, the leader of the conferederacy, although I point out that Lincoln never one time acknowledged him as preside,  bemoaned Lincoln's death after losing the war and for good reason.  After Lincoln''s death, profiteers, corruption and all kinds of chaos descended on America.  Grant, who was a sincere and an incredible advocate for African Americans, was able to defeat the confederate armies but not able to contain the host of corruption that plagued our nation during reconstruction.    And so we end with Whitman's final poem- his most personal tribute to Lincoln and the one that many consider the better if less famous work, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom”.  In this poem, Whitman reverts to his usual style of free verse and strong metaphors.  It's beautiful and for me, it's where we see the universal truth of lost moral leadership and grief emerge- he expresses loss well beyond the moment of Lincoln.  Let's read just the first little bit.  It's long, and references the journey of Lincoln's casket to its final resting place without ever mentioning Lincoln's name.     When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd,  And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,  I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.    Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,  Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,  And thought of him I love.    2  O powerful western fallen star!  O shades of night—O moody, tearful night!  O great star disappear'd—O the black murk that hides the star!  O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me!  O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.    There are three big symbols in this poem= the lilacs, the sun and then a bird.  But since we read only the first two stanzas, I want to focus on those.  Lilacs are flowers that have a strong smell and were blooming at the time of Lincoln's death.  They are beautiful, but they also return every spring.  The star is an obvious symbol for Lincoln.  I want to point out that Whitman never really used stars as positive images for leaders because he didn't like the idea of a ruler just hoarding over us- but again, in this case, he made an exception.  Lincoln was the powerful star- and of course, we are left to answer, why would a man, so bent on equality of humans, elevate this one man- the only man he would elevate- it wasn't just because he was the president.  It was because he embodied what a great leader truly was- and this is the nice idea that I think resonates through the ages.      Agreed, average leaders and I will say most leaders give lip service to serving all people, but we can see by their actions, that a lot of that is propaganda.  Most are in it to win it.  It's easy to get to the top and view oneself as better than the rest of us.  It's just natural to do what's best for me or my team, so to speak.  It's natural to want to put enemies in submission- prove own own power and greatness.  But Lincoln was different- his compassion for his enemy, his unwavering commitment to integrity, his ability to see beyond his current moment, is a star- something that outlasts us all.  The South as well as the North mourned deeply Lincoln's loss.  The procession described in this poem where the casket was taken from Washington DC back to Illinois was something that had never happened in the history of the United States and has not happened since.      It is a legacy of leadership that Whitman not only admired but also immortalized.  It's also a legacy that I find inspiring no matter how great or small our little ships are, if we are ever called to be a captain.  It's something to think about when we smell lilacs in the Spring.  For Whitman every time we smelled those flowers, we grieve, but also we remember- because just as lilacs return every Spring, so does a new opportunity- the end of the Lilac poem looks to the future.  In another of Whitman's great poems, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” he says this, “We use you, and do not cast you aside-we plant you          permanently within us,       We fathom you not-we love you-there is perfection in          you also,       You furnish your parts toward eternity,       Great or small, you furnish your parts toward the soul.”  It's a nice idea, Lincoln was a man, but for Whitman he embodied an ideal we can all aspire to: integrity, humility, compassion and grace- in defeat and death but also in victory.  Whitman believed in those ideals in leadership- leadership that embraces those things can lead a ship to harbor in scary waters.  Perhaps, when we smell the lilacs, we can be reminded that those ideals are also planted in us.     Thanks for listening.  We hope you enjoyed our discussions of Walt Whitman.  Next episode, we will look farther into the American past to even deeper roots of democracy on the American continent, the Iroquois constitution.  So, thanks for listening, as always please share a link to our podcast to a friend or friends.  Push it out on your social media platforms via twitter, Instagram, facebook or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend, and if you are an educator, visit our website for instructional resources.  Peace out.                 

