Podcast appearances and mentions of Paris Agreement

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2016 international agreement concerning global warming

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Best podcasts about Paris Agreement

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Latest podcast episodes about Paris Agreement

Columbia Energy Exchange
Forging US-Canadian Partnerships On Climate

Columbia Energy Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 65:38


How can the US and Canada cooperate to meet international and domestic climate targets?  To try and answer that question, host Jason Bordoff spoke with Catherine McKenna – the former Canadian Minister of Infrastructure and Communities and former Canadian Minister of Environment and Climate Change.  McKenna, who recently joined the Center on Global Energy Policy as a Distinguished Visiting Fellow, was a lead negotiator of the Paris Agreement before introducing and successfully defending landmark legislation that established a carbon price across Canada.  In this conversation, the pair discuss Canada's decarbonization strategy, misogyny in climate politics, building US-Canadian partnerships in tackling climate change, and her hopes for this new, exciting stage in her career. 

The John Batchelor Show
Terry Anderson #Unbound (climate change). The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 40:03


Photo:   Instrumentation: Climatic - California, National Forest Service photograph. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Terry Anderson #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change.  Paperback – April 1, 2021. by Terry Anderson  (Editor) https://www.amazon.com/Adapt-Be-Adept-Responses-Climate/dp/0817924558/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1619395663&refinements=p_27%3ATerry+Anderson&s=books&sr=1-1 How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? The editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep70: Ban Ki-moon 'The Planet's Leading Diplomat'

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 47:41


Ban Ki-moon was the 8th Secretary General of the UN. He is the Chairman of Ban Ki-moon Foundation for a Better Future.In April 2019, Mr. Ban was elected as the Chairman of Presidential National Council on Climate and Air Quality (NCCA) (2019-2021). In April 2018, Mr. Ban was elected as the Chairman of Boao Forum for Asia. In January 2018, Mr. Ban, along with former President of Austria Mr. Heinz Fischer, were inducted as Co-Chairs of the Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens in Vienna, Austria. Mr. Ban Ki-moon was also elected as Chairman of IOC Ethics Committee in September 2017. Currently, he is the Distinguished Chair Professor and Honorary Chairman at the Institute of Global Engagement & Empowerment at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. In February 2018, he was elected and has been serving as the President of the Assembly & Chair of the Council of Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). Prior to these appointments, Mr. Ban served two consecutive terms as the Secretary General of the United Nations (2007-2016).Throughout his tenure at the UN, Mr. Ban strove to be a bridge builder, to give voice to the world's poorest and the most vulnerable people, and to make the Organization more transparent and effective. He successfully pressed for action to combat climate change - an effort that culminated in the adoption and rapid entry into the landmark Paris Agreement in 2016. Mr. Ban worked closely with member states of the UN to shape the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and to establish UN Women, which has been advancing the Organization's work for gender equality and women's empowerment. Mr. Ban also launched major efforts to strengthen UN peace operations, to protect human rights, to improve humanitarian response, and to prevent violent extremism and to revitalize the disarmament agenda.At the time of his appointment at the UN, Mr. Ban was the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea. His 37 years with the Ministry included postings in New Delhi, Washington D.C., and Vienna, and responsibilities for a variety of portfolios, including Foreign Policy Adviser to the President, Chief National Security Adviser to the President, Vice Minister, Deputy Minister for Policy Planning and Director-General for American Affairs. Mr. Ban has also been actively involved in issues relating to inter-Korean relations by serving as Chairman of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization.Mr. Ban received a bachelor's degree in international relations from Seoul National University in 1970. He earned a master's degree in public administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1985. Further reading:Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizenshttps://bankimooncentre.org/The Elders mourn the loss of Archbishop Desmond Tutu (December 2021)https://theelders.org/news/elders-mourn-loss-archbishop-desmond-tutu

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change, by Terry Anderson (Editor)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 7:45


Photo:  Ice Bridge, Mueller Glacier 4/4 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change,  by Terry Anderson  (Editor) Paperback – April 1, 2021 How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? Editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change, by Terry Anderson (Editor)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 12:55


Photo:  Black Pooeenyah and the Ignimut Glacier from Northward over the “Great Ice: a narrative of life and work along the shores and upon the interior ice-cap of Northern Greenland in the years 1886 and 1891-1897 . . .  With maps, diagrams, and about eight hundred illustrations. 3/4 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change,  by  Terry Anderson  (Editor) Paperback – April 1, 2021   How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? Editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change, by Terry Anderson (Editor)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 9:05


Photo:  A Texas Army National Guard UH-60 Black Hawk out of the Austin Army Aviation Facility helps fight wildfires threatening homes and property near Bastrop, Texas, Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Malcolm McClendon) 2/4  Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change,  by  Terry Anderson  (Editor) Paperback – April 1, 2021   How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? Editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change, by Terry Anderson (Editor)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 9:45


Photo:   First Bench on Low Boardwalk Flooded 1/4  Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change,  by  Terry Anderson  (Editor) Paperback – April 1, 2021 How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? Editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global
Climate must factor into ‘every financial transaction,' says Just Climate Chairman

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 31:53


In this year's final episode of ESG Insider, we talk with David Blood about two big sustainability issues impacting the financial sector as we head into 2022: Plugging the climate financing gap, and aligning investment portfolios with Paris Agreement goals. David is a senior partner at Generation Investment Management, the sustainable investment firm he founded with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore. David tells us about the strategy behind Just Climate, a new venture Generation Investment Management launched in October 2021 to tackle the net zero challenge at scale. "To achieve our goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 1.5 degrees C, every financial transaction must take climate into consideration," David says in the interview. "I don't believe yet that the asset owner community or the asset manager community fully embrace that, have fully internalized that notion." He also talks about his role leading the Portfolio Alignment Team. This group was created in 2020 by Mark Carney in his capacity as U.N. Special Envoy for Climate in response to rising interest from investors and lenders in measuring how portfolios align with Paris Agreement goals. The Portfolio Alignment Team published its latest report shortly before COP26. In this episode, we also speak with Carter Powis, a consultant with McKinsey who led the firm's support of the team. "Knowledge of portfolio alignment tools is still in a very nascent state across the financial sector," Carter says. "As a result, there are some pervasive misunderstandings about what these tools are and why they're important." Photo credit: Generation Investment Management

Simple, but Not Easy
ESG in 2022: a Simple, but Not Easy Short

Simple, but Not Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 20:03


Environmental, social, and governance. More commonly called ESG, it used to be seen in many parts of the investment world as a niche specialty that was mostly about virtue—something that was nice to do. But now there's been no question that it's something we need to do, particularly coming out of Glasgow's United Nations Climate Change Conference, known as COP26. Nearly 500 financial-services firms from around the world agreed to align $130 trillion with the goals specified by the Paris Agreement, with the objective of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. In this special short episode, we hear from Global Chief Investment Officer Dan Kemp on the ramifications of COP26 and the outlook for ESG for investment advisors and their clients in the coming year.

