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Capital city of Denmark

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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Copenhagen

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Latest podcast episodes about Copenhagen

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

The afikra Podcast
TAREK ALAMEDDINE | Chef | Matbakh

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:58


In this Matbakh event, we talked to Tarek Alameddine about his experiences in the culinary field between Copenhagen, Egypt, and Lebanon. Tarek believes that Levantine flavors and seasonal produce should be celebrated in the fine dining scene. In the process of creating dishes and designing menus, the ingredients he uses should be in season, wildly foraged, and in synchronization with the time and place.Created by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Hosted by Salma SerryEdited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About Matbakh:Matbakh is a conversation series that focuses on food and drink of the Arab world. The series will be held with food practitioners who study how food and the kitchen have evolved over time in the Arab world. The guests will be discussing the history of food and what its future might be, in addition to a specific recipe or ingredient that reveals interesting and unique information about the history of the Arab world. Guests will be chefs, food critics, food writers, historians, and academics. Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Graining In
#128: Cory Smith | Storyteller

Graining In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 87:41


Cory Smith is a Copenhagen-based, semi-recent Brooklyn transplant with an ever-growing resume of extremely high quality beer photography and journalism to his name. We get into his entry into the world of beer photography via a background in advertising; his personal account of life as an Ex-Pat and compares recent experiences in the ER at hospitals in both in new and old home; The global glue of the English language; Cory's COVID-spurred project "Closed // Open", a series of in-depth profiles on Copenhagen hospitality figures amid lockdown; and as always, a slew over other things, both warmly surprising and gratingly predictable. He won't tell you, but Cory's triple-threat of photography, writing, and perspective can go toe-to-toe with any beer journalist in the globe and it was a pleasure to get a dose of culture in the Grain Gang box from the nicest dude on any continent. ................. .................... .........Music: "Mountain Climb" by Jake Hill

New Books Network
‘Network Monarchy' and Its Challengers: Making Sense of Thai Politics with Duncan McCargo

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 31:31


What does a cup of coffee tell us about Thailand's intricate power relations? Where does the country's monarchy come into this? And why does it matter? Prominent political scientist and NIAS director Duncan McCargo joins Petra Desatova to revisit his famous ‘network monarchy' concept and explain why Thailand should not be seen as a ‘Deep State.' Duncan McCargo is a Professor of Political Science and Director of the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Duncan is well-known for publishing a dozen books and over 100 articles and chapters on Asian politics. His latest books are Fighting for Virtue: Justice and Politics in Thailand (Cornell 2019) and (with Anyarat Chattharakul) Future Forward: The Rise and Fall of a Thai Political Party (NIAS Press, 2020). His 2005 Pacific Review article on Thailand's ‘network monarchy,' which is the subject of this episode alongside his 2021 Pacific Affairs article that revisits this concept, has been extremely influential. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Breathe Pictures Photography Podcast: Documentaries and Interviews
#270 Photowalk: National Geo's Best Pics! & the Extraordinary Tom Stoddart

Breathe Pictures Photography Podcast: Documentaries and Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 95:18


This week we're walking in Sherwood Forest, the legendary woodland 'belonging' to Robin Hood, making our pictures together and reading listener letters. National Geographic's Editor in Chief Susan Goldberg is my guest and we celebrate Tom Stoddart, the British photojournalist who passed away last week. Your letters include making photographs to celebrate a win over adversity, making ultra long exposure pictures from a tin can, Christmas in Copenhagen and dream photo retirements. The show is supported by MPB.com and our wonderful Patrons. See the SHOW NOTES.

Subliminal Jihad
#95 - SPOOKY ACTION AT A DISTANCE: The Copemorehagen Deception & Quantum Ont-Ops (w/ Mike & Jay)

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 230:46


Dimitri and Khalid speak with neuroscientists Mike (@tismcast) and Jay (@The_Hague_ICC) about why the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is a massive ontological op with troubling social-political ramifications, Werner Heisenberg squashing the Himmler beef and staying in Nazi Germany during the war, Oppenheimer burying David Bohm's Marxian challenge to the Copenhagen gang, Schrödinger's sus cat in a sus box, modern physics departments slandering Einstein for challenging the Copenhagen ontology, Soviet critiques of western quantum theory as idealism/positivism, and serrrious scientists erming every form of “metaphysics” while confidently proclaiming that the moon isn't there if nobody's looking at it. Check out Mike's podcast “This Is Some Marginalia”: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/this-is-some-marginalia/id1574184151 Twitter: @tismcast Follow Jay on Twitter: @The_Hague_ICC For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad.

Places I Remember with Lea Lane
Winter Travel: Northern Lights, Christmas Markets, Weird (Cussing, Naked) Festivals!

Places I Remember with Lea Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:17


Winter can be cold, and Lea prefers warmth, but the lights, markets, and festivals of the winter months create warm, beautiful (sometimes weird) experiences, terrific travel opportunities to understand the variety of customs and cultures around the world.Lea reflects on pleasures of winter. She talks of lights and fireworks and remembers festivities in places she has lived, including Miami, Paris and London. Christmas markets are described in Vienna, Prague, Strasbourg, Basel, Krakow, Talinn, Colmar, Heidelberg, Helsinki, Copenhagen, Birmingham, and Florence.And then there are the festivals around the world: some grand with snow sculptures and costumed pageants; and some wacky fun, with food fights, ending with the weirdest of all -- the cussing festival and the naked man festival in Japan. If you like hearing about these winter customs and festivals, check out others throughout the seasons, in Episodes 8 (spring), 19 (summer) and 31 (fall).Wherever in the world you celebrate, Happy Holidays and Happy Travels in the new year!_____Podcast host Lea Lane blogs at forbes.com, has traveled to over 100 countries, written nine books, including Places I Remember, and contributed to guidebooks. She's @lealane on Twitter; PlacesIRememberLeaLane on Insta; on  Facebook, it's Places I Remember with Lea Lane. Website: placesirememberlealane.com.  Please follow, rate and review this weekly travel podcast!

Dekmantel Podcast Series
Dekmantel Podcast 360 - Mama Snake

Dekmantel Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 89:36


@mamasnake is at the heart of Copenhagen's blistering techno scene. She plays with a serious amount of speed and showcased that as far back as 2018 when she played for Boiler Room at our Amsterdam festival. But she is also a qualified surgeon, co-founder of Amniote Editions and curator who oversees the release of music, posters, videos and t-shirts. She prefers to keep a low profile and operate in darkened spaces at the dead of night, but with her at the controls, there is no finer place to be. Mama Snake's supple and sublime sound is a mix of sleek techno and uplifting trance. She plays with a tight and technical mixing style and can make you fall in love with tracks you didn't even know you liked. On this week's mix, she charges through kinetic beats and slithering synths that never let up, but never get stuck in a rut. There is always a breakdown to reset the mood, a dreamy lead to take your mind away or a vocal latch on to. They say that speed kills, but when it comes to Mama Snake, speed thrills.

