Podcasts about hired

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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about hired

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Latest podcast episodes about hired

The Paint & Pipette Podcast
Ep 09: Conscious Leadership with Amy Yin

The Paint & Pipette Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:58


This week we get together with Amy Yin, CEO and Founder of Office Together, a company that delivers manager empowerment and scheduling tools to achieve the full potential of a flexible workplace. We talk with Amy about her unique life experience and how it influenced her mindset and career. She describes how her parents raised her to have a CEO mindset and be comfortable with risk and how this differed from the upbringing of her peers who share her American-born Chinese identity. We hear from Amy about her decision to drop out of Harvard to pursue an opportunity to be part of a start-up with her professor in Paris, and why the opportunity was so valuable despite the company ultimately not succeeding. Next, we discuss Amy's work experience at companies like Hired and Coinbase and how her experiences with working remotely prompted her to found her own company. Amy goes on to explain why she was determined to hire her friends, why she is proud of her choices, and how she maintains those relationships with clear boundaries and expectations. You'll also hear how Amy nurtures creativity and inspiration in her daily life and why she is a big proponent of conscious leadership. Join us today for this inspiring conversation on what it means to start a company!Key Points From This Episode:Get to know today's guest Amy Yin, CEO and founder of Office Together.Amy's company Office Together and how they are helping managers by selling empowerment and scheduling tools to run a hybrid office.How Amy started Office Together after being inspired by the quiet time inherent to lockdown measures and working from home.Amy's upbringing and how it diverges from many of her peers who are also the children of immigrants.Why Amy's parents raised her to take risks and have a CEO mindset and how that affected her education, career, and attitude towards risk.How Amy dropped out of Harvard to build a company and how her parents' support was integral to that.Why this experience was hugely formative and positive, even though the company didn't succeed.The Conscious Leadership framework and how it manifests in Amy's attitude to work and life.Amy's decision to hire many of her close friends and their experiences organizing other events together.What Amy has learned from working with friends like setting clear boundaries and expectations.Some of the ways that Amy encourages people to think outside of the box at social engagements.How Amy recognized the moment that she should start a company.Why it was difficult for Amy to leave her job at Coinbase and start her own company.Amy's search for a co-founder and how she became a solo founder.How to determine whether you have a customer and whether something is worth building.How Amy used her connections to interview companies to test the viability of her product idea.How Amy nurtures creativity and inspiration in her daily life.Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:Amy YinAmy Yin on LinkedInOffice TogetherHiredCoinbaseJeremy UtleyMelissa MirandaMar HershensonThe Paint & Pipette Podcast

Black and White Sports Podcast
Lincoln Riley Hired By USC! Riley Has Informed Oklahoma Sooners Staff Of Departure!

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 4:04


Lincoln Riley Hired By USC! Riley Has Informed Oklahoma Sooners Staff Of Departure!

Dirty Little Secret - The Jubal Show
Spurt Hired Dirt's Dirty Little Secret is exactly why you shouldn't be rude!

Dirty Little Secret - The Jubal Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 4:36


Dirty Little Secret is when someone calls The Jubal Show with one of their top secrets. No matter how big or dirty the secret is, Jubal Fresh, Alex Fresh and English Evan give the caller an anonymous nickname so no one knows who they are. Be careful to who you are rude to! You'll understand exactly why when you hear Spurt Hired Dirt's Dirty Little Secret! Leave a rating and review wherever you listen. It will help the show out in a big way. If that's not your thing, you can find us on social media here:https://instagram.com/thejubalshowhttps://twitter.com/thejubalshowhttps://www.tiktok.com/@thejubalshow

Pleasant Good Evening
Episode 61: Ok Fine They Hired A Guy

Pleasant Good Evening

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:15


Noah Syndergaard is an Angel. Billy Eppler is running the show. Who the heck is gonna manage the Mets? News broke while we were recording! It was not good news! Listen to us chat about it all. Thanks. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sam-lebowitz9/support

FirstDown RunDown
College Football Coaching Carousel: Who Should be Hired and Fired?

FirstDown RunDown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 51:44


Hayden and Matt cover the biggest CFB head coaching openings and offer some possible fits for those teams. Also making it on the show is the overarching idea of why it is so tough to keep a head coaching job in college sports.

Decision Point
Creating a Brand and Executing on Ideas with Troy Barter

Decision Point

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:24


Troy Barter, Director of Sales with Hired, stops by Decision Point to discuss Brand building, idea execution, and more within the SaaS sales world. Brad and Troy discuss Troy's journey to today, and all of the setbacks and moments that made his journey so influential to his best practices today. With over 15 years of experience in sales and 8 years as a sales leader in SaaS Troy has had the privilege of helping scale multiple sales organizations to billion dollar valuations and multi-billion dollar acquisitions.

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: Don't just cheer removal of Deepa Mohanan's director. Why was casteist prof hired, promoted?

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 8:44


Caste bias isn't new. But where Rohith Vemula, Delta Meghwal, and Payal Tadvi failed, Deepa Mohanan has an answer.----more----Read article here: https://theprint.in/opinion/dont-just-cheer-removal-of-deepa-mohanans-director-why-was-casteist-prof-hired-promoted/767399/

Unhinged with Chris Klemens
I Hired a Weed Chef

Unhinged with Chris Klemens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 74:20


Fresh off his birthday weekend, Chris addresses comments from the podcast, imparts wild wisdom to callers, shares secrets from his weed-infused birthday dinner, and nearly drools over the mic when raving about the Tame Impala concert. Thanks to our Sponsors:  Bev - Go to DRINKBEV.com/UNHINGED at checkout to claim 20% off   Helix is offering up to $200 off all mattress orders AND two free pillows for our listeners at https://helixsleep.com/chrisklemens Donate to: Project Coffee Cup: https://gofund.me/b73a899c Follow Unhinged with Chris Klemens on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/unhingedwithchrisklemens Follow Chris: https://www.instagram.com/chrisklemens/ Follow Big Spark Studios: https://www.instagram.com/bigsparkstudios Leave Chris a voicemail: 310-844-6459 Submit your secrets: https://forms.gle/ZPtbT3EKFHQWpZ4K7 

Amazon Bound
#12 - How Amazon Hired Me: Conversation with an Amazon Recruiter

Amazon Bound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 26:46


I discuss how successful candidates prepare for and come across during the Amazon interview with a former Amazon recruiter, Bryant. Enjoy! "Amazon gives you all the tools you need to succeed. They're going to tell you what their Leadership Principles are, they're going to tell you about the STAR process. Your Recruiter, if they are a good Recruiter, is going to call you beforehand and walk you through the process. There's no 'gotcha' questions. There's no questions that are completely unrelated to what you're interviewing for. Turn it into a conversation. Take a deep breath. Yawn before your interview, that's proven to calm you down at work. And just talk to another human being. People tend to build up these interviews like they're bigger than they are, and they're not." Visit https://amazonbound.today to find out more.

The Bert Show
PT 3: Her Job Just Hired Her To Replace A Pregnant Woman...And Now She's Pregnant Too! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 7:14


She just got a brand new job filling in for a woman who is out on maternity leave. Here's the problem: She just found out she's pregnant too!What does she do? Tell her job or hide her pregnancy?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Status Post Adulting
#43: The Great Resignation

Status Post Adulting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:38


Sammie and Michelle take a look at a movement in 2021 coined, "The Great Resignation". For the last five months, in the United States and across the globe, people are quitting their jobs at a record rate. Since both Sammie and Michelle have left their job this year, they take a look at this phenomena and share their take. Show Notes:Red (Taylor's Version)22 (Taylor's Version)Amazon TV Commercial, 'You're Hired'Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2017Great Resignation Sources:U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS - Job Openings and Labor Turnover SummaryA record 4.4 million Americans quit their jobs in September as labor market tumult continued (Washington Post)The psychologist who coined the phrase 'Great Resignation' reveals how he saw it coming and where he sees it going. 'Who we are as an employee and as a worker is very central to who we are.'  (Insider)'Pandemic epiphanies' as people ponder quitting their jobs (BBC)How to Quit Your Job in the Great Post-Pandemic Resignation Boom (Bloomberg)Dr. Anthony C. KlotzContent Corner:Oprah and Eckhart Tolle: Acceptance of Troubled Times on SuperSoul Podcast Eckhart Tolle: How to Find a New Spiritual Awakening During the Pandemic on SuperSoul Podcast Your Money or Your Life by Vicki RobinStatus Post Adulting Instagram: @statuspostadultingStatus Post Adulting Email: statuspostadulting@gmail.comFind all show notes and more at statuspostadulting.com

From Plum Creek With Love: A Little House on the Prairie Podcast
“One day you're gonna be nice to me. We may both be dead and buried, but you're gonna be nice - at least civil.” The Long Road Home S2 Ep 16

From Plum Creek With Love: A Little House on the Prairie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:57


When Charles and Mr. Edwards arrive in Mankato with their fresh crop ready to sell, they are greeted with the news that this is a Bumper crop. Which sounds like great news but sadly, it's not. Unsure how to make ends meet, these two sign up for a freighting job that pays really well but can also be categorized as "high risk". Just how high of a risk? Enough to merit a $5,000 insurance policy paid to the heirs of accident victims. It's not like Charles, Mr.Edwards and another Hired hand named Murphy are left all on their own. There's Henry Hill, a man who has done this work a few times already. And although Henry Hill has plenty of experience with transporting this explosive material, Murphy doesn't feel comfortable working with a man who looks like that (His words, not mine). But, Henry Hill says men like Murphy stopped bothering him the day he was born and reckons it's only a 10 day job and can put up with it for that time. This caravan sets out on a slow trek that involves keeping a close eye for rocks and chuckholes, rising temperatures, down trees and even robbers. Meanwhile, Caroline, Grace Snider Edwards, and all the children are at home waiting for these men to make it back. Will Charles and Mr. Edwards reconsider their lives as famers since it never seems to be working out for them? Will we ever get to meet Henry Hill again? Why is Murphy a jerk even though he might have dealt with prejudices in his own life too?

The Bert Show
Update: Her Job Just Hired Her To Replace A Pregnant Woman...And Now She's Pregnant Too! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 5:01


She just got a brand new job filling in for a woman who is out on maternity leave. Here's the problem: She just found out she's pregnant too!What does she do? Tell her job or hide her pregnancy?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

United Church of God Sermons

By Chuck Smith in Ft. Lauderdale, FL - October 30, 2021 - We have all been "hired" for a job. Our job is to model Jesus Christ and to sell His way of life. What are some of the requirements of this job?

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1802: #DurhamReporting: The Clinton campaign hired the false witnesses. Svetlana Lokhova. @RealSLokhova #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 16:34


Photo:   Huma Abedin in October 2010. Public  domain. @Batchelorshow #DurhamReporting:  The Clinton campaign hired the false witnesses.  Svetlana Lokhova. @RealSLokhova #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2021/11/06/charles-dolan-steele-dossier-igor-danchenko-indictment/

Do We Have A Point?
Alex Baldwin: Hired Assassin

Do We Have A Point?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 49:10


Sam takes the night off, and Special Guest Chef Mike joins us again to talk about Alex Baldwin, Danl's run-in's with the police, and more! Make sure to follow, subscribe, rate, comment, and tell your friends about Do We Have A Point? Want Do We Have A Point? merch? go to store.dowehaveapoint.com to pick up some sweet swag --   Shout out to our affiliates:   ZenniOptical.com - Need prescription glasses, but hate paying hundreds of dollars for them? Zenni Optical can get you in a new pair of stylish frames with your prescription requirements for a fraction of the cost! Just go to zennioptical.com and start seeing how much you'll save! Reppsports.com - Go to reppstports.com/free and enter the coupon code POINT15 to get a huge sample package for only S&H ($9.99). Podpage - If you're a podcast in need of a great website, go to podpage.com and sign up today. Accusonus - If you need some kickass, easy to use, and super powerful plugins for your audio creations and editing, check out Accusonus today! accusonus.com   --   Do We Have A Point? Website - www.dowehaveapoint.com Facebook Page - facebook.com/dowehaveapoint Facebook Group - facebook.com/groups/dowehaveapoint Email - dowehaveapoint@gmail.com

The Bert Show
Her Job Just Hired Her To Replace A Pregnant Woman...And Now She's Pregnant Too! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 5:48


She just got a brand new job filling in for a woman who is out on maternity leave. Here's the problem: She just found out she's pregnant too! What does she do? Tell her job or hide her pregnancy?   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

The Good Phight: for Philadelphia Phillies fans
Continued Success #157: Can You Believe It, the Phillies Hired Somebody from the Rays

The Good Phight: for Philadelphia Phillies fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 72:36


Jokes aside, the Phillies have hired a key player in assembling the Rays' vaunted 2021 bullpen. It's an encouraging sign for an off-season in its infancy. Also, hey--let's talk about Brock Stassi and Juan Nicasio, because why not? Don't answer that. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
11-09-21 - Entertainment Drill - TUE - Demi Lovato Enters Sex Toy Biz - Salma Hayek Hired Company To Ghost Proof Her Home - Brady Struggles w/Foo Fighters Horror Comedy Movie Story

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 12:43


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - The Entertainment Drill - Tuesday November 9, 2021

Virtual Careers for Milspouses by VirtForce
127. #Hired: Use Resources to Better Yourself

Virtual Careers for Milspouses by VirtForce

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 11:59


Show Notes | November 8, 2021 | Episode 127 Are you stationed outside the continental US or are you headed there soon? This challenge can feel overwhelming. It can feel like your career opportunities are like sand slipping through your hands.  There is hope for you. Today, we meet Abigail Grizzle who has four pieces of advice to share with you.  Her story is one of overcoming the adversity of being stationed OCONUS and overcoming the adversity of losing her US-based job. Abby's story is one of career pivot and innovation.  Tune in now to hear it firsthand from Abby.  Links and Resources Kimber Hill LinkedIn In this episode, we mentioned the following resources: 19. Ace Your Virtual Interview How to Ace Your Virtual Interview VirtForce Facebook Group VirtForce Job Board Join the Conversation Our favorite part of recording a live podcast each week is participating in the great conversations that happen on our live chat, on social media, and in our comments section.   VirtForce on Facebook VirtForce on LinkedIn VirtForce on Instagram Check Out Recent Podcast Episodes: VirtForce Podcast on Apple Podcasts  VirtForce Podcast on Spotify VirtForce Linktree Check Out Recent Podcast Episodes: 126. Coffee & Connect with Travelers125. #Hired: Take Time to Find Something You Love124. The Art of the Follow Up123. #Hired: Stay Open-Minded122. Coffee & Connect with Intuit121. #Hired: Narrow Down Your Options About Our SponsorStay At Home Profit provides education, consulting, scholarships and career opportunities for military spouses and veterans in remote work through virtual assisting & digital marketing in an authentic and transparent environment. Stay At Home Profit spent 4 years developing and perfecting multiple certification programs that enhance military spouse's and veterans' skill sets and experience to get hired remotely in the digital workforce. Join the Stay At Home Profit family today and check out our 5-week RVAC Remote Virtual Assistant Certificate program at bit.ly/vf-profit.