CoinGecko Podcast
Putting the Paris Agreement on Blockchain with Joseph Pallant, Founder of Blockchain for Climate Foundation - Ep. 42

CoinGecko Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 44:54


In this episode, Zhong, head of research at CoinGecko is joined by Joseph Pallant, Founder and Executive Director of Blockchain for Climate Foundation. Joseph discussed his background in carbon markets and blockchain, the foundation's work in putting the Paris Agreement on blockchain, and its next step to making an impact on the environment.[00:00:40] Intro[00:01:21] Joseph's background in carbon markets and crypto space[00:03:44] About Blockchain for Climate Foundation[00:09:53] What are internationally transferred mitigation outcomes (IMTOs)?[00:14:47] More on ITMO targets for different countries[00:17:22] The foundation's aim and aspects it's trying to improve[00:23:02] Clarifications on BITMO and the origin of the name[00:23:33] Working with government organisations and whitelisting process[00:26:09] Thoughts on the ITMO issuance process[00:29:50] Thoughts on private sector involvement[00:32:12] Will BITMO be tradable in open markets?[00:34:44] Merging of blockchain and carbon markets[00:37:27] The foundation's next step and future plans[00:39:54] Final notes on the foundationQuotes from the episode:“Back in 2017, when I sort of fell a second time on to the concept of Ethereum and to the work it was doing, really jumped in both feet recognizing the commonality between carbon markets and how blockchains work” [00:03:14] “And so we feel by building more transparency, we can get more trust and confidence of the global community to use article 6.2 ITMOs and be able to fund countries and the underlying projects there to help beat climate change.” [00:14:36]“What kind of magically happened was that this fecund broad Ethereum community was able to create all the tools that we would need to build this tool of our wildest dreams.” [00:25:04]Watch the Podcast on YouTubeWebsite Blockchain for Climate Foundation - https://www.blockchainforclimate.org/CoinGecko - https://www.coingecko.com/ Social Media Blockchain for Climate Foundation:https://twitter.com/blockforclimateCoinGecko:https://twitter.com/coingeckohttps://www.youtube.com/c/CoinGeckoTV/https://www.instagram.com/coingecko/https://t.me/coingecko

Big Tech
Catherine McKenna on Cutting through Online Hate to Have Meaningful Discussions on Climate Change

Big Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 42:17


Social media has become an essential tool for sharing information and reaching audiences. In the political realm, it provides access to constituents in a way that going door to door can't. It also provides a platform for direct access to citizens without paying for advertising or relying on news articles. We've seen how Donald Trump used social media to his advantage, but what happens when social media turns on the politician? In this episode of Big Tech, Taylor Owen speaks with Catherine McKenna, Canada's minister of environment and climate change from 2015 to 2019. McKenna's experience with online hate is not unique; many people and groups face online harassment and, in some cases, real-world actions against them. What does make McKenna's case interesting is the convergence of online harassment on social media and the climate change file. In her role as minister, McKenna was responsible for implementing the federal government's environmental policy, including the Paris Agreement commitments, carbon pricing and pipeline divestment. No matter what she said in her social posts, they were immediately met with negative comments from climate change deniers. Attacks against her escalated to the point where her constituency office was vandalized and a personal security detail was assigned to her. Finding solutions to climate change is complicated, cross-cutting work that involves many stakeholders and relies on dialogue and engagement with government, industry and citizens. McKenna found that the online expression of extremism, amplified by social media algorithms, made meaningful dialogue all but impossible. McKenna, no longer in politics, is concerned that the online social space is having negative impacts on future youth who may want to participate in finding climate solutions. “I've left public life not because of the haters, but because I just want to focus on climate change. But…I want more women to get into politics. I want broader diversity. Whether you're Indigenous, part of the LGBTQ+ community, or a new immigrant, whatever it is, I want you to be there, but it needs to be safe.” Which raises the question: To find climate solutions, must we first address misinformation and online hate? 

The John Batchelor Show
Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change. Paperback – April 1, 2021. by Terry Anderson (Editor)

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 40:03


Photo: Darwin's finches, or Galapagos finches. Darwin, 1845. Journal of researches into the natural history and geology of the countries visited during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the world, under the Command of Capt. Fitz Roy, R.N. 2d edition. 1. (category) Geospiza magnirostris 2. (category) Geospiza fortis 3. Geospiza parvula, now (category) Camarhynchus parvulus 4. (category) Certhidea olivacea .. Terry Anderson #Unbound (climate change). The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021 @Batchelorshow Terry Anderson #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change.  Paperback – April 1, 2021. by Terry Anderson  (Editor) https://www.amazon.com/Adapt-Be-Adept-Responses-Climate/dp/0817924558/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1619395663&refinements=p_27%3ATerry+Anderson&s=books&sr=1-1 How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? The editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate. PODCAST: - 2021 Sept 6 Monday ; Oct 2, Oct 30

Planet of the Klimates
Joseph Pallant - Founder of Blockchain for Climate Foundation

Planet of the Klimates

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 67:26


Joseph Pallant joins your favorite Klimates, Phaedrus, REG & DiamondHands to school us on all things carbon. From building the tooling required to bring the Paris Agreement and carbon markets on chain, to learning about cryptocurrencies in basements back in 2017, there's few individuals with more passion for what blockchain technology can do for the environment.What they touch on:(0:01) Intro(1:01) Pre-Show Notes(3:18) Joseph Pallant introduction(4:15) Joseph's introduction to the crypto world(5:00) The tools for carbon markets(8:23) Bringing the Paris Agreement on-chain(11:47) Wait, what is a carbon market?(12:35) Difference between regulatory and voluntary credits(16:44) The difficulty of obtaining a carbon credit(18:09) Applying the carbon standards to other assets(20:53) What are BITMO's and how the idea came to be(26:34) How does the ERC-1155 standard differ from ERC-721?(32:44) Industry reaction to increasing cost of pollution(39:53) How are BITMO's created?(41:42) BITMO's and KLIMA(44:04) Klima's impact on the environment(50:03) Klima and the carbon markets in 2033(55:17) How do we get people to support the fight against climate change?(59:44) Closing thoughts(1:03:00) Key TakeawaysLinks:-Blockchain for Climate Foundation https://www.blockchainforclimate.org-Ecotrust Canada https://ecotrust.ca-Gitcoin: Blockchain for Climate Foundation https://gitcoin.co/grants/2924/put-international-carbon-markets-on-ethereum-with-Joseph Pallant Twitter https://twitter.com/josephpallantKlimaDAO:-Website https://www.klimadao.finance/-Twitter https://twitter.com/KlimaDAO-Discord https://t.co/DHXgR0Jfie?amp=1-YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM0q6tAgndEOs6n6A_-Ou1QHosts:-Phaedrus https://twitter.com/AlphaBetaCrypt-REG https://twitter.com/OccultDegen-DiamondHands https://twitter.com/diamondhandsKM