SAP Experts Podcast
Episode 91: Compelling Customer Engagements Masterclass – Cyril Rathogwa and Lars Elmquist

SAP Experts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:49


There are some studies which claim that the human attention span continues to decrease and might be as low as 8 seconds – that's lower than a goldfish. While there are other studies which claim that humans were always cognitively distracted and hyper-alert creatures, which enabled us to accomplish complex tasks while still being aware of our surroundings. Well, either way, one thing is true – the sheer amount of information around us is increasing, and as a result, we are always competing for the attention of our audiences. How do we create an enthralling enough experience, that could capture an audience for 10 mins, 30 mins, 2 hours? Which is why, today, I am joined by two individuals who have mastered the art of creating compelling customer engagements – Cyril Rathogwa and Lars Elmquist! My guest, Cyril, is a passionate football enthusiast and storyteller. He is a senior solutions adviser in the Intelligent Spend Business Network covering the entire Africa continent. Cyril has over 15 years procurement experience in different industries. His experience includes consulting, procurement process re-engineering and advising clients in public, retail and financial sectors. He also brings a vast amount of implementation experience of sourcing, contract management, procurement and inventory management systems, and has led support teams responsible for supporting and providing thought leadership for procurement applications. Because of his vast knowledge in the procurement areas, Cyril often speaks on wide ranging procurement topics on various public forums. My guest, Lars, began his SAP journey in 2015, and since the last 3 1/2 year has been the Global Solution Hub Lead for the Procurement Line of Business. His role is an amalgamation of Community Leadership, Content Management, Corporate Programs & Knowledge Sharing. Based in Copenhagen, Denmark, Lars is an expert of visual best practices. He uses visuals both in relation to his work, including internal and external presentations, and also privately, in his photography, sketching and whiteboards As always, my name Akshi Mohla, and you're listening to SAP Experts Podcast.

Call Your Girlfriend
So You Want to Change the World

Call Your Girlfriend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:55


Can't be that hard, right? We pass the mic to Nereya Otieno, one of Ann's 2021 writing fellows, who sits down with two women who have started initiatives to improve the lives of a select few in hopes that it can spark a radical shift. Tia Korpe is the founder of Future Female Sounds, a nonprofit organization based in Copenhagen that aims to make DJing accessible to women and gender-minorities everywhere. Cybille St. Aude-Tate is a chef and children's book author and the co-founder of Honeysuckle Projects, a multifaceted endeavor to engage community and lineage through nourishment with Afrocentric ideologies at the center. And Nereya is in the process of starting Rising Artist Foundation, an organization to give grants to musicians who typically fall outside the existing funding system. They all redefine the idea of entrepreneurship as an act in service of community. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books Network
Chinese Digital Vigilantism: The Mediated and Mediatised Justice-Seeking

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:39


What is digital vigilantism? How do Chinese citizens seek justice online? How does digital vigilantism reflect contemporary Chinese technological and socio-political development? In a conversation with Joanne Kuai, a visiting PhD Candidate at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, Qian Huang, lecturer and PhD Candidate at Erasmus University Rotterdam, explains the growing phenomenon of online collective action against an individual to protect a shared value and the consequences of it. Digital vigilantism refers to citizens' practice of weaponising online visibility for retaliation when collectively offended. Qian Huang speaks to the Nordic Asia Podcast about her research on Chinese digital vigilantism, a part of the research project funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) entitled Digital Vigilantism: Mapping the terrain and assessing societal impacts. Qian Huang is also the co-editor of the book Introducing Vigilant Audiences (Open Book Publishers, 2020) The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Chinese Digital Vigilantism: The Mediated and Mediatised Justice-Seeking

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:39


What is digital vigilantism? How do Chinese citizens seek justice online? How does digital vigilantism reflect contemporary Chinese technological and socio-political development? In a conversation with Joanne Kuai, a visiting PhD Candidate at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, Qian Huang, lecturer and PhD Candidate at Erasmus University Rotterdam, explains the growing phenomenon of online collective action against an individual to protect a shared value and the consequences of it. Digital vigilantism refers to citizens' practice of weaponising online visibility for retaliation when collectively offended. Qian Huang speaks to the Nordic Asia Podcast about her research on Chinese digital vigilantism, a part of the research project funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) entitled Digital Vigilantism: Mapping the terrain and assessing societal impacts. Qian Huang is also the co-editor of the book Introducing Vigilant Audiences (Open Book Publishers, 2020) The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

Troubled Men Podcast
TMP179 BEN SCHENCK GOES PANORAMIC

Troubled Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 71:30


The clarinet player, arranger, and driving force behind the Panorama Jazz Band has an affinity for exotic folk music from around the world. A founding member of the N.O. Klezmer All Stars, he’s been mining this vein since he first got to town. Panorama’s “Good Music for You” song-of-the-month subscription service keeps the fresh releases coming. Ben makes time to spell it all out for the Troubled Men. Topics include a trip to Chicago, college plans, a physical exam, a naked football fan, a gypsy roofer, stolen yard signs, street work, an Annapolis childhood, music training, Quaker schools, modern dance, Go-Go music, the Smithsonian, Jonathan Freilich, Arthur Kastler, the Little People’s Club, Dean Stockwell, “Compulsion,” “Blue Velvet,” Mark Rubin, Bruce Springsteen, a Passover program, the Spotted Cat, Frenchmen St., Turkish dates, a bar hustle, a Copenhagen hustle, the Music Box Village, a wedding story, and much more. Intro Music: Styler/Coman Break and Outro music: “Les Deux Jumeaux” and “Spin the Dreidel” by the Panorama Jazz Band Support the podcast here. Join the Patreon page here. Shop for Troubled Men’s Wear here. Subscribe, review, and rate (5 stars) on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any podcast source. Follow on social media, share with friends, and spread the Troubled Word. Troubled Men Podcast Facebook Troubled Men Podacst Instagram Panorama Jazz Band Homepage Panorama Jazz Band Facebook Ben Schenck Facebook

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU175: Dr Kasper Opstrup presents "Myths of the Near Future: Radicalising Body and Mind"

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:16


On this episode of Rendering Unconscious, Dr. Kasper Opstrup presents "Myths of the Near Future: Radicalising Body and Mind" at Re-Writing the Future: 100 Years of Esoteric Modernism and Psychoanalysis in Merano, Italy on May 30, 2019. http://psychartcult.org Dr. Kasper Opstrup is a writer and researcher based in Copenhagen. He is the Danish translator of, among others, Alexander Trocchi and William Burroughs and is currently finishing a monograph with the tentative title An Imaginary Kingdom in the Wastelands of the Real: On Art, Esotericism and the Politics of Hope. His most recent book is The Way Out: Invisible Insurrections and Radical Imaginaries in the UK Underground from 1961 to 1991 (Minor Compositions, 2017). https://ebsn.eu/about-ebsn/members/kasper-opstrup/ On Sunday, November 21st, he will be presenting "How Weird is That?" looking at the tradition of weird fiction and the current revival of weird thought, alongside Icy Sedgwick, who will be presenting “The Face of Fear: Faces in Gothic Horror Films” as part of our Psychoanalysis, Art & the Occult series hosted by Morbid Anatomy Museum, online via zoom at 2PM NYC / 7PM UK / 8PM CET. https://www.morbidanatomy.org/events-tickets/psychoanalysis-art-and-the-occult-the-face-of-fear-faces-in-gothic-horror-films-with-icy-sedgwick-and-dr-kasper-opstrup-live-on-zoom Follow him at Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kasperopstrup/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/KasperOpstrup Support the podcast at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl For links to everything visit: www.renderingunconscious.org http://www.drvanessasinclair.net/news/ Follow me at Instagram: https://www.instagram.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/home Sign up for my newsletter: http://www.drvanessasinclair.net/contact/ The song at the end of the episode is "The Awareness" by White Stains from the album "Singleminded Dualisms (1987-989)": https://whitestains.bandcamp.com Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson for providing the intro and outro music for Rendering Unconscious Podcast. https://www.carlabrahamsson.com Image:

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp
EPISODE #140 Cannabis Testing Labs with Connor Jensen Murphy and Justin Ihnken, Co-founders at QNTM Labs