Dissecting the Pitch
UCL Matchday 5, Europa League, Conte & Xavi hired and More!

Dissecting the Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 54:57


Gareth, Miller and Edwin return for another episode of DTP! They break down UEFA Champions League Matchday 5 group-by-group and who's riding high and who's riding low with just two group stage matches left. They also give an update on the Europa League and who's the best team through four matches. Is Antonio Conte the right man for Spurs after being hired as new manager this past week? Will Xavi work out as new manager of Barcelona? Lastly, we make our weekend picks in the Premier League and the USL.

Side Hustle School
#1770 - Failure Friday: “We hired a designer who said she could do everything…”

Side Hustle School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 9:09


In this week's Failure Friday segment, we hear from the co-founder of TuckTats, which sells temporary tattoos to cover surgical scars. When they were just getting started, they found a designer who was a one-stop shop—or so they thought.   Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.

Stoppage Time Soccer Show
59. Nuno Fired, Conte Hired

Stoppage Time Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:09


Logan and Jordan talk Nuno being fired from Spurs, and reports that Conte is replacing him. Follow the show: Twitter: @Stoppageshow Facebook.com/Stoppagetimesoccershow Email: Stoppagetimeshow@gmail.com Instagram: @stoppagetimesoccershow --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stoppagetimesoccershow/message

The Nathan Barry Show
054: Nick deWilde - Growing Your Audience While Working Full-Time

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 61:08


Nick deWilde is a Product Marketing Principal at Guild Education. Guild is a fast-growing startup that partners with Fortune 500 employers. Guild unlocks opportunities for America's workforce via education and upskilling.Nick also runs his newsletter, The Jungle Gym. The Jungle Gym helps readers build a more fulfilling career that integrates work and life. Before working at Guild, Nick earned his MBA from Stanford Business School, and was a Managing Partner at Tradecraft.Nick and I talk about his relationship with Twitter, and how social media can both serve you, and be a challenge. We talk about individual brands and growing a platform. Nick also shares his thoughts about marketing yourself as an individual, and we discuss how growing an audience plays into your career.In this episode, you'll learn: Building an audience while working full-time Three reasons people start newsletters What to do when your follower count hits a plateau Links & Resources Morning Brew Fastly Joseph Henrich, The Secret of Our Success Julian Shapiro Sahil Bloom Dickie Bush Medium Tiago Forte Building a Second Brain David Perell Write of Passage Tradecraft Guild Hacker news John Lee Dumas Packy McCormick Mario Gabriele Seth Godin Rachel Carlson On Deck Gong Matt Ragland Charli Prangley The Nathan Barry Show, featuring Kimberly Brooks Harry Stebbings The Twenty Minute VC Isa Adney Liz Fosslien, No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work Discord Reddit Pallet Craft + Commerce ConvertKit Enough Ryan Holiday James Clear Marie Forleo Ramit Sethi Nick deWilde's Links Follow Nick on Twitter Nick's newsletter, The Jungle Gym To tweet, or not to tweet Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Nick:I've tried to do things in my writing where my employer benefits from them. I talk about work a lot, and whenever I talk about hiring, I mention Gild is hiring. There are things I do to just try to make sure that it still feels worth the company's while.[00:00:25] Nathan:In this episode, I talk to Nick deWilde, who writes a popular newsletter called The Jungle Gym. He's got a background in product and growth, and all these things from the startup world. I just love the approach that he's taken to writing these days.We talk about growing as newsletter. We talk about his interesting relationship with Twitter and social media. How it can really serve you and be this great thing, and then it can also be challenging. Maybe you're spending too much time on it, or time on it in a way that's not actually serving you or benefiting you.We talk about the rise of individual brands being used to grow a platform. It's something I've been thinking a lot about, watching Morning Brew and Fastly, and some of these other companies do it. It's just interesting whether you're marketing as a company or an individual. It's just a good conversation. We also talk about audience, and just how that plays into your career.He recently made the switch from a full-time role, to doing more audience-based business stuff. He was just in the middle of that journey. So, it's a fun place and time to catch up in the conversation.Nick, welcome to the show.[00:01:33] Nick:Hey, thanks for having me, Nathan.[00:01:35] Nathan:I want to start on this article you have, that I like a lot, called, “To tweet, or not to tweet,” That got you ahead. I also happened to go to the Shakespeare festival recently, and watched them do “The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Abridged.”So, you know, I could probably pull off a good, to[00:01:50] Nick:Nice.[00:01:51] Nathan:Be or not to be speech right now. It's in my head because I think about all the wonderful things that Twitter and an audience beyond that does for me. Then also the negative sides of it. So maybe we dive into that, but I'd also love to hear what sparked you diving in and building an audience.[00:02:11] Nick:Yeah, I'm so conflicted on Twitter, and audience building in general. Like anything, I imagine there's a fair number of people who you talked to, who are in the writing community, who feel that way. On the one hand, Twitter does so many things for me. Especially over the past couple of years.As we've been in lockdown, lives have moved online. I have met and made friends with so many amazing people through Twitter that I wouldn't have met otherwise. Same with the newsletter, but Twitter is a little bit easier to build those relationships.Twitter has definitely helped grow my bank account. So, there are clearly things that being online and participating in the online world really does for you that are valuable.I think, building an audience is super valuable.When I think about the future of work, and what will be automated and what won't be, I really think that human beings, our greatest strength that is the hardest to copy is our ability to influence other people. This really comes from some of the thinking of author Joseph Heinrich, who looked at what is the secret of human success.It's cultural learning. It's our ability to essentially watch what other people do, and mimic them. We're really good at detecting what is a real human and what's not, and who's someone prestigious that we should learn from, and who isn't.I think that audience building is super valuable. So, even though I don't love the activity of building an audience, I have gotten a lot of value out of it, and I see the value in it. So, I very much come from a conflicted spot in this. I'm very impressed by people like Julian, and Sahil, and Dickie Bush, who have grown amazing audiences.Some days I aspire to 10X my audience, and some days I'm just like, please let me be a monk and live in seclusion.[00:04:20] Nathan:Well? Okay. So I had a Twitter thread last week that I did It was on company culture for remote teams, and I've had some that like take off and do well before, but this was like 1300 retweets, like almost a million impressions, a level of taking off. And on one hand I was like, this is amazing.And the other, I like checked the notifications and the replies so many times, and it was fascinating watching it go from like my circle to the next circle, out to the next circle out. And like, we're still in like positive replies, happy. Oh, build on it, refine it. And then like the one circle past that, which it took about, let's say 12 to 18 hours to get to[00:05:06] Nick:Yeah[00:05:06] Nathan:And that was the. This guy's an idiot. I'd never want to work at that company. you know, like all like the, the haters and the non from there, and then it like dies out and this is weird arc of his, we should graph it, but it just made me think of, is this something that I want to do and want, had I added thousands of Twitter followers?I think I could recreate it. Like maybe one in five attempts would like hit that big. Who knows. but I wrestle with the exact question of like, do I want this?[00:05:36] Nick:You and you're, you're just, you're like jacked up on dopamine. You're like, you're, you're sort of you're you, you, you start just imagining all the good things that will come from this. I should be doing this all the time. Like, you know, I, I mean, I think it's, it's sort of pre progressive problems, right?Like, like there's, there's the problem of like having a smaller audience and like putting something out into the ether and then, this, this kind of, getting no response, right. That, that, that's the first thing that, that actually like most people kind of deal with. Right. And, and, and that's, that's a weird thing because it's like, it's like, you're, you're then judging the quality of your ideas based on the ability of, based on basically your, your audience's response and, and realizing like, you're not actually talking to your audience, you're talking to.Subsection that Twitter has decided that you can talk to at that specific point in time. And so, and then you're basically judging your own ideas based off that. And if, if your idea is like, I think, I think when you hit a certain bar of audience, like you can, you can share ideas that are, pretty complex and nuanced and like you'll, you'll find some, some sort of interest for it and it has a potential to take off, but like there there's stuff where if it's kind of interesting and nuanced there, isn't really kind of a built in audience for it.And people don't really have the time to like always dig in and kind of engage and try to like, find what's at the kernel of, it's why I like newsletters a lot more than I like tweeting. But, but, but, but I think, I think what you're, you know, then there's, there's, there's the problem where once you get big enough, like you're now being your ideas are being put in front of a bunch of people who like you didn't intend them for.And those people for some reason have decided to invite into their lives, like conflict with strangers on the internet, because[00:07:19] Nathan:That's like a primary goal,[00:07:21] Nick:Right, right. It's like, it's it. It's what gives them a great day. Right. And, and, and so, so yeah, it's, it's such a weird thing. And so I, like, I mean, I, I think about this with like, I equate Twitter, often to, to kind of, like refined sugar, right.With refined sugar, right. It's it's, it's what we call supernormal stimuli. Right. It, it, it, or super, super normal stimulus. and, and what that is, is basically something that like replaces some natural, like evolutionary desire you have with something kind of artificial that just sends your brain on like overdrive seeking that thing, seeking that thing over and over.And, and that is. That's what Twitter is. It's, it's, it's refined status instead of refined sugar. And that refined status is like, it just, it takes this thing that you normally do, which is like seek, prestige from your, your tribal group, which was a really good thing to do to make sure that you, you know, ate a good meal.And it, and it puts that into, into this crazy overdrive and it like, it centers your brain around it, and it's, it's such a, it's a really powerful thing. And so I, you know, again, right, it's like, there's all these great gifts that come from Twitter and then there's, then there are all these drawbacks and it's, it's almost like perfect equilibrium of, should you do it or should you not?And I don't begrudge anyone either way for their decision.[00:08:46] Nathan:What I always wonder is if I could only have the benefits, like, is there a way let's say that you don't doom scroll Twitter with the latest news and whatever's going wrong, or whatever, latest Twitter fight there is. Maybe you do in a separate app publish these like smart tweets or brilliant threads that are going to get all this attention.And you do one of those every day, but then like you jump in an hour later and respond to a bunch of comments and then like the next day you do it again for 30 minutes and then like, that's it. And you just bat, like, there is this world where you could own Twitter rather than Twitter owning you, but like, are you capable of it?Do you have the self-discipline to pull that off?[00:09:33] Nick:Totally. And, and I, and I think, I think like, you know, I I've talked, I think Julian about this and I think he uses like tweet deck for it. And I think, I think there are ways you can do it. Right. I like for awhile, I was good at like, I would tweet in the morning and then I would like uninstalled the app off my phone.So I wouldn't look at it. and like, there are things that you can do. it's just, it's just really hard because I think to some degree what Twitter, rewards, especially when, when you're on the audience building path. Right. I think when you're like, tens of thousand or hundreds of thousands of followers, you, you actually have a lot more leeway to do what you want.Because, because like, you're just, it's likely that your tweets will work, but like when you're building your ions, there's, there's something that like, it's sort of like, there's a Turing test that's happening, right. People are sort of looking, are you an engaged human being? Cause I I've I've I knew some people who sort of, they, they schedule and preplan all their tweets and like, and to some degree they, they just, they don't hit, they don't work because it doesn't feel real time.They're responding in real time. So like[00:10:35] Nathan:Out of pace. You're out of touch with what's happening with.[00:10:38] Nick:Exactly And so, and so it's, it's sort of, Twitter's kind of like looking for these weird signs of life. So I think it's, I think it's doable. There, there must be some way to do this, but, it's tough. I think the, the other, the other thing that Twitter did to me, that I, disliked is, it makes me feel like my relationships are very transactional because you have these likes retweets, and like these, these, Very clear, like signals of engagement.You, you start to like, or I start to like, to like keep score. Right. And, and I, and I don't, I like, I don't do that anywhere else in life. I think a good, like obviously good relationships tend to start out transactional and then like, they, you kind of forget what the transactions are and like that, that's what creates a close friendship where like, look like you may have paid from the last time I paid for you this time.It doesn't really matter anymore because we transacted so many times, but, but Twitter, for some reason, the score always feels out there. And, and so that was, that's really been like a little bit of a red flag to me. And I, I I try to keep a generous mindset and a generous spirit on Twitter, but I find it harder than in real life.[00:11:52] Nathan:That makes sense to me. So maybe taking a step back, and maybe we'll wrestle with some of these, like to grow an audience or not to grow an audience questions[00:12:00] Nick:Sure[00:12:02] Nathan:What was the thing that, sparked for you? I'm like, I'm going to go start a sub stack. I'm going to actively work to build an audience.[00:12:10] Nick:Yeah, I, so I was writing on, on medium starting in like 2013, maybe. Um and and really got a lot out of it. I, I started my career out as a, as a screenwriter, so I was planning to go into the TV industry and like, and, and for, you know, for, for many reasons, found that to be, a path where like, you didn't really control your destiny.I saw I met lots of, you know, mid thirties, you know, production assistants who were slightly bitter. And then, so I just kind of realized like, this, this wasn't exactly a good path, for me. And so, but I, I wanted to kind of keep that like, that creativity, that like interaction with an audience, I think, you know, it, it was.And found that in writing. And so And so started publishing on medium. Um we was a great experience in terms of how quick it was to publish, but like the distribution of publishing a medium sucks, right? Like, you're you you, you publish ones and then like you spam all your friends and like, you're, you're just, you're working super hard to like push this thing and promote it.And I was like, there's gotta be some way that's a little bit easier. and so I actually ended up in, I think I took, I took Tiago Forte is building a second brain course that kind of like, magically grandfathered me in somehow to like David Pearl's first um uh cohort or Write of Passage, which was awesome And like, I would say, like, I took a lot out of that, but like the biggest thing was, was like start a newsletter. and so basically I started out, I think I started out with a review even. but but anyway like started publishing. Opted in when I knew onto the email list, which I'm sure they, they may or may not appreciate it, but this is before there were tons of sales tax out.And so I felt like it wasn't, it wasn't that crazy. I probably wouldn't have done that in like 20, 20, but, but w really wanted like a way to like, continually kind of interact with my audience without having to worry about like, you know, just, just kind of constantly doing the heavy promotion work.Um now that's because I now you know posts just as a part of medium but but at least there's those sort of a built in audience that kind of grows over time that you kind of keep with you. and, and so. doing that, it was kind of it's kind of a mix of for work and for life.I, I was, at the time, the managing partner of a, of a, uh immersive education program called Tradecraft. And like we, we would help people make sort of complex career transitions into the startup world. And and so a lot of what I was writing was kind of about that. It was about careers. but it also tied in with, with kind of deep interests.It was sort of why I took the role in the first place. and, and what I found when I, when I moved from Tradecraft over to Guild was like that kind of nicely traveled with me. and, and I think there's, there's something, something really nice about a newsletter, being a kind of an appendage to your career, where, like it expands your professional identity to a certain degree.You, you can become a little bit more than just your job, especially working for, like, like a single individual company, especially if you're, if, if the company is larger you, have to deal with a lot of like coordination challenges. there there's a lot of bureaucracy that happens at a company And one of the nice things about having a newsletter is you are in charge of it. It's like you're the CEO of it. the product ships, when you choose to ship it and you have complete editorial say over it, and the distribution that you put into it is what you get out of it. And and there's something really nice about that.It helped me kind of identify as a person who who, ships a lot, even when, sometimes, you know, you know, you you have to work on something at at work that takes a long time.[00:16:12] Nathan:Have you found a dress core even a strong correlation between the effort that you put in to your newsletter and your audience growth and the results that you get out, or does it feel like a more tenuous connection?[00:16:24] Nick:I think, I think there is a pretty good, like w w when I think a post is going to really hit it usually does and so I would say like, like when I put effort into, into writing something really good, I think usually it meets it meets or exceeds my expectations. And when, and when I feel like something is, I'm kind of honing in on, on a, on a post, like usually I get that too.So I think what, what can also happen. You know, sometimes you post something to hacker news and it turns out it's somehow on the front page and like that your audience growth spikes, or like you get featured in someone else's newsletter and your audience grows spikes. And like, there there's a lot of activities that like, you know, I'm not doing directly to promote it, but but it just sort of, um you know, happens in a nice way.And so that's happened, you know, more than a few times and like, that's a pretty neat thing, but like, I think to some degree that comes from just trying a lot of different things and then like, there's sort of like a, a second order effect of some of those things really, you know, hitting it off.[00:17:28] Nathan:Yeah, I think that's that's right. I knew in the early days of starting my newsletter, I felt a strong correlation between what I was working on and like the effort that I put in and the results that I got out, been been interested well at the time I do like a really epic blog post where I put of effort, you know, we're kind of the, for, you know, off and on for weeks or months and like really a hundred and get friends to read it, all of that.Those pretty much always do really well. But what I'm surprised by is sometimes the throwaway posts really, throwing it. Like, it's a simple idea that you flushed out into a post and you were. Hey, it's Tuesday. I got to get something out. Like it's sort of in that[00:18:09] Nick:Totally[00:18:09] Nathan:Sometimes those really hit.Sometimes they actually resonate. Have you had some of those that were like easy easy ones ones that hit?[00:18:18] Nick:So the, publishing cadence is I do, I do two, two posts a month and one a and it used to be, it used to be one post a month. And then I basically separated out into two. Cause I realized like it was too much to kind of condense into, into one post. And like, I wasn't getting the. The, as many eyeballs on like the second half, so decide to pull them apart.One is kind of one big essay. And the second is a, is is of like a, a But I think of it as like, as like I do pretty deep them. So it's actually of like a, here's what this is about. And a little bit more like, here's what this made me think about.And And, the, the essay is, I always spend a good amount of time on them. or at least this year I've spent a good amount time[00:19:05] Nathan:On all of them two hours, 20 hours, 200 hours?[00:19:11] Nick:2020 is probably probably closest. a really slow writer. And so, and so, like, I, I do, I mean, I like like write and like re-edit the first paragraph, 20 onto the next And likeI don't either Yeah The the the the the, the, top of the like, it's like a then like the last paragraph gets like one glance and I'm like, God, get this thing from Um don't and I I that is the wrong thing to do, yet, somehow I do that anyway. but, but, so, so those, those posts, they tend to get, of. You know, time and care. and then what'll happen is sometimes the, the ones that are like the link roundups, like will, will be very spiky.And I I'll spend, you know, that's, that's a little bit more like a three hour thing, um or four hours or something like that. and yeah, so, and then, and then I had, I had a, a, something that I was doing when I was interviewing folks, I call it the key ring where it was like a pretty structured interview that I would do where I asked the same questions over and over again.That was, that was fun. It, it, it started taking a long time to like do the back and forth. And so I'm putting that on pause for the moment. I may pick it back up again. those are fun just cause you can, you can feature someone that, that you like and get a chance to just and hang out It's kinda like[00:20:40] Nathan:Yeah. Those are always interesting to me. Cause I, I think about that on this podcast of asking the same questions, which I know New, I riff on the questions too or elementBut if you did, in theory, if you're like, did you grow from a hundred subscribers to a thousand subscribers in your newsletter?And you asked that to every single person, then you could compile that over 40 episodes or 40 newsletters or whatever. like, Hey, here's a guide on how to do it. And like, I pulled it from a whole bunch of sources. So that part of like standardized questions intrigues me. don't love it the live, know, version of a or newsletter where it's like, okay, it's too formulaic.People have done super well with us formulaic, like, John Lee Dumas, who did the Podcast entrepreneur on fire. Like he went all out. He was like, this will be 20 minute episodes, we're going to of release one a day, seven days a week and like works for him. I have no desire to do that, you[00:21:36] Nick:Totally[00:21:38] Nathan:Yeah, I don't know. you think about the repurposing side of content like that, or is it more just about the, the upfront.[00:21:45] Nick:I'm at repurposing and, and I, it's something that I, have like a psychological hangup about it. Like I always kind of feel like I need to be just like moving on to the next thing. The next thing, like I've, I've tried like going back and like, be like, oh, I should mind this thing for some, some tweets.And it always feels weird to do. And like, I want to write my Roundup, but I think, I think what I've just recognized as. Another reason why I write the newsletter is like, I want an excuse to have interesting new thoughts each month. I want essentially a performance, right. Where like, we're like, there is a moment where like, if I, if I hadn't been like reading and thinking each month, like, there is a moment that it will, that I will be embarrassed if I don't do that.And like that, that's the way I think about the newsletter. And so, and so repurposing content would be something it's almost like an admission of defeat. which, which I don't is is other people should think but that's an area of my head. And so, and so I think it just like, I need to be onto doing the next thing.There's a bunch of stuff where like, I would love to, I love ways to use the archives, my newsletter better. I think actually like stuff like this is a fun way to do it. Like through a articles and I was like, oh, there's there's stuff I can, I can reference from those. Um but it's it's, it's tough.[00:23:05] Nathan:That makes sense. Okay. So let's talk cadence for a second because this is one of the most popular, common, I don't know, questions that I get from people starting newsletters. Is there, like it should be daily right now, weekly, monthly, twice a month. Can I just do quarterly? Can I grow an audience for the quarterly newsletter?You've settled on twice a month? What was the thought that went into that? And, and what's your present cons on, on that particular.[00:23:33] Nick:I think. I mean, one of the weird things, which I'm like, I don't think it's just me, but like, like, it was like, when you, when you release a newsletter issue, like you naturally lose subscribers, but like, like, like people are reminded that like, they're like, know you have yeah You have keys to their inbox and they're like, like, why why did I let this And so and so like and so ideally like that, you know what I mean, then that's gonna have a rude awakening for, I think, I think people who are like, oh, this, this thing just goes on autopilot. but, but you need something that like is going to generate more new subscribers than it will lose subscribers because I'm a slow writer, like my, my ability to write something that I think is going to generate new subscribers is like twice a month. And like, and, and, if, and if I was, you know, Paki and Mario there, I don't know how fast they are, but like they are, they're dedicated.They can crank out some ungodly number of words, you know, once a week, twice a week, which is super impressive. And I think if I was them, I would do that. And like, you know, I, I love still like Seth Godin writes, like, you know, I feel like he writes every day. And I think so I think if you're, if you're capable of doing that, like, and, and, and doesn't lose subscribers, then like do it and set an appointment.And I think all those things are really nice, but for me, it's like, how do I make sure that like, one it's kinda, it's kinda manageable with a, with like a full-time job, which is the way I've been doing it for a long time. Right. and need to, I think, um you know, there, there are, there are weirdnesses of having a newsletter, any full-time job at the same time.And one of those is like, You are publishing, like if your hobby was sea kayaking, right? Like, like you could do that with no one knowing that you were doing it. Right. And like, and, and there's, there's nothing weird about that. Or like running a marathon or something like that. like it's clearly the thing you're doing on the side, writing a newsletter is like, it's it's knowledge work that is like akin to, to, type of work that you might do in an office Right Coding[00:25:41] Nathan:Marketing copywriting, whatever your your day job[00:25:44] Nick:A hundred percent. And like, and like, if you're putting that out on LinkedIn, like, you know, your managers managers are seeing it and like, and so there's, there's just like, like doing that every day would be, a weird would feel weird to me even if, even if no one else felt weird about and so, and so I feel like twice a month it feels, feels good to me.It's also, it also just like keeps me excited to keep, to keep at it versus making feel like it's like a daily or weekly chore. And I have like a day off, I have a week off in between so that I can like, you know, spend the weekend, not writing if I want to, which is nice.[00:26:23] Nathan:Yeah. I like the idea of timing it to your, like your cadence as a writer. What advice would you have to someone who's in that position of, building audience on the side there, maybe they're doing it secretly at first where they're like awkward about it's this may maybe self promotional, but, but at some point, if you get to any scale right. will either you'll tell people at work about it or they'll find out about it in some way, hopefully be supportive, but I don't know. What advice do you give to someone who's in that[00:26:54] Nick:First, acknowledge that there is weirdness to it. Like there, are, like there are inherent trade-offs to everything and like, and like there is there's weirdness and if, and if you're your, like the, the company I've been working for Guild, like they, like everyone has been more than supportive at it, but, of the, the work and like, but I still have a weird complex about it.You know, I think part of the reason I ended up getting the job was because of, because of the newsletter, some of the stuff I publish of like, you know, shaped our marketing strategy. So there were things where like, I've tried to do things in my writing where my employer benefits from them.Like, you know, whenever I talk about work a lot and whenever I talk about hiring, I mentioned Guild's hiring, Like there, there are, there are things that I do to just try to like, make sure that it still feels worth the company's Weill. And also, like, I think, I think I try to bring in ID.Like I try to have ideas that are useful to what I do at work. so I I wrote this, this piece on, platform branding, which was all about, companies that essentially used their employees to build audiences that, also benefit the companyAnd like, you know, we, ended up using that strategy at Guild which, which was, which was cool.And like that ended up being the strategy doc to some degree, around it, which was cool. And so so so, there's there, there's like ways that you can. think um you bring that in that that are, that valuable. And so I try to sort of look for those things. I, but I think, you know, acknowledged right.That there's, good writing is vulnerable and sometimes it's weird to be vulnerable in front of your colleagues. and, and like it's naturally an attention seeking activity. And if like, if like there's someone at work feels weird about you, like, will be, you know, something that they can talk about, the proverbial water cooler about like, you know, why, why you're not doing your job and you're, you're off writing these letters So so there's there there's weirdness, but like, I think if you can make, if you can allow your company to benefit from the audience you are growing, I think that tends to be a pretty good fit[00:29:12] Nathan:What that made me think of is basically it's going to accelerate or, magnify, whatever someone already thinks of you. So for example, if someone already thinks, like, I don't know, next kind of. he just doesn't contribute that much. Like is he even working half the time then if they publishing once a week, then they're like, see proof of what I already thought. if like the executive at the company is like, Nick is one of the best hires we've ever made. Oh. And look now he's like publishing and rhinos. Like he's a thought leader as well. Like whatever they think is just going to accelerate more. And so maybe it's looking what reputation you already have.[00:29:51] Nick:A hundred percent and it's like, it's like, I mean, the way I see it, and this is kind of what I wrote about in the platform, branding thing is like, I actually think that, having a bunch of employees who are, in a creator type role, um it's like underdeveloped marketing channel. Like you essentially, you have these people who have.Hey, like, I'm going to, going to take my scarcest asset my time give it to this company. and and and now I'm going to build relationships with, with all of these thousands of people who, who listen to these ideas and like, and like that sort of just gives positive energy to the company. So, so actually, like when you compare it, even to like a, a side project that you're coding nights and weekends, I actually think, I think companies should be really supportive of, of, of kind of audience building on the side because it really can benefit them but, but people naturally have a, there's there's a weird feeling about it. And so, and so you have to like, especially as a company, You know, like our, our CEO is, is, is really good at building her own audience on LinkedIn. And I think that gives everyone else some permission to like, you know write vulnerable and things like that.So I think, but I think it, it is, it is a really important thing to be able to have this kind of a group of people who are increasing the company's sort of surface area in Serendip.[00:31:23] Nathan:Yep. I like that. I've wondered about doing something like that for ConvertKit. We have a handful of people on the team who are very prolific creators, for the two myself and then, our creative director, Charlie, frankly, she has like followers on YouTube and a popular channel and all of that.There's a handful of other people who have podcasts and are, are active on Twitter. Our product managers are quite active when you talk to them about things related to ConvertKit, you know, they're like active with customers, but I haven't, or we haven't taken this approach like fast or on deck, or I'm trying to think who else does it, but, but these companies where they're like, okay, there's 15 of us and we're all going to.Become Twitter famous, you know, or start our thing and we'll all drive back. Is it a strategy that you think works well?[00:32:17] Nick:The, the best example of this actually think is, I think on-deck did it, did it really has done it really well on Twitter Um I think gong is actually probably my favorite example. Um especially from a B2B what they do is like is all of their salespeople are out there, like posting content on LinkedIn, but it's not like how great gong is.Almost has nothing to do with gum. It's like you know, an a I'm I'm I'm grinding today. Can't wait to get off for the weekend. It's like, it's like, it, it, it sort of, embodying kind of this, this, like this, the sales lifestyle. Right. And, and, and the, the engagement they get is, is crazy.Right. And like, and that, the thing is, if, so, so there's sort of like, there's kind of like, you can build lifestyle influencers among your employees Right But you can also. Like this idea of building up someone who is, who is a, I know this is kind of a gross word, but thought leader in the, in the, space you're, you're excited about.People kind of come to them, they build affinity with them. And I think you, you can build individuals as marketing channels where like starts out where like someone's reading your posts on LinkedIn. maybe that person hosts a, a kind of invite only webinar for, for the people who engage most of them on LinkedIn.So, so then you're building sort of deeper affinity towards that person. And, and as, as you go down the sales funnel um like marketing and sales, you actually transfer that affinity over to the company as, as like they get into the sale process. from kind of a B2B side, but like, I think you can do it also from a B to C.[00:33:49] Nathan:Do you think that a company like gone. Hired people are good at that and encouraged it, or do you think they like had the people that they hired and said like, okay everyone, this is now what we're doing. a playbook, here's best practices. Here's a slack channel where you can talk about what's working.What's not, but like we're this now. Get on board.[00:34:11] Nick:This is, would be a hundred percent pure speculation. What is, is someone at gong started doing this one of their salespeople and started crushing it. And they're, you know, director of marketing was smart enough to. Hey could be doing a lot like, and B, because it's their salespeople who do it, right.A natural incentive to do it. And so, you know, I would imagine they probably brought on a copywriter and said, Hey, if you need help, you know, crafting these posts, like you can do that It's just, it's such a, it's such a virtuous right? It's like, it's like, because of the affinity you build with these individuals it translates to the company.And like it just sends it a bat signal out to other people who are like that, who want to build audiences, that like the company will help you do that. And they will be supportive. And like, and again, if we imagine that like, they're like audience is this long-term career mode, it's just like, it's such a great gift.You can give to your employees for them to leave with like you know, like you leave ConvertKit and you have, you know, a hundred thousand subscribers or 10,000 it's like, or whatever. Right. It's, it's, it's as much of a gift as like the salary you're giving them. It's just, we don't think of it that way.Cause it's, it's a weird thing to think about getting. From your company[00:35:27] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, that's how we've handled it in that we're very in favor of side projects. We want everyone who wants to, like, we're not gonna force it on. But to have a way to be a, a creator on the, on the side and to have some actual reason to use ConvertKit as a customer. Because it's so different when you're the product and like clicking through the happy path to test something and you're like, Hey guys, it works.Then some customers like this is really frustrating. and so that, like, it's a very different, different, I think that it's just interesting. You're absolutely right about people with that. Like, Matt Reglan, who's been on this show before he was at ConvertKit for years. joined when we were like 20,000 a month in revenues like that. when he eventually moved on to his nets, next thing, you know, he built an, a YouTube audience to like 10,000 subscribers at that point. And that was a whole thing that he'd done a lot with skills he learned at ConvertKit a lot with, you know, our creative director, Charlie, like promoting him and just, all right. But like, it still happens even we've got 70 people on the team and we're talking like six are active in this way. I just wonder how much to encourage it versus how much to just say like, Hey, this is an option if you want it, but like you don't push it any more than that[00:36:51] Nick:I mean, I think one of the interesting things, when you think about like the creator economy is like, I think the creator economy can support a lot of people, but the the challenge is like when you're deciding, should I follow this person? there aren't very good moats in the creator economy. And so and so one of the.Few moats you can have is like companies that you've worked for giving you this brand halo. Right And so, and, and, brand from your company sort of, it says this person might be a little more worth following because someone chose them now, does that true You know, don't think so, but like, it at least sends this signal.And so I think, one, like your brand can do that for, for, for your employees, but also like I think there's a. I think just showing that the company will pour fuel on whatever fire you're starting, I think is like, it's, it's one of the best like employee value props. I think a company can have, It's like, it's like, look the life you want to have. Like, we, want to get you there. like, and like, and I think the kind of people who would come work for ConvertKit it should be that they want to do something in the creator space, because you're serving creators that makes a ton That makes a ton of of sense[00:38:10] Nathan:Yeah. And we've definitely had people that we've hired, who are already creators, and that's grown. So it, an interesting world in all the things that you could do to grow. Like a company or growing audience. I'm not sure that that's the one would pick, but you, you see Morning Brew and, and gong in so many of others doing it and it seems to work, know? So[00:38:33] Nick:Yeah Like, I think it works for like, like select companies in select Right. And like, and there's, and there's probably a channel that works under and like the. way you do it for, you know, for Guild where, like we, you know, we really target, um you know, companies with huge employee populations at the very level Like like we wouldn't do that on, on Twitter. Right. Just doesn't make any sense, but like, would we do it on LinkedIn where like, where, you know, C-suite spends an increasing amount of time and we can directly with those individuals and maybe influence that the five to 10 people that, that matter at those companies with like, you know, one post a week.Totally. so, so it just, it kind of depends on like, um I think companies can, can kind of do it at different levels.[00:39:21] Nathan:So that's interesting of the LinkedIn approach, which I think a lot of creators are either all in, on LinkedIn and loving You know, people have built massive lists over there, or they're like, what's that like, I'll hang out in the Instagram, YouTube, Twitters of the world, you know? but if you imagine that B2B world where let's say I'm, I'm working in sales, either as an executive, trying to get big deals done, or, you know, or as a team member, I have a meeting, we have a great conversation.We connect on LinkedIn, you know, we're now an official connection. And now, even though you're not going to buy my thing now, you're like seeing my content every. Week or every few weeks. And then it's like, oh yeah, you're going to buy that thing from Nathan, you know, whatever B2B tool, like starts to come up.And then when I reach out again and you're like, it's not like, oh yeah, it's that one sales rep that I wasted 20 minutes off on with, you know, six months ago. It's like, oh yeah. I feel like we're friends there. I've learned so much, even though it's just been one to many communication.[00:40:25] Nick:I mean, I think the really powerful thing it's like obviously a sales rep is incentivized to promote the product at company they work for So it's like it's product whether it's in a sales call or on LinkedIn like it will not it will not move the needle for any customer.Because it's sort of priced in that That's what they're expecting. But showing that you are an intellectually interesting person who has deep thoughts about the world, who is, who's a smart person. And then the customer making the connection, man, this smart person out of all the places where they could go work has chosen to work here.[00:41:04] Nathan:Right[00:41:05] Nick:Of something, right. There must be something kind of interesting and special there. And so they built of this affinity and comfort and excitement about you and like, and, and then getting on a sales call with you, you're at this just like this nice advantage, right? You're, you're, you're now slightly a celebrity to them.Right Like and, and there's something, you know, like when your, your email or even your company's email then pops up in their inbox, like it's just that much more likely to open that much more interesting. And sometimes it's, it's those, it's those little things on the margin that can make all the difference.And so I think, especially when you're talking like a, like really big enterprise sales, I actually think it's still, a kind of, underrated strategy.[00:41:48] Nathan:Yeah, sense. talk about a, more from the creator side. Cause that was, know, we went more on the platform company side of the which, you know, someone running a company, I am intrigued in that direction, but I'm curious on the, on the creative side, how do you think about that audience as being for your career and that thing that goes with you as you between roles and giving you a future opportunities and all.[00:42:14] Nick:I think it comes to like writing a newsletter.There's basically three reasons. You'd write a personal newsletter and earliest the way I think about it. Like it's either passion, like, you know, I love cooking and like, this is a way I can express that side of me It's it's profit. I want to actually just make some side income or make this into my full income Or it's General advancement.And maybe the relationship building kind of tithing relationship building probably ties into that. but, but in general, like the, I sort of see one things being being like the reason, like for me, at least for a long time, it's probably been advancement. but, certainly the other two are mixed.Like I'm, you know I'm curious about, you know, turning on the profit spigot out of it And like, it certainly like I wouldn't keep doing it if it didn't hit the passion bucket. and so, and so I think that, that, you have to sort of figure out which of those you're doing. I think, I think like if, if what you want to do, I think most people actually are doing it because they do want new opportunities and relationships.I think actually advancement to me is it's actually, the best reason to do it. Um uh over the other two. And, in that world, like, you kind of want to imagine like, okay, Who is, what kind of job do I want, who is the person that I want to be at some point down the road? Who's the gatekeeper that stands in the way of that.Whether it's like, maybe it's I want to publish a book at some point, right. a publisher stands in the way of that. and so what, what gets this publisher excited? Well, either, maybe I'm writing a newsletter for book publishers and this is the industry standard, but like more likely it's like, it's like, Hey, I built this audience that is then really exciting to a publisher.So-so I or, you know, it's, I want to become a senior engineering manager. and so what's going to be exciting to the VP of engineering who is going to interview me. You know, it, it could be that I have an audience full of engineers, who who like are easy to hire, maybe it's that I just like think in a really deep level about this really complicated problem that is really important to them, but it's, it's sort of like, I think having that, kind of magic gatekeeper mind as as not the person you're necessarily writing for all the time, but the, thing you're trying to build up to, that can be a good north star in that direction.If you're doing this, advancement thing, I still don't think you should pick something that doesn't light you up because it's really, you know, it's really hard to keep doing this, week after week when you're grinding it out for some future version of yourself that you know, may may change.I, I think that, that that tends to be a pretty good path.[00:45:10] Nathan:Yeah, that makes a lot of sense to me and like networking connection and advancement side of things, I think is one of the best reasons to do. A lot of that. I remember like the first conference that I went to after having a blog and it being such a night and day difference. I wasn't even a speaker at this conference, any of that, but people were like wanting to come up and talk to me because of the articles that I've written you.Whereas like months earlier, you know, pre blog, you go to a conference and I was shy and introverted. Like I didn't talk to anybody. And so I was like, wow, because I published words on the internet. People will now do all the work. Like interesting people will come meet me instead of me having to like put out all the work.This is the best leverage ever on the same way, like podcasts and everything else Write being able to, everyone says the Podcast in there for the audience. It is right. You know, thousands of people will listen to this episode. I am more doing it because I get to meet people like you and Kimberly, who we just had on last week.And right. It's just about meeting people. that's so[00:46:09] Nick:It's like it's like you know, like I think with Podcast, it's crazy because you like appear in somebody's ears. Right. You're like, literally like you're right next to their head, you know And like and it's it's, just like, it's this, it's this wild, like intimate relationship, usually, like I'm listening, you know, on, on two X.So everyone sounds smarter than you than they would were listening to them on one X like it's, it's, it's I think publishing and creating content, especially in a world where like we just live more online where like more of our interactions are, are remote. I think it's, it's a, it's a pretty, it's still sort of an underrated hack, especially in, in your career, right?Like you can, you can do. You know, you, you become inter like instantly, someone who someone wants to take a meeting with and like it's those little, like, sort of marginal decisions, right To like chart the course of your career, right? Like, like, did, did this person meet with you or not? Were they predisposed to like you, before you came in and like, you don't actually know which article is going to hit to make them feel that way, or which Podcast is going to, you know, which Podcast you're going to meet, the person who, you know, might be an ex customer or investor or something like that.But like, there's just such a powerful, you know, with that[00:47:26] Nathan:I think one of my favorite examples a people using an interview show or, you know, interviews in general to break into an industry Harry Stebbings, who does 20 minute VC, because I don't know how old he was when he started it, but like 17, maybe I'm not[00:47:42] Nick:Totally[00:47:43] Nathan:nd he's like, I want to break into the world of venture capital and, you know, interviewing all the biggest names at first people were saying yes to him, probably because of his hustle, because he was young.They're just like, sure. I'll take a chance on this kid on, your 20 minute.And[00:47:59] Nick:Now love I love people who have like, a, a 10 step plan for their career. Maybe you just, you just wanted to create a podcast. It was sort of like,[00:48:11] Nathan:Right[00:48:12] Nick:Doing this for fun, but like, not a ton of people have, have a plan. Right. like, like most people are just sort of doing stuff, but like, if you like sit down and just kind of think about it for like, like 20 minutes and you're like, who might, I want to be like, who does that person like, like what would make me credible in that person's eyes?Like, like how could I, you know, do that thing now. So that in two or three years, like, like Harry's, I've been such a good example. Like, I, I think there, there are so many people who, who like, if they, they sat and gave that like 10 minutes and turn Twitter off, like you can just, like, you can do a lot of, you know, good, good strategy there.[00:48:52] Nathan:Well, I think can do it as a method to break into any business. So if we were like, know if you and I were 18 years old and we're like, wouldn't be in the music business or even right. You wanted to go into screenwriting. you with what you know now, and you and I were brainstorming how to get 18 year old you into like screenwriting, we would probably suggest starting a podcast and you interview all the screenings. In some format and it wouldn't result in work, but then you'd imagine we have this network and this work would come from the network and you're like, no direct connection, but then there's a ton of indirect connections that wouldn't have happened without it.[00:49:31] Nick:You know, it's kind of a similar thing. We talked we've dragged them at Twitter at the beginning. Right. Twitter does this service for people that gives them like a feeling of prestige. Right. And like, and, and what you're basically doing is like, it's like, you're giving an audience to people who don't have time to build one for themselves.And like, you know, most of the people who are listening to this podcast are people who are building audiences in, in some way shape or form, but like most people don't do that. Right And and so, and so you can find all sorts of people who are who are just like all the time, who like, would love to sort of rent someone else's audience to build themselves up.And so like, and so you can be then 18 and it's a total hack to be able to sort of bring on this screenwriter, this music industry, executive, this, you know, a VC. Right. And it's just, it's[00:50:23] Nathan:Right It made me realize another person on the ConvertKit team who does this really well is ISA Adney. Who's our storyteller. she used to teach all of our webinars and workshops and, and, is branched into working on like brand development sides as he writes a lot of and else, but her personal audience, let me take a step back.If you talk to her, she's like, know this person, or whoever at Disney or that kind of thing who worked on, you know, and just like the amount of people that she knows in the world of storytelling and film and everything else, you're like, how do you know all these people? like, oh, I interviewed them for my newsletter, you know?And you're just like, wait, what? And it's like, I was going to say cartoonists, but like illustrators from, from will like draw her a birthday card. can tell us just for her, you know? And you're like, how, and, and it just comes from this exact thing of like, oh, I just interviewed them on my newsletter, which is a fantastic newsletter, but it's not like they came on it because she's wildly famous.It's that[00:51:26] Nick:It's incredible. And I like there, there's a couple other people I've seen who have like, who, who sort of, they have their, their, their full-time job, but like, on the side, right? Like, Liz Bostonian, someone I've known for awhile and interviewed, and she, she wrote a book called no hard feelings about emotions at work.She's about to publish her second one and like the way she's just like, she's known by, by all of these people at all these different companies that like her company would be the perfect company to sell in, to sell into. you know, it's just, it's just there. There's. There's so many good things that can come a bit.I think one thing I'd advise to like, w going back to like this, how do you balance a, like a, like a newsletter and a full-time career is like don't work for any company that doesn't value it because because like you know, clearly there are places like Guild, like ConvertKit like there there's so many different companies where like you can go where like, they will appreciate what you're doing.And if you can, if you can, like, ideally, like, let's say you love to write about cooking, right. If you can find a company where like, that is like, like, especially like building an audience around cooking, like it's, you know, a dishware company or whatever it is, like finding that right place for not just you, but your publication, a really underrated thing, because it just makes everything so much smoother to find that right.Manager find that. Right. you know,[00:52:52] Nathan:Yeah. That makes sense. If it's an uphill battle, like find another, another place where that's actually a asset.[00:52:59] Nick:Someone will like it.[00:53:00] Nathan:Yeah, exactly. So maybe before we wrap up, let's talk about the growth side. Cause everyone's thinking about, okay, I have my newsletter and it has 100 subscribers or 500. How do I grow it to that next tier So I'm curious, what are some of the things that have worked for you on, adding 100 or 500 or a thousand subscribers at a time?[00:53:19] Nick:Twitter Twitter. You, you, you can use Twitter.[00:53:22] Nathan:Yeah[00:53:22] Nick:It's It's frought in many ways you can also use LinkedIn. I actually think LinkedIn is, an underrated place to do it. Like it's to me, it's not as stressful to write a LinkedIn post as it is to write. A tweet, it's a little stressful, cause it's like, it's like, definitely definitely to your company And it's a place where you're in professional domain, but especially if your newsletter is somewhat professional, then I think, I think LinkedIn can be a really good place for it. and a little bit less of a pressure-filled way to do it. I probably one of the underrated things now is like, you know, I look at how many discord servers I'm suddenly in, like in in you know, months and like, I think those are probably good places to like promote.I don't think it's, I don't think you can in communities, it's harder to just be promotional. You need to sort of have earned it by, by building relationships. And so, but I think like, you know, I'm, I'm in a writing group called foster, right? Where, where like where, you know that they help with editing and like, and like everyone's sort of publishes their stuff in there, but like that's a great place to like, to, to sort of build a following, especially sort of early on.Obviously you can do things like hit Reddit, hit hacker news, you know, Reddit, I think I've been banned from like, you know, 20 different subreddits for, you know a just posting a blog post, which seemed to me. But, um and then hacker news, right? You, you, you never know. And, and, you know, getting to the top means you're going to get barraged with terrible comments, but, I think ultimately though you kind of want something you can build, right.And this is, this is the, this is the challenge with Twitter, right? It's like, it's like, there is a weirdness about Twitter, but. Building an audience on Twitter Like it's a great top of funnel for a newsletter, and same way with LinkedIn. And so it's hard to totally steer away from those things. I think one thing I'd to try and toy with once I figure out the monetization piece, of my newsletter is I'd like to try paid ads.And there's this weird discomfort with it with it. if what you value is value is, having an audience and people to write to and you want to grow that audience, I actually think it doesn't need to be that literally every person you painstakingly gathered with your blood, sweat, and tears, right.It's it's I think there's, there's other stuff that you can try, but you obviously don't want to be throwing a lot of money down the drain on, building an audience[00:55:53] Nathan:YeahI've, I've done paid ads with good results of four. I have a local newsletter called from Boise, is just for the Boise area. And in the last month we actually went to a thousand subscribers and we doubled to a little over 2000 subscribers, almost entirely with ads. So like no ads to a thousand and, ads worked well, you know, and it helps to have the hyper-local targeting.So I was in the same boat of like, hadn't played with it before. And, you know, at, I think we paid between $2 and two 50 a subscriber,[00:56:25] Nick:Facebook.[00:56:26] Nathan:Yeah, Facebook and Instagram. So we'll play with it more. What are you thinking maybe we'll end on this question. What do you thinking for on the newsletter?What are you paid? Is it a A A book? What other things are coming up?[00:56:39] Nick:It took me a while to find something I was comfortable with on modernization paid, never, appealed that much to me. just because there, there are some people who I like I will pay for their ideas, but like, overwhelmed with Content. that like, usually when I'm paying for, for, for, for a newsletter, it's because I really liked the person, like their, their, just their style of analysis.I can't get anywhere else. but, but, but the competitive dynamics of newsletter sort of, to me, like they'll, they'll kind of always be someone who something close to what you do for free. And so, and so that, that always kinda, didn't appeal to me as much. Like I think of it as like, This audience, that you're kind of building affinity with over time and like, and can you, ideally sort of find, build something or find something that's going to be really valuable to them.So I actually, literally just this morning, teamed up with this, this company called palette, to, I swear, this, this, this time it was not planned. It just, it just happened nicely, to a team at this company called pallet in pallets, been sort job boards with a bunch of and I actually worked with them on this, this kind of beta product that they're working on, which is this idea of talent collectives. And so what we're doing is like, it's like basically job searching really sucks. Like you're filling out tons of applications. You are, waiting for a long time to hear back from companies.If you are highly desirable, you're getting a lot of recruiter spam and they're just like barraging you. so we're going to do, is, is put basically just an air table form where you can say, Hey, like, this is who I am. This is the kind of role I'm looking for. pallet has this, this, all these companies that they are so, so they're going to basically, send people and you can be anonymous if you want to all sorts of stuff, but they're to their partner companies and then and then they'll send you sort of the intro request, like, Hey, you know, do you want to, do you want to chat with ConvertKit right.And, and, and if you do right, we'll, we'll make the intro, but like, you don't have to worry about our recruiter reaching out to you because they've, they've said they won't do that. so yeah, I think it's cool. you know, if, if, if any of the folks listening to this are like, exploring new job opportunity.We'd love you to come check it out. I think it'll be really neat. I think it'll solve a challenge that a lot of people are facing. For me it felt really native. It felt like I didn't want to do a job board because I don't know these companies. I'm doing a newsletter about careers, and it felt really important that I'm sending people to the right place.I said, “Hey, if you sign up for this, and you take one call from a company, I'll do a 30 minute career coaching session with you.” Even though, I'll get paid some commission, if the person goes to one of these companies, I will really try to give them the best advice for them, because that's what I promised to readers.When you're thinking about monetization, it's like find something that feels native, and not weird to your audience. I think sometimes that can be a pure paid subscription, but you can be creative in different stuff.[00:59:51] Nathan:Yeah, I think that's good. Let's leave it there. I'm super excited to see what comes on the monetization side. It's probably the coolest thing about newsletters and audiences that you can monetize different ways.So, where should people go to follow you and follow your writing, and see more about what you're up to?[01:00:07] Nick:You can follow where I have a conflicted relationship, where there are days I will post a tweet, tweet threads, and the next day I'll feel very ashamed of it, but that's @Nick_deWilde. Then the better place to get my thoughts, I would say, is JungleGym.Substack.com.At some point I should probably switch that to ConvertKit, but yeah, that's another time. We'd love that, and thank you so much for having me. This has been so fun.[01:00:42] Nathan:Yeah, It's been a great conversation and, thanks for coming on, and we'll talk soon.[01:00:47] Nick:Awesome, Nathan.

Kevin & Fred's Next Level Podcast: Quick Tips for Realtors and Interviews from the best in the real estate business
Coach Burt on Activating Your PREY DRIVE & Performing At Your Highest Level

Kevin & Fred's Next Level Podcast: Quick Tips for Realtors and Interviews from the best in the real estate business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 43:36


In today's episode, we're joined by Bestselling Author, Dynamic Speaker, Championship Coach Top Business Growth Trainer, and #1 ACTIVATOR of PREY DRIVE in AMERICA, Coach Burt. After seeing Coach Burt speak a few times, and watching some of his training content, we've really been looking forward to having him on the show. Coach Burt's story is unique because he has wanted to be a coach since the age of 15, and his ability to spark something on the inside of people to help them perform better at a high level is unparalleled. Today he shares how to activate your drive to go out and get more.    Based on Micheal's unique background as a former championship women's basketball coach combined with his impressive ability to build a “competitive intelligence” in people, the 17X author uses a unique methodology to inner engineer people to compete at the highest levels. Coach Burt goes to work on all four parts of a person's nature through building specific knowledge for the mind, impeccable skills for the body, intense desire for the heart, and a contagious confidence for the spirit. Hired by many of the top companies in the world to activate this drive in their teams Micheal has built out a framework and model to “FLIP the SWITCH” in people that shows quantitative improvements in concentrated periods of time. Currently Micheal is building and licensing “Greatness Factories” around the world, which are unique destination locations that combine “intentional collaboration” between members through inspired real estate, coaching programs, and a common desire to do something LEGENDARY.   Every human being has a PREY DRIVE, a ferocious instinct to go after what we want, but it has to be activated through inner engineering. Whether you're a junior high athlete who wants to play better, a business owner who just wants to get better or a top performer who wants to get to the next level, if you flip the switch on that drive, nothing can stop you.    Guest Info   Coach Burt is a Bestselling Author, Dynamic Speaker, Championship Coach Top Business Growth Trainer, and the #1 ACTIVATOR of PREY DRIVE in AMERICA.  Based on Micheal's unique background as a former championship women's basketball coach combined with his impressive ability to build a “competitive intelligence” in people, the 17X author uses a unique methodology to inner engineer people to compete at the highest levels. Coach Burt goes to work on all four parts of a person's nature through building specific knowledge for the mind, impeccable skills for the body, intense desire for the heart, and a contagious confidence for the spirit. Hired by many of the top companies in the world to activate this drive in their teams Micheal has built out a framework and model to “FLIP the SWITCH” in people that shows quantitative improvements in concentrated periods of time. Currently Micheal is building and licensing “Greatness Factories” around the world, which are unique destination locations that combine “intentional collaboration” between members through inspired real estate, coaching programs, and a common desire to do something LEGENDARY.   For more information, visit https://coachburt.com/, follow @michaelburt on Instagram and connect with him on Facebook.  

True Confessions of a Sales Leader
Hiring and Retaining the Right Sales Team

True Confessions of a Sales Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 51:21


In our first episode of the new season, we tackle a growing problem not only facing sales organizations but entire companies—keeping your team intact.Our guest is Scott Campbell, Senior VP at Sales at Docker, who has been responsible for ramping up a new sales team in 2021. Scott joins (our own) Scott Olsen, founder of the Olsen Group, and Gary Brashear, managing partner of the Olsen Group. You've read the headlines about the mass exodus of employees or perhaps you're struggling to keep or attract a talented sales team. Hired just over a year ago, Scott has been responsible for building a new sales team —90% of the team are new hires. So, how do you attract new talent like this? Listen in as we discuss what Scott has accomplished and how to implement your own changes to recruit sales rock stars. 

Mornings with Coach On Demand
Coach gets the inside scoop on how the Padres hired Bob Melvin

Mornings with Coach On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:16


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Behind the Line
Woke Shannon Sharpe Claims Nick Sirianni Hired Because He‘s White

Behind the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 9:54


Shannon Sharpe just can't help himself. Shannon Sharpe has copied the style of Stephen A Smith. Anytime a white man is hired in the NFL or NBA...Shannon Sharpe likes to claim it's due to white privilege. Shannon Sharpe made this claim after a Nick Sirianni press conference on Wednesday. The press conference had nothing to do with Nick Sirianni's job status...but Shannon Sharpe somehow brought up the issue. We react to the comments of Shannon Sharpe...and explain how he turned a Hall-of-Fame NFL career...into a running joke of wokeisms. 

The Pete Kaliner Show
Pete Kaliner: I See Terry McAuliffe's Hired Marc Elias To Dig Up Some Votes

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:15


In Hour 1 of the program, Pete talks about the Virginia Governor's Race and makes note of Democrat Terry McAuliffe hiring election lawyer Marc Elias as he falls in the pre-election polls.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

JEFF STERNS CONNECTED THROUGH CARS
JOHN DINKEL- ROAD & TRACK | SAE | MEN'S FITNESS | VISIONARY VEHICLES | FORD | CHRYSLER | WOODWARD GARAGE | NASCAR

JEFF STERNS CONNECTED THROUGH CARS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 73:49


2:03 How did John end up at Road & Track? 4:36 How did Patrick Bedard bust onto the scene? 9:22 the job ad 13:12 did the advertising manufacturers dictate the content? 16:02 The Road & Track History Project 16:11 Locked down in Australia 6 mos 22:24 Road & Track as a magazine has lived through the major significant events that have taken place in the auto industry over the last 70, 80 years... 25:20 What was the one thing that kept Jeff out of U of M? 25:27 Brooklyn Poly Tech in New York 26:01 Hired by Ford Motor Company (Spitfire from Long Island to Dearborn) 29:01 senior in the engineering mechanical engineering program at the University of Michigan 29:45 MS and mechanical engineering with Chrysler 32:55 Woodward Garage 33:19 Barracuda and Trans Am racing 33:47 NASCAR / the winged supercars 41:41 Hemis and Marty Schorr 44:49 cam overlap explained 48:42 the 2 biggest innovations in automobile engineering 1:02:51 Radial vs Bias-ply explained 1:03:52 why gas won 1:09:49 something John would like us to know about him

10 Million Journey
#191: WBU - Finding Asymmetric Benefits, Hired a Professional Trainer, Feeling Good

10 Million Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 8:05


This episode is a regular Weekly Business Update. All revenue/profit numbers are inside the episode. Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/10millionjourney Want to sit down with Anatoly 1 on 1 ? Even though I keep saying I AM NOT A GURU, many of you ask to sit down and pick my brain. I have decided to do a 1h HELP calls. There are 2 purposes: 1st to support you in your journey and second also to be able to break even on the production of this podcast (each episode editing, marketing, guest research etc takes about $60 - $150 to produce). Now you can schedule 1h with me, and we can talk about launching products, hiring, product research, keywords, mindset, how I did an Ironman or anything at all. Link is here - https://calendly.com/anatolyspektor/anatoly-connsulting-1h  ANATOLY's TOOLS: Product Development: Helim10 - I use it for  Product Research, Keyword tracking and Listing Optimization . SPECIAL DEAL: Get 50% your first month or 10% every month: http://bit.ly/CORNERSIIH10  Pickfu - I use it for split testing all of my products and for validation ideas . SPECIAL DEAL: First split test 50% 0ff  https://www.pickfu.com/10mj Trademarking: Trademark Angels - For all my trademarking needs. SPECIAL: Mention Anatoly and 10MJ podcast and get 10% Off your trademark. HR: Fiverr -  I hire my 3dMockup person and images label designer here on Fiverr - http://bit.ly/10mjFIVERR Upwork - I hire people long term on Upwork - upwork.com  Loom.com - for creating SOP's, I record everything on Loom and give to my VA's Keepa.com - to track historical data such as prices ANATOLY's  3  Favorite Business Books: DotCom Secrets by Russel Brunson - I think this is a must read for every online entrepreneurs - http://bit.ly/10MJDotCom 4 hours work week by Tim Ferriss  - This book changed my life and made my become an entrepreneur - http://bit.ly/10MJ4WW The Greatest Salesman In The World  by Og Mandino - Old book but it goes to the core of selling -  http://bit.ly/10MJGREATSM  DISCLAIMER: Some Links are affiliate, it costs you nothing, but helps to keep this podcast on the float I am doing more live interviews this year, to watch them: Follow 10MJ on https://www.fb.com/10millionjourney

C4 and Bryan Nehman
OCTOBER 27TH, 2021: A new Goucher Poll (Pt 2) is out, 66 more officers lost than hired, Loudoun Co. students held walk out regarding sexual abuse reports and more

C4 and Bryan Nehman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 117:58


C4 and Bryan Nehman heard weekdays from 5:30-10:00 am ET on WBAL Newsradio 1090, FM101.5, and the WBAL Radio App.

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Legendary Kentucky baseball coach Keith Madison on finding his identity in Christ

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 55:17


Keith Madison served for 25 years as the head baseball coach with the University of Kentucky. Hired at the age of 26 in 1979, he was the youngest head baseball coach in NCAA Division One at the time. He is the winningest coach in Kentucky Wildcasts history with 737 career victories and was inducted into the Kentucky High School Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame and the University of Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame. For many years after coaching, Keith served with SCORE international, a Christian Mission Organization leading players and coaches on short term baseball mission trips to the Dominican Republic. Today on the podcast, Keith shares about his coaching journey, growing up in the 60's, signing a pro baseball contract at 17 years old, walking with God during his wife's breast cancer battle and finding his identity in something other than baseball.  --- Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up here.

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Tuesday - No Former Head Coaches Hired After Fired By Miami Dolphins 10 26 2021

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 2:11


Big O looks at The Personnel Dept & Head Coaches of Miami Dolphins

Mojo In The Morning
He Got Hired and Fired in the Same Day

Mojo In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 9:50


The Collaboration Superpowers Podcast
289 - Hiring can be equitable, transparent and efficient

The Collaboration Superpowers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 48:54


JOSH BRENNER is the CEO of Hired, an AI-driven hiring marketplace that helps companies such as Instacart, Postmates, Capital One, and Peloton identify and employ diverse talent – through a more efficient, transparent, and equitable hiring process. For more stories of remote teams doing great things, visit www.collaborationsuperpowers.com

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
She Got Hired By Building a Pokemon App!? (Jessica's Developer Job Search Journey)

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 28:16


Jessica just landed her first developer role. I invited her on to share her job search journey. We dove into the frustrating parts and also tried to figure out what really made her stand out. I want to continue sharing these stories and show you how different each person's path is to finally getting that first position - just like yours is.Host (Don Hansen):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/donthedeveloperGuest (Jessica Chen):Portfolio that got her hired: http://jessicaazchen.comLinkedin post that helped her get noticed by hiring managers:https://www.linkedin.com/posts/jessicachen415_folks-i-just-graduated-from-rithm-a-fullstack-activity-6805557029491630080--urC---------------------------------------------------❤️ If you find my content helpful, support me on Patreon and get access to perks - https://www.patreon.com/donthedeveloper

Virtual Careers for Milspouses by VirtForce
125. #Hired: Take Time to Find Something You Love

Virtual Careers for Milspouses by VirtForce

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 7:38


Show Notes | October 25, 2021 | Episode 125 Has your career ever led you in a totally surprising direction? VirtForce Member Maria Gaines never saw herself working in accounting or bookkeeping, but now she loves her new career with QuickBooks Live.  This stay at home mom of three little boys and a soon-to-be little girl wanted to contribute to her family's finances, but she needed something flexible she could do while raising her children.  With Intuit, the maker of QuickBooks Live, she found a community that understands the challenges that go along with the military lifestyle and a flexible, part-time opportunity that accommodates her work-life balance.  Tune in to hear how the remote community at Intuit helps Maria feel less lonely as a military spouse. Links and Resources Kimber Hill LinkedIn In this episode, we mentioned the following resources: VirtForce Facebook Group VirtForce Job Board Join the Conversation Our favorite part of recording a live podcast each week is participating in the great conversations that happen on our live chat, on social media, and in our comments section.   VirtForce on Facebook VirtForce on LinkedIn VirtForce on Instagram Check Out Recent Podcast Episodes: VirtForce Podcast on Apple Podcasts  VirtForce Podcast on Spotify VirtForce Linktree Check Out Recent Podcast Episodes: 122. Coffee & Connect with Intuit121. #Hired: Narrow Down Your Options120. Get Organized with Erin Condren119. #Hired: Research Behavioral Interview Questions118. Intuit's Free Bookkeeping Cert for Milspouses117. #Hired: Be Ready When Opportunity Strikes About Our SponsorStay At Home Profit provides education, consulting, scholarships and career opportunities for military spouses and veterans in remote work through virtual assisting & digital marketing in an authentic and transparent environment. Stay At Home Profit spent 4 years developing and perfecting multiple certification programs that enhance military spouse's and veterans' skill sets and experience to get hired remotely in the digital workforce. Join the Stay At Home Profit family today and check out our 5-week RVAC Remote Virtual Assistant Certificate program at bit.ly/vf-profit.

GeekWire
Tech pay, cloud trends, Kraken, and self-driving cars with Qumulo CEO Bill Richter

GeekWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 43:59


Everyone is closely monitoring the implications of remote work as we emerge from the pandemic, so it's no surprise that one of the most widely read stories on GeekWire this week — right behind the Titanic's disappearing bathtub and Facebook's potential name change — was a story on trends in tech salaries.  Two big trends stood out in the report from jobs site Hired: Average tech salaries in Seattle are up 4.6% from last year, to $158,000, second only to the Bay Area, which saw its average dip slightly to $165,000. Nationwide, the average U.S. tech salary fell 1.1% to $152,000. With the shift to remote work, “employers are expanding their addressable candidate pool, filling roles faster and paying lower average salaries,” Hired said. What's going on here? That's our first topic on this week's GeekWire Podcast. Guest commentator: We get a real-world perspective on tech hiring, remote work, and pay trends from Bill Richter, president and CEO of Qumulo. The cloud file storage and management company joined the ranks of Seattle's unicorns with a valuation of $1.2 billion in its latest funding round. Richter was previously a venture partner at Madrona Venture Group, and a leader at Isilon Systems and EMC. "We are far more open to remote locations," he said. "It really doesn't make that much of a difference where they are when they appear on their video conferencing screen. And that opens up a lot of new talent pools." It also opens up new opportunities for people previously based in Seattle to relocate and continue working for the company. For its remote work policy, Qumulo's executive team has delegated decisions to its functional leaders, with a plan to learn and adjust as it goes, adopting an Amazon-like policy before Amazon did. "So we're definitely approaching things differently," he added. "That's not a temporary state for us; that will be the future of the way we go as a company." What does that mean for pay? The Hired survey shows that new employees in far-flung locations might not command as much as those in tech hubs. But unlike some other tech leaders, Richter, whose background is in accounting and finance, doesn't see much merit in attempting to adjust salaries when existing employees relocate. "It's a global market for talent. And in exchange for the talent and the impact that the individual provides the organization, they shall be compensated," Richter said. "All the micro-tuning of things like location and that sort of thing, that might work in the short run. In the long run, what we'll see is a market clearing for compensation in return for talent." Other topics this week The boom in unstructured cloud data, which is fueling Qumulo's business. My colleague John Cook makes his best effort to get Richter to disclose Qumulo's financial data and IPO plans. Richter does share some insights into which sectors are seeing the biggest increase in data, and thoughts on how companies are viewing Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform in this environment. The home debut of the new Seattle Kraken NHL franchise Saturday. Our colleagues Kurt Schlosser and Kevin Lisota got to tour Climate Pledge Arena this week. Check out their story and video. We reminisce about John's run-in with the Pittsburgh Penguins mascot, Iceburgh, during GeekWire's 2018 stint in the Steel City, and wonder if he'll have a similar altercation with the Kraken mascot. We'll soon find out. The future of self-driving cars, and the news that Amazon's Zoox will test its technology in Seattle's "different driving culture." John is a skeptic of autonomous vehicles, based on part his terrifying ride in one of Uber's self-driving cars. Richter is an optimist. We can only imagine what will happen when four-self driving cars arrive simultaneously at a four-way stop in Seattle. Produced and edited by Curt Milton; Music by Daniel L.K. Caldwell. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Could Get Me Fired
This Could Get Me...HIRED - Episode: 51

This Could Get Me Fired

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 25:28


Do you believe in manifestation? This episode has a Major announcement. It's a must listen, if you've been a fan of our podcast!

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy react to last evening's CNN Town Hall with Joe Biden 14:45 - Dan & Amy discuss recent lawsuits filed against school districts in IL 45:00 - Martin Kulldorff, Professor at Harvard University Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital: Covid, lockdown and the retreat of scientific debate. Follow Martin Kulldorff on twitterhere 01:02:40 - Darren Bailey, member of the Illinois Senate for the 55th district and candidate for Governor, has put forward important voting rights legislation and fights for your right to choose. For more on Darren Bailey's run for Governor baileyforillinois.com. 01:19:47 - Ashley Jacobs, Executive Director at ParentsUnited.org, takes on Merrick Garland and his House Judiciary Committee testimony. Fore more on Ashley Jacobs – parentsunited.org 01:35:17 - Casey Mulligan, professor of economics at the University of Chicago who served as the chief economist of the White House Council of Economic Advisers in 2018–19: ‘Build Back Better' Would Sink the Labor Market. Purchase Casey Mulligan's book You're Hired! Untold Successes and Failures of a Populist President here 01:49:07 - Open Mic Friday! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Buddy Read Podcast
A Lot Like Adios by Alexis Daria

Buddy Read Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:31


Your co-hosts Kim and Nia are FINALLY back after an unexpected hiatus with a review of A Lot Like Adios by Alexis Daria. Around this time last year, we discussed the first book in the series, You Had Me at Hola, and had a fun time! Now we're following one of the other Primas of Power, Michelle Amato as she navigates working for her former best friend, Gabriel Aguilar's gym. Hired to work on the marketing campaign for the gym's New York City location, Michelle is uncertain just how much distance she should put between her and Gabe after he left unexpectedly, thirteen years ago. Gabe has a lot of unresolved baggage back home in the Bronx including unfinished business with Michelle. We have an interesting ride maneuvering through the feelings of betrayal, second-chance romance, and fake dating drama this contemporary romance throws at us. As always, remember to follow us on Instagram and check out our website for all of our latest updates! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Using Virtual Assistants to Grow Your Real Estate Business with Bob Lachance  | EP75

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 37:40


Bob Lachance is a Real Estate Investor, a Nationally Recognised Speaker, Mentor and Trainer who Specialises in Helping Customers Build their Businesses through Automation and Outsourcing. Bob currently Owns Four Businesses and Helped Start One of the Nation's Largest Real Estate Coaching Programs. In this episode we talked about: Bob's Bio & Background “Who Not How” mentality Bob's journey from pro hockey player to entrepreneur Why outsourcing is so important in real estate How to Find and Hire the Right Virtual Assistant How to integrate VAs in your business E-mail Management, Cold Calling, Admin Management Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://revaglobal.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/boblachance/ https://www.facebook.com/REVAcareers Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. All right, ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galley and you're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I have Bob on the program today. He's a real estate investor.   He's a nationally recognized speaker, mentor trainer, and everything related to real estate. He helps out with, and I believe Bob correct me if I'm wrong. You are a ex pro hockey player.   Bob (44s): I am, I played eight years and four years here. Four years in Europe,   Jesse (48s): Right on, well in recognition of a Leaf's a home opener here. Yeah. Great to have you on how you doing?   Bob (54s): Very good. Very good. Thanks for having me. Appreciate it.   Jesse (57s): Awesome. So, Bob, typically what we do, we have a new guests on the show. We do a little bit of a background on the guests. Maybe you could give listeners a little bit of your history as it relates to your career and, and real estate.   Bob (1m 11s): Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. W what's fast forward today. I'll back into it. I run a successful virtual assistant company out of the Philippines have been doing since 2014 and also have a, a real estate company. We should be at about a hundred and probably 40 to 50 transactions this year. So we're on, we're on a pretty good trajectory there, but how I got started to get back to that, I went to Boston university on a four year scholarship for a ice hockey league, which has talked about, and then I was fortunate enough to be offered a two year contract by St.   Louis blues. So I left two classes short of getting my degree with the thought process of, you know, you can always go back, but being obviously you've been from Toronto and understanding the hockey mindset, I never went back. So my thought process was I could always go back and get those two classes, but as you know, you know, once life gets in the way it gets rolling. Every summer I lived in Boston, I would be working out training and never ended up back in school.   So it's kind of comical though. It's when you actually go in school or when you're in school, you don't appreciate it as much as when you're actually out. So I, and I'll get back. I'll get to that a little bit later, but just starting with my path. I played at eight years, four years here in us and then four years in Europe. And then my last year I had my first son and my wife was working in the United States and I was in leave. I was in Switzerland at the time and I D I had to decide whether I was gonna hang up the skates or bring her with me.   And she had a very successful career in medical sales at the time. So we decided that, you know, I was going to hang up my skates and figure out what I was going to do with my life. So just probably 99.9% of all people that do real estate. I was reading books and read rich dad, poor dad. I bought a course online, a guy by the name. I think he's an attorney, David wisdom all about real estate, but you know, nothing in particular. I was a course about that thick, probably about 3, 4, 5 inches thick, but I read the thing from top to bottom and decided, Hey, you know what?   I don't have to go back to school to be a real estate investor. So I was a real estate investor. I was quiet, coined myself to rephrase. I coined myself as a real estate investor. This is 2004, started from there. My first flipped in 2004. And I decided to really do it as a, as a passion and a career and got my first business partner. I think it was the end of 2004, 2005. I was actually door knocking to people that were losing their houses.   Pre-foreclosure my buddy gave me a script at the time just, and I knew it and let me, let me rephrase it. I knew nothing like zero. I came from the hockey locker room, which for those of you who actually listened this, that came from any type of locker room, you learn zero in business. You learn how to cuss. You learn how to you learn how to, you know, kinda have a, a, a camaraderie, if you will. But on the business side, you don't learn much. And being in Europe for four years, you don't have a network either like you do have here in the United States.   So when I got back, I was kinda, you know, you're you go through any, any athlete understands this, you go through kind of a depression. I think you're a football player, right? Jesse. Yeah. I played football and hockey and hockey. So after you're done the planning, you understand this, you go, you know, before you start, or even when you join, you jump into a different industry, you go through some sort of, kind of a depression. It's, it's, it's not, I don't like saying the word depressed, but you go through a law if you will. And it takes a little while to find out and really get your team again.   Right? Because when you're hanging out with your buddies and you're hanging out with, you know, you, you know, you got your, you're going to block your butt, you block for your buddy. You're going to pass to your friend, you know, and you're going to win as a team when you're out there as a solo preneur, there is a transition, right? And it took me a little while. And I, you know, when I first got in real estate, I got a deal by myself that a rehab to pretty well made about $32,000 on it. But I also realized that there's no emotion in a dollar, right? When you get a big check the first year, you know, there's a quick high, there's a quick, it's kinda like when you, you know, back in the day, when you took Sudafed three Sudafed before you played, right, you can't do that now, but I'm just saying Sudafed.   So I took a couple Sudafed before I played every game. Maybe some coffee too. And you get that, that you get that quick high, right? You get that quick, quick, Joel. And it's the same thing when you get a big check, but when you take a step back, there's really no emotion in money it's really has to do with the goals that you hit. So I realized I didn't want to work by myself. So I joined a real estate investment association. I saw the speaker on the short-sale industry. So I bought that course and next event again, I had no network.   So the next event I had this, I had to go to within the regroup I had asked, Hey, who's the, who's the best short-sale person in Connecticut. And they all pointed this gentlemen, Patrick, pre-court went up to him say, listen, do you have no idea who I am? I'm not looking for a penny, but are, do you have any openings in your business? He said, you know what? I actually am looking for a door knocker. So for those of you who know what a door knocker is, it's kind of like working your first job as a janitor, and you have to work your way up because it is not sexy.   It's not your you're literally, you have a list of individuals and names, and you're driving from house to house with a script knocking on a door, right. It's door to door sales in essence. So I ended up having a little bit success in that. And then I, I hired someone to take my spot, jumped into negotiating with banks, because we were doing short sales, which means, you know, their, their debt was they're over leveraged. So they had $200,000 of debt. The property is worth a hundred. So now I'm talking to banks on a daily basis negotiating, and then brought myself out of that.   Hired. Somebody started a national coaching program while I was investing, started a virtual assistant staffing company for not only individuals like myself, but for other students as well, that needed extra time in their day that are working part-time or full-time and needed to, you know, needed to, to offs offset some of the tasks. So I know that, sorry about the long-winded answer, but   Jesse (7m 38s): No, that's great. I mean, I think it touches on a, I'm sure there's listeners that are coming from the sports world. I know in real estate, in general, there's a lot of ex players of all sports, but especially here in Toronto, our office is a lot of ex hockey players. My partner was drafted to the pens, played ECHL, kind of went all over and really didn't start in brokerage until he was in his late twenties. I think it was, yeah, it was late twenties. And I can a hundred percent appreciate the fact that, you know, you got somebody staying late in the office and you're trying to figure out what what's this guy doing.   And he's just trying to just get caught up on things that, you know, guys had, you know, Excel and just being able to figure out the emails and everything. But I think that's probably what, at least on the brokerage. And that's probably what the draw is for a lot of players to come over to brokerage because you get that team camaraderie aspect that you maybe don't get in other businesses. And certainly not as a, a solopreneur. So Bob, when you, when you got into kind of, when you say door knocking, you mentioned that you were doing some flips at that point, was it starting to get into the flipping business and that's you started doing transactions there or was that something separate?   Bob (8m 49s): Yeah, so I actually did it my first flip. It was just driving for dollar. So I saw a, a house that was, you know, needed it, it needed a roof, it was beat up. You could tell it was vacant. So I got in called the broker, actually it was listed property, got in, walked in, opened the door. And there was like a, a rancid smell of cats CRN. Right. So I opened the door and I'm like, all right, I read in this book that, you know, a lot of people are going to turn away from this. So I ended up making an offer. I think the property is listed for 180 5. I made an offer at 1 35 and lo and behold, the owner accepted it.   And I was like, oh, what do I do now? Right. Obviously you need money, you need contractors, you need all that kind of cool stuff. But I figured it out, ended up doing okay. And then after that, it was just, you know, I had zero systems, zero marketing, nothing. Right? So that's when I actually got a door knocking when I met my future business partner and he actually taught me, he said, listen, you know, he'd go door to door. Here's one of the, the systems and strategies for getting motivated sellers to sell your houses. So my whole mindset was, I want to start from ground up to learn the business because if one day I'm in, this is what pat taught me.   He was my old business partner that, you know, the, the success rate of businesses that last two years is not very high. I think it's, I don't even know the rate. It's very, very low of any business being successful, let alone partnerships. So John me that's my mindset was, you know what? I got to learn everything from ground up just in case I have to start my own company, whether it's a brokerage, whether it's a real estate investment company, whatever that looks like. I think it's very important for everybody to learn from foundation down or foundation up, I should say.   Jesse (10m 28s): Mm. Yeah. Fair enough. So you, you kind of, you start getting into hitting your stride in terms of doing transactions, moving up in the career in terms of where you're at now. Cause you mentioned kind of on the outset talking about virtually virtual assistance and that business. And I think it kind of takes a theme of a lot of people that we've come on the podcast, basically the who, not how mindset of, of basically trying to figure out what tasks are absolutely mission critical that you do, which ones can you outsource?   How do you do that? Can you afford it? So how did you get into that side of the business?   Bob (11m 3s): Yeah, it was interesting cause we, 2007, we actually got approached. There's a company called fortune builders here in Connecticut. And, but three of our buddies that actually started it, we're, we're flipping properties. They're were flipping properties. We would wholesale them. Some properties, we'd do some short sales together, a bunch of different stuff. And they approached us because pat and I actually started our first education program with a company out of Florida, end of 2005, 2006, and then 2007, when they were launching fortune billers, they said, Hey, listen, we've never done fulfillment.   We've never done coaching. How do you, you know, what do you guys do? And then we started mapping it out and they said, Hey, you guys want to be partners with us handshake partners. Right? So we were, our job was to take care of this. And, and then we grew that to, I think the biggest, they were were probably about $300 million in sales. Well, took care of the backend, started a coaching program from ground up hired coaches filled from within. And so after going probably through and working with over 30, 40,000 students, there's a lot of common themes, right?   Not only with my own business, but a lot of our students were either working part-time or full-time. And one of the things that we've noticed, I mean, you probably see this in your business. They're not making any more time. There's 24 hours in a day. There's not much time left to do a lot of this stuff. So I was always looking for some sort of service or product to, to help our students. And then in 2013, I actually got introduced to what a virtual assistant was and virtual assistants most likely when I talk about it, it's someone who doesn't live in the country.   Right. And I know there's, there's people that live in country in the same country that are virtual assistants, but not in the same state, et cetera. But I got introduced to a couple of different countries. I tried India, I tried Pakistan. I tried south America. The best virtual assistants that I found were in the Philippines. So after a year of working with them, a light bulb went on and I said, you know what? There's a business here. And the partner that I had at the time had no idea what I was talking about, but I said, listen, I said, you're using virtual assistance.   I said, you're pretty good on the systems and processes. I helped start coaching firms. So let's create training right behind the virtual assistant industry. So we started launched our first company, 2014, tested there for two years for proof of concept. It was a big hit. And then, you know, fast forward today, we're at over, they were at about 560 virtual assistance within, within a couple countries.   Jesse (13m 43s): So I'm curious on that point about trying different countries, whether it's Pakistan, India, like you see a lot of, you know, Upwork or fi wherever people kind of go resources that they use to look for virtual assistance. And it's been my experience too. I've had a, I've had three virtual assistants, the Philippines, two of them, the Philippines one, not in the Philippines. And I found the same thing. And I hear a lot of people that even just colleagues of mine or friends of mine, one just comes to mind, just started a Keller Williams brokerage on the residential side.   And they have found success in that side. Is there, is there something about what you were looking for or real estate that it seems to be the Philippines keeps coming up as, as the place to go?   Bob (14m 24s): Yeah. I just think it's really more cultural based. The Philippines Philippine culture is very family oriented. They look at your business as their business and they really, you know, they, they have a lot of pride in what they do. That's one thing, but also English is one of their main languages there. A lot of people don't realize that. Of course there's other kind of other kinds of like tagalo is one of them, but English is what they're taught and the newer generation too. And they're getting, you know, their English and accents getting, you know, more improved each year that they, you know, they've learned and they, you know, think about this now they got the internet here.   They're watching YouTube to watch a Netflix all day long, et cetera. So it just improves on that side of it. So we just selected that because of those main reasons.   Jesse (15m 13s): Yeah. It was one thing I was really surprised by when I started looking into this was, you know, part of the, the friend I mentioned the business that they were doing was cold calling. And like, to me, I was like, you can't outsource cold calling you can't and they say, well, why can't you? It's like, well, we outsource it. Like we, we teach younger guys and gals every day in our office there. Why can't you do that? And part of it was the first question was if you're in Toronto, you're in Boston, you're in New York, like you have the cultural or the, the proficiency in English is one thing, but not to have an accent and immediately think it's a cold call is another thing.   And what surprised me is that the people that we interview in the Philippines, like the first one had a UK accent, like fluent. And, you know, as a north American, there's, there's nothing better than a cold call from somebody from the UK or it's just a very, in a very endearing or disarming accent. So that was something for sure. I, I, I could see that a hundred percent that every year you're starting to get that proficiency up higher and higher to the point where yeah, you can hire for cold calling. It's just a matter of them teaching, teaching them the same way you would teach somebody local on the specific task of cold calling.   Bob (16m 24s): Yeah. And that's a great point. I literally had a, I had a presentation or a, I don't know if it was a podcast or a webinar to a, a real estate. It was a, it was a mix of investors and agents. And we had that this same conversation. And a lot of people don't realize is that, you know, I live in the Northeast, Northeast, Connecticut, United States. And I don't know if anyone's ever been there, but you know, growing up in Boston and Connecticut, there, there's a different kind of attitude there with people.   Right. So if they are okay with having a Filipino call them and they're giving them information, then anybody in this world will be okay with someone from the Philippines because you know, the attitudes of the Northeast are kind of like, you know, they look at you a certain way, like, what's your angle? What are you putting in that? So, so just, just to that kind of going off of that, if you have the right script and like you said, they follow a process, the main thing for any, whether it's it's the brokerage side or the investment side, the only thing that you want as an operator is for them to pretty screen that potential lead to say, yes, I'm interested to talk to either Bob or Jesse or whoever.   That's all you want. You do not want any, any virtual assistant closing a deal for it. Because if you do, it's your, it won't work. It's your business to close those deals. So driving those motivated leads to you. It's a, it's a very good way to keep your energy.   Jesse (17m 57s): Yeah. I think that's, that's for those listening that are looking at on the say on the investment side, you're calling off market deals because of how crazy our market is right now, especially industrial and multi-racial, but you're calling those owners of property. And you're trying to figure out if they're sellers. The, the thing that clicked for me, especially with the VA side of things is that their goal is not the same as yours. When you're calling, when I'm calling. It's a certain, I know that I have the ability to pivot to it, to the sale, but even for myself, the first part of the call is usually, you know, not somebody is not going to say, okay, yeah, well, I'll sell right here.   So what I underestimated was what you just said, the piece about them, first of all, their goal is to get them in contact with, you know, their team lead or their that's, who that's you, whoever, you know, whatever way you describe getting that call, but it's basically booking a meeting for us and to, to actually close the deal. And what I underestimated was that, that layer of having that seniority, when you go on the call, it actually helps you because it looks like you, you know, you have a staff of people that your, your time is valuable too.   You're not just calling.   Bob (19m 3s): Yeah. Yeah. And, and it weeds through a lot of the thinking about this. If you're sitting by your desk all day long, calling four hours a day, I guarantee you will be burnt out. Right. I mean, it did for me. So what I did, I didn't finish my, actually my, I didn't finish my story on every day from 10 o'clock to 3:00 PM, I would door knock. And then I would go home in that same list, I'd go to either white pages, four eleven.com or whatever. And I would skip trace the number in out and hammer the phones before I would have dinner. Cause obviously my wife would have killed me if I, if I kept working all night, but that's what I would do all day long and over time.   And that beats you up, that beats you up. If you're hammering that all doing that, if that's the only thing you're going to do. Yeah.   Jesse (19m 44s): That's a lot of fatigue. I mean, even, even in our industry, you do that for your first couple of years at most. And then hopefully, you know, you get some, some deal volume. So Bob, in terms of, for somebody that's, they are completely outside of the realm of, of hiring somebody. It doesn't seem like something that'd be part of their business at this point. A lot of times people that justification will be the costs, which, you know, I think Kevin kind of get dispelled fairly quickly with the fact that you're outsourcing it. But the, just the fact that talk a little bit about the need for one, when people say, I don't think I'm at that stage yet.   Yup.   Bob (20m 22s): And I look at it. It's, it's funny. You said that. Cause I had this conversation earlier with someone too, I look at is, and this is not what I, I, how I looked at things when I first started, I look at things as an investment now. Right. So if you're going to hire somebody, it's not a cost, it's an investment. Right? So we just added a transaction coordinator in our office. And that to me is a huge investment because that's going to give your team is going to be way more right then if you don't have it.   So that's the way I look at adding a, let's say a cold color because you have to look at what we do on a daily basis. And you say, okay, if I'm doing a $10 an hour task, most likely I'm gonna have a $10 an hour bank account, right? Because if you're doing those tasks, our jobs as business owners or whatever role managers, whatever role we are is not to be cold calling all day. It's not to be, you know, spending our time prospecting. It's not to be, you know, doing admin work, posting social media, doing all of that stuff that you should literally look at your calendar for the next two weeks, write down all of your tasks, identify what tasks you could take off of your plate and pass off to somebody else.   Whether it's a virtual assistant or your office assistant, whatever it is. Right. And then you'll realize like, wow, I actually have 20 plus more hours of my week. Hey, you may, you may decide to go to a Leafs game then and get out of office, get out of your office early. But if you have that extra time, then you could decide, Hey, do I want to use that to build this or build this or build this or go on vacation or whatever it is. But you'll realize with an extra 20 hours, you can do a lot.   Jesse (22m 5s): Yeah. For sure. What do you find from the individuals that you work with in real estate? What do you find is the task that they find that is the one that they end up saying, this is something I, I need more time to do or when they take these other things off their plate, they're like, this is really the thing I should be focusing on.   Bob (22m 23s): So are you saying that the tasks typically that they're doing, are you saying then that when that's off or do they do   Jesse (22m 29s): Once, once they offload, like you said, you go through your tasks, you, you identify the ones that you don't need to be there that you can offload to the VA after that, do you find there's one or two tasks that those individuals find that, okay, here, this is what I should be focusing on. Okay.   Bob (22m 44s): So yeah, that's kind of tough question, but I'll give you, I'll give you the answer of me personally. What happens when you, you're not overwhelmed and you're not looking at this phone, you want you, you're not checking the list and checking the box. You could actually take a step back and look at your business through a 10,000 foot overview. And once you actually can do that, it's kind of like sports, right? When you're, when you get better, the game gets slower, right? So it's kind of the same concept. And in, in, in business, if you could then have more time, you could pull yourself out, you could see how things are moving, right.   They move really, really slow. So now you'll be looking at your acquisition team, how many calls and now you can really oversee them. How many calls are they doing? Maybe you're going to listen to calls maybe, oh, you're going to realize, now you need to add another individual on your team. So you could really look at it on a and again, this all depends on what type of business you're in. If you're in the commercial brokerage right now, you're going to be building relationships, going to dinner with a banker or with a v-neck or you'll have that much more time to build your business and look at your business in a different light.   Does that, does that?   Jesse (23m 51s): It makes sense. Yeah. A hundred percent. And I think it, it, it is probably a tough question because I find it'll probably be different for each type of individual and worker or, or type of entrepreneur, especially. I think that's a good point because I feel like most entrepreneurs like pure entrepreneurs at heart, I think are, are creative and big picture. And part of, one of the worst things you can do is get them bogged down in, in my new HSA and task oriented things. And like you said, it's almost like a it's sports or it's like Neo in the matrix, everything kind of slows down and you know, you're seeing everything around you and you can finally say, you know, what are we doing in six months?   What are we doing a year from now? And have that big picture plan.   Bob (24m 33s): Yeah. And you can start, you can start doing quarterly, you know, start setting quarterly goals. And you know, a great book has traction. Right? Very, very good book to read, to start that scaling up as another one, but it's really good. You could now start implementing this in your business and you could do more training. You know, there's nothing more important as you know, is, is training your team because, you know, if you could have spend more time on the ground with the team training, they're going to be that much better themselves in the companies you have that much better.   Yeah.   Jesse (25m 3s): Fair enough. So when you let, for example, if you have somebody that, whether it's, you know, most listeners are on the real estate end on the investment side, when you have an individual that's looking for a virtual assistant, they hire the virtual assistant. Do you find that there's kind of a hierarchy of tasks that you, you know, you say start with these types of things before you go, for instance, into more sales oriented stuff. So here's an email list that we need cleaned up, or here's a know here's some administration work that we need done and then move them towards sales or cold calling or acquisition, or is there it's, everything's, you know, everybody's different.   Bob (25m 42s): Yeah. You know what, that's an extra, very good question. And the answer is everyone's different. We identify that right or front, because the way our process is we have a sourcing and recruiting team in the Philippines. We also have a training team where they train three to four weeks a month on real estate tasks. And then we have a placements team where we use predictive and index and disc profiling. So once it gets to the placements team, we already know when sales comes in, when an individual wants a cold call, or let's say, it's almost like match.com and in placements, right.   They match up the, the disc profile, that predictive index in the qualities that, that particular virtual assistant has with the tasks that you're looking for, I'm looking for. So that's what we do as a company to match them up. Because you know, you know, this, if you've ever, if you've ever gone on a company like Upwork, it's a pain in the butt, right. You have to sift through hundreds and hundreds. I mean, I hired here in my office and I use wise hire or indeed or whatever, it's the concept I got to do all the heavy lifting.   Right. So we, what we did in our, my Reva global company is we funded all of that heavy lifting and just hand it over to them.   Jesse (26m 53s): Yeah. It's funny. It's almost a, the irony of when you do go on Upwork, you almost want a virtual assistant to, to hire for you on Upwork tonight. When you, when you say disk, just, just so I'm following you, it's like the personality tests, like the, the profile. Okay. So you go to that, to that level of, of granularity when you're trying to match up the VA with the professional. Yep. Correct. And what, what was the kind of the origin of that approach where you start actually looking at all right, is this person really psychologically the right person for this task or for this, this matchup?   Yeah.   Bob (27m 32s): And you started looking at that over the years. You know, it started, like I said, I started this in 2014, you'll realize that, you know, cold callers tend to be a certain kind of profile. Right. And you'll have, you know, bookkeepers are a certain type of profile because you'll never want to put, and I'll give you an example. These is accurate it's dominance, right? So you have dominance and eyes for influence interaction or interactive. So those type of individuals, they love being on the phone. Right.   You know, just the fi finish up that S S is for, for a steadiness and a CS for consciousness. Those are more of your bookkeepers that are really attention to detail. You know, you know, there's a lot of salespeople, you know, their attention to detail. Sometimes you don't want them.   Jesse (28m 19s): There's a couple of zeros there.   Bob (28m 21s): Exactly. So that's how we look at that to, to help, you know, find the best fit.   Jesse (28m 27s): Yeah. And I think that's a missing piece with a lot of it. I think that goes for not even VAs. I think that's just hiring in general, trying to match up culture. And that's, you know, it goes back to the beginning of our discussion here, you know, where you have certain industries, I find are more conducive to X athletes. It's a very, you'll have very similar cultures and working together.   Bob (28m 49s): Yep. Yeah. There's I mean, you know, ex athletes, it's typically it's sales, right? You got a lot of Phi X app, that's going in a financial industry, right. Medical industry, same thing, pharmaceutical industry. That's a lot of how, how a lot of these companies, actually, I got a buddy that's pretty high up in principal financial, and that's what they do. They look at, you know, they look at resumes from, from bigger companies. And I know there's a lot of colleges that are tying to some companies now, which is actually really, really, really good.   And you know, the funnel.   Jesse (29m 21s): Yeah. Would you not to put you on the spot here, but would you be able to name a couple tasks or jobs that you would think, or that most people think is, is something they wouldn't put on a VA, but, but you've, you've found success in it or are there certain things that people are surprised that VA's can, can do?   Bob (29m 43s): Yeah. I mean, on the multifamily level, just talk about the multifamily side. We have a lot of our multi-family investors. We have a lot of our blog. We have a lot of single family investors that own hundreds of units. Right. I have one individual that has 15 virtual assistants with us that does everything from bookkeeping to taking tenant calls, to doing tenant placements. Right. So those are some of the things off the bat right away. The other marketing properties that are actually some of those properties that go vacant, someone needs to then start marketing them and push them around to all of the sites that they have.   The there's a, some syndicated sites. So you push them out too. So there's a lot of those types of tasks that other people don't think of in reference to that. Another one is, is a big part of all of our businesses. I mean, you have a podcast, right. It's using a virtual assistant to splice up your videos and send it out to your, whether it's your email list or whatever list that you have posting it on YouTube posting on Instagram, posting it on Facebook, all that kind of stuff that takes a lot of time. And it's a pain in the butt, right.   So I have a podcast. That's what we do.   Jesse (30m 52s): Yeah. 100%. It is a, it becomes a bit of a full-time job, but, and once you hit your stride with something like that, really the hardest, the hardest part I found is the, is that setup piece. So like you're saying whether it's going an Upworker, it's going on another site, it really, a lot of it is that finding people and you find, you find that you, you really need a virtual system for that job itself, just trying to get other people on.   Bob (31m 15s): Yup. Yeah, for sure. And, and, you know, it took me a little while at the beginning and that, that was the business model that we, we figured out at the beginning because of the pain, you know, I felt you could go for places that, you know, I always look at in this kind of funny, you look at, I look at my company, I'm not the cheapest. Right. And I've, I've come to realize after 17 plus years in business, if you go for the cheapest, you're going to get the cheapest. Right. That's the way it's pretty, you know, you start looking at that, the older we get, you start seeing things a little different.   And I always go back to, to this one of my first houses I ever bought, I bought a home Depot cheap door for 99 bucks. And the, and it was a you're the next door and every winter and every summer, my, either he bill or electric bill was through the roof. And I was looking at that door doors. I think I probably should've spent probably over 500 bucks and I probably would have saved thousands of them, thousands and thousands of dollars. So that's the way I look at, you know, you pay for in life, you pay for what you get rewarded, you pay for   Jesse (32m 22s): Yeah. A hundred percent. So just wrapping up close to the end here, we usually have a set of questions. We ask every guest, but before we do them, I'm, you know, selfishly on the VA side, I have a question about email and calendar management and, you know, just like a lot of these things that you think can't get outsourced, that it turns out that you can, from an email management point of view, how, what do you recommend if somebody is they've, you know, for whatever business it is, they want somebody to offload or shoulder some of the things that they're doing through email, you know, for strategies from that point of view, whether it's calendar and email, just email and you know, what techniques do you find these that, that people are, that are the VA's are doing?   Are, you know, the aggregating, the most important ones. Are you training them up on that piece?   Bob (33m 13s): Yeah. So just on, on email management, I mean, we could get, I don't know how many emails you get a day, but I get a billion. Right. And you get some that don't, you know, they're just junk mail. You signed up for a Travelocity Expedia and they sell your email over to something else and they sell it to something else. Right. So I find what works out well as virtual assistance, just sifting through and going through each, probably each hour and then getting through some of those. And then we set up a side email to send the really important ones over to.   So that's how it worked out very well. It saves that does save a lot of time. I know it sounds so simple, but if you actually took the time and you're like, all right, you're looking at, you're looking at your emails, how many junk emails you actually get per day or emails that just waste your time and are not important for you on a daily basis. It's hours upon hours on a day.   Jesse (34m 8s): Yeah. And it's, it's time is one piece of it. But I think another piece for sure is just the stress. It's, you know, when you look at your phone and there's 200 emails or there's 78, whatever it is like you go, if somebody can be like, okay, I have somebody, whatever. I was just text message or emailed. I know those are the important ones. I don't have to stress about it. I can manage it. Yeah.   Bob (34m 26s): And I, I know if anyone's like me, it's I look at this, I gotta get mine down to zero.   Jesse (34m 31s): Yeah. I'm the same way. I, if it's over like 20, I'm starting to get stressed. Awesome. Well, we've got four questions. We typically ask every guest. So if you are a, if you're ready to go off, throw them at you, let's do it. All right. What's something, you know, now in your career or business, you wish you knew when you started out   Bob (34m 52s): Don't chase the shiny objects. Because typically those shiny objects where losing a lot of money and wasted a lot of time.   Jesse (34m 60s): I like it in terms of mentorship for younger people getting into, in, into the industry, whether it's real estate or other specific areas, what would you say to them? What's your view on mentorship?   Bob (35m 12s): I say 100% invest in it. 100% because mentors will cut your learning curve over time and will make you way more money than being a, a lone Wolf in a, in a solo preneur and saying, Hey, I can do it all myself. You know, if you learn anything from, from, from sports it's you need a team. I don't care if it's Wayne Gretzky, right? Wayne, Gretzky has a team with them. Doesn't matter. Right? I mean, look, how good look, how good Toronto is? They have a lot of sprinkles stars, right?   If they learn how to play together, they might win a cup. Right?   Jesse (35m 46s): So fingers crossed any resources or books you're reading right now that you'd, you can share with the listeners.   Bob (35m 55s): I would, I would definitely say books like scaling up or traction or some of the books that 100% I would highlight. And we talk about our, in our business, outside these walls here all the time. And I think those are, if you're going to read some books, those are very, very powerful books. The other one is one of the, the ones that I think is for me, it has been very powerful as a it's called a compound effect. Darren. That's a very good one. Yep.   Jesse (36m 21s): First car make and model.   Bob (36m 23s): First car was a Nissan Maxima, white Nissan Maxima. This is when I got my signing bonus. I bought a used one. So it was back. This is hallway back.   Jesse (36m 33s): That's awesome. Right on Bob. Where, where can listeners find you on the interwebs?   Bob (36m 40s): Yep. Actually you go to my website@rivaglobal.com, R E V a global.com. I'm on Facebook. I'm on LinkedIn. I'm on Instagram. So you can find us there. We have a podcast called Friday coffee break. It's on every Friday at 10:00 AM. Eastern standard time. So you check me out there and yeah, all my contact information is out there.   Jesse (37m 4s): My guest today has been Bob Bob. Thanks for being part of working capital.   Bob (37m 9s): Awesome, Jesse, thanks for having me.   Jesse (37m 18s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five-star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.

Copywriters Podcast
The Two Copywriters Who Changed Everything, And The Man Who Hired Them

Copywriters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


We're back with a special Gold Edition of Copywriters Podcast. The reason it's a Gold Edition is because we are taking a deep dive into the gold mines of copywriting history. The two men who invented copywriting as we know it are Claude Hopkins and John E. Kennedy. And the man who hired them was Albert Lasker. I came across this book, The Man Who Sold America, which has information I'd never seen anywhere else before. That was probably because one of the authors, Arthur Schultz, is the former CEO of the ad agency Foote, Cone and Belding — which gave him and his co-author Jeffrey L. Cruikshank access to private papers and other information that was not available to anyone else. You see, Foote, Cone and Belding used to be called Lord and Thomas. That was the agency Albert Lasker ran when he hired Claude Hopkins and John E. Kennedy. I probably never would have even known about this book if I hadn't been told about it by Brad Nickel, one of my mentoring clients and a previous guest on Copywriters Podcast. It's a big book, so I've selected a handful of key highlights from more than 400 pages that go deep into Lasker's life, and his experiences with the two copywriters. This podcast contains three sections, and each section is focused on one person. First, Albert Lasker… then John E. Kennedy… and last, Claude Hopkins. We look at how their lives and careers intertwined. I think it's very interesting that all three of them got to where they were and did what they did through some personal connections. In the case of Kennedy, a personal connection he proactively created himself. Here's the book this information was taken from, and adapted considerably for today's show: The Man Who Sold America, by Jeffrey L. Cruikshank & Arthur W. Schultzhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B003SNJYTYDownload.

How I Got Hired
54. Sonalogues: 6 Lessons after 1 year of 'How I Got Hired'

How I Got Hired

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 22:08


Yes, it's been exactly one year. Exactly 52 Mondays ago, I released the first episode of 'How I Got Hired'. In this first anniversary special, I share 6 lessons I have learnt that you can apply in your own career. A BIG, heartfelt thank you to you for being a part of the HIGH podcast journey, I appreciate you so much!Thanks to your support, the podcast featured in the Top 50 career podcast in 22 countries!Which of the 6 lessons resonated the most with you?Tag me on Twitter (@GotHired) and Instagram (@HowIGotHired).Hope you enjoyed listening, and here's to many, many more!------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Liked this episode? A couple of things:1. Share the podcast with three of your closest friends! And please leave a great review on Apple Podcasts here, as it would mean a lot to me and hopefully help others discover this resource for Job Seekers ! 2. You will love my weekly emails called Charge-Up! .. they're no fluff no spam, where I share my favourite career insights from movies, TV shows, news and my own personal experiences, that I don't share anywhere else. Make sure you sign up here!  3. Come hang out with me LIVE on LinkedIn/Facebook/Youtube every Friday at 2 pm CET where I answer your questions and often bring in fab guests:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonalbahl/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/SuperChargeYourselfFacebook: https://m.facebook.com/SuperChargeYourself/

Project Medtech
Medtech Money --- Episode 31: Charlie Huiner, CEO at Modulim --- Being Hired as CEO to Raise Capital for US Commercialization: Where to Begin?

Project Medtech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:36


In this episode, Giovanni and Charlie discuss what they are doing at Modulim, the first money that came in the door, their different rounds of funding, how they made non-dilutive funding last so long, when it makes sense to pursue non-dilutive funding, why the name of your round matters, and more. Charlie Huiner LinkedIn Modulim Website Giovanni Lauricella LinkedIn Project Medtech LinkedIn Project Medtech Website

Tony Katz + The Morning News
Child Actors Hired To Listen To VP Harris Talk About Outer Space

Tony Katz + The Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 4:05


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Successful Fashion Designer
SFF141: Why I Hired This Freelancer (and then hired her again, and again, and again!)

The Successful Fashion Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 77:53


Ever wondered what your clients & potential clients are thinking? What makes them decide to hire a freelancer from a cold pitch? What are they thinking while you're working together? And how do they decide whether to lose your info, or hire you again (and again, and again)? In this interview with freelance graphic designer Atara, you'll hear a client's perspective on what makes a freelancer irresistible.  For the complete show notes, including links to the resources mentioned, head over to Successful Fashion Designer!

Unconquered Podcast
Building on the Syracuse Win and Q&A, Including: Should FSU Have Hired Lane Kiffin?

Unconquered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:30


Looking again at what Florida State did to pull out a close victory against Syracuse, what this says about where Florida State is at this point in the season, and looking forward to the remainder of the season. Plus some question-and-answer, including whether Lane Kiffin... The post Building on the Syracuse Win and Q&A, Including: Should FSU Have Hired Lane Kiffin? appeared first on Unconquered Podcast.