Express Yourself!
The White House and Renewable Energy

Express Yourself!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 51:24


How much do you know about the White House? Ruhani takes us behind the scenes to inform us about fascinating and historical details that most Americans are unaware of. Dr. Jill Biden's Christmas décor this year is inspired by the small acts of kindness and experiences that lifted our spirits throughout the pandemic, rooms throughout the White House are decorated to reflect the Gifts from the Heart that unite us all. After a tour of the building, she talks about the Paris Agreement and COP 26 Climate Change Conference. Co-host, Nihal, continues the conversation with information about renewable energy. Renewable Energy is energy that is collected from renewable resources such as water, sunlight, wind, tides, waves, and geothermal energy. Renewable energy plays an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Using renewable energy can help to reduce energy imports and reduce fossil fuel use, which is the largest source of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. Nihal gives examples on how teens and young adults can reduce their carbon footprint. In segment three, our Express Yourself! poet, Sharanya shares her original poem called “The Wind, The Water, The Earth”. She compares becoming a competent writer to renewable energy. Renewable energy uses what the Earth has already provided to harvest energy. To become a better writer, the first step is to read or listen to pre-existing literary works. Follow us: https://www.starstyleradio.com/expressyourselfteenradio • https://www.facebook.com/ExpressYourselfTeenRadio/ • https://www.facebook.com/BTSYAcharity/ • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/expressyourselfradio/

IfG LIVE – Discussions with the Institute for Government
Can UK trade policy be made greener?

IfG LIVE – Discussions with the Institute for Government

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 61:39


Having introduced a legally binding target to achieve net zero by 2050 and with the Environment Act – designed to enforce UK environmental standards – now on the statute book, the UK government is proud of its green achievements. But does the UK's post-Brexit independent trade policy live up to its domestic environmental commitments? Earlier this year the UK agreed to omit references to temperature goals committed to in the Paris Agreement in order to secure a free trade agreement with Australia – an agreement which, on the government's own analysis, will result in increased use of scarce natural resources and increased waste. So does the UK need to do more to position its environmental goals at the heart of its trade policy or would this hinder the UK's ability to strike deals across the globe? Can trade policy help deliver positive gains for the environment? And should the UK government set out an overarching trade policy to bring consistency and coherence to its trade deals? To answer these questions, and to explore what goals UK trade policy is – or ought to be – serving, the Institute for Government was delighted to bring together an expert panel including: Sir Martin Donnelly, former Permanent Secretary for the Department for International Trade (DIT) and for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (now BEIS) Dmitry Grozoubinski, Director of ExplainTrade Anna Sands, Trade Policy Specialist at WWF UK Chris Southworth, Secretary General of the International Chamber of Commerce The event was chaired by Jill Rutter, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Government. #IfGTrade We would like to thank WWF UK for supporting this event.  

Institute for Government
Can UK trade policy be made greener?

Institute for Government

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 61:09


Having introduced a legally binding target to achieve net zero by 2050 and with the Environment Act – designed to enforce UK environmental standards – now on the statute book, the UK government is proud of its green achievements. But does the UK's post-Brexit independent trade policy live up to its domestic environmental commitments? Earlier this year the UK agreed to omit references to temperature goals committed to in the Paris Agreement in order to secure a free trade agreement with Australia – an agreement which, on the government's own analysis, will result in increased use of scarce natural resources and increased waste. So does the UK need to do more to position its environmental goals at the heart of its trade policy or would this hinder the UK's ability to strike deals across the globe? Can trade policy help deliver positive gains for the environment? And should the UK government set out an overarching trade policy to bring consistency and coherence to its trade deals? To answer these questions, and to explore what goals UK trade policy is – or ought to be – serving, the Institute for Government was delighted to bring together an expert panel including: Sir Martin Donnelly, former Permanent Secretary for the Department for International Trade (DIT) and for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (now BEIS) Dmitry Grozoubinski, Director of ExplainTrade Anna Sands, Trade Policy Specialist at WWF UK Chris Southworth, Secretary General of the International Chamber of Commerce The event was chaired by Jill Rutter, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Government. #IfGTrade We would like to thank WWF UK for supporting this event.

IFRS Talks - PwC's Global IFRS podcast
Episode 122: Carbon pricing models

IFRS Talks - PwC's Global IFRS podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 20:33


The Paris Agreement adopted at COP 21 in 2015 introduced a market based mechanism to price carbon with the aim of cost-effectively managing and reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.  But carbon pricing mechanisms can raise tricky accounting questions.

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Climate experts say Labor's emissions reduction plan needs to go further - Експертите за клима велат дека планот за намалување на емисиите на Лабуристите треба да биде поам

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 8:18


Climate experts are hailing Labor's election promise to make a 43 per cent emissions cut by 2030 as a step in the right direction, but warn it is a goal that falls short of what the science calls for. To limit global warning within the Paris Agreement goal of "well below" two degrees, scientists and Greens activists are pushing for a 75 per cent emissions cut. - Експертите за клима го поздравуваат изборното ветување на Лабуристичката Партија за намалување на емисиите за 43 отсто до 2030 година, како чекор во вистинската насока, но предупредуваат дека тоа е цел што е под она што науката го бара. За да се ограничи глобалното затоплување во рамките на целта на Парискиот Договор за „многу под“ два степени, научниците и активистите на Зелените се залагаат за намалување на емисиите за 75 отсто.