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 41:54


This week's episode comes to you from Odense in Denmark, where we're joined by Connor Jensen Murphy and Justin Ihnken from Danish full service cannabis testing and analysis lab, QNTM Labs.We examine the importance of continuity, standardisation, and frameworks with the context of cannabis laboratory testing, and how QNTM Labs are helping to bring pharmaceutical testing standards to the European medical cannabis industry.About QNTM LabsQNTM Labs is an advanced analytical laboratory providing research, development, and regulatory compliance services for pharmaceutical companies.Founded in 2020 and headquartered in Odense, Denmark, QNTM is dedicated to developing innovative analytical methods while maintaining the highest quality levels to forge new industry standards.As global sentiment is increasingly focused on quality data, QNTM Labs is determined to improve transparency and access to robust scientific analysis, working hand-in-hand with global cultivators, API manufacturers, and pharmaceutical industry stakeholders through analytical testing, contract research and clinical trials support.About Justin IhnkenJustin Ihnken is the Chief Executive Officer and Co-founder of QNTM Labs, a state-of-the-art GMP-certified laboratory dedicated to supporting plant-based pharmaceuticals. Outside of QNTM Labs, Justin also currently sits on the Board of Directors for the American Club of Copenhagen.Prior to founding QNTM Labs, Justin worked in Copenhagen for Danish global shipping conglomerate, A.P. Møller-Mærsk, where he was responsible for interest rate portfolio management and derivative trading, as a part of the company's global treasury team. Before moving to Denmark in 2018, Justin built his professional career in institutional banking in New York City, within fixed income trading and interest rates.  Justin completed his education at Seton Hall University's Stillman School of Business where he studied Mathematical Finance. About Connor Jensen MurphyConnor Jensen Murphy co-founded QNTM Labs in March 2020 and is currently the company's Chief Operating Officer.  Connor has spent his career advising middle-market and founder-owned companies in corporate restructuring and M&A transactions.Prior to starting QNTM, Connor was a VP on EY's Investment Banking team in Copenhagen focused on M&A transactions. Before moving to Copenhagen, he was based in San Francisco, California and also worked with EY's Investment Banking group. Connor holds a B.A. from Colgate University where he studied Environmental Economics.ResourcesFollow QNTM Labs on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/qntmlabs/QNTM Labs Website: https://qntmlabs.com/Connect with Connor on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/connor-jensen-murphyConnect with Justin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-ihnken

Chelsea FanCast
50 Years of Chelsea: 1998-99 Pt 1

Chelsea FanCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 90:33


The Chelsea FanCast looks back, season by season, to 50 Years of Chelsea history from 1970 to the present day.Stamford Chidge is joined by Jonathan Kydd and Mark Meehan to look back at the 1998-99 season.3 months after the end of Chelsea's most successful season since 1971, they started the 1998-99 season by winning their third European trophy, the UEFA Super Cup, beating the mighty Real Madrid 1-0. Hope's naturally were very high for the season and with the signings of Pierluigi Casaraghi, Albert Ferrer, Brian Laudrup and World Cup winner Marcel Desailly, many thought that Chelsea might challenge for their first League title since 1955.The first half of the season seemed to confirm this view as Chelsea went on a 21 match unbeaten run and the 2-0 defeat of Spurs at White Hart Lane in December put them top of the Premier League at the end of the year.But, Chelsea were unlucky with injuries with Casaraghi's career ending injury against West Ham in November followed by Laudrup's departure to Copenhagen and then Gus Poyet's injury on Boxing Day denying Chelsea their cutting edge. Thankfully Gianfranco Zola was in impressive for, but would that be enough? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Movement Made Better Podcast
#71 Strength Training, Adaptability, and Chiropractics with Dr. Robert Crawley

Movement Made Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 52:37


Check out this week's podcast episode with Robert Crawley, BSc (Ex Physiology) DC (Doctor of Chiropractic). Robert has 18 years of experience as a chiropractor. He is originally from the USA where he obtained a BSc in Exercise Physiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1998. In 2002 he qualified as a Chiropractor at the National University of Health Sciences. Robert practiced in the USA from 2003-2008 working in an interdisciplinary setting, along with Medical Doctors, Physical Therapists, and Chiropractors. In 2008 he moved to the United Kingdom and registered with the General Chiropractic Council. He is currently in private practice at Gain Recovery Chiropractic & Sports Rehab in Norwich. He is a CrossFit Level 1 Coach and served as Clinical Lead of Athlete Services from 2014-2017 at CrossFit Games European/Meridian Regionals in Copenhagen and Madrid, leading an interdisciplinary team of Chiropractors, Osteopaths, Physiotherapists, and Sports Therapists. Robert is also a RockTape Instructor, delivering kinesiology taping, IASTM, myofascial cupping, and movement specialist courses to manual therapists. He also is a Stick Mobility Instructor certifying manual therapists and personal trainers in the use of the mobility stick. Robert is a member of the British Chiropractic Association and European Chiropractic Union.   In this podcast we discuss:   00:00 - Intro 05:40 - Stickmobility as a primary rehab tool 07:55 - Stickmobility as a cross-training tool 12:13 - Adaptability & improvisational skills in training and recovery 18:30 - Strength training & chiropractics 24:35 - Fascial competence within the wellness industry 30:46 - Lockdown training 38:36 - What should you look for in a chiropractor? 45:05 - Book recommendations More from Dr. Robert Crawley https://www.gainrecovery.co.uk/about-us.php  

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Phishing scam insights with Morten Kjaersgaard CEO Heimdal Security

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:13


We have all heard of the increase in phishing scams via emails and texts that are designed to steal financial details from you. One of the most popular ones claims to be from An Post and in the run up to Christmas more and more of these will be received. I have gotten numerous texts from Irish mobile phone numbers over the last few weeks stating “ANPOST: Payment of import duty/tax & advance fee of €1.99 is required for your shipment to be processed. Pay securely via xxxxxxxxxx”. The xxxxxxxxxx at the end of the text is actually a link to a website where your payment is processed. Another person who received one of these phishing attacks is Morten Kjaersgaard CEO Heimdal Security, a cybersecurity company based in Copenhagen. Morten received an email supposedly coming from the GLS courier company, informing him of an incoming package in his name and for the delivery of which he had to make a small payment. Morten talks to Ronan about the email he received, what he did next, how the scam works and how his research and development team managed to infiltrate the attackers. More about the phishing scam: The email/text is a phishing scam and clicking the link within the email/text takes the recipient to a phishing web page with credit/debit card inputs for the victim to execute the payment for the package delivery. Once the recipient fills in their credit/debit card details, all the data is then sent to the attackers through a Telegram chatbot, onto a public Telegram channel, which basically makes the 3.000 stolen credit/debit cards to date visible not just to the attackers but also to anyone else who is aware of the Telegram channel's existence.

New Books Network
Alice Beban, "Unwritten Rule: State-Making through Land Reform in Cambodia" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:38


Why do so many Cambodian small landholders live in fear? How did the issuance of official land titles contribute to growing indebtedness in rural areas? Why did the government send thousands of university students to the countryside to help with the land titling process? And why did international donors eventually become so disllusioned? In this podcast, Alice Beban, senior lecturer in development sociology at Massey University, discusses her new book Unwritten Rule: State Building Through Land Reform in Cambodia (Cornell 2021) with Duncan McCargo, Director of the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Unwritten Rule draws on eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork to paint a disturbing picture of how an ambitious land reform project, generously funded by leading donors, largely failed to deliver the benefits it promised. In 2012, Cambodia—an epicenter of violent land grabbing—announced a bold new initiative to develop land redistribution efforts inside agribusiness concessions. Alice Beban's Unwritten Rule focuses on this land reform to understand the larger nature of democracy in Cambodia. Beban contends that the national land-titling program, the so-called leopard skin land reform, was first and foremost a political campaign orchestrated by the world's longest-serving prime minister, Hun Sen. The reform aimed to secure the loyalty of rural voters, produce "modern" farmers, and wrest control over land distribution from local officials. Through ambiguous legal directives and unwritten rules guiding the allocation of land, the government fostered uncertainty and fear within local communities. Unwritten Rule gives pause both to celebratory claims that land reform will enable land tenure security, and to critical claims that land reform will enmesh rural people more tightly in state bureaucracies and create a fiscally legible landscape. Instead, Beban argues that the extension of formal property rights strengthened the very patronage-based politics that Western development agencies hope to subvert. If you liked this podcast, you may also enjoy two other podcasts, hosted by Duncan McCargo on related topics, here and here.  Duncan McCargo is an eclectic, internationalist political scientist and literature buff: his day job is directing the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Learn more here, here, here, and here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Hand & Heart Media
Super Cool Toxic Workplace E4: HQ - Pretty as a Picture

Hand & Heart Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 41:14


We continue to hear from John, the employee who began employment in San Diego - and hear what happened during his employment once he had arrived in Copenhagen and worked at Mikkeller Headquarters. We stay at headquarters to hear from Michael, who shares their observations from their employment.

