Podcasts about East Asia

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Eastern region of Asia

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    Latest podcast episodes about East Asia

    Nomura Podcasts
    ESG360 - Green Energy Stocks and Navigating Social Data

    Nomura Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 23:45


    In this episode of ESG360, we take a look at the resilience of green energy stocks amid a broad-based stock market downturn in the first half of the year. A further interesting point is that solar stocks have performed better than wind as some of these companies are not yet profitable highlighting the challenge investors face in their efforts to advance the green transition. We also cover the development of carbon markets in Japan and part 3 of our ESG in East Asia series, which focuses on navigating social data in South Korea and reveals the industries that disclose the most data.

    Sinica Podcast
    Another Taiwan Straits Crisis? CIA veteran John Culver weighs in

    Sinica Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 58:01


    In a week dominated by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, Kaiser welcomes John Culver, who served as national intelligence officer for East Asia from 2015 to 2017 and as a CIA analyst focusing on China for 35 years. John offers his perspective on Pelosi's trip and provides important context with a discussion of the last Taiwan Straits Crisis, in 1995-96 — a crisis touched off by Lee Teng-hui's decision to visit Cornell University, his alma mater. John also draws important parallels to the Diaoyu/Senkaku crisis of the fall of 2012, after the Japanese government nationalized the disputed islands.2:47 – A walkthrough of the last Taiwan Strait crisis13:45 – How China's growing capabilities could affect its decision-making in future Taiwan crises19:52 – Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan and the political environment surrounding her decision25:14 – Explaining China's interpretation of U.S. actions and the Chinese domestic political context32:21 – Parallels to the 2012 Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands episode35:22 – The potential fallout of this crisisA complete transcript of this podcast is available at SupChina.com.Recommendations: John: The late Alan Romberg's exegesis of the US-China negotiating record, "Rein In at the Brink of the Precipice" and Ryan Hass's book Stronger: Adapting America's China Strategy in an Age of Competitive InterdependenceKaiser: Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada — and the town of Canmore as a great place to stay nearby.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Squawk Box Europe Express
    SQUAWK BOX, WEDNESDAY 3RD AUGUST, 2022

    Squawk Box Europe Express

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 25:40 Very Popular


    Wall Street closes in the red for a second day running and Treasury yields rise following hawkish comments from San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly, who says that the battle to rein in U.S. inflation is far from over. Tensions are high in East Asia after U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi touches down in Taipei to pledge close support for Taiwan, irking the CCP administration. Pelosi is the highest ranking U.S. official to visit the island in 25 years. We speak to Société Générale CEO, Frédéric Oudéa, who has seen the lender's Q2 revenues surge by 13 per cent. Also, Chinese July PMI storms back expanding at its fastest pace for more than a year as Covid restrictions were finally lifted.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The John Batchelor Show
    #LondonCalling: Troubles in East Asia. @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinion

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 6:26


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #LondonCalling:  Troubles in East Asia.  @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinion https://www.wsj.com/livecoverage/nancy-pelosi-taiwan-visit-china-us-tensions?mod=hp_lead_pos1

    The Trident Room Podcast
    30 [1/2] - Luke Goorsky and Marcus Antonellis - Surfaces and Solutions

    The Trident Room Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022


    Episode 30 [Segment 1 of 2] - Luke Goorsky and Marcus Antonellis - Surfaces and Solutions The Trident Room Podcast hosts Luke Goorsky and Marcus Antonellis sit down and have a conversation. This episode was recorded on October 07, 2021. Luke Goorsky is from Santa Clarita, CA. He attended the University of California, San Diego where he earned a bachelor's degree in History. He received his commission in May 2014 as a naval intelligence officer through Officer Candidate School. Luke served onboard the USS Harry S. Truman, at U.S. Fifth Fleet, and at the Defense Intelligence Agency's Hawaii Field Office. Luke is enrolled in the department of National Security Affairs in the East Asia track. Episodes Hosted: Episode 27 June 15 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/luke-goorsky-b7225513b/ Marcus Antonellis is from Groton, MA. He attended the College of the Holy Cross, getting his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and commissioning via the NROTC unit. A Naval Surface Warfare Officer, he has served as the Auxiliaries Officer on USS FREEDOM (LCS 1) and as the Damage Control Assistant on USS JOHN PAUL JONES (DDG 53). His assignments had him deploying to the 5th Fleet AOR and participating in multiple Missile Defense Agency test missions. Episodes Hosted: Episode 25 June 10, | Episode 22 February 2, | Episode 21 January 13, | Episode 16 April 30 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcus-antonellis-a3649655/ The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you!