Crypto Current
Leighton Emmons on Uniting Alpha Seekers with the Blockchain Boys Club

Crypto Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 28:25


Leighton Emmons joins us to discuss uniting Alpha seekers with the Blockchain Boys Club. Leighton Emmons is Co-founder of Blockchain Boys Club, a new community where founders, developers, and investors can come together around their mutual passion for all things blockchain; learning, sharing knowledge, and discovering opportunities they otherwise might have missed. The community is launching with an NFT collection of 10,000 unique avatars called BCBoys and holders will have access to “The Terminal,” a members-only area of the community where professional traders and investors offer real-time trading signals and share investment opportunities. Links Website: https://www.blockchainboys.club/ (https://www.blockchainboys.club/) Twitter: https://twitter.com/BCBoys_NFT (https://twitter.com/BCBoys_NFT) Discord: https://t.co/jXaH9sPa2b?amp=1 (https://t.co/jXaH9sPa2b?amp=1) *Disclaimer. Richard Carthon is the Founder of Crypto Current. All opinions expressed by members of the Crypto Current Team, Richard or his guest on this podcast are solely their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Crypto Current. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Richard as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes only.  ~  Put your Bitcoin and Ethereum to work. Earn up to 12% interest back with https://get.tantralabs.io/earn/?utm_source=cryptocurrent&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=advertising-display-cryptocurrent&utm_content=lp (Tantra Labs). ~  New to crypto? Check out our https://bit.ly/394YKFw (Crypto for Beginners) Step-by-Step Guide to Crypto Investing!  ~  Follow us on https://bit.ly/3CPwepn (Youtube), http://bit.ly/2TRIArp (Twitter), http://bit.ly/38yfrqo (Instagram), http://bit.ly/39DhpHi (Facebook), http://bit.ly/38wsXL5 (LinkedIn), & https://bit.ly/3yQ30Es (Tik Tok).  ~  Want to make ~$25+ a month for FREE? Sign up to get a FREE https://www.emrit.io/?referral=cryptocurrent (emrit.io Coolspot today)!  ~  Want to learn more about cryptocurrency? Check out our https://bit.ly/2CbaYzw (educational videos) today!  ~  https://bit.ly/2TF3Gtb (Swan) is the easiest and most affordable way to accumulate Bitcoin with automatic recurring purchases. Start your plan today and get $10 of free Bitcoin dropped into your account.  ~  Want access to cool crypto/blockchain projects that you can use immediately? Check out our https://bit.ly/3eZ8J1E (partnerships page)!  ~  Looking to attend a cryptocurrency or blockchain event? Check out our https://bit.ly/2ZVCV8f (events page)!  ~  Tune in on https://bit.ly/2CN9bl1 (Crypto Current TV) throughout the week for a 24/7 crypto stream on the latest action on crypto markets, news, and interviews with the industry's top experts!  ~  Enjoying our podcast? Please leave us a 5 star review http://bit.ly/2Is3iJ9 (here)!  ~  Stay up to date with the latest news in cryptocurrency by opting-in to our http://bit.ly/2xmkKfQ (newsletter)! You will receive daily emails (M-S) that are personalized and curated content specific to you and your interests, powered by artificial intelligence.  ~  We were featured as one of the http://bit.ly/2vRAGGl (Top 25 Cryptocurrency Podcasts) and one of the http://bit.ly/33cnus9 (16 Best Cryptocurrency Podcasts in 2020).  ~  Are you an accredited investor looking to invest in cryptocurrency? Check out http://bit.ly/2IrKABr (Crescent City Capital).  ~  Earn Interest. Receive Loans. Trade Crypto. Start Today! Learn more about how you can https://bit.ly/38Ezc3s (sign up for Blockfi).  ~  Want to be on our show or know someone who should? http://bit.ly/38ufSC8 (Contact us) today!  ~  We hope you are enjoying our cryptocurrency and blockchain educational...

Africa Daily
How are women uniting against gender based violence?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:35


Gender based violence is a problem around the world. And Africa is no exception. For years, women across the continent have been raising their voices and demanding change. On Thursday, many of them will join women around the world for '16 days of activism against gender based violence'. So, how are women leading the conversation? #AfricaDaily hears from women across the continent This programme contains frank discussions of a physical and sexual violence.