Hand & Heart Media
Super Cool Toxic Workplace E2: WARPIGS

Hand & Heart Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 46:44


We hear from former employees of the pride Mikkeller establishment, WarPigs - in Copenhagen. We cover a long timeline of repetitive patterns starting with testimony as to how it was being the first employee of the establishment, to how it has been more recently.

The Minimalist Vegan Podcast
Are Zoos Ethical For Animals?

The Minimalist Vegan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:07


One of our fondest memories is having a family outing at the zoo. It was surreal to see lions, tigers, elephants, and monkeys in person. Not only that, but zoos are critical for conservation and public education. At least so we thought… There's a dark side to the zoo industry to suggest it's more entertainment than conservation. But is it? In this conversation, we discuss the ethical considerations of zoos and some alternative ways to connect with animals. This episode is brought to you by Woron. Woron is a sustainable and ethical underwear & everyday essentials. They're a brand based out of Copenhagen & owned by two sisters – Arina and Anya Woron. Browse their full range at woronstore.com. Use discount code MINIMALISTVEGAN at checkout to get 15% off storewide. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. Submit your question or topic suggestion at https://theminimalistvegan.com/podcast/ Visit the show notes at https://theminimalistvegan.com/072/ Check out our new cooking show on YouTube https://bit.ly/36XRk6V Follow us on Instagram @theminimalistvegan Email us at info@theminimalistvegan.com

New Books Network
In Search of New Social Democracy: Insights from the South - Implications for the North

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 22:27


In his new book In Search of New Social Democracy: Insights from the South - Implications for the North (Zed-Bloomsbury), Olle Törnquist has returned to findings from fifty years of research on democracy and social rights movements in especially Indonesia, India and the Philippines, to address the major puzzle of our time: why the vision about development based on social justice by democratic means has lost ground, and if there are openings. In this episode of the Nordic Asia Podcast Kenneth Bo Nielsen is joined by Olle Törnquist to discuss the main results and arguments in what he calls his endbook. Olle Törnquist is a Swedish global historian and Professor Emeritus of Politics and Development at the University of Oslo, Norway. He has written widely on radical politics, development and democratisation. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Beyond Busy
Cycling Without Age with Ole Kassow

Beyond Busy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 54:36


My guest today is Ole Kassow. Ole is a social entrepreneur based in Denmark and the founder of Cycling Without Age, a global movement that brings together volunteers to provide outdoor cycle rides to older people who would otherwise be stuck inside. Ole has also spent a lifetime experimenting with different ways to bring kindness into the world of work.In this episode, we talk about his journey creating Cycling Without Age and growing it to become a truly global organization. We also talk about the importance of intergenerational conversations, his experiments in slowness, why kindness is good for business and how his dad inspired his playful spirit. I think you're gonna love this one.Ole starts by telling us how Cycling Without Age was created:So I come out of a family with a dad who suffered from MS. He was very quick in a wheelchair. Actually, I know firsthand how lack of mobility can cause social isolation, loneliness and depression. There was one particular guy who just caught my attention and spurred me into action and that was a man who later really changed my life. I offered bike rides to him. It just brought me an amazing insight into a different generation. It gave me a lot of joy to be able to take this man back on a bike and get him back into his neighbourhood and meet his old friends, see the old places and listen to stories and so on. I felt it was a really wonderful two-way thing where I was able to offer my companionship and he was able to offer me a lot of stories and a lot of insights and wisdom from his age. And then continued on from that with the city of Copenhagen getting involved and sponsoring some wonderful three-wheel bikes with a double seat in front. Then it just grew from there, it grew to all the care homes and activity centres in Copenhagen and beyond, and has since spread to most corners of the world as well.✔ Links: Cycling Without Age:https://cyclingwithoutage.com/Ole Kassow on Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/olekassow/Ole Kassow on Twitter:https://twitter.com/OleKassowSubscribe to Graham's Newsletter: https://www.grahamallcott.com/sign-upOur Show Sponsors: Think Productive - Time Management Training:http://www.thinkproductive.com​​Useful links:https://www.grahamallcott.com/links See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talking Too Loud with Chris Savage
Conducting Customer Research with Michele Hansen

Talking Too Loud with Chris Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 46:40


Michele moved to Denmark with her husband and daughter after spending 10 years in the US. Now living in the countryside, she doesn't meet a lot of people in her daily life that run an internet business like herself. Michele's super excited to do more with the entrepreneurial and UX communities in Copenhagen. Links to learn more about Michele Hansen:Michele's LinkedInMichele's TwitterGeocodio's WebsiteDeploy EmpathyFollow us: twitter.com/wistiaSubscribe: wistia.com/series/talking-too-loudLove what you heard? Leave us a review!We want to hear from you! Write in and let us know what you think about the show, who you'd want us to interview on future episodes, and any feedback you have for our team.

GotMead Live Radio Show
11-9-21 Rohan Meadery – Wendy Rohan and Rosie Haines – Mead is big in Texas

GotMead Live Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 125:10


11-9-21 Tonight we're headed to Texas to talk with Wendy Rohan and Rosie Haines at Rohan Wines and Meads in La Grange, situated between La Grange, Round Top and Fayetteville in south central Texas. Rohan Meadery is at Blissful Folly Farm. The farm is home to Rohan Wines and Meads, Blissful Folly hard ciders and La Grange Brewing Co. All the beer, wine, mead & cider is made on site and served at the tap room on the farm. Wendy & John Rohan started with the meadery first in 2009, then slowly built the business and added different items over the last 12 years. The farm is a working farm with guinea fowl, chickens, ducks, a 2 acre vineyard, fruit trees, bees, goats, sheep & donkeys. The couple practices sustainable farming methods, and the farm is bee friendly certified. Wendy & John were avid homebrewers in the 90s and both have background in the sciences. They make their meads on the principle that the freshest ingredients, locally- sourced when possible, will have the best end result. To that end, over 90% of the honey used in their meads is Texas wildflower or huajilla honey & much of the fruit used is organic. Rosie Hanes came on board as production manager and mead maker in the summer of 2020. She brings a wealth of homebrewing experience, and creative ideas that have resulted in some unique and amazing offerings this past year. Rohan Meadery makes over 15 styles of meads; some are seasonal, others available year-round. This player will show the most recent show, and when we're live, will play the live feed. If you are calling in, please turn off the player sound, so we don't get feedback.[break] [break]Click here to see a playable list of all our episodes! Sponsor: Honnibrook Craft Meadery. Rated the very best winery in Colorado! Visit our state-of-the-art meadery and tasting room south of downtown Castle Rock, Colorado, in a converted man cave. Mention the Got Mead Podcast this month for a free draft taster!  Google H-O-N-N-I Brook for hours and directions. They love visitors!  www.honnibrook.com If you want to ask your mead making questions, you can call us at 803-443-MEAD (6323) or send us a question via email, or via Twitter @GotmeadNow and we'll tackle it online! 9PM EDT/6PM PDT Join us on live chat during the show Bring your questions and your mead, and let's talk mead! You can call us at 803-443-MEAD (6323), or Skype us at meadwench (please friend me first and say you're a listener, I get tons of Skype spam), or tweet to @gotmeadnow. Upcoming Shows November 23 - Steve at Experimeads Show links and notes Let There Be Melomels by Rob Ratliff The Big Book of Mead Recipes by Rob Ratliff Upcoming Events Nov 11 - WildFlyer Mead Co, Navasota, TX - Mead and Read - Book Club Nov 12 - Copenhagen Mead Company, Copenhagen, Denmark - Sparkling Elderflower Mead Launch Nov 13 - The Bee Store, Lake Ridge, VA - Honey and Hops Brewworks mead tasting Nov 13 - Deseret Hive Supply, Ogden, UT - Basic Mead Making class Nov 18 - Keys' Meads, Florida Keys - Mead and Greet - Author signings Nov 19 - Haley's Honey Mead, Fredericksburg, VA - Paint and Mead Nov 20 - Kvlt Mead, Tacoma, WA - Deconsecration Mead Release Nov 21 - Moonjoy Meadery, Lenoir, NC - Mead and Mindfulness Nov 26 - Antelope Ridge Mead, Colorado Springs, CO - Mead Black Friday Nov 28 - Viking Alchemist Meadery, Smyrna, GA - Mead and Metal Artists Market Dec 4 - Wandering Bard Meadery, Greenville, SC - Advanced Mead Making Class Dec 4 - Batch Mead, Temecula, CA - Viking Night - mead, hard cider and a souvenir horn You can buy mead online at https://shopmeads.com Got an event you'd like us to mention on GotMead Live? Send us an email at gotmead@gotmead.com and tell us about it!