The Straits Times Audio Features
Article 6 - Rise of the carbon markets?: Green Pulse Ep 66

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 18:59


Green Pulse Ep 66: Article 6 - Rise of the carbon markets? 18:59 min Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change. At the recent COP26 climate talks in Glasgow, Scotland, negotiators from nearly 200 nations concluded discussions on Article 6 of the Paris Agreement. This relates to carbon markets, and whether countries can trade carbon credits to meet their climate pledges — known as nationally determined contributions (NDCs). The discussions, six years in the making, also established rules on who emissions savings accrue to, if one nation pays to set up a green initiative - say a wind farm instead of a coal plant - in another country. But what exactly are these new rules and markets and what are some of the concerns that still remain?  To help explain what it all means for governments and investors, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty speak with Mr Richard Saines, who is partner at Pollination, a specialist climate change investment and advisory firm. Highlights of conversation (click/tap above): 1:13 What is the difference between existing voluntary and compliance carbon markets, and how will the outcome at COP26 change them?  5:56 What is the key provision under Article 6 that ensures carbon credits are not double counted? 6:45 How does Article 6 help countries cooperate to find cheaper ways to cut their emissions, while ensuring an overall reduction in concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere? 8:50 What is the potential of nature in yielding new emissions-reductions projects? 15:46 With the rules for international carbon trading agreed on at COP26, how soon can countries start buying credits to meet their climate goals? Carbon credits explained: https://www.straitstimes.com/world/carbon-copy-tricky-carbon-market-rules-struggle-to-get-off-the-ground Produced by: Audrey Tan (audreyt@sph.com.sg), David Fogarty (dfogarty@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV  Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2 Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6 Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz --- Discover more ST podcast series: Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Life Weekend Picks Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa2 #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Planet A - Talks on climate change
Laurence Tubiana and Tomas Anker Christensen – Deciphering COP26

Planet A - Talks on climate change

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 65:50


In the 4th episode of Planet A's third season, Dan Jørgensen talks with Laurence Tubiana and Tomas Anker Christensen about the complexity of negotiations at COP26 in Glasgow, the significance of the outcome and the nature of the COP proces.Laurence Tubiana is CEO of the European Climate Foundation (ECF) and the former French Climate Change Ambassador and Special Representative for COP21. In this capacity, she became the key architect of the Paris Agreement.Tomas Anker Christensen is the current Danish Climate Ambassador and has extensive experience with climate diplomacy. As Senior Adviser for the UN Secretary General, he played a key role in planning, organising and executing the Climate Summit in 2014.Mr. Anker Christensen opens the episode by providing a comprehensive primer on the most important issues that were discussed at COP26. He explains the importance of “keeping 1.5 alive” and talks about the general negotiation dynamics, carbon markets, climate finance and the reason why it is necessary that the global ambition is ramped up next year.Building on her expertise as the main architect of the Paris Agreement, Ms. Tubiana shares her views on the outcome of COP26. Although she's been sceptical about the outcome she calls COP26 a “much needed moment” and looks ahead to COP27, which will be held in Egypt next year.

Innovation Forum Podcast
How can carbon accounting accelerate action within the forest and land use sector?

Innovation Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 51:39


Achieving the Paris Agreement targets requires a radical transformation of the world's food and land use systems. The land sector alone can deliver at least 30% of the mitigation required to reach net-zero. In this context, companies with a land-use footprint must embrace interventions to conserve and restore forests and other natural ecosystems in the landscapes they source from as part of their climate strategies. To help scale up these investments, carbon accounting frameworks that provide the right incentives are key. This hour-long webinar assessed what's required to drive urgency and transformation in the food and land use system. We discussed: What is the role of carbon accounting rules to incentivize the right actions for transformation? The challenges that need to be addressed to make these incentives work in practice The challenges and opportunities for companies with a land-use footprint to invest and scale up natural climate solutions at a landscape level Our panel: Michele Zollinger, global sustainable sourcing for pulp and paper, and climate lead, Nestlé Scarlett Benson, co-director of knowledge generation for the food and land use coalition (FOLU), SYSTEMIQ Sandra Genee, head of value change initiative, SustainCERT Tilmann Silber, strategy lead climate and nature, Barry Callebaut Moderated by Toby Webb, Innovation Forum

The Greek Current
The COP26 summit and the threat of rising temperatures

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 19:07


World leaders recently gathered in Glasgow for the COP26 summit, where they signed off on the Glasgow Climate Pact, which states that carbon emissions will have to fall by 45 percent by 2030 to keep alive the goal set out in the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5°C. This summit followed a summer of record breaking heat waves and intense wildfires, such as those experienced by Greece and other Mediterranean countries, which were largely attributed to climate change. Experts Alice Hill and Madeline Babin join The Greek Current to assess whether COP26 was a success, look at the many challenges rising temperatures pose to humans across the globe, and explore the policy initiatives that can be adopted in response.Alice Hill is the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment at the Council on Foreign Relations. She previously served as special assistant to President Barack Obama and senior director for resilience policy on the National Security Council staff, leading the development of national policy to build resilience to catastrophic risks, including climate change.Madeline Babin is a research associate for the Energy Security and Climate Change Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, where her research focuses on climate change policy and building resilience to the catastrophic risk of climate change.Read Alice Hill and Madeline Babin's latest pieces here:What COP26 Did and Didn't AccomplishThe Policy Challenge of Extreme Heat and Climate ChangeA World Overheating: How Countries Should Adapt to Climate ExtremesThe Fight for Climate After COVID-19You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Pope Francis coming back to GreeceMigrant crisis front and center in pope's Greece-Cyprus tripWith migrants in mind, Pope Francis visits divided CyprusEU launches €300bn bid to challenge Chinese influenceEU launches €300bn fund to challenge China's influence

SuperCreativity Podcast with James Taylor | Creativity, Innovation and Inspiring Ideas

Fashion Industry's Impact On Climate Change I'm James Taylor and you're listening to the super creativity podcast a show dedicated to inspiring creative minds like yours. This month witness cop 26 in Glasgow a summit that brings the world together to accelerate action towards the goals of the Paris Agreement, and the UN Framework Convention […] The post Fashion Industry's Impact On Climate Change- #313 appeared first on James Taylor.