The Outlaws Radio Show
Ep. 261 - Outlaws Xtra: Senate candidate JD Vance talks about his plans, uniting black and white working class voters and more

The Outlaws Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 32:56


Outlaws Xtra: Senate candidate JD Vance talks about his plans, uniting black and white working class voters and more

EVERYTHING HOME
272: ALEX NEWMAN, Homeschool, Uniting Patriots, Biz Growth & Automation, Passion

EVERYTHING HOME

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 143:00


12:06p - Meg Poag: Personal & Business Purpose - Helping Businesses & People Maximize Their Impact By Becoming Mission-Aligned 12:17p - Toni McLelland: Transforming Your Business & Leadership For Positive Change & Growth - Tips For A Strong End Of Year Surge 12:27p - Brian Kelly: Automation Expert & Host of The Mind Body Business Show - How To Saturate The Marketplace With Your Message 12:38p - Don Sevcik: Learning Tips & Tricks For Quick Learning & Retention and The Fastest FREE Math Tutor 12:48p - Victoria Wieck: Host of Million Dollar Hobbies Podcast - Turning Your Passion Into Profits *Michele's Patriotic Soapbox: Facts, Truth, Take Action Items & Resources* 1:00p - Special Guest FELISA BLAZEK: The Visionary behind “Unite The Light” 2021 Liberty Lantern Relay. The lantern is on a nationwide journey to all 50 states being carried by Patriots committed to fighting against tyranny. The movement is a symbolic tribute to Paul Revere's ride & will end Dec 24th in NH. 1:30p - Special Guest ALEX NEWMAN: President of Liberty Sentinel Media, Editor for The New American & Founder of Public School Exit - the nation's premier ministry working to rescue American children from the horrors of government indoctrination. VISIT: http://EverythingHomeAboutUs.com For our Partners' Info, Episodes, Subscribe, Like-Follow-Join Our Community & Newsletter, Become A Purpose-Driven Business & Much More! Patriotic Purpose Driven Resource Platform - Hosted by Michele Swinick "The Queen of Quality Content" ONE Location With All The Information! We're LIVE Monday @ 12p MT with experts, entrepreneurs & purpose-driven people to provide real-life tangible takeaways to make your life BETTER!

Data And Analytics in Business
E82 - Sigal Pilli - Uniting Finance & All Sides of Business with Data Analytics

Data And Analytics in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 50:18


If communication is key to running a successful business, then why do the different departments in a business fail to communicate? How many people go about their work day without knowing a single thing about what their co-workers are doing? If communication really is key, then what can miscommunication do to a business? Meet Sigal Pilli Sigal's Role as a Finance Leader at Seer Medical Sigal Pilli is the Chief Financial Officer of Seer Medical, a creator of technology that revolutionises the diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. Their technology consists of wearable devices, a cloud platform and machine learning systems. These systems are at the core of their at-home video EEG monitoring and diagnostic service - the first of its kind. At Seer Medical, Sigal took part in structuring the financial department to integrate with other departments, merging data, finance and the diversity of views from around the table to ensure decisions are made well. As the CFO, Sigal's role was to shine a light on points not considered by marketing and product. Sigal's Past Experiences in Finance Sigal is also a Non-Executive Director at RateMyAgent Australia (ASX:RMY), Australia's No. 1 real estate agent ratings and statistics website. Previously, Sigal held CFO and COO positions at industry-leading organizations like John Deere, Envato, Assembly Payments, and New Aim. Sigal has decades of experience working in senior leadership roles in digital (e-commerce and SaaS), fintech, manufacturing, and engineering. Her expertise also includes acquisitions, integration, change management, and digital transformation. Over the years, she has built many large and complex financial and operational projects from scratch, including an effective, commercial and service-oriented finance function involving 40 professionals at Envato. Uniting Finance and All Sides of the Business with Data and Analytics In this exclusive analytics podcast episode, Sigal shares: About her volunteering experience and why she chose those organisations to volunteer for. How to avoid biases in hiring and managing female employees, especially for the STEM and tech industries. Her thoughts and experience in using data analytics in the areas of her work. Why making the most impact on an organisation with analytics is to focus on the revenue. Why finance is best suited for this work and how the overall organisation, including pricing, products and marketing department, can work with their finance team to make a sound decision that is forward-looking with a long term view. How to organise the financial department to work well with other departments in the organisation. If you're a CFO, and always intrigued about how you can move beyond financial control but modernise your department to play a bigger role in your organisation with your finance expertise, listening to Sigal and how she plays her roles in scaling and growing the company is highly recommended. Join our Dogecoin Giveaway! Start your cryptocurrency journey without the risk of losing money, without the anxiety over figuring out how to start, and without the hassle over choosing from the plethora of cryptocurrencies out there. Join our giveaway now to stand a chance to win 1,000 Dogecoin, free! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