The Tea Leaves Podcast
Peter Borup on the Supply Chain Crisis and the Global Shipping Industry

The Tea Leaves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 42:31


Peter Borup is a seasoned shipping executive with nearly three decades of experience across Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Peter began his career with A.P. Moller Maersk in Copenhagen, and helped to build the company's businesses in South Korea and China. Most recently, Peter was the CEO of Norvic Shipping International, based in Denmark and the U.A.E. In this episode, we discussed the 2021 global supply chain disruptions, longterm challenges and trends in shipping, and the prospects for the shipping industries of China, India, and other Indo-Pacific economies.

Downhill Fast
Season 5 Ep 23: Gesture of friendship

Downhill Fast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 68:08


This episode kicks off with Tamara sharing how she messed up and didn't know the difference between a wine decanter and a vase. Her friend, who she was visiting, did not appreciate the kind gesture of getting flowers due to the mix up. Apparently they are very difficult to dry. Not to worry Rheannon is a problem solver and was able to google possible solution. Rheannon also had a very productive weekend making a lot of progress with her carport. Tamara had some questions about the logistics of it. There was a good news update about the butt soap. Rheannon has an update and turns out she was right. Tamara has some updates on her travel with Ireland and England. She did manage to scare Rheannon pretty good because of some train news. Everything was ok in the end. Tamara has been watching her fair share of murder mysteries in Copenhagen, Ireland, and England. She did take a break though from all the murder shows go see a fun musical while in London. There was some trouble with trying to find a place to store her luggage during the play. Let's just say it went downhill fast. 

Heartrepreneur® Radio
Heart-repreneur® Radio | Episode 288 | Shifting Your Mindset To Thrive with Deborah Peters

Heartrepreneur® Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 36:56


Deborah Peters; not just the top International Business Coach, but an Idea! She helps Business Leaders Scale offering a specialized leading edge approach! She is known in the industry as "The Business Accelerator". Facilitating Leadership Retreats, Board Retreats, Strategy Sessions & Negotiating High Stakes deals, Deborah is a Visionary, a Strategist and a Change Agent. Deborah has delivered keynote speeches and customized programs in over 16 countries to date including; The 8th International Congress on Behavior Studies in Santiago, Spain; Leadership Skills for John Cabot University, Rome, Italy; The Global Super Yacht Forum, Seattle and Monaco; The Prince of Wales Business Leaders Forum, London; Opportunities in Super Yachts in Malta and the Off Shore Wind Energy Conference, Copenhagen. Deborah is also a very engaged public presence in her local community with Los Angeles Police Department Community Police Advisory Board. Master Trainer in Neuro Science, Deborah designs & delivers Growth Mind-Set tools that create change, growth and stability in any organization large or small. She has successfully lobbied US Congress and facilitated a trade agreement between Canada and Panama. A partial list of clients include; Boeing, City of Long Beach, Bingham Law Firm, Epson America, Encore Credit Corporation, KIA Motors, Fox Rothschild, University of California; Irvine and San Bernardino Campuses, The Federal Bureau of Investigations, Arco Oil, Mayan Vacations, NASDAQ, Fraser Yachts etc. Follow Deborah: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborahpetersnei4change/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/NEI4Change Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/nei4change/ Website: http://www.neimind.com Official Heart-repreneur® Site:  https://heartrepreneur.com

Finding Harmony Podcast
Susanna Finocchi: Transitions Through Time and Space

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 96:27


Similar to Ganesha the elephant-headed deity in India, Janus is the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, frames, and endings in ancient Roman mythology. He is usually depicted as having two faces. Susanna Finocchi, (our first Italian guest!) is a woman who knows these transitions well. Susanna expounds on the weirdness of being a Southerner in the North. You become a kind of “in-between person,” neither here nor there, but like all these mythological figures you are given a special insight to human nature. And Susanna, in her loving and enthusiastic way, gifts us with her wisdom today. Susanna's mother was a Herbalist, and her father Dionysus was a connoisseur of wine, so it's no surprise that she would grow to hold space for transformation and health. She details her childhood for us and her first encounter with Ashtanga Yoga, and her subsequent emigration to Denmark. Together, with Jens Bache, she co-founded Astanga Yoga Copenhagen and was the main teacher there for almost 18 years, teaching hundreds of students. In 2006, she hosted the entire Jois family in Copenhagen and in 2009 she had the honor of being the first school to invite her teacher Sharath Jois, as the incumbent Guru, on his debut tour, and has since hosted him 6 times since that year. She made her first pilgrimages to Mysore in 1995 and 1996 and since 2003 has returned yearly to KPJAYI (now Sharath Yoga Centre) to practice and study. Susanna studied Sanskrit at the University of Copenhagen and continues to learn together with chanting and Indian Philosophy during her trips to Mysore. She currently is living in Rome, her place of birth, and travels all over Italy and Europe teaching the Ashtanga Yoga method. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SUSANNA WEBSITE I INSTAGRAM FIND HARMONY WEBSITE I INSTAGRAM - harmonyslater.com The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations. If you've enjoyed today's podcast, please consider supporting our future episodes by making a donation. Every little bit goes a long way and we are immensely grateful for any and all of your support. Make A Donation Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review! ❤ Give us a 5★ rating! Opening and closing music compliments of my dear friend teaching Ashtanga yoga in Eindhoven, Nick Evans, with his band “dawnSong” from the album “for Morgan.” Listen to the entire album on Spotify - Click Here. To purchase your own copy - Click Here.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Linda Purl: In The Mood (11/05/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 58:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/cWYaL-fvFYU Linda Purl New York theater credits include Broadway productions of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Getting and Spending and the Off-Broadway production of The Baby Dance. Among regional productions have been Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, Hedda Gabler, The Real Thing, The Glass Menagerie, The Little Foxes, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Road to Mecca (with Miss Julie Harris), A Doll's House, Dinner with Friends(original production), The Year of Magical Thinking (originally for ETC), Hippolytus, Camille, Same Time Next Year, The Miracle Worker, Little Murders, All the Way Home, Nora, Copenhagen, Beyond Therapy, Love, Loss and What I Wore, Oliver, Grease, On a Clear Day, Threepenny Opera And The King and I. Partial film credits include Mighty Joe Young, The Walking Major, Leo and Loree with an upcoming release of Paul's Promise. She has had recurring roles on Homeland (Elizabeth Gaines); True Blood (Barbara Pelt); The Office, (Helene Beasley) and Hacks. She has starred in over 45 made-for-TV movies, and is especially known for Charlene Matlock on Matlock and Ashley Pfister (Fonzie's fiancée) on Happy Days. Ms. Purl currently tours with her solo concerts and as a recording artist, has released solo albums that include Alone Together, Out of this World, Midnight Caravan, Up Jumped Spring and Taking a Chance On Love. Past concert venue appearances include Feinstein's/54 Below, Lincoln Center Jazz, Naples Philharmonic, Catalina Jazz Club (LA), Crazy Coqs (London), Club Raye (Paris) and Satin Doll (Tokyo). https://www.lindapurl.com/