1 Point 5
Who Is Involved in the Climate Justice Movement?

1 Point 5

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 24:57


Hear from those active in the climate justice movement with hosts Zanagee and Olivia and special guest Levi Draheim. Let's talk about the need for all voices to join together in achieving justice. You can learn more about Levi's work by visiting: ourchildrenstrust.org/leviAnd learn more about Juliana v. US by visiting: ourchildrenstrust.org/juliana-v-usOther resources mentioned:The Paris Agreement - https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreementThe Children's Fundamental Rights and Climate Recovery Resolution - https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-concurrent-resolution/119/textCheck out A Kids Book About Climate Change: HEREThere's other great guides on what climate is for kids! We like this guide from The New York Times: ​​A Climate Change Guide for Kids

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast
Have energy markets overlooked COP26? The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:47


Despite being the most anticipated climate event since the Paris Agreement in 2015, in the end discussions at COP26 took place against a backdrop of concerns regarding security of energy supply and high prices that threatened to derail a global recovery from the worst economic shock in a generation. Energy crises often need short-term (6-12 months) fixes that can be contrary to longer-term climate targets, and whilst change was never going to happen over a fortnight, the pre-occupation of global energy markets with resurging demand and security of supply concerns made COP26 somewhat of a side show. In this week's podcast, Ehsan Khoman, Head of Emerging Markets Research (EMEA), offers perspectives on what the outlook for energy markets post COP26 looks like and believes that whilst the energy transition train will march on, COP26 highlighted that the split between emerging markets and developed markets split  in tackling climate change is as wide as ever. Disclaimer: www.mufgresearch.com (PDF)

North Korea News Podcast by NK News
North Korea's response to global warming – NKNews Podcast Ep. 210

North Korea News Podcast by NK News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:12


A North Korean delegation recently joined the U.N. Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, one of the first times DPRK representatives have attended such an event in person since the pandemic began. Yet North Korea's participation was no anomaly: The country has long joined international efforts to combat global warming, including the Paris Agreement and […]

Supply Chain Revolution
Live from COP26 - Creating ESG Transparency and Raging Against the Machine for Systems Change not Climate Adaptation with James George of Pyxera Global (Day 2 of 3)

Supply Chain Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 18:27


Join host Sheri Hinish LIVE from the COP26 floor with returning guest James George (formerly of Ellen MacArthur Foundation and now with Pyxera Global). Supply chains came up ALL OVER THE PLACE TODAY! Amongst the walls and halls of pledges, panels, and provocative dialogue, this 3 part series will bring you the pulse of COP, the highlights and what doesn't make the headlines. In Part 2, we explore how reliable is data + if disclosures really create transparency, financing the gap in climate transition, the types of data and insights that create space to rage against the machine (systems change/stress testing we need). 30 year legacy data feeds won't model scenarios for the next 10 years. We discuss a real world example shared over lunch that nearly had us in tears. We need data to see where we should focus our efforts, but not let perfect get in the way of starting. IPCC report came out 3 months ago, and not much heard now. We all have to change and disrupt our quality of life and the types of choices we make. If we don't do it now, it will only get worse. Where are the grown ups? Consumerism is destroying our planet. COP26 aspirational goals and commitments to impact include: 1. Secure global net zero by mid-century and keep 1.5 degrees within reach Countries are being asked to come forward with ambitious 2030 emissions reductions targets that align with reaching net zero by the middle of the century. To deliver on these stretching targets, countries will need to: accelerate the phase-out of coalcurtail deforestationspeed up the switch to electric vehiclesencourage investment in renewables. 2. Adapt to protect communities and natural habitats The climate is already changing and it will continue to change even as we reduce emissions, with devastating effects. At COP26 we need to work together to enable and encourage countries affected by climate change to: protect and restore ecosystemsbuild defences, warning systems and resilient infrastructure and agriculture to avoid loss of homes, livelihoods and even lives 3. Mobilise finance To deliver on our first two goals, developed countries must make good on their promise to mobilize at least $100bn in climate finance per year by 2020.  International financial institutions must play their part and we need work towards unleashing the trillions in private and public sector finance required to secure global net zero. 4. Work together to deliver We can only rise to the challenges of the climate crisis by working together. At COP26 we must: finalize the Paris Rulebook (the detailed rules that make the Paris Agreement operational)accelerate action to tackle the climate crisis through collaboration between governments, businesses and civil society. To learn more about James, visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-george-20995b75/ and https://www.pyxeraglobal.org/ Learn more about the podcast at supplychainqueen.com

Climate One
Taking Stock of COP26

Climate One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:04


In 2015, delegates from 196 nations entered into the legally binding treaty on climate change known as the Paris Agreement, which set a goal of limiting global warming to “well below 2 and preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels.” Yet in August of this year, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a new assessment report that starkly illustrated the world's collective failure to meet that target. Delegates from across the globe have just met in Glasgow for the international climate summit known as COP26, with the hope of strengthening commitments to keep emissions targets at that 1.5 degree level.  After two weeks of negotiations, presentations and protests in Glasgow, COP26 is a wrap. This week we discuss what was achieved - and what wasn't - at the summit.  For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Vanessa Nakate, Ugandan climate activist Jiang Lin, Adjunct Professor, University of California Berkeley Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
CLIMATE ONE: Taking Stock of COP26

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:04


In 2015, delegates from 196 nations entered into the legally binding treaty on climate change known as the Paris Agreement, which set a goal of limiting global warming to “well below 2 and preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels.” Yet in August of this year, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a new assessment report that starkly illustrated the world's collective failure to meet that target. Delegates from across the globe have just met in Glasgow for the international climate summit known as COP26, with the hope of strengthening commitments to keep emissions targets at that 1.5 degree level.  After two weeks of negotiations, presentations and protests in Glasgow, COP26 is a wrap. This week we discuss what was achieved - and what wasn't - at the summit.  For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Vanessa Nakate, Ugandan climate activist Jiang Lin, Adjunct Professor, University of California Berkeley Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

So You Want to Be a Marine Biologist
67. Kaitlyn Lowder, PhD: Decapods, Global Ocean Policy, and Enabling

So You Want to Be a Marine Biologist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 57:25


As a senior program associate with The Ocean Foundation, Kaitlyn Lowder  supports the International Ocean Acidification Initiative. Despite growing up in a landlocked desert, Kaitlyn always knew she wanted to become a marine biologist.She pursued her dream of becoming a marine scientist, despite growing up in a landlocked desert, and was the recipient of the NOAA Hollings Scholarship as well as the Knauss Fellowship Kaitlyn also presented at two COP events, and succeeded in her efforts in getting “ocean” in the Paris Agreement. show notes: marinebio.life/67Support the show (http://patreon.com/marinebiolife)

The Global Politico
Will the GOP go along with the COP26 pact?

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 22:43


The Republican delegation went to COP26 with a clear message: both parties recognize the need to fight climate change. But did world leaders take them seriously? And how will Republican leaders sell that pivot to Republican voters? Fresh off his trip to Glasgow, Scotland, Rep. Garret Graves, a Louisiana Republican, spoke with POLITICO's Ryan Heath. He shares — if not a commitment to the Build Back Better plan — his ideas on turning climate pledges into climate action. Rep. Garret Graves is a Republican Congressman representing Louisiana's sixth Congressional district. He is also the ranking member on the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

Supply Chain Revolution
Live from COP26 -The Pulse of Progress or More GreenWashing with James George of Pyxera Global (Day 1 of 3)

Supply Chain Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 16:21


Where are all the grown ups? In early October, the IPCC issued a CODE RED for humanity. The 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP26 brings together the world's parties (leaders, industry giant, communities, voices unheard, and technologists) to accelerate action towards the goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The event focused primarily on climate action and Net-Zero goals. Join host Sheri Hinish LIVE from the COP26 floor with returning guest James George (formerly of Ellen MacArthur Foundation and now with Pyxera Global). You can't do business on a dead planet, right? Amongst the walls and halls of pledges, panels, and provocative dialogue, this 3 part series will bring you the pulse of COP, the highlights and what doesn't make the headlines. COP26 aspirational goals and commitments to impact include: 1. Secure global net zero by mid-century and keep 1.5 degrees within reach Countries are being asked to come forward with ambitious 2030 emissions reductions targets that align with reaching net zero by the middle of the century. To deliver on these stretching targets, countries will need to: accelerate the phase-out of coalcurtail deforestationspeed up the switch to electric vehiclesencourage investment in renewables. 2. Adapt to protect communities and natural habitats The climate is already changing and it will continue to change even as we reduce emissions, with devastating effects. At COP26 we need to work together to enable and encourage countries affected by climate change to: protect and restore ecosystemsbuild defences, warning systems and resilient infrastructure and agriculture to avoid loss of homes, livelihoods and even lives 3. Mobilise finance To deliver on our first two goals, developed countries must make good on their promise to mobilize at least $100bn in climate finance per year by 2020.  International financial institutions must play their part and we need work towards unleashing the trillions in private and public sector finance required to secure global net zero. 4. Work together to deliver We can only rise to the challenges of the climate crisis by working together. At COP26 we must: finalize the Paris Rulebook (the detailed rules that make the Paris Agreement operational)accelerate action to tackle the climate crisis through collaboration between governments, businesses and civil society. To learn more about James, visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-george-20995b75/ and https://www.pyxeraglobal.org/ Learn more about the podcast at supplychainqueen.com

The Current
Christiana Figueres and what was and wasn't achieved at COP26

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 19:52


COP26 wrapped up in Glasgow last week, but big questions remain on how committed everyone is to reducing coal emissions. For some perspective on what was achieved at the climate summit, we speak to Christiana Figueres. She's the former executive secretary of the United Nations Climate Convention, and she oversaw the creation of the Paris Agreement in 2015.

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global
Inside COP26: Chaos, optimism, progress

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 32:37


There have been a lot of headlines coming out of COP26, the big United Nations climate conference that took place in Glasgow the first two weeks of November. In this episode of ESG Insider, we bring you inside the event through interviews with COP attendees.  We hear about the mood on the ground: chaotic, but with an overriding sense of optimism that the world can make progress toward the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C relative to preindustrial levels.  “For the first time, that target seemed to be in reach,” says Mike Wilkins, Head of Sustainable Finance Research at S&P Global Ratings and a member of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures, or TCFD, who has attended many previous iterations of COP. Part of that sense of progress came from the growing presence of the financial sector at COP.  “The finance sector was really clearly present and active, and communicating the need for financial institutions to take account of climate change. And that was a new part of the dynamic this year,” says Divya Mankikar, Global Head of ESG Market Engagement at S&P Global Sustainable1.  We saw many private sector pledges during COP26, including an announcement from the Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero, or GFANZ, that financial institutions representing $130 trillion of assets have committed to Paris Agreement goals. We should celebrate that progress, says James Vaccaro, Executive Director of the Climate Safe Lending Network, a group with the goal of bringing international bank lending in line with the Paris Agreement.  “A few years ago, if anyone was really talking seriously about large global banks making net zero carbon commitments … it would have been seen as quite fringe or radical,” James tells us. But he says there is more work to do. “Once you do have people in the tent … you want to move very quickly from a situation of normalized best practice into raising the bar for everyone.” Photo credit: Getty Images

Science Friday
Psychedelics Can Treat Depression, Climate Meeting, Dopesick Show. Nov 12 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 47:21


Psilocybin Effective In Treating Serious Depression Depression is often treatable with medication, therapy, or a combination of the two. But some 30% of patients don't respond well to existing medications—and may try multiple antidepressant drugs with little or no improvement. This week, researchers reported that a new trial suggests psychedelics may be an effective therapy for treatment-resistant depression. A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial found that people with treatment-resistant depression who were given 25 milligrams of psilocybin, the psychedelic component of magic mushrooms, had a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. The treatment didn't work for everyone, however, and more research needs to be done before the finding can move to clinical use. Sabrina Imber, a science fellow at the New York Times, joins Ira to talk about the trial and other stories from the week in science—including a new timeline for the planned Artemis missions to the moon, screaming bees, and a very wayward eagle. Activists And Vulnerable Nations At COP26 Seek More Than Promises There's a big international climate summit wrapping up in Glasgow, Scotland this week. COP26 is the followup to 25 previous United Nations meetings about how the world must respond to the climate crisis—and its shortcomings in doing so. This year leaders had a big conversation to tackle: Countries needed to pledge to reduce emissions even further to prevent a global temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. To do so, they needed to finish hashing out the details of how they will enforce the 2015 Paris Agreement's provisions. Meanwhile, island nations and other vulnerable countries, who themselves don't emit much carbon, have continued to lobby for payment for what's called loss and damages. That's the harm they've already encountered as seas rise, threatening to obliterate their existence. The first week kicked off with bold pledges about methane emissions, coal phaseouts, and ending deforestation. This week, former President Obama spoke about the need for urgent action, and called out large greenhouse gas polluters like Russia and China for not attending. And a grim United Nations report was released, forecasting that despite all the bold pledges, the world was on track to warm a dangerous 2.4 degrees Celsius. The team of Threshold, a podcast that tells stories about our changing environment, has been reporting on these updates from Glasgow, talking to attendees and occasionally witnessing negotiations. In today's show, Ira talks to journalist Amy Martin, Threshold's executive producer and host, about her opinion on the outcome of COP26—and if transformative change can still come out of this year's meeting.   ”Dopesick” Takes On The Opioid Crisis The opioid epidemic has affected millions of people across the country—and more than 800,000 people are estimated to have died from an opioid overdose. At the root of this crisis is the painkiller Oxycontin, manufactured by Purdue Pharma. The company has made billions of dollars from the drug; but has also spent the better part of the last two decades fighting legal battles over its impacts, falsely arguing the drug is non-addictive and completely safe. Meanwhile, people from all walks of life, particularly in small towns across America, have been crippled by addiction to Oxycontin. The limited series “Dopesick” traces the story of the opioid epidemic, from the creation of the Oxycontin pill to a landmark legal battle where Purdue Pharma admitted it misbranded the drug as being less addictive than other prescription opioids. “Dopesick” follows a wide range of characters, from Purdue Pharma executives and federal prosecutors, to an Appalachian doctor and his pain-addled patients. Joining Ira to talk about bringing the show and its people to life is Danny Strong, creator and writer of “Dopesick,” joining from New York, New York.

Climate 21
How Much Did The Fossil Fuel Companies Know About Climate Change, And When? A Chat With Ben Franta

Climate 21

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:20


Stanford doctoral candidate Benjamin (Ben) Franta has a degree in Applied Physics from Harvard, a Law degree from Stanford, and is currently working on his Ph.D. from Stanford on the history of climate science, climate denial, and the fossil fuel industry.I came across him when I heard about his most recent paper where he and two French researchers showed how French fossil fuel company Total were aware of harmful global warming impacts since at least 1971 but instead of doing anything about it, they engaged in overt denial of climate science. This was the way fossil fuel companies decided to deal with the issue.That this was standard practice for fossil fuel companies is something I've been aware of for some time, but I decided to invite Ben to come on the podcast to talk about not just this but also the potential legal ramifications of this behaviour.This was a truly fascinating episode of the podcast and I learned loads as always, and I hope you do too.If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page, head on over to the Climate 21 Podcast Forum, or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).And if you want to know more about any of SAP's Sustainability solutions, head on over to www.sap.com/sustainability, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover the show. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane!Music credit - Intro and Outro music for this podcast was composed, played, and produced by my daughter Luna Juniper

PRI's The World
EU climate chief calls for reaching headline Paris agreement goal

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:11


The European Union's climate chief said during the ongoing COP 26 conference in Glasgow that talks must focus on meeting the headline goal of the Paris agreement. Former US President Barack Obama spoke on the sidelines of the conference on Monday, saying President Joe Biden's climate package will be “historic,” while welcoming the efforts of bipartisan US support in working toward slowing down global warming. Also, pressure is building for more Haitians to migrate by sea, as The World's Monica Campbell shares first-hand accounts of the latest. And, an app at a Swiss university tries to use augmented reality to help people overcome arachnophobia. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom.  Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

Dollar & Sense
Will COP26 in Glasgow spur progress on reducing carbon emissions?

Dollar & Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 21:20


As the global climate change conference (COP26) continues in Glasgow, climate expert David Victor joins host David Dollar to talk about what's been happening in Scotland and whether it will be viewed as a success. Victor, a professor of innovation and public policy at UC San Diego and co-director of the university's Deep Decarbonization Initiative, discusses a range of issues, including whether countries are meeting their Paris Agreement commitments to reduce emissions, the target of $100 billion per year in climate aid for developing counties, and where the U.S. and China might be able to cooperate on climate issues. Show notes and transcript: https://brook.gs/3bGu1QF  Dollar & Sense is part of the Brookings Podcast Network. Send feedback to podcasts@brookings.edu, and follow us on Twitter at @policypodcasts.

The Real Story
Who pays to fix climate change?

The Real Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 49:10


The UN Climate Conference in Glasgow is being described as a make-or-break moment for humanity. The purpose of the gathering is to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement, which aims to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. Currently the world is way off target, with temperatures still projected to rise higher than is sustainable. A big part of the problem is the huge cost involved. Developed countries have confirmed they have failed to meet a pledge made in 2009 to provide $100 billion a year in climate finance by 2020. Developing countries say the money is needed now. They require defences to protect their populations from the growing effects of climate change, and to move away from carbon energy and towards renewable sources. So what is climate finance, what's been promised and will it be be delivered? Join Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests from the UN summit in Glasgow as they discuss who pays to fix climate change.

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 11/4/2021 (Keeping Up With the Wars For and Against Democracy)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 58:26


Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-11-04 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 59:00


The former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, on how rising seas threaten low-lying islands; A lawyer who helped write the 2015 Paris Agreement says the world is running out of time; Leaders pledge more funds to help small countries adapt to the climate crisis. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Democracy Now! Video
Democracy Now! 2021-11-04 Thursday

Democracy Now! Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 59:00


The former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, on how rising seas threaten low-lying islands; A lawyer who helped write the 2015 Paris Agreement says the world is running out of time; Leaders pledge more funds to help small countries adapt to the climate crisis. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Woman's Hour
COP26

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:22


The starting gun has fired on COP26, and the UK now has less than two weeks to get around 200 countries over the line towards stronger commitments on climate action. It's not going to be easy. Of the 25 COPs that have gone before, only one produced concrete targets for change. That was the 2015 Paris climate conference - aka COP21 - where two new ideas were launched onto the international stage: keeping average global temperature rises below 1.5C, and the notion of aiming for 'net zero'. Women were at the forefront of the Paris negotiations and we unite three of those women in a Woman's Hour COP special - Laurence Tubiana, France's Climate Change Ambassador and Special Representative for COP21 - who many recognise as the main architect of the Paris Agreement; Amber Rudd, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change at the time of Paris and the then leader of the UK's COP21 negotiating team; and Jennifer Morgan, one of a group of women who brought the idea of Net Zero to the global stage during Paris. She is now Executive Director of Greenpeace International. They discuss women's role in Paris's success, the origin story of net zero, the successes and failings of global governments in delivering on their promises, and their hopes for COP26 bringing about necessary change. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

The Climate Pod
COP26: Can World Leaders Stabilize The Climate? (w/ The Economist's Oliver Morton)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 43:03


On this installment of our series, The Road To COP26 Presented By Octopus Energy, we look at the big picture of the climate crisis with The Economist's Oliver Morton to talk about their latest Special Report “Stabilising the climate." We go in-depth on the state of the crisis, greenhouse gas emissions, and what it will take to hit the goals set out in the Paris Agreement almost 6 years ago as we arrive at the second day of the World Leader's Summit. We discuss the realities world leaders face with the economics of clean energy, how the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) committed to in the Paris Agreement are measuring up, and the hurdles countries may face trying to achieve negative emissions.  Co-hosts Ty Benefiel and Brock Benefiel also react President Joe Biden's speech at COP26 and Sen. Joe Manchin's reaction to it and discuss the WMO's "State of Climate in 2021: Extreme events and major impacts" report.  Oliver Morton is an award-winning science writer and editor, author of multiple books including most recently 2019's The Moon: A History for the Future. The Economist's “To a lesser degree” podcast on climate change.  .Thank you to our sponsor Octopus Energy, a 100% renewable electricity supplier. Octopus Energy is currently serving millions of homes around the globe in countries like the United Kingdom, United States, New Zealand, and Germany.  Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website!

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Sue Biniaz on the Trump Administration and International Climate Policy

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 87:31


From March 27, 2019: From 1989 to early 2017, Sue Biniaz was the lead climate lawyer and a climate negotiator at the State Department. She was also a key architect of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, a UN-negotiated agreement designed to mitigate global warming, which went into effect in November 2016. In June 2017, President Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States from the agreement.Sue sat down with Lawfare's Jack Goldsmith to talk about the early days of U.S. and international climate action, how the Paris Agreement came into force and the predecessor agreements that gave rise to it, how it was supposed to operate, and what impacts Trump's actions have had on international climate policy.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
1810: Terry Anderson #Unbound (climate change). The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 41:33


Photo:   Ice chunks, Exit Glacier, Alaska. September, 2006. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Terry Anderson #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview. April 6, 2021 Adapt and Be Adept: Market Responses to Climate Change.  Paperback – April 1, 2021. by Terry Anderson  (Editor) https://www.amazon.com/Adapt-Be-Adept-Responses-Climate/dp/0817924558/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1619395663&refinements=p_27%3ATerry+Anderson&s=books&sr=1-1 How can markets help us adapt to the challenges of climate change? The editor Terry L. Anderson brings together this collection of essays featuring the work of nine leading policy analysts, who argue that market forces are just as important as government regulation in shaping climate policy—and should be at the heart of our response to helping societies adapt to climate change. Anderson notes in his introduction that most current climate policies such as the Paris Agreement require hard-to-enforce collective action and focus on reducing or mitigating greenhouse gases rather than adapting to their negative effects. Adaptive actions can typically deliver much more, faster and more cheaply than any realistic climate policy. The authors tackle a range of issues: the hidden costs of renewable energy sources, the political obstacles surrounding climate change policy, insurance and financial instruments for pricing risk of exposure to the effects of climate change, and more. Reliance on emerging renewable energies and a carbon tax are not enough to prevent the effects of global warming, they argue. We must encourage more private action and market incentives to adapt to a rapidly changing climate. .

Intelligence Squared
The Sunday Debate: Is COP26 a turning point for the planet?

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 42:10


This debate, recorded on Thursday 28th October 2021, was part of Energised, a debate series from Intelligence Squared in partnership with Iberdrola, a leading company in the field of renewable energy.It's make or break time for the planet. That's the warning issued by the UN ahead of COP26 in Glasgow this November, when leaders and heads of state from all over the world will meet to agree on global action to fight climate change. The main goal will be for them to commit to reaching net-zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century with interim targets by 2030. If they don't achieve this, many scientists warn, the effects of rising global temperatures – extreme weather, rising sea levels and warming oceans – may become irreversible. But what are the chances of success? Very little, if previous summits are anything to go by. Despite a COP having taken place every year since 1995 (with the exception of last year due to the pandemic), and all the buzz around the Kyoto Protocol of 2011 and the Paris Agreement of 2015, concentrations of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere have continued to rise steadily, even during the lockdowns of 2020. But this year there is an unprecedented urgency in the run up to the conference. Can the biggest emitters – China, the US, India, Russia and Japan – be persuaded to sign up to legally binding agreements on emissions? Will the voices of people from the Global South, where the effects of the climate crisis are already being felt, be heard? And is the UN's top-down approach really the best way to tackle the most pressing existential threat facing the world today?We were joined by ScottishPower CEO Keith Anderson and Professor of Energy Policy and Official Fellow in Economics Dieter Helm to debate whether COP26 will make any serious contribution in the fight against climate change. The debate was chaired by Kamal Ahmed. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Science Friday
Filipino Nurses, Francis Collins Exit Interview. Oct 22, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 47:00


Biden's Administration Preps For A Crucial Climate Conference This week, CDC advisers gave their support to approve COVID-19 vaccine boosters for those who received Moderna and J&J vaccines. The recommendations would follow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's authorization of “mixing and matching” booster shots from different vaccine developers. Ira provides new updates on the latest vaccine booster approvals, and a story about a successful transplant of a pig kidney… to a human. Plus, climate reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis gives us a closer look at how the United States is living up to its Paris Agreement pledges as a crucial international gathering looms, and Biden's clean energy legislation appears to be faltering.      Seeing The History Of Filipinos In Nursing You may have seen a grim statistic earlier this year: 32% of U.S. registered nurses who died of COVID-19 by September 2020 were of Filipino descent, even though they only make up 4% of nurses in the United States. Yet an event like the pandemic is disproportionately likely to affect Filipino-American families: Approximately a quarter of working Filipino-Americans are frontline healthcare workers. There's a deep history of Filipino immigrants and their descendants in frontline healthcare work. This Filipino-American History Month, Ira talks to nurse and photojournalist Rosem Morton and freelance journalist Fruhlein Econar about their recent collaboration for CNN Digital, using photographs from Morton's “Diaspora on the Frontlines” project.  They talk about the long reliance of the U.S. healthcare system on the Philippines, and the importance of documenting the lives, not just the disproportionate hardship, of these frontline healthcare workers and their families.       Francis Collins, Longest-Running NIH Director, To Step Down Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will be stepping down from his post at the end of the year. Collins is the longest serving NIH director, serving three presidents over 12 years: Barack Obama, Donald Trump, and Joe Biden. Before his role at the NIH, Collins was an acclaimed geneticist, helping discover the gene that causes cystic fibrosis. He then became director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, where he led the project that mapped the human genome.  A lot can happen in 12 years, especially in the fields of health and science. Collins joins Ira to talk about his long tenure at the NIH, as well as how his Christian faith has informed his career in science.