Sermons – Carryduff Baptist Church
The Death of Evangelism

Sermons – Carryduff Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 32:30


Having talked about what drove him to persuade others to come to Christ, in 2 Corinthians 6, Paul now talks about what stops us from doing that, indeed from serving Christ at all. We are divided when we should be united, and united when we should be divided. Dividing when we should be united Uniting…

Ridgecrest Baptist Church
Uniting a World Divided // Dr. Jeremy Muniz

Ridgecrest Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:34


Flyover Conservatives
Vaxxed and Unvaxxed Uniting Against Mandates

Flyover Conservatives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


These long term 3m employees are fighting the unconstitutional vaccine mandates and promoting personal choice. They are asking 3M to fight for their employees that worked overtime through the pandemic. If we Americans don't link arms and unite  by speaking to our legislators, joining protests and rallies, and not complying with Biden's mandates we will lose our God given rights. Shows Mentioned To Help You Get Up To Speed on VaccinesMike Moon - The Most Conservative Politician in Missouri: https://bit.ly/mikemoonDr. Carrie Madej - Information Doctors Have Died For: https://bit.ly/infodrshavediedforDr. Christiane Northrup - 3 Reasons Not To Get Vaxxed: https://bit.ly/3reasonsNOTvaxxedDr. Bryan Ardis - Which Is More Deadly… Covid or the Hospitals?: https://bit.ly/covidorhospitalmoredeadly-------------------------------------------► Sign Up For Our Newsletter! -https://bit.ly/flyovernewsletter► MEET US IN PERSON!! Text EVENTS to 40509 to learn more► Watch ALL our content in FULL on Rumble! https://bit.ly/FlyoverRumble► Support Flyover Directly - https://www.flyoverconservatives.com/donate► Flyover Conservatives Gold and Silver Buyer of Choice - https://flyovergold.com► Use Promo Code “ Flyover” when checking out at www.MyPillow.com

Ridgecrest Baptist Church
Uniting a World Divided // 11-14-2021

Ridgecrest Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 69:49


The Hot Mess Comedy Hour
Onika Mclean Wants to Quit Fighting and Start Uniting

The Hot Mess Comedy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 71:34


*** Join our Patreon at the $5 level and up in the month of November and you'll be entered to win a gift basket with $200 worth of sponsored products and goodies! The basket will include an Olive and June Mani Kit, Dad Grass CBD Joints, Prose Hair Supplements, fresh Hot Mess Merch, and MORE! Join now and you'll also have advance access to the first episode of Andrea's upcoming podcast "Dog Pig" featuring the infamous Claws. Visit Patreon.com/HotMess ***Follow Onika @onikacomedy on InstagramFollow Emily @lubination on InstagramFollow Andrea @andreacomedy69 on InstagramFollow Hot Mess:Insta @HotMessComedyHour

Trinity Evangelical Presbyterian Church

If we want to secure our future as a multigenerational community of faith it will take you and I submitting the Lord’s leadership and making space for each other. May God give us the grace to do so!

Law Enforcement Today Podcast
S5E81: Sheriffs Uniting To Protect America. From the anti-law enforcement, open borders politicians and policies in Washington DC.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 20:09


Sheriff Scott H. Jenkins is our guest. He is the Sheriff of Culpeper County, Virginia, since 2012. He talks about the recent anti-law enforcement riots and the impact of the southern border crisis on his community. Sheriff Jenkins serves on the Advisory Board of Protect America Now, in this special episode from the Feet 2 The Fire Radio Row event in Washington, DC. Sheriff Jenkins is a recognized thought leader in the areas of secure borders, secure communities, constitutional government and law enforcement. He is recognized for his no-nonsense but compassionate approach to law enforcement. His thoughtful leadership in these areas has resulted in him being invited to the White House numerous times for briefings with the Executive Branch. He also speaks at local, state, and national conferences on these issues. He has numerous appearances on Fox News, local network affiliates of the major networks, international media, and digital media. Print stories on his principled stands have appeared in local, national, and international media. Follow us on the MeWe social media platform. We are on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. In the Clubhouse app look for and follow @LetRadioShow. Background song Hurricane is used with permission from the band Dark Horse Flyer. If you enjoy the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast, please tell a friend or two, or three about it. Never miss out on an episode of the Law Enforcement Today Podcast, AND be automatically entered in all future contests. Simply subscribe for our free email newsletter, never more than 2 issues a week sent out. Click here and scroll down about half way. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family
51. Finding Identity Through Navigating A Faith Crisis with Thomas McConkie

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 55:35


Hey guys! Chris and Melissa here, we're bringing you a really big conversation today. One that is difficult for many families to navigate. According to research, one component that makes up a strong family is shared spirituality. But what happens when a family member steps away from your faith? Research shows that last year, for the first time ever, Gallup reported America's membership in houses of worship dropped to 47%. A significant difference from the 50% reported in 2018 and even farther from 70% in 1999. This is more than just numbers. For individuals and families, this can be a really challenging dynamic.Today we have a thought-provoking conversation with Thomas McConkie. Thomas teaches courses on mindfulness and adult development through the Lower Lights organization in Salt Lake City. Where seekers of diverse faith orientations can discover new depths and heights in their evolving identity. Thomas takes us on his journey of developing his faith by leaning into the doubt he felt at a young age.  From Christianity to Buddhism and back to Christianity 20 years later, Thomas has unique insight into the root of a faith crisis. Listen in as Thomas talks about the importance of identity and how it's the questions we ask that lead us to who we really are. He talks about the transformational power that doubt has and how it can help you find a deeper quality of faith (if you let it). You'll get practical tips and practices for navigating doubt in your own life, as well as what you can do if there is a faith struggle within your family.  Join us as we discuss the healthy ways your family can grow together and how you can bring a deeper sense of belonging to your kids even if they've strayed from the path.  To find the resources we talked about in this episode, check out the links below!  More Of What's Inside: The reason behind a faith crisis Finding the balance between stability and change Exercising caution when navigating an identity crisis Allowing yourself to be uncomfortable Embracing your change to understand others better Leaning into doubt as an indicator of growth Transformational doubt vs. dangerous doubt Practical tips to handling your doubt Finding the wisdom in doubt Why doubt is important for faith How mindfulness can help your family And much more!     GUEST LINKS: Book: https://www.amazon.com/Navigating-Mormon-Faith-Crisis-Developmental Podcast: https://www.mindfulnessplus.org/ Website: https://lowerlightswisdom.org/   Website:   familybrand.com     Social:   Facebook: www.facebook.com/FamilyBrandOfficial Instagram: www.instagram.com/ourfamilybrand YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCGu-7odB6gkPbyXpUIQLkrg Twitter: https://twitter.com/OurFamilyBrand     Free course:   familybrand.com/10steps     Episode Minute By Minute: 0:02 - What we cover today! 0:42 - Introducing Thomas McConkie 2:37 - Why a faith crisis happens 7:46 - Understanding the nature of humans 11:38 - What questions can reveal about ourselves 16:24 - Connecting to discomfort in a deeper way 20:59 - How to help others who may be doubting 23:41 - Red flag indicators for dangerous doubt  28:16 - How doubt has played a role in Thomas' life 32:33 - Creating space for people on a journey 35:58 - Meditation benefits in the home 41:34 - Uniting as a family past beliefs 48:04 - The importance of wanting each other

K'hal Mevakshei Hashem
Pidyon HaBen - uniting Kehuna and Malchus

K'hal Mevakshei Hashem

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 28:24


Harav Yussie Zakutinsky Shlita

Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine
Uniting Faith and Action - Erev Shabbat/Friday - Cheshvan 17, 5777 / November 18, 2016

Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 41:40


Please enjoy this special encore message from Rabbi David Levine. Vayera – He appeared Genesis 18:1-22:24 Haftarah: 2 Kings 4:1-37 B'rit haChadasha: Luke 1:26-38; 24:36-53

The Newsmax Daily with Rob Carson
Americans Are Uniting To Sink The SS Bitanic! (10/15/21)

The Newsmax Daily with Rob Carson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:42


- Bill Clinton is in the hospital with a urinary tract infection. OK, maybe that's not news-breaking…