New Books Network
Bertil Lintner, "The Wa of Myanmar and China's Quest For Global Dominance" (NIAS Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:45


Who are the Wa of Myanmar and how, in three decades, have they built a force that is now the largest non-state military actor in Asia-Pacific? How does China's economic, political, and military support for the Wa factor into the Chinese Belt and Road Initiative? What role might the Wa play in the unfolding political crisis in the wake of the February 1, 2021 coup in Myanmar, and Covid-19 pandemic? In this episode, Bertil Lintner discusses these topics and more, related to his recent book The Wa of Myanmar and China's Quest For Global Dominance from NIAS Press (2021). Bertil is Swedish journalist who has lived permanently in Thailand since 1979. He is a full-time correspondent for Asia Pacific Media Services and writes regularly for Asia Times, The Irrawaddy and other publications. He has written 20 books on Asian politics and history. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Heart of Markness Led Zeppelin Podcast
Ep. 135 - Led Zeppelin Copenhagen 1971 Redux

The Heart of Markness Led Zeppelin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 58:35


We revisit May 3, 1971 and Led Zeppelin's show in Copenhagen, with a speed corrected audience recording. This is Zeppelin at the top of their game, Robert Plant especially. We hear Dazed and an epic Whole Lotta Love with a million medleys. Legend.

Football Daily
BONUS: The European Away: Bergamo and Malmo

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 20:16


Correspondent John Murray and former Everton midfielder Leon Osman are in the picturesque Italian city of Bergamo to preview Manchester United's Champions League trip to Atalanta. They ask whether Ole Gunnar Solskjaer will stick with playing three defenders following their success at Tottenham. And Vicki Sparks joins the podcast from Copenhagen, en route to Chelsea's Champions League trip to Malmo.

Good Beer Hunting
SL-030 Beyond Beer — Will a Global Outcry Have Lasting Impact on Mikkeller?

Good Beer Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:07


Over the past several months, Good Beer Hunting reporter Kate Bernot has been at the forefront of covering allegations of sexual harassment, bullying, and unsafe working conditions at Mikkeller, a Denmark-based brewery with bars and brewpubs all over the world, including a prominent location in San Diego. Kate's coverage has included stories on protests at the brewery's Copenhagen headquarters and stories from former employees who alleged instances of inappropriate workplace behavior and silence from leadership. Most recently, Kate has written about how these previous storylines came together ahead of the company's Mikkeller Beer Celebration Copenhagen, one of the most prestigious beer festivals in the world, from which dozens of breweries withdrew in opposition, and eventually garnered an apology from Mikkeller. In this conversation, Kate will recap all this and more, and give you insight into what it's been like to report on an evolving story. This is an opportunity to better understand what it takes to write about all of what's happened to, with, and toward Mikkeller since this summer, and get a better understanding of the context behind it all.

New Books Network
Giuseppe Bolotta, "Belittled Citizens: The Cultural Politics of Childhood on Bangkok's Margins" (NIAS, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 26:25


How is childhood experienced in the slums of Bangkok and how does it relate to socio-political processes in Thailand? What role do mothers play in the leadership of the slums? And how can we understand recent mass protests in Thailand through the lens of children's activism? Giuseppe Bolotta gives insights into his recently published book Belittled Citizens: The Cultural Politics of Childhood on Bangkok's Margins (NIAS Press, 2021). This study explores the daily lives, constraints and social worlds of children born in the slums of Bangkok. It examines how slum children define themselves – and are defined by others – in relation to a range of governing technologies, state and non-state actors, and broad cultural politics. To learn more about the book, visit the NIAS Press website. Giuseppe Bolotta is Assistant Professor in the Department of Asian and North African Studies at the Ca' Foscari University of Venice and Research Associate at the National University of Singapore's Asia Research Institute. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Two Old Bucks
S2 Ep 43: Safekeeping, Copenhagen radicals, Del's crypto-coin, Unhollywoods, Traffic, Henry Kloss

Two Old Bucks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 33:15


What does safekeeping mean?Del announces the Copenhagen Radical Artist Program.  Listeners are invited to submit candidates.Del wants to create a cryptocoin and agonizes over what to name it. Dave has some ideas on how to avoid high-energy crypto-mining. It just might work.After taking a course in traffic engineering, Del proposes a new highway traffic pattern. Dave is confused.Hollywood, Bollywood, Buckywood.Find out who Henry Kloss is.

Where Hollywood Hides: Television | Movies | Music | Show Business | Writing | Producing | Directing | Acting

With an athletic background as a competitive figure skater, Duncan Regehr became a classically-trained Shakespearean stage actor before venturing to Hollywood. Once there, it didn't take him long to win roles in major films and TV series. After appearing in Wizards and Warriors, Duncan snagged lead roles in The Last Days of Pompeii, and My Wicked, Wicked Ways...all of which lead to his most iconic role as "Don Diego de la Vega" in 88 episodes of Zorro. Regehr has since appeared in dozens of shows, drawing a huge following for his Star Trek: TNG performances, but in this interview with Bob & Suzanne McCullough, you'll learn the source of his true creative passion.  No mere "dabbler" as an artist or writer, is written works and paintings are found in collections worldwide, including the Smithsonian Institute, the Jilin Collection of China, the Kunstallen in Copenhagen, Focus on the Masters Archives for the Getty Museum and the Syllavethy Collection of Scotland.                                                                                                        His books The Dragon's Eye, Corvus Rex, Chrysalid, Scarecrow and Presence combine prose, poetry and visual imagery...a true experience and insight into the man. He is a Royal Canadian Artist, a recipient of the American Vision Award of Distinction in the Arts and holds a Doctorate of Fine Arts from the University of Victoria. A creative force to be reckoned with since early childhood, Duncan Regehr defines the 21st Century "Renaissance Man."  This is a conversation not to be missed!    

Have You Eaten Yet?
Chef Jamie Lee: A Conversation from Fiskebar in Copenhagen

Have You Eaten Yet?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 47:37


Today My Guest Is Chef Jamie Lee.He​ Joins Us From Copenhagen.Currently He's Head Chef Of Fiskebar.Today We'll Be Discussing:Work / Life BalanceCopenhagen: Diving Deeper Into That Feeling That  Brought Jamie There And The Moment He Knew The City Connected With Him On A Deeper Level.Also The Future Of Oceans: We'll Discuss An Op-Ed Piece About The Fishing Industry That Jamie Wrote Earlier This Year. And Staging A.K.A Unpaid Kitchen Interns….Will They Continue To Have A Place In Fine Dining? https://www.instagram.com/jamielee_fiskebar/?hl=enhttps://www.instagram.com/fiskebaren/?hl=en

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 62: Maryland's Zebras, Slow Baseball, & The Vikings Kill Columbus

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 80:20


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Packerland Pilsner from Hinterland Brewery and eating delicious Henning's cheese curds from Green Bay. She gives an overview of her weekend in Green Bay and Minneapolis, having a blast touring Lambeau Field and the Green Bay Packers' pro shop, drinking Guinness at St. Brendan's Inn, and sampling delicious beer and MORE brats and cheese as detailed on her social media. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Cookies & Scream M&M's, which don't taste anything like M&M's but she thinks that kids will love them. She moves on to taste Lay's Doritos Cool Ranch flavored potato chips, which she compares to any sour cream & onion flavor (and nothing like Ranch.) Kathleen finishes her tasting with Olive Garden's Parmesan Ranch dressing, which she loves and recommends dunking your unlimited breadsticks in it (or anything else.) UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Court, reporting that Queen Stevie has recorded a duet with Sir Elton John called “Stolen Car,” which was released on The Lockdown Sessions album released in October 2021. Queen Tanya Tucker has announced that she won't return to the road until 2022 so that she can properly recover from hip surgery, and Queen Dolly's Holiday collection in collaboration with Williams Sonoma has released new items including wreaths and cookie mix.UPDATES: Kathleen provides updates on Pablo Escobar's hippos, the IPO of WeWork finally takes place and its founder Adam Neumann celebrates inappropriately with former employees, a 3rd juror is dismissed in the ongoing Elizabeth Holmes trial after she is found playing Sudoku instead of focusing on the deliberations, and the Bellagio's 11 Picasso paintings were auctioned off for more than $100M. REMNANT FELLOWSHIP CULT: Kathleen discusses whether Remnant Fellowship Church outside of Nashville is a church or a cult after watching the HBO documentary “The Way Down: God, Greed, and the Cult of Gwen Shamblin.” The church has been marred with scandal and controversy for decades, from Shamblin's teachings that extreme weight loss will bring a parishioner closer to God, to their general abuse of children that has been documented by local authorities. Shamblin and 6 others died in a private plane crash outside of Nashville in June 2021. BITCOIN SETS ANOTHER RECORD: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article announcing that Bitcoin recently climbed above $60,000, pushing the digital coin further toward its all-time high as traders speculated U.S. regulators would clear the first bitcoin futures exchange-traded fund.BLUE EYED PEOPLE RELATED TO COMMON ANCESTOR: Kathleen's Irish heritage links her to a large population of blue-eyed people, so she is interested in the findings of a study released by the University of Copenhagen proving that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. Scientists have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6,000-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye color of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today.THE “NEW” FACEBOOK: As listeners know, Kathleen holds distain for Mark Zuckerberg and his perceived lack of care around monitoring the content of Facebook, and is appalled when reading an article announcing that Facebook is rebranding and changing its company name as soon as November 2021, according to The Verge. Apparently, the social media giant will have a new name that will reflect its focus on creating a metaverse.PHIL COLLINS' ALAMO OBSESSION: Kathleen laughs as she reads an article about drummer Phil Collins' obsession with the Alamo. Collins donated his trove of Alamo-related artifacts to Texas in 2014 with the stipulation that the state open a museum at the landmark to house them by 2021. With the museum currently finalizing its curating of the exhibits, there is debate on whether the museum “should be focused on celebrating the small group of leaders who played key roles or reflect a broader, more complicated tale,” referring to the Tejanos, Native Americans, and Black indentured and enslaved people that are rarely noted in the history of the Alamo. VIKINGS DISCOVERED AMERICA: Kathleen reads some breaking historical news confirming that Vikings had settled in a remote corner of northern Newfoundland by AD 1021, establishing for the first time a precise date for the earliest European habitation in the Americas — exactly 1,000 years ago. In A.D. 993, a storm on the sun released an enormous pulse of radiation that was absorbed and stored by trees all over the Earth. Now, that solar event has proved a critical tool in pinpointing an exact year the Vikings were present in the Americas before the arrival of Christopher Columbus.ROYAL CARIBBEAN'S ULTIMATE WORLD CRUISE: Kathleen prefers other types of vacations to those on cruise ships, and is amused at the response to Royal Caribbean's announcement that their new Serenade of the Seas will sail around the world in 80 days, and passengers can book a 274 night cruise that will visit more than 150 destinations. The ship will embark on what the line is calling the "longest and most comprehensive" world cruise scheduled to depart in 2023.MARYLAND ZEBRAS: Kathleen reads an article advising that 5 zebras escaped from a private farm in Upper Marlboro, Maryland on August 31st, 2021. 3 of the 5 animals are still loose, and local authorities and zoo experts have weighed in their opinions on how to go about catching the creatures. SPEEDING UP PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL: Kathleen is a massive St. Louis Cardinals fan, and agrees that the game would be MUCH more exciting if changes were made to speed up how the game is played. She's excited to read a recent article announcing that MLB is using the Atlantic League as a test league for changes that could potentially speed up the play of game and add more drama. Stay tuned, baseball fans ☺ 106-Year-Old Credits Beer With Longevity: Kathleen is thrilled reading an article from Pennsylvania where a 106-year-old woman credits a Yuengling Lager a day with her longevity. The brewer heard about her endorsement before a Philadelphia Eagles game and send Margaret Dilullo a truckload of the beer as a thank you for her decades of support. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching the HBO documentary “The Way Down: God, Greed, and the Cult of Gwen Shamblin.,” on HBO Max, and “Succession” on HBO.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Business Daily
Can global shipping go green?

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 17:28


Fergus Nicoll travels to the port of Workington in the north west of England, where he hears from port manager Sven Richards about how small regional ports can make global haulage more sustainable. Blue Line Logistics run a fleet of low emission barges in Belgium and the Netherlands and have plans to expand to the UK and the US. Fergus speaks to the company's founder, Antoon van Coillie. The BBC's Adrienne Murray has been looking into the research and development going into producing 'green fuel' in Copenhagen. Fergus also hears from Yon Sletten, who is developing the Yara Birkeland, a zero emission, autonomous, electric freighter, currently undergoing final sea tests off the coast of Norway. Also in the programme, the efforts of Green Marine, a group of ship owners, ports and shipyards in North America, that has come together to raise the bar for environmental standards in their industry, as their executive David Bolduc explains. Producer: Russell Newlove. (Picture: aerial view of a container ship surrounded by green sea. Credit: Getty Images.)

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
170 | Priya Natarajan on Galaxies, Black Holes, and Cosmic Anomalies

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 87:52


There is so much we don't know about our universe. But our curiosity about the unknown shouldn't blind us to the incredible progress we have made in cosmology over the last century. We know the universe is big, expanding, and accelerating. Modern cosmologists are using unprecedentedly precise datasets to uncover more details about the evolution and structure of galaxies and the distribution and nature of dark matter. Priya Natarajan is a cosmologist working at the interface of data, theory, and simulation. We talk about the state of modern cosmology, and how tools like gravitational lensing are providing us with detailed views of what's happening in the distant universe.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Priya Natarajan received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge. She is currently professor of astronomy at Yale University, the Sophie and Tycho Brahe Professor at the Niels Bohr Institute of the University of Copenhagen, and an honorary professor for life at the University of Delhi, India. She is an Affiliate at the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University and an Associate Member of the Center for Computational Astrophysics at the Flatiron Institute in New York. She is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and other publications. Among her awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, the India Abroad Foundation's “Face of the Future” Award, and an India Empire NRI award for Achievement in the Sciences. She is the author of Mapping the Heavens: The Radical Scientific Ideas That Reveal the Cosmos.Web siteYale web pageGoogle Scholar publicationsArticles at the New York Review of BooksWikipediaTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Friends Drink Beer
159. Zombie Dreams by Mikkeller Brewing

Friends Drink Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:01


Zombie Dreams was created with the idea of bringing the flavors and notes of a cranberry mimosa to beer. After letting their in-house lactobacillus culture sour their wort, they added cranberry puree and Sauvignon Blanc grape juice to the fermentation. This resulted in smooth aromas of sweet cranberry with hints of tropical fruit. On the palate, the carbonation brings forth the mix of fruit during fermentation with a backend acidity to round things off. Mikkeller Brewing started when Mikkel and his childhood friend, Keller, began working on a series of ‘physics experiments' using malt, hops, and yeast in their home kitchens in Copenhagen. The kitchen experiments lasted for two and a half years and while they continued, Mikkel and Keller also began brewing beer on a larger scale at the Danish microbrewery Ørbæk. In the beginning of 2007, Keller left Mikkeller to pursue a career as the editor of a music magazine, while Mikkel remained on his own to continue pursuing his dream of taking Mikkeller to another level. Mikkeller's growth was rapid, and in 2010 Mikkel decided to bid farewell to his students and colleagues at the school he taught at and decided to commit himself full-time to the brewery. This week on FDB - a bulldozing powerchair, illegal sprinkles, breaking a contract with a wizard, and more! Now please kick back, and enjoy another sit down with Friends Drink Beer. To support Mikkeller Brewing, and find out more about their beers, visit: Website: mikkeller.com Instagram: @mikkellerbeer Have a question for Ryan & Alex? Submit it today at www.friendsdrinkbeer.com, and we will answer it on the next episode! Lastly if you like the show, donate to us and show your support: www.patreon.com/friendsdrinkbeer CREDITS Alex Hobbs - Host/Executive Producer Ryan Roope - Host/Executive Producer Jared Brody - Writer/Producer Chelsea Cook - Writer

We Travel There with Lee Huffman
Copenhagen, Denmark | Mermaid Statue, Tivoli Gardens & Copenhill Skiing

We Travel There with Lee Huffman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 37:27


We're in Copenhagen, Denmark, with my new friend Sally Bunnell, the founder of the Navi Savi app. Sally and I talk about visiting the Mermaid statue, exploring Tivoli Gardens, and skiing at Copenhill. Show notes are at https://WeTravelThere.com/copenhagen Miles and points make travel affordable, but tracking them is difficult. That's why I use AwardWallet to monitor my rewards, reservations, and free night certificates. Sign up for free at WeTravelThere.com/awardwallet.

The Documentary Podcast
Denmark's Red Van

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:35


A unique project aimed at reducing harm to women selling sex in Copenhagen… Every weekend night in Copenhagen's red light district of Vesterbro, a group of volunteers pull up and park a Red Van. This is no ordinary vehicle. The interior is lit with fairy lights. There is a bed – and a ready supply of condoms. The Red Van constitutes a harm reduction strategy like no other. It is designed for use by women selling sex on the streets – somewhere they can bring their clients. Just as health workers might argue addicts should have a safe place where they can take their drugs to prevent overdoses, the Red Van NGO's volunteers believe they are creating a more secure environment for Copenhagen's sex workers or prostitutes. Producer / presenter: Linda Pressly (Image: The Red Van with some of its volunteers – Pauline Hoffman Schroder, Sine Plambech and Aphinya Jatuparisakul. Credit: BBC/Linda Pressly)

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore
1773: Maria Edwards Helps Bipolar Disorder, Now Researches Ketogenic Diet For TBI

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:54


On today's episode of the LLVLC Show, Jimmy welcomes Maria Edwards to talk about helping bipolar disorder and other issues with Keto. “Many people in the system look for help and they just finally give up.”  - Maria Edwards In this episode, Jimmy is pleased to have a ketogenic researcher and clinical nutritionist named Maria Edwards (@millaedwards). After beating back the major ramifications of her bipolar disease through the use of the keto diet, she's now examining traumatic brain injury (TBI) at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark (even working with Dr. Dominic D'Agostino on her PhD project on this very topic). Check out this interview to hear Maria share why she is so passionate about mental illness, survival, and how to thrive with nutrition and lifestyle therapies. Maria's research area is in Clinical Nutrition is Ketogenic Therapies. Her Master's Thesis was a Feasibility Study with the Ketogenic Diet in Severe Brain Injury at the Department of Brain Injuries, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Maria's BSc project in Food Science, Health and Nutrition deals with the Ketogenic Diet as a treatment for Epilepsy.

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: I'll Be Your Mirror

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:56


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by Karen Han. First, Slate's music critic Carl Wilson chimes in to discuss Todd Haynes's new The Velvet Underground documentary, which he wrote beautifully about for Slate. Next, the panel (minus Dana) is joined by Slate staff writer Rebecca Onion to review Mike Flanagan's newest Netflix horror series, Midnight Mass—which she also wrote lovingly about. Finally, the panel (minus Dana) is joined by Vulture senior editor and host of the Good One podcast, Jesse David Fox, to discuss the Dave Chappelle controversy. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses media they loved when they were younger that they have since outgrown. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: The book equivalent of Todd Haynes's documentary, the first oral history Dana ever read and still one of the best she's ever read to this day: Edie: American Girl by Jean Stein and George Plimpton. The oral history tells the story of actress and model Edie Sedgwick completely through testimony from people that were there, without any interstitial material.  Karen: New World, the Korean crime drama film from Park Hoon-jung that stars Squid Game's Lee Jung-jae. The film features Lee as an undercover cop who is tasked with infiltrating the mob, but ends up caught between two worlds. It also stars a slew of great Korean actors including Hwang Jung-min and Song Ji-hyo.  Steve: First, Netflix's series The Chestnut Man, a dark, taught crime drama which takes place in Copenhagen. Then, a whole genre of YouTube videos taking you from raw audio of rehearsal to mastertape of Elvis's songs, including “And The Grass Won't Pay No Mind”—though, Neil Diamond's version of that one is better. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is “I'll Be Your Mirror” by The Velvet Underground. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Cycling Podcast
188: The 2022 Tour de France routes

The Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 64:45


The routes for the 2022 Tour de France and Tour de France Femmes were revealed in Paris so now the riders know what awaits them next July. The 109th edition of the men's Tour will start on Friday, July 1 with a time trial in Copenhagen, followed by two stages in Denmark before a transfer back to France where the cobbles of the Hell of the North await. The serious climbing starts with La Super Planche des Belles Filles before Alpe d'Huez returns for the first time since 2018. The Tour will visit Hautacam in the Pyrenees before a time trial at Rocamadour. The first edition of the Tour de France Femmes will kick off with a stage in Paris on the same day the men's Tour reaches the Champs-Élysées. Over the course of eight stages, the women will tackle gravel and climbs before the yellow jersey is decided on La Super Planche des Belles Filles. Richard Moore, Lionel Birnie and Daniel Friebe dissect the routes, assess some of the culinary highlights and ask whether the sprinters will be forced to look elsewhere for opportunities. The Cycling Podcast is supported by Supersapiens and Science in Sport. Supersapiens is a continuous glucose monitoring system that helps you make the right fuelling choices. See supersapiens.com  For 25% off all your SiS products, go to scienceinsport.com and enter the code SISCP25 at the checkout. This episode is sponsored by Noom, the psychology-based approach to getting people on track to eating healthier. Sign up for a trial and get psychology-based support to lose the weight for good at noom.com/cycle 

THEMOVE
TheMove: 2022 Tour de France Course Preview

THEMOVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:50


We take a first glimpse at the different stages of next year's Tour de France which were announced yesterday in Paris and analyze the difficulties and challenges of the route. The Tour 2022 starts in Copenhagen and stays in Denmark for the first 3 stages, before traveling to the North of France. The first week will be mainly flat but very stressful, particularly with the return of the cobblestones on stage 5. On stage 7 we will have the first real test for the big favorites with the finish on La Planche des Belles Filles. Then it's towards the Alps with the return of the famous climb of Alpe d'Huez and from there to the Pyrenees featuring the extremely hard climb of Hautacam. The last big test will be the 40km long individual time trial on the second last day before the peloton finally enters into Paris. In all, a very well balanced yet quite hard course which will be won undoubtedly by the strongest cyclist supporter by a very solid team.