    The Signal
    When Nancy Pelosi risked war with China

    The Signal

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 11:09


    There's already so much uncertainty in the world and now it's being compounded, with China scrambling jets in response to a visit to Taiwan by the Speaker of the US House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi.  The headlines are worrying, pointing to the risks of an all-out war.  Today, the ABC's East Asia correspondent, based in Taipei, Bill Birtles on the potential for a crisis in the Taiwan Strait.  Featured:  Bill Birtles, ABC East Asia correspondent, Taipei, Taiwan 

    Business Drive
    The United States Issues Fresh Sanctions On Iran

    Business Drive

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 0:55


    The United States issued fresh sanctions on Iran, this time targeting Chinese and other companies it said were used by one of Iran‘s largest petrochemical brokers to facilitate the sale of tens of millions of dollars worth of Iranian petroleum and petrochemical products from Iran to East Asia. The US Treasury Department says the Iranian Persian Gulf Petrochemical Industry Commercial Co allegedly exploited the designated businesses to sell Iranian oil and petrochemical goods to East Asia. The Treasury says the US slapped sanctions on businesses from Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates and Singapore.

    The Trident Room Podcast
    30 [2/2] - Luke Goorsky and Marcus Antonellis - The Future of The Surface

    The Trident Room Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022


    Episode 30 [Segment 2 of 2] - Luke Goorsky and Marcus Antonellis - The Future of The Surface The Trident Room Podcast hosts Luke Goorsky and Marcus Antonellis sit down and have a conversation. This episode was recorded on October 07, 2021. Luke Goorsky is from Santa Clarita, CA. He attended the University of California, San Diego where he earned a bachelor's degree in History. He received his commission in May 2014 as a naval intelligence officer through Officer Candidate School. Luke served onboard the USS Harry S. Truman, at U.S. Fifth Fleet, and at the Defense Intelligence Agency's Hawaii Field Office. Luke is enrolled in the department of National Security Affairs in the East Asia track. Episodes Hosted: Episode 27 June 15 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/luke-goorsky-b7225513b/ Marcus Antonellis is from Groton, MA. He attended the College of the Holy Cross, getting his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and commissioning via the NROTC unit. A Naval Surface Warfare Officer, he has served as the Auxiliaries Officer on USS FREEDOM (LCS 1) and as the Damage Control Assistant on USS JOHN PAUL JONES (DDG 53). His assignments had him deploying to the 5th Fleet AOR and participating in multiple Missile Defense Agency test missions. Episodes Hosted: Episode 25 June 10, | Episode 22 February 2, | Episode 21 January 13, | Episode 16 April 30 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcus-antonellis-a3649655/ The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you!

    Americana - The American Way
    Republicans Back Pelosi Trip

    Americana - The American Way

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 36:41


    Senate Rs stand behind Pelosi's diplomatic East Asia trip. Rivian electric vehicles. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-morrow/support

    Sports Talk presented by JAPAN Forward
    #12 Sports Talk ― Matt Beyer Outlines Ambitious Vision for East Asia Super League

    Sports Talk presented by JAPAN Forward

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 53:26


    Matt Beyer, EASL's CEO, recalls working as a Chinese interpreter for the NBA's Milwaukee Bucks and shares insights on the plans for his league's inaugural season.

    Talking Taiwan
    Ep 199 | Gerrit van der Wees: The Past and Present State of US Taiwan Relations

    Talking Taiwan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 51:40


    A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   In June I spoke with Gerrit van der Wees about an article that he wrote about U.S. President Biden's remarks about Taiwan when he was in Tokyo in May.   Just last week, Gerrit wrote a very timely article about the controversy over the U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi's plans to visit Taiwan.  In April Pelosi had planned to visit Taiwan as part of a tour to the Indo Pacific region but had to cancel because she contracted COVID-19.   Last week Pelosi left with a delegation for Asia, but made no mention of visiting Taiwan. There had been speculation that the Chinese would attack if U.S. fighter jets escorted Pelosi's plane into Taiwan, and in a phone conversation with U.S. president Joe Biden, Chinese president Xi Jinping warned Biden against “playing with fire” over Taiwan.   In his piece for the Taipei Times, Gerrit stated that it is essential that Pelosi stands her ground and pushes through with her plan to visit Taiwan. We'll share Gerrit's Taipei Times article and a few others about this situation on our website for this episode.   In my interview with Gerrit I asked him to explain in detail what the Taiwan Relations Act is, and what it tells us about the relationship between the U.S. and Taiwan. We also talked about the so-called U.S. policy of strategic ambiguity, how his work on the Taiwan Communique evolved from 1980 to 2016, and his thoughts on the war in Ukraine, and how it relates to China and Taiwan.   About Gerrit van der Wees   Gerrit van der Wees is a former Dutch diplomat. From 1980 through 2016, he served as chief-editor of “Taiwan Communiqué.” Also, from 2005 through 2016 he was liaison for the Senate and the State Department at FAPA-HQ.  He currently teaches the History of Taiwan at George Mason University and Current issues in East Asia at George Washington University's Elliott School for International Affairs.   This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.   NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:   to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity, to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality, to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs, to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan, to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.   To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com     Here's a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:   U.S. President Joe Biden's remarks on the U.S.'s willingness to help defend Taiwan The Taiwan Relations Act, the document that contains US commitments to (help) defend Taiwan, and its first two clauses How U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken referred to the second clause of the Taiwan Relations Act in a speech he made at the end of May What the second clause of the Taiwan Relations Act says and means The background of the Taiwan Relations Act How Harvey Feldman of the East Asia Pacific desk of the U.S. State Department was involved in initially drafting the Taiwan Policy Act How in 1979 the U.S. Congress started drafting the Taiwan Relations Act which had security clauses and a human rights clause embedded within it How Senator Ted Kennedy, Senator Claiborne Pell, and Congressman Jim Leach were instrumental in drafting the Taiwan Relations Act and getting it passed in April 1979 The establishment of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) in January 1979 Mark Chen's (陳唐山) work with Senators and Congressmen to ensure that the Taiwan Relations Act took into consideration the native Taiwanese perspective The Taiwan Communique and why it was established How news from and about Taiwan while under martial law was obtained, communicated and printed in the Taiwan Communique How dangwai (outside party) magazines: Měilì dǎo aka Formosa Magazine (美麗島) and Bāshí niándài aka 1980s (8十年代) were sources of information for the Taiwan Communique How the George Washington University library has a complete collection of dangwai magazines from Taiwan The censorship of postal mail that was received in and sent out from Taiwan during the martial law era After the Taiwan democratized in the early 1990s the focus of the Taiwan Communique shifted to working to gain more international recognition for Taiwan What the “One China Policy” means from the perspective of the U.S. and China How the “One China Policy” which was based on the 1970s, a time in which Beijing and Taipei that claimed to be the government of China How things have changed since the 1970s, which requires an adjustment in policy to reflect current times What makes the Taiwan Relations Act so unique How Taiwan meets all the requirements of a nation state according to the Montevideo Convention of 1933 How Montevideo Convention states that the existence of an independent state does not depend on the recognition of other states When the United States of America declared independence in 1776 there were no other countries that recognized the new government in Washington D.C. for two years For the first 25 years of the United States of America it was only recognized by seven countries The Taiwan Travel Act Why the U.S. policy of strategic ambiguity toward Taiwan is not a policy How the term “strategic ambiguity” dates back to the mid-1990s Robert Suettinger's 2003 book, Beyond Tiananmen Gerrit's thoughts on the war in Ukraine and what China is taking away from the situation Gerrit's observations on how the war in Ukraine has impacted the people of Taiwan Things that Taiwan need to reconsider about its military strategy   Related Links: To view all related links for this article, click link below: https://talkingtaiwan.com/gerrit-van-der-wees-the-past-and-present-state-of-u-s-taiwan-relations-ep-199/  

    The Top Story
    Chinese FM denounces US House Speaker's visit to Taiwan

    The Top Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 11:18


    The Chinese foreign minister has denounced U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan. Wang Yi made the remarks in Cambodia where he attends a series of meetings on East Asia cooperation.

    China In Context
    China's problems with faltering growth and rising debt

    China In Context

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 15:36


    One of the loudest messages from the Chinese Communist Party is that it has delivered wealth to citizens by creating an environment in which the economy grows and thrives. However, as a result of the zero-Covid policy and other factors, the economy has hit the buffers. Gross domestic product rose just 0.4% year-on-year in the second quarter of 2022 missing expectations and suggesting a recession could be on the way in parts of China such as Hong Kong and Shanghai. In this podcast, Paul Hodges from New Normal Consulting considers China's economic outlook with host, Duncan Bartlett.

    The Chinese History Podcast
    The Ming in the Southwest: Conquest, Rule, and Legacy

    The Chinese History Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 39:23


    In 1381, Ming armies marched into Yunnan and Guizhou and within a year had deposed the Mongol Yuan's Prince of Liang, who had been enfeoffed there by the Yuan court. The Hongwu's emperor's decision to annex Yunnan and Guizhou and establish Ming administration there was unusual, for before the Mongols conquered it in the mid-1250s, the area had never been under the control of a China-based empire. It was more Southeast Asian in character than it was Chinese in character. Yet for decades, the scholarly community has neglected the study of the southwest. In this episode, Sean Cronan will discuss the Ming's rule in the region, how the early Ming court reshaped the interstate environment of Southwest China and Upper Mainland Southeast Asia, as well as some of the legacies that the early Ming left on the region. Contributors Sean Cronan Sean Cronan is a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley. His work focuses on East and Southeast Asian diplomatic encounters from the thirteenth to eighteenth centuries, tracing the development of new shared diplomatic norms following the Mongol conquests of Eurasia, as well as how rulers and scholar-officials in the Ming (1368- 1644) and Qing Dynasties (1644-1911) institutionalized and challenged these new norms. He explores how ideas of multipolarity, regime legitimacy, and the makeup of the interstate order came under debate throughout the Mongol Empire, Ming China, the Qing Empire, Chosŏn Korea, Dai Viet (Northern Vietnam), Japan, the Ayutthaya Kingdom of Thailand, the Pagan Kingdom of Burma, and beyond. He works with sources in Chinese (literary Sinitic), Japanese, Thai, Burmese, Manchu, and Dutch. Yiming Ha Yiming Ha is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research is on military mobilization and state-building in China between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on how military institutions changed over time, how the state responded to these changes, the disconnect between the center and localities, and the broader implications that the military had on the state. His project highlights in particular the role of the Mongol Yuan in introducