Podcasts about National Book Award

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 817PODCASTS
  • 1,779EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about National Book Award

Show all podcasts related to national book award

Latest podcast episodes about National Book Award

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Richard Powers

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:00


Richard Powers has published thirteen novels. His most recent is Bewilderment. He is a MacArthur Fellow and received the National Book Award. His novel, The Overstory, won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. He lives in the Great Smoky Mountains. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Midday
'What About the Baby?': Essays by Alice McDermott on writing fiction

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:44


Tom's guest today is the acclaimed author, Alice McDermott. She is the winner of a National Book Award. Three of her novels have been finalists for the Pulitzer Prize, and she's garnered many other prizes and accolades in a career that has spanned 40 years, and counting. She's an insightful observer of the passing parade and her prose is a delight to encounter. Books like Charming Billy,After This, Someone, or her most recent novel, The Ninth Hour, have afforded readers some of the most enjoyable and enlightening experiences available in contemporary fiction. Alice McDermott has long been revered as a teacher of writing as well, serving for many years on the faculties of the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars and the Sewanee Writers' Conference. Her latest book is a work of non-fiction, in which she proffers what might be dubbed a Bill of Rights for readers, and a how-to guide for writers. It is a celebration of great writing, and an investigation into what makes great writing, great. The book is called What About the Baby?: Some Thoughts on the Art of Fiction.  Alice McDermott joins us on our digital line from her home in Bethesda, Maryland. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Lauren Groff on Exploring the Many Meanings of Matrix in Her New Novel

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:46


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan talks to Lauren Groff about her new novel, Matrix, out now from Riverhead Books. ________________________________ Subscribe now to The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you find your podcasts! Lauren Groff is a two-time National Book Award finalist and the New York Times bestselling author of the novels The Monsters of Templeton, Arcadia, and Fates and Furies, and the short story collections Delicate Edible Birds and Florida. She has won the Story Prize and has been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Groff's work regularly appears in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and else­where, and she was named one of Granta's 2017 Best Young American Novelists. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Novel Dialogue
2.3 Because I Couldn’t Be a Dancer: Sigrid Nunez and Tara Menon (JP)

Novel Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:52


The brilliant New York writer Sigrid Nunez‘s most recent novel is What Are You Going Through; her previous one, The Friend, (2018) won the National Book Award. She speaks with Tara Menon, of the Harvard English department, and author of a terrific article about Sigrid Nunez in the Sewanee Review. The conversation ranges widely andContinue reading "2.3 Because I Couldn’t Be a Dancer: Sigrid Nunez and Tara Menon (JP)"

The Brian Lehrer Show
Geo-Quiz: Brooklyn

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 14:10


Play along with the Brooklyn Geo-Quiz, with guest quiz leader Jacqueline Woodson, the author of many books, in prose and poetry, for adults and children, including the National Book Award-winning Brown Girl Dreaming (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2014), Another Brooklyn (Amistad, 2016) and her latest book, Before the Ever After (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2020).

Stitch Please
A Sewing Chat with Rita Dove

Stitch Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:09


Thank you to volunteer sound designer for her work on this episode including the following music: “Chill Lo-Fi Hip Hop” by Skilsel; “News Corporate” by Skilsel; “Hip Hop Lo-Fi” by John Sib; “Hip Hop Funk” by John Sib and “African Percussion” by SofraMore about Rita DoveWhether she is crafting a line of poetry or stitching together her husband's lavender velvet wedding suit, Rita Dove is a master of storytelling. In this episode of Stitch Please, Lisa talks with former US Poet Laureate, Rita Dove, about her introduction to sewing, the relationship between poetry and sewing, and how to walk along the seam sewn by those who have come before us. After graduating from Buchtel High School as a Presidential Scholar, Dove went on to graduate summa cum laude with a B.A. from Miami University in 1973. In 1974, she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship from the University of Tübingen, Germany and later completed her MFA at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa in 1977 where she met her husband, Fred Viebahn. In 1987, Dove received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In 1992, Dove was named US Poet Laureate and served as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress—a position she would later hold again as a Special Bicentennial Consultant in 1999. In addition to being the youngest individual and the first African American to hold the position of Poet Laureate, Rita Dove is the recipient of 28 honorary doctorates and numerous awards, some of which include: Poet Laureate of Virginia, the National Humanities Medal presented by President Bill Clinton, the National Medal of Arts presented by President Barack Obama, several lifetime achievement awards, and the Gold Medal in poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Dove has published the poetry collections The Yellow House on the Corner (1980), Museum (1983), Thomas and Beulah (1986), Grace Notes (1989), Selected Poems (1993), Mother Love (1995), On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999), American Smooth (2004), Sonata Mulattica (2009), Collected Poems: 1974-2004 (2016) which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and her most recent work, Playlist for the Apocalypse (2021).  In addition to poetry, Dove has published a book of short stories, Fifth Sunday (1985), the novel Through the Ivory Gate (1992), and the play The Darker Face of the Earth (1994). Rita Dove is currently the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia. When she's not writing timeless literary gems, Dove might be found thumbing through High Fashion Sewing Secrets and creating her own wearable works of art.

Thresholds
Rita Dove

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:03


Jordan talks to the incomparable Rita Dove about discovery, about taking a break from creating and publishing, and about re-learning to hold a pen again after her MS diagnosis. Rita Dove, Pulitzer Prize winner and former U.S. Poet Laureate, is the only poet honored with both the National Humanities Medal and the National Medal of Arts. Her recent works include Playlist for the Apocalypse, Sonata Mulattica, and the National Book Award–shortlisted Collected Poems: 1974–2004. In 2021 she was awarded the Gold Medal for Poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She lives in Charlottesville, where she teaches creative writing at the University of Virginia. For more Thresholds, visit us at www.thisisthresholds.com Be sure to rate/review/subscribe! -------------------------------- This episode is presented in collaboration with the 2021 Miami Book Fair. Rita Dove is just one of the many writers from around the world participating in the nation's largest gathering of writers and readers of all ages. This year's Miami Book Fair takes place online and in person from November 14th to November 21st. Please visit miamibookfair.com for more information, or follow MBF at @miamibookfair Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Writer's Bone
Episode 500: Lauren Groff, Author of Matrix

Writer's Bone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 67:19


We celebrate our 500th episode with the help of Pop Literacy hosts Jennifer Keishin Armstrong and Kimberly Potts. They share some pop culture book and TV recommendations with Daniel Ford and share some lessons they've learned about podcasting (0:51 - 41:56). Two-time National Book Award finalist Lauren Groff then joins Daniel on the show to discuss her latest book Matrix (43:07 - 1:06:35). Groff explains to us how she went about crafting a story set in 12th century and featuring Marie de France as the main character. To learn more about Lauren Groff, visit her official website and follow her on Twitter. Matrix was featured in September 2021's “Books That Should Be On Your Radar.” To learn more about Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, visit her official website, like her Facebook page, and follow her on Twitter and Instagram. To learn more about Kimberly Potts, visit her official website and follow her on Twitter and Instagram. Also subscribe to Pop Literacy and pick up When Women Invented Television and The Way We All Became The Brady Bunch. Here's a list of recommendations featured in this episode: The Storyteller by Dave Grohl Woke Up This Morning: The Definitive Oral History of The Sopranos by Michael Imperioli and Steve Schirripa Bad Motherfucker: The Life and Movies of Samuel L. Jackson, the Coolest Man in Hollywood by Gavin Edwards Daisy Jones & the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid "For All Mankind" on Apple TV "Heels" on Starz "Impeachment" on FX "Dopesick" on Hulu Today's episode is sponsored by Libro.fm.

You Don't Know Lit
71. National Book Month

You Don't Know Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:35


Happy National Book Month! This episode we feature previous National Book Award winners. The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer (2013) vs The Yellow House: A Memoir by Sarah M. Broom (2019).

All Of It
Get Lit Preview: Lauren Groff

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 13:20


Acclaimed author Lauren Groff joins us for a preview conversation highlighting her new novel and our "Get Lit with All Of It" October selection, Matrix. The novel tells the story of Marie de France, a 12th century nun who is expelled from the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine, only to find power as the prioress of a failing abbey. Matrix is a National Book Award nominee and a New York Times bestseller. Groff will join us for our virtual book club event on Wednesday, October 27 at 7 pm. To find out more about our Get Lit with All Of It book club, and our partnership with the New York Public Library, click here, and follow us on Instagram at @allofitwnyc.

Dialogues with Richard Reeves
Evan Osnos on America‘s fire and fury

Dialogues with Richard Reeves

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 72:24


What made America into a tinderbox, ready for Donald Trump's spark? That's the question Evan Osnos, staff writer for the New Yorker, set out to answer in his book Wildland: The Making of America's Fury. Having lived overseas for many years, mostly in China, Evan returned to the U.S. in 2013 and felt something of a stranger in his own land. The events of the next few years added to this sense. So he set out to find out what had happened to make his home country feel so foreign, by returning to the places he knew best: Greenwich CT, where he grew up, Clarksburg WV where he started his reporting career, and Chicago where he covered city politics for the Tribune. The book is already a bestseller and being heaped with critical acclaim. The story is of a country that was ever more divided by class and geography and politics, but ever more connected by the ties of the modern economy. Evan and I talk about the financialization of the economy, and the transformation of the culture of his home town of Greenwich into the hedge fund capital of the country; the battles over the coal industry; the rise of Trump; the potential for Joe Biden to bring the nation back together; the cleavages of race and wealth in cities like Chicago. Although he is worried about what he calls the "seclusion of mind" of many of America's tribes, Evan ends on an optimistic note: that the pandemic has shown that whether we like it or not, we're all in together. Evan Osnos Evan Osnos is a staff writer for the New Yorker, contributor to CNN, and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution covering politics and foreign affairs. A graduate of Harvard, Osnos started his journalism career in West Virginia and Chicago, before being stationed in the Middle East to report on the Iraq War. He then moved to Beijing for eight years and wrote, “Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China” which won the National Book Award. He now lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and two children.  More Osnos  Read his "novelistically gripping" book, Wildland: The Making of America's Fury Find more of his writing at The New Yorker  Follow him on twitter: @eosnos Also mentioned We briefly discussed the book “The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class”, written by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett. Osnos referred to Michael Sandel's work, specifically what he calls "The Skyboxification of American Life" We discussed the saga of Varsity Blues, and the very notable quote from Gordon Caplan: “To be honest I'm not worried about the moral issue here.”  Osnos referred to the documentary-style photography of Walker Evans Osnos spoke in depth about Patriot Coal  I highlighted the racial disparity in wealth pre- and post-recession, which you can learn more about here.  Osnos mentions a political movement in West Virginia, called WV Can't Wait  The Dialogues Team Creator: Richard Reeves Research: Ashleigh Maciolek Artwork: George Vaughan Thomas Tech Support: Cameron Hauver-Reeves Music: "Remember" by Bencoolen (thanks for the permission, guys!)  

Writers on Writing
Lauren Groff, author of "The Matrix," on Writers on Writing

Writers on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021


Lauren Groff, author of MATRIX, joins Marrie Stone to talk about the novel. Author of six books of fiction, Groff's work has won The Story Prize and was twice a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction. She talks about the surprising inspiration for the novel, her time spent in a convent with Benedictine nuns, her research process for this 12th century novel, and so much more. Download audio.  (Podcast date: October 1, 2021)

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes 201: Victoria Chang

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:08


Starting with Victoria's most recent book of poems, Obit, Paul and Victoria have a fascinating and deeply considered conversation about grief, craft, and the joys of obsessions.Victoria talks about the experience of writing about her grief in Obit and how the obituary form helped to guide her process. They discuss how Obit felt suited to the grief of the past year before Victoria shares her own poems and unpacks her latest obsessions, including her upcoming books and her fascination with tiny poems. Victoria Chang's latest poetry book is OBIT, which was named a New York Times Notable Book and received the LA Times Book Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and the PEN Voelcker Award. It was also longlisted for a National Book Award and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Griffin International Poetry Prize. Her forthcoming hybrid nonfiction book is Dear Memory. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and lives in Los Angeles.

Reading Women
Interview with Lauren Groff

Reading Women

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 34:42


In this week's episode, Kendra talks with Lauren Groff about her book, Matrix, which is out now from Riverhead Books. Check out our Patreon page to learn more about our book club and other Patreon-exclusive goodies. Follow along over on Instagram, join the discussion in our Goodreads group, and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more new books and extra book reviews! Books Mentioned Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff Florida by Lauren Groff Matrix by Lauren Groff Lauren Recommends Agatha of Little Neon by Claire Luchette 2666 by Roberto Bolaño, Translated by Natasha Wimmer Amulet by Roberto Bolaño, Translated by Chris Andrews Harrow by Joy Williams About the AuthorLauren Groff is the author of six books of fiction, the most recent the novel MATRIX (September 2021). Her work has won The Story Prize, the ABA Indies' Choice Award, and France's Grand Prix de l'Héroïne, was twice a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction and the Kirkus Prize, and was shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Prize, the Southern Book Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Prize. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and was named one of Granta's Best of Young American Novelists. Her work has been translated into over thirty languages. She lives in Gainesville, Florida. Website | Twitter CONTACT Questions? Comments? Email us hello@readingwomenpodcast.com.  SOCIAL MEDIA Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website Music by Miki Saito with Isaac Greene Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Book Riot - The Podcast
E464: Ascending Levels of Sauciness

Book Riot - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 60:10


Jeff and Amanda talk about Sally Rooney sales, author who want to be publishers who also want to be influencers, the National Book Award longlist, Amanda's favorite books of the year so far, and the going price for The Constitution. Follow the podcast via RSS, Apple Podcasts, and Spotify. The show can also be found on Stitcher. This content contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Discussed in this episode: 2021 Fall Preview Draft Lena Waithe & Gillian Flynn launching imprints with independent publisher Zando Sara Gran also launching a publishing project National Book Award Long list Rare First Edition of the US Constitution to go to auction Cultish by Amanda Montell She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan The Jasmine Throne by Tasha Suri Dial A For Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto The Sentence by Louise Erdrich I Love You But I've Chosen Darkness by Claire Vaye Watkins Matrix by Lauren Groff See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Close Talking: A Poetry Podcast
Episode #142 The Nightmare Touched Its Forehead to My Lips - Andrés Cerpa

Close Talking: A Poetry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 59:34


Connor and Jack discuss a poem by Andrés Cerpa whose book "The Vault" was recently long-listed for the 2021 National Book Award in Poetry. They dive into the short poem "The Nightmare Touched Its Forehead to My Lips" unpacking the ways it describes grief and loss, the meaning of vaults, and spend time on the title, which is also the title of a whole section of "The Vault." Read the poem here (or below): https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/the-nightmare-touched-its-forehead-to-my-lips/ Learn more about Andrés Cerpa, here: https://www.andrescerpa.com/ The Nightmare Touched Its Forehead to My Lips By: Andrés Cerpa For the living, water. And now, you're all the wells mined for their depth. All of the silence & all of the alls I can conjure. You are not in the living room. You are not in your chair. I drove to the end of the world today. Snow in the forecast, so I left my bicycle & the other half of your ashes at home. Find us at our website: www.closetalking.com/ Find us on Facebook at: facebook.com/closetalking 
Find us on Twitter at: twitter.com/closetalking
 Find us on Instagram: @closetalkingpoetry You can always send us an e-mail with thoughts on this or any of our previous podcasts, as well as suggestions for future shows, at closetalkingpoetry@gmail.com.

Bookworm
Richard Powers: “Bewilderment”

Bookworm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 28:32


Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning Richard Powers discusses his new novel, “Bewilderment,” which has been longlisted for the Booker Prize and National Book Award.

Free Library Podcast
Richard Powers | Bewilderment

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 61:18


In conversation with Andrew Ervin A ''genuine artist ... who can render the intricate dazzle of it all and at the same time plumb its philosophical implications'' (Esquire), Richard Powers won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for The Overstory, a tale of activism, the natural world, and people's connection to trees. His other novels include The Echo Maker, a story of the brain, mass migrations, and car accidents; Orfeo, the narrative of a falsely accused amateur scientist/composer; and Three Farmers on Their Way to a Dance, in which a WWI-era photo sends the men on very different quests. Powers has earned the National Book Award, a MacArthur Fellowship, the Lannan Literary Award, and two Pushcart Prizes.  Bewilderment follows a widower astrobiologist dealing with both the mysteries of the cosmos and the troubles befalling his young son. Andrew Ervin is a writer and critic and author of Extraordinary Renditions, Burning Down George Orwell's House, and Bit by Bit: How Video Games Transformed Our World. He teaches part-time in the MFA program at Temple University and for the School of Interactive Games and Media at Rochester Institute of Technology. (recorded 9/22/2021)

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Joseph J. Ellis on The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 55:16


(9/22/21) George Washington is said to have remarked that anyone who attempted to provide an accurate account of the American Revolution would be accused of writing fiction. Of course, no one called the uprising from American colonists by that name or referred to the struggle as the Revolutionary War at the time. John Adams insisted that the British were the real revolutionaries, for attempting to impose radical change without the consent of the colonies. In his new book The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783 Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning historical scholar Joseph J. Ellis of Mount Holyoke College takes a fresh look at the events between 1773 and 1783, recovering a war more brutal than anything we learned in grade school. Join us for a critical look at the stories we have long told about our origins as a nation in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

Welcome to Florida
Episode 66: Craig Pittman 'The State You're In'

Welcome to Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 43:14


This week's episode is devoted to Craig Pittman's new non-fiction book, "The State You're In: Florida Men, Florida Women, and other Wildlife."Joining Chadd Scott this week to talk to Craig about the book is environmental journalist and author of The Sound of the Sea: Seashells and the Fate of the Oceans. Also: Mirage; Blue Revolution; and Rain: A Natural and Cultural History, long-listed for the National Book Award. Cynthia was our guest on "Welcome to Florida" episode #55 all about her seashell book.

Poured Over
Richard Powers on BEWILDERMENT

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 44:27


Richard Powers is the author of 13 novels, including The Overstory, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. His new novel, Bewilderment, shortlisted for The Booker Prize and longlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction, is an intimate story of two lost boys—father and son—and it's a bit of a departure from his earlier books. Richard joins us on the show for a charming conversation about where the title came from, why he used a first-person narrative for this book, the connection between writing fiction and computer code, writing about grief, and more. Produces/hosted by Miwa Messer and engineered by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Free Library Podcast
Alice McDermott | What About the Baby? Some Thoughts on the Art of Fiction

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 62:56


In conversation with Danielle Evans Pulling the delicate threads of ''fear and vulnerability, joy and passion, the capacity for love and pain and grief'' (The Washington Post), Alice McDermott's fictional narratives explore intersecting stories of familial love, Irish American culture and assimilation, and the lessons of adulthood. Her novels include Someone; Charming Billy, winner of the 1998 National Book Award; That Night; At Weddings and Wakes; and After This, all of which were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. For more than 20 years McDermott was the Richard A. Macksey Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University and on the Sewanee Writers Conference faculty. She has contributed writing to The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, and The New York Times, among many other periodicals. In What About the Baby?, McDermott shares a collection of essays inspired from a lifetime of reading, writing, and teaching literature. Danielle Evans is the author of the story collections The Office of Historical Corrections and Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, winner of the PEN America PEN/Robert W. Bingham prize, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the Paterson Prize, and a National Book Foundation 5 under 35 selection. She teaches in The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. (recorded 9/20/2021)

Well-Read Mom
It's okay to make room for reading literature! Literature and Spiritual Growth with Gregory Wolfe

Well-Read Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:47


Highlights of this podcast include: How to become an active reader? Why is reading meant to be a communal act? Experiencing renewal through deep attention How is loneliness healed? What is the danger of living in a utilitarian way? Why are we so stressed out? What is the remedy? What uplifts me is not just a sitcom or happy ending? What really uplifts me? Why do women read more than men? Women are in the trenches of daily experience. Gregory Wolfe is a writer, teacher, editor, and publisher. In 1989 he founded Image—one of America's leading literary journals, which he edited for thirty years. He was also the founding director of the Seattle Pacific University MFA in Creative Writing program. Wolfe brings to the position more than three decades of experience as an editor, publisher, writer, teacher, and thought leader in the realms of art, literature, and religion. Wolfe is the founder of Image—one of America's leading literary journals, which he edited for thirty years. He was also the founding director of the Seattle Pacific University MFA in Creative Writing program. Wolfe's writing has appeared in numerous publications, including the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, First Things, Commonweal, and America. In 2005 he was a judge for the National Book Awards. His books include Beauty Will Save the World, Intruding Upon the Timeless, and The Operation of Grace. He is married to the novelist, Suzanne M. Wolfe. They are the parents of four grown children and live in Richmond Beach, Washington. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wellreadmom/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wellreadmom/support

Haymarket Books Live
Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, Twenty Years After 9-11 w/ Deepa Kumar, Naomi Klein, & more

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 85:55


Join Deepa Kumar, Noura Erakat, Naomi Klein, Jasbir Puar, and Keenaga-Yamahtta Taylor to discuss Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire. In Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, leading scholar Deepa Kumar traces the history of Islamophobia from the 16th century to the “War on Terror.” In the twenty years since 9/11, she writes, Islamophobia has functioned in the United States both as a set of coercive policies and as a body of ideas that take various forms: liberal, conservative, and rightwing. This particular form of bigotry continues to have horrific consequences not only for people in Muslim-majority countries who become the targets of an endless War on Terror, but for Muslims and those who “look Muslim” in the West as well. Importantly, Kumar contends that Islamophobia is not simply religious intolerance or the reaction of an empire in crisis; it must be recognized instead as racism—the kind that manifests in mass surveillance, arbitrary arrests, and deportation, much like other forms of centuries-old systemic racism. And this anti-Muslim racism in turn sustains empire. Order a Copy of Islamophobia: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3839-islamophobia-and-the-politics-of-empire Speakers: Noura Erakat is a human rights attorney, Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Rutgers University, and non-resident fellow of the Religious Literacy Project at Harvard Divinity School. Noura is the author of Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine. She is co-founding editor of Jadaliyya and editorial board member of the Journal of Palestine Studies. Noura has also produced video documentaries, including "Gaza In Context" and "Black Palestinian Solidarity." She has appeared on CBS News, CNN, Fox News, and NPR, among others. Naomi Klein is the bestselling author of The Shock Doctrine, This Changes Everything, No Is Not Enough, and the young adult book How to Change Everything: The Young Human's Guide to Protecting the Planet and Each Other. She is Senior Correspondent for The Intercept, a Puffin Writing Fellow at Type Media Center and Professor of Climate Justice at the University of British Columbia. Deepa Kumar is an award-winning scholar and social justice activist. She is Professor of Media Studies at Rutgers University. Her critically acclaimed book Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire (2012) has been translated into five languages. The second and fully revised edition, published in 2021, marks twenty years of the War on Terror. Dr. Kumar has authored more than 80 books, journal articles, book chapters, and articles in independent and mainstream media. She has shared her expertise in numerous media outlets such as the BBC, The New York Times, NPR, USA Today, the Danish Broadcast Corporation, TeleSur and other national and international news media outlets. Jasbir K. Puar is Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She is the author of the award-winning books The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability, and Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times. Her scholarly and mainstream writings have been translated into more than 15 languages. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. ​She is author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, which was a semifinalist for the 2019 National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2020. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker, and a Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/XoyuCSmd-JA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Photo Detective
Using Twitter for a Photo Reunion

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 31:41


Twitter is a social media platform that folks either love or hate. It doesn't generate too much of an in-between feeling. It's known for short posts and hashtags. It's the place you go for breaking news and some groups like #GenChat use it to inspire collaboration and social interaction in the genealogy world. There are photo historians on Twitter too. But I was surprised to see a photo reunion trending. Historian and author Victoria Johnson maximized her Twitter reach by encouraging her students and twitterstorians (historians on Twitter) to share an unidentified photo she found in a used book. It caused a flood of comments, resulted in a reunion and landed Victoria in the national spotlight of CNN and ABC News. It's made me reevaluate the power of Twitter for family history ( and it might make you take a look at the social media platform).  Related Episodes:Episode 142: Vintage Aerial PhotosEpisode 101: Rediscovering an American Community of ColorLinks:Story on CNNABC News StorySign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Victoria Johnson is a historian and Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College of the City University of New York. Her most recent book, American Eden, a biography of the New York doctor who served at the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr (yes, he has a small part in the musical!) was a finalist for the 2018 National Book Award in Nonfiction and for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in History.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

The Maris Review
Episode 121: Lauren Groff

The Maris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 36:16


Lauren Groff is a two-time National Book Award finalist and The New York Times–bestselling author of three novels, The Monsters of Templeton, Arcadia, and Fates and Furies, and the celebrated short story collections Delicate Edible Birds and Florida. Her latest novel is called Matrix. This episode is brought to you by the House of CHANEL, creator of the iconic J12 sports watch. Always in motion, the J12 travels through time without ever losing its identity. Join New York Times #1 best-selling author George Saunders in conversation with author and professor Imani Perry for Humanities New York's third annual History and the American Imagination benefit. The live discussion will take place online on October 5th at 7 PM EASTERN. Purchase your tickets at humanitiesny.org and use code MARISREVIEW for half off membership tickets. Recommended Reading: Something New Under the Sun by Alexandra Kleeman Dear Memory by Victoria Chang How To Wrestle a Girl by Venita Blackburn Harrow by Joy Williams Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - Stanley Kunitz

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 0:33


Today's Quotation is care of Stanley Kunitz.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app!On July 29, 1905, Stanley Kunitz was born in Worcester, Massachusetts. About his own work, Kunitz has said: “The poem comes in the form of a blessing—‘like rapture breaking on the mind,' as I tried to phrase it in my youth. Through the years I have found this gift of poetry to be life-sustaining, life-enhancing, and absolutely unpredictable. Does one live, therefore, for the sake of poetry? No, the reverse is true: poetry is for the sake of the life.”Kunitz published his first book of poetry, Intellectual Things, in 1930. Fourteen years later, he published his second book, Passport to War. His recent books include: The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz (W. W. Norton, 2000); Passing Through: The Later Poems, New and Selected (1995), which won the National Book Award; Next-to-Last Things: New Poems and Essays (1985); The Poems of Stanley Kunitz, 1928-1978, which won the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; The Testing-Tree (1971); and Selected Poems, 1928-1958, which won the Pulitzer Prize.His honors include the Bollingen Prize, a Ford Foundation grant, a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, Harvard's Centennial Medal, the Levinson Prize, the Harriet Monroe Poetry Award, a senior fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Medal of the Arts, and the Shelley Memorial Award. In 2000 he was named United States Poet Laureate. Kunitz was deeply committed to fostering community among artists, and was a founder of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and Poets House in New York City. Together with his wife, the painter Elise Asher, he split his time between New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. He died at the age of 100 on May 14, 2006.From https://poets.org/poet/stanley-kunitzFor more information about Stanley Kunitz:“‘I Have Walked Through Many Lives': Listen to Stanley Kunitz read his poem ‘The Layers'”: https://lithub.com/i-have-walked-through-many-lives-listen-to-stanley-kunitz-read-his-poem-the-layers/“Stanley Kunitz, The Art of Poetry No. 29”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/3185/the-art-of-poetry-no-29-stanley-kunitz“Poet Stanley Kunitz at 100”: https://www.npr.org/2005/07/29/4776898/poet-stanley-kunitz-at-100

The Environmental Health Trust
Reducing Environmental Toxins with Dr. Devra Davis Part 5 - Q&A

The Environmental Health Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 42:06


Dr. Devra Davis is a respected leader in environmental toxicology heading the Environmental Health Trust, a non-profit organization raising awareness about human-made health threats. In this 5 part podcast series, Dr. Davis will share the latest in policy and research concerning environmental hazards, as well as how to reduce exposure at the individual and community levels. Dr. Davis has authored over 200 publications as well as three books, one of which was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has advised Congress, the UN, and The World Health Organization. She will address other environmental hazards as well, including cell phones, wireless technology, and blue light. Her lecture will also draw parallels between human and ecological impacts, touching on the effects of environmental toxins in the climate change debate. She will end the talk with a focus on tips for reducing your exposure, as well as what communities can do to reduce toxins, and decrease greenhouse gases. Learn more at ehtrust.org and sign up for our newsletter: https://ehtrust.org/publications/newsletters/ Read the research on EMFs and health here: https://ehtrust.org/science/top-experimental-epidemiological-studies/ Get the facts about 5G here: https://ehtrust.org/key-issues/cell-phoneswireless/5g-internet-everything/20-quick-facts-what-you-need-to-know-about-5g-wireless-and-small-cells/

The Environmental Health Trust
Reducing Environmental Toxins with Dr. Devra Davis Part 4

The Environmental Health Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 11:02


Dr. Devra Davis is a respected leader in environmental toxicology heading the Environmental Health Trust, a non-profit organization raising awareness about human-made health threats. In this 5 part podcast series, Dr. Davis will share the latest in policy and research concerning environmental hazards, as well as how to reduce exposure at the individual and community levels. Dr. Davis has authored over 200 publications as well as three books, one of which was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has advised Congress, the UN, and The World Health Organization. She will address other environmental hazards as well, including cell phones, wireless technology, and blue light. Her lecture will also draw parallels between human and ecological impacts, touching on the effects of environmental toxins in the climate change debate. She will end the talk with a focus on tips for reducing your exposure, as well as what communities can do to reduce toxins, and decrease greenhouse gases. Learn more at ehtrust.org and sign up for our newsletter: https://ehtrust.org/publications/newsletters/ Read the research on EMFs and health here: https://ehtrust.org/science/top-experimental-epidemiological-studies/ Get the facts about 5G here: https://ehtrust.org/key-issues/cell-phoneswireless/5g-internet-everything/20-quick-facts-what-you-need-to-know-about-5g-wireless-and-small-cells/

The Environmental Health Trust
Reducing Environmental Toxins with Dr. Devra Davis Part 3

The Environmental Health Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 21:26


Dr. Devra Davis is a respected leader in environmental toxicology heading the Environmental Health Trust, a non-profit organization raising awareness about human-made health threats. In this 5 part podcast series, Dr. Davis will share the latest in policy and research concerning environmental hazards, as well as how to reduce exposure at the individual and community levels. Dr. Davis has authored over 200 publications as well as three books, one of which was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has advised Congress, the UN, and The World Health Organization. She will address other environmental hazards as well, including cell phones, wireless technology, and blue light. Her lecture will also draw parallels between human and ecological impacts, touching on the effects of environmental toxins in the climate change debate. She will end the talk with a focus on tips for reducing your exposure, as well as what communities can do to reduce toxins, and decrease greenhouse gases. Learn more at ehtrust.org and sign up for our newsletter: https://ehtrust.org/publications/newsletters/ Read the research on EMFs and health here: https://ehtrust.org/science/top-experimental-epidemiological-studies/ Get the facts about 5G here: https://ehtrust.org/key-issues/cell-phoneswireless/5g-internet-everything/20-quick-facts-what-you-need-to-know-about-5g-wireless-and-small-cells/

The Environmental Health Trust
Reducing Environmental Toxins with Dr. Devra Davis Part 2

The Environmental Health Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 25:30


Dr. Devra Davis is a respected leader in environmental toxicology heading the Environmental Health Trust, a non-profit organization raising awareness about human-made health threats. In this 5 part podcast series, Dr. Davis will share the latest in policy and research concerning environmental hazards, as well as how to reduce exposure at the individual and community levels. Dr. Davis has authored over 200 publications as well as three books, one of which was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has advised Congress, the UN, and The World Health Organization. She will address other environmental hazards as well, including cell phones, wireless technology, and blue light. Her lecture will also draw parallels between human and ecological impacts, touching on the effects of environmental toxins in the climate change debate. She will end the talk with a focus on tips for reducing your exposure, as well as what communities can do to reduce toxins, and decrease greenhouse gases. Learn more at ehtrust.org and sign up for our newsletter: https://ehtrust.org/publications/newsletters/ Read the research on EMFs and health here: https://ehtrust.org/science/top-experimental-epidemiological-studies/ Get the facts about 5G here: https://ehtrust.org/key-issues/cell-phoneswireless/5g-internet-everything/20-quick-facts-what-you-need-to-know-about-5g-wireless-and-small-cells/

The Environmental Health Trust
Reducing Environmental Toxins with Dr. Devra Davis Part 1

The Environmental Health Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 31:23


Dr. Devra Davis is a respected leader in environmental toxicology heading the Environmental Health Trust, a non-profit organization raising awareness about human-made health threats. In this 5 part podcast series, Dr. Davis will share the latest in policy and research concerning environmental hazards, as well as how to reduce exposure at the individual and community levels. Dr. Davis has authored over 200 publications as well as three books, one of which was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has advised Congress, the UN, and The World Health Organization. She will address other environmental hazards as well, including cell phones, wireless technology, and blue light. Her lecture will also draw parallels between human and ecological impacts, touching on the effects of environmental toxins in the climate change debate. She will end the talk with a focus on tips for reducing your exposure, as well as what communities can do to reduce toxins, and decrease greenhouse gases. Learn more at ehtrust.org and sign up for our newsletter: https://ehtrust.org/publications/newsletters/ Read the research on EMFs and health here: https://ehtrust.org/science/top-experimental-epidemiological-studies/ Get the facts about 5G here: https://ehtrust.org/key-issues/cell-phoneswireless/5g-internet-everything/20-quick-facts-what-you-need-to-know-about-5g-wireless-and-small-cells/

The Gateway
Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - Examining How People Can Be Pulled Away From Extremism

The Gateway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 9:37


St. Louis native Carla Power's new book focuses on deradicalizing extremists. It's told through the stories of former militants and people working to bring them back into society. Power has won the National Book Award and been a Pulitzer Prize finalist for non-fiction.

Poured Over
Colson Whitehead on THE HARLEM SHUFFLE

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 27:31


Two Pulitzers, a National Book Award, and a MacArthur Genius Grant: Colson Whitehead is one of the greatest novelists working today. From The Intuitionist to The Underground Railroad and The Nickel Boys, his incredible body of work is driven by sharp insight and brilliant sentences. Harlem Shuffle is his newest novel, a character study, a caper flick, and an absolute thrill to read. Colson joins us on the show to talk about his love of 1970s heist flicks, walking aimlessly around Harlem, messy internet searches, and more. Featured Books: Harlem Shuffle and The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead, Richard Stark's Parker novels, and The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith. Produced/hosted by Miwa Messer and engineered by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays.

The Ezra Klein Show
How Colson Whitehead Writes About Our ‘Big Wild Country'

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:35


“If he got a thrill out of transforming these ill-gotten goods into legit merchandise, a zap-charge in his blood like he'd plugged into a socket, he was in control of it and not the other way around,” writes Colson Whitehead in his new novel, “Harlem Shuffle.” “Dizzying and powerful as it was. Everyone had secret corners and alleys that no one else saw — what mattered were your major streets and boulevards, the stuff that showed up on other people's maps of you.”Whitehead is the author of “The Underground Railroad,” which won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and “The Nickel Boys,” which also won a Pulitzer, the first time two consecutive books by an author won. But he actually started “Harlem Shuffle” in between those two books. And now that he's finished it, he can't quite put it down. He's working on a sequel, he told me. The first time he's tried one.“Harlem Shuffle” is both a joyous and a troubled book. It's built around Ray Carney, a furniture salesman and fence for stolen goods, and a series of capers around 1960s-era Harlem. But at its core it's about patrimony, capitalism, ambition, race and the moral costs of striving in an unjust system.We talk about all that, and more: how Marvel Comics made Whitehead want to be a writer, how parenthood changed him, why he hopes to distill it all down to a haiku, whether the writing world is a just or unjust system, the nature of zombies, the nonfiction of the late-Aughts internet, the legacy of 9/11, his favorite heist movies, what his wife thinks his characters know that he doesn't — and I could keep going.This one's a fun one.Mentioned: "Wow, Fiction Works!" by Colson WhiteheadHarlem Shuffle by Colson WhiteheadThe Underground Railroad by Colson WhiteheadThe Nickel Boys by Colson WhiteheadZone One by Colson WhiteheadSag Harbor by Colson WhiteheadThe Noble Hustle by Colson WhiteheadBook recommendations: Love Goes to Buildings on Fire by Will HermesThe Buddha in the Attic by Julie OtsukaWhen the Emperor Was Divine by Julie OtsukaMad As Hell by Dave ItzkoffYou can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

Books On The Go
Ep 184: Minor Detail by Adania Shibli translated by Elisabeth Jacquette

Books On The Go

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 17:42


Anna and Amanda discuss the 2021 Women's Prize winner Susanna Clarke for Piranesi, a follow-up story about #BookTok trends and the winners of the 2021 Wainwright Prize for nature writing.  Amanda recommends this interview with Merlin Sheldrake on Conversations with Richard Fidler.  Our book of the week is Minor Detail by Adania Shibli translated by Elisabeth Jacquette.  A short, powerful novel about a crime in 1949 and a young woman investigating in modern-day Palestine, it was longlisted for the 2021 International Booker Prize and shortlisted for the 2020 National Book Awards for translated literature. It was also the group read-along for the Women in Translation Month #WITReadathon. Coming up: Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney and Real Estate by Deborah Levy. Follow us! Email: Booksonthegopodcast@gmail.com Facebook: Books On The Go Instagram: @abailliekaras and @vibrant_lives_podcast Twitter: @abailliekaras Litsy: @abailliekaras Credits Artwork: Sascha Wilkosz

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - Thomas Pynchon

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 0:31


Today's Quotation is care of Thomas Pynchon.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app!Thomas Pynchon is the author of V., The Crying of Lot 49, Gravity's Rainbow, Slow Learner, a collection of short stories, Vineland, Mason & Dixon, Against the Day, Inherent Vice, and most recently, Bleeding Edge.  He received the National Book Award for Gravity's Rainbow in 1974.From https://www.nationalbook.org/people/thomas-pynchon/#fullBio. For more information about Thomas Pynchon:“On the Thomas Pynchon Trail”: https://www.vulture.com/2013/08/thomas-pynchon-bleeding-edge.html“Thomas Pynchon Unmasked”: https://www.altaonline.com/dispatches/a6465/thomas-pynchon-unmasked/“Meet Your Neighbor, Thomas Pynchon”: https://nymag.com/arts/books/features/48268/

NüVoices
Eat the Buddha: A conversation with award-winning author Barbara Demick

NüVoices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 48:56


Barbara Demick is the author of Eat the Buddha: Life and Death in a Tibetan Town (2020), Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea (2009), and Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo neighborhood (1996). She spent 12 years as bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times in Beijing and Seoul and previously reported from the Middle East and Balkans for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Barbara has won many awards for her work, including the Samuel Johnson prize (now the Baillie Gifford prize) for non-fiction in the UK, the Overseas Press Club's human rights reporting award, the George Polk Award, the Robert F Kennedy Award, and Stanford University's Shorenstein Award for Asia coverage. Her North Korea book was a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. She was a press fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, a Bagehot fellow in business journalism at Columbia University, and a visiting professor of journalism at Princeton University. She grew up in New Jersey, graduated from Yale College, and now lives in New York City.Barbara joins NuVoices board member Sophia Yan to discuss her most recent book, Eat the Buddha, which tells the story of Ngaba, a town high on a Tibetan plateau that is one of the most hidden corners of the world, and near-impossible for foreigners to visit. Through the rich tales of those linked to this town, Barbara illuminates decades of intertwined Tibetan and Chinese history, and explores what it means to be Tibetan today — to preserve a culture, faith and language despite all odds. Barbara talks about navigating reporting on China, despite the challenges, imparts sage writing advice, and previews her next book in the works. Recommendations:Sophia: Read Barbara's books! Eat the Buddha; Nothing to Envy; Logavina Street. Also this fascinating New Yorker article from May that I just read (the issues take forever to arrive abroad) about cutting-edge research on using electricity to regenerate limbs.Barbara: The Ministry for the Future, a science fiction book set in the near future about people trying to save the world from the ravages of climate change. I was reading it as the New York City subways flooded from the tail of Hurricane Ida. Evan Osnos' forthcoming Wildland: The Making of America's Fury, about how America is tearing itself apart with political polarization. Yes, I know you'd say not exactly soothing bedtime reading. More cheerful listening to podcaster Mike Duncan's Hero of Two Worlds about the Marquis de Lafayette.Self-Care Suggestions:Sophia: Not looking at your phone and emails/messages the minute you wake up! Try setting a timeframe – say half an hour – or perhaps until your morning routine is over (ie brushing teeth, washing face, making/having breakfast. Look out the window, enjoy your coffee/tea/Oatly/delivered jianbing! Then.... thumb scroll! Barbara: I'd say read before bed (don't watch Netflix or other streaming late at night) and turn off the lights before midnight. Researchers say if you don't get enough sleep in middle age, you increase your chances of dementia.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Keen On Democracy
Dave Eggers on His Fight Against Big Data

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 47:36


On today's episode, Andrew talks with Dave Eggers about his latest novel, The Every, a follow-up to his bestselling novel The Circle; the resistance to big data, and his personal strategy to distribute his latest hardcover only in independent bookstores. Dave Eggers is the author of many books, among them The Circle—the companion to the book you are holding—and also The Monk of Mokha, A Hologram for the King, What Is the What, and The Museum of Rain. He is the cofounder of 826 National, a network of youth writing centers, and of Voice of Witness, an oral history book series that illuminates the stories of those impacted by human rights crises. He has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and is the recipient of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and the American Book Award. He has attended the Jetpack Aviation Academy in Moorpark, California, but is not yet certified to fly off-tether. Born in Boston and raised in Illinois, he has now lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for three decades. He and his family often consider leaving, but they do not leave. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Conservative University
The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 51:54


The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 By: David McCullough  Narrated by: Edward Herrmann This selection serves as an introduction to this fine book. It is available on Audible or purchase at your favorite book seller The National Book Award–winning epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal, a first-rate drama of the bold and brilliant engineering feat that was filled with both tragedy and triumph, told by master historian David McCullough. From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Truman, here is the national bestselling epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal. In The Path Between the Seas, acclaimed historian David McCullough delivers a first-rate drama of the sweeping human undertaking that led to the creation of this grand enterprise. The Path Between the Seas tells the story of the men and women who fought against all odds to fulfill the 400-year-old dream of constructing an aquatic passageway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a story of astonishing engineering feats, tremendous medical accomplishments, political power plays, heroic successes, and tragic failures. Applying his remarkable gift for writing lucid, lively exposition, McCullough weaves the many strands of the momentous event into a comprehensive and captivating tale. Winner of the National Book Award for history, the Francis Parkman Prize, the Samuel Eliot Morison Award, and the Cornelius Ryan Award (for the best book of the year on international affairs), The Path Between the Seas is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, the history of technology, international intrigue, and human drama.

American Conservative University
The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 51:54


The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 By: David McCullough  Narrated by: Edward Herrmann This selection serves as an introduction to this fine book. It is available on Audible or purchase at your favorite book seller The National Book Award–winning epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal, a first-rate drama of the bold and brilliant engineering feat that was filled with both tragedy and triumph, told by master historian David McCullough. From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Truman, here is the national bestselling epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal. In The Path Between the Seas, acclaimed historian David McCullough delivers a first-rate drama of the sweeping human undertaking that led to the creation of this grand enterprise. The Path Between the Seas tells the story of the men and women who fought against all odds to fulfill the 400-year-old dream of constructing an aquatic passageway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a story of astonishing engineering feats, tremendous medical accomplishments, political power plays, heroic successes, and tragic failures. Applying his remarkable gift for writing lucid, lively exposition, McCullough weaves the many strands of the momentous event into a comprehensive and captivating tale. Winner of the National Book Award for history, the Francis Parkman Prize, the Samuel Eliot Morison Award, and the Cornelius Ryan Award (for the best book of the year on international affairs), The Path Between the Seas is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, the history of technology, international intrigue, and human drama.

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - Louise Glück

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 0:33


Today's Quotation is care of Louise Glück.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app!Louise Glück was born in New York City on April 22, 1943, and grew up on Long Island. She is the author of numerous books of poetry, including Faithful and Virtuous Night (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2014), which won the 2014 National Book Award in Poetry; Averno (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2006), a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award in Poetry; and Vita Nova (Ecco Press, 1999), winner of Boston Book Review's Bingham Poetry Prize and The New Yorker's Book Award in Poetry. In 2004, Sarabande Books released her six-part poem “October” as a chapbook.In a review in The New Republic, the critic Helen Vendler wrote: “Louise Glück is a poet of strong and haunting presence. Her poems, published in a series of memorable books over the last twenty years, have achieved the unusual distinction of being neither ‘confessional' nor ‘intellectual' in the usual senses of those words.”The recipient of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature, Glück was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets in 1999. In the fall of 2003, she was appointed as the Library of Congress's twelfth poet laureate consultant in poetry. She served as judge of the Yale Series of Younger Poets from 2003 to 2010. In 2008, Glück was selected to receive the Wallace Stevens Award for mastery in the art of poetry. Her collection, Poems 1962-2012, was awarded the 2013 Los Angeles Times Book Prize. In 2015, she was awarded the Gold Medal for Poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Currently, Glück is a writer-in-residence at Yale University.From https://poets.org/poet/louise-gluck. For more information about Louise Glück:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Peter Kimani about Glück, at 17:50: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-086-peter-kimani“Louise Glück”: https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/2020/gluck/facts/“Afterword”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/55238/afterword-56d23699928fe“Louise Glück: ‘It's too new...it's too early here'”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FIFQR56TyQ

Hell & High Water with John Heilemann

In which John Heilemann talks with George Packer, staff writer for The Atlantic and National Book Award-winning author of The Unwinding, The Assassin's Gate, Our Man, and, Last Best Hope: America in Crisis and Renewal. Heilemann and Packer discuss Joe Biden's handling of the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan and how it spurred the first foreign policy crisis of his presidency; the twentieth anniversaries of 9-11 and the global war on terror, and how they changed America in ways large and small; and Packer's argument in Last Best Hope that, over the past forty years, the two dominant national narratives of the post-war era—the stories espoused by Democrats and Republicans to explain the country's identity and aspirations—have subdivided into four: Free America, Smart America, Real America, and Just America. Heilemann and Packer also discuss the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol, and whether it represents an even greater threat to the country than the horror at Ground Zero on September 11, 2001. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Raging Gracefully
#71: Author Series: Dana Spiotta

Raging Gracefully

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 31:12


Nina Collins interviews Dana Spiotta about her new book Wayward, which we'll also be discussing at September's Book Club. Dana Spiotta is the author of five novels: Wayward (forthcoming in 2021), Innocents and Others (2016), winner of the St. Francis College Literary Prize and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Stone Arabia (2011), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Eat the Document (2006), which was a finalist for the National Book Award and the winner of the American Academy's Rosenthal Foundation Award; and Lightning Field(2001), a New York Times Notable Book. Other awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, the Rome Prize in Literature, the Premio Pivano, a Creative Capital Award, and the John Updike Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. About Wayward: On the heels of the election of 2016, Samantha Raymond's life begins to come apart: her mother is ill, her teenage daughter is increasingly remote, and at fifty-two she finds herself staring into the Mids--that hour of supreme wakefulness between three and four in the morning in which women of a certain age suddenly find themselves contemplating motherhood, mortality, and, in this case, the state of our unraveling nation.When she falls in love with a beautiful, decrepit house in a hardscrabble neighborhood in Syracuse, she buys it on a whim and flees her suburban life--and her family--as she grapples with how to be a wife, a mother, and a daughter, in a country that is coming apart at the seams. Dana Spiotta's Wayward is a stunning novel about aging, about the female body, and about female difficulty--female complexity--in the age of Trump. Probing and provocative, brainy and sensual, it is a testament to our weird, off-kilter America, to reforms and resistance and utopian wishes, and to the beauty of ruins. Tremendous new work from one of the most gifted writers of her generation. More About Revel: www.hellorevel.com

Midday
George Saunders' 'A Swim In A Pond': Lessons in Literature & Life

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 49:31


(This conversation was originally aired on March 3, 2021) Good afternoon and welcome to an archive edition of Midday.  My guest is the author, George Saunders. He's published hundreds of short stories, and he's the winner of the Man Booker Prize for his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo. Saunders' short stories have been published in The New Yorker, Harper'sand many other magazines, and collected in best-selling books like The Tenth of December, which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and which Time Magazine called one of the ten best books of the decade. Tom describes George Saunders as "a wholly original, surprising and powerfully imaginative writer whose work is unlike anything I've read before. His writing," Tom adds, "seems to re-invent the rules for how fiction is structured and re-imagine how storytelling can unfold." In 1997, George Saunders joined the faculty of his graduate school alma mater, Syracuse University. Earlier this year, he published his 11th book, which is a fascinating peroration that draws on his experience in the classroom. Saunders has chosen seven stories by a quartet of famous Russian authors: Chekhov, Tolstoy, Turgenev, and Gogol. He examines, explains, and riffs on each story, and in the process, with joy and wonder and delight, he offers insight into how we read, and how great authors write. It's called A Swim in a Pond in the Rain: In Which Four Russians Give a Masterclass on Writing, Reading, and Life. George Saunders joined us on Zoom. Our conversation was recorded in early March, 2021. Because this is a re-broadcast of Midday, we aren't able to take any new calls or comments. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Between The Covers : Conversations with Writers in Fiction, Nonfiction & Poetry

The latest book by Palestinian novelist Adania Shibli, Minor Detail, was a finalist for the National Book Award for Translated Literature, and longlisted for the International Booker Prize. Shibli talks about what it means that she doesn't write about Palestine but rather from Palestine. And why for her, as a writer, so many of the […] The post Adania Shibli : Minor Detail appeared first on Tin House.

Midday
'On Juneteenth': Annette Gordon-Reed's Ode To Emancipation Joy

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 49:30


(This conversation was originally broadcast on June 18, 2021) Tom's guest on this archived edition of Midday is the author and historian Annette Gordon Reed. She is best-known for her study of Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson. Her book, The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family,won sixteen book prizes, including the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Her latest book is a beautiful peroration on the meaning of the holiday known as Juneteenth, which marks the anniversary of a significant historical event: on June 19th, 1865, Major General Gordon Granger issued General Order No. 3 in Galveston, Texas, declaring that all slaves were free, two months after General Robert E Lee had surrendered to Gen. Ulysses S Grant in Appomattox, Virginia. Juneteenth celebrations of this belated emancipation originated among African American communities in Texas, and now take place around the country. Gordon-Reed's book is at once an homage to her home state of Texas, and a wholly original and fascinating exploration of how history and legend and myth all shape what we learn when we're young, how our understanding evolves as we grow older, and how social dynamics inform the evolution of societal understanding. Professor Reed writes with erudition and grace, authority and humility, weaving a touching personal memoir into the stark reality of a harsh historical record. Her book is called On Juneteenth.  Annette Gordon Reed joined Tom on Zoom from her home in New York. They spoke just a few days before President Biden signed a congressional act making Juneteenth a federal holiday. Because the conversation was recorded earlier, we can't take any calls or comments. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Imagine Neighborhood
No Filter: with Dr Ibram X Kendi

The Imagine Neighborhood

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 15:09


Hey, everybody! It's me again, your good pal Count Vacula—bringing you a brand-new No Filter! My guest this week is the very kind and very smart Dr. Ibram X. Kendi. He's a podcaster like me—but he's also a professor, and a National Book Award winner, and a #1 New York Times bestselling author of really terrific books like Antiracist Baby and Stamped (For Kids)! We talked about playing basketball, and cardboard creations, and how when the people you care about are happy, it can make you feel happy too! But we also talked about serious things, like how there are some rules that aren't fair to everyone, and that it's up to us to change those rules! It reminded me of when Big Bot Burger made a rule that said Wastelanders couldn't eat in their restaurants. That wasn't fair, so we all joined together to protest, and we got rid of discrimination in our neighborhood! Dr. Kendi says that standing up to discrimination is one of the kindest things we can do, and I think he's right. A great thing about meeting different people is that you can learn all sorts of new ways to be kind. Did you do something kind this week? Tell me about it, and then maybe I can do it too! Yay! Okay! I'll be back soon with more No Filter—and in the meantime, I'll see you around The Imagine Neighborhood™! Love,   Vac

Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady
George Packer on Redefining "American" and the Inequalities of the State

Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 66:09


In this episode of Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady, George Packer joins Roxanne to discuss his new book, The Last Best Hope: America in Crisis and Renewal, out now from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. George Packer is a journalist, novelist, playwright, and staff writer for The New Yorker. His latest book is Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century, which the members of the Whiting Award grant jury—from whom Packer was awarded a grant to complete the work—say is “irreverent, fast-paced, and unfailingly rigorous. . . an enthralling nonfiction picaresque that offers incisive clues to the complexities this country faces today.” Packer's other works include the nonfiction titles The Unwinding, recipient of the National Book Award for Nonfiction in 2013; The Assassins' Gate, which was named one of the ten best books of 2005 by the New York Times Book Review and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; and Blood of the Liberals, which won the 2001 Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He was a Guggenheim Fellow and has taught writing at Harvard, Bennington, and Columbia. Roxanne Coady is owner of R.J. Julia, one of the leading independent booksellers in the United States, which—since 1990—has been a community resource not only for books, but for the exchange of ideas. In 1998, Coady founded Read To Grow, which provides books for newborns and children and encourages parents to read to their children from birth. RTG has distributed over 1.5 million books. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Latino USA
How I Made It: Ada Limón

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 20:28


Ada Limón spent almost her whole life dreaming about poetry. Today, she has five successful poetry titles under her belt, including “Bright Dead Things,” a National Book Award finalist, and her most recent book, “The Carrying,” which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry. Ada's debut poetry collection, “Lucky Wreck,” was published in 2006. In honor of its 15th anniversary, the collection was re-released in spring 2021. “Lucky Wreck” explores themes of life and death, along with bicoastal living in California and New York City. In this episode of our "How I Made It" series, Ada Limón tells her story of a young woman falling in love with poetry and reflects on the making of “Lucky Wreck” 15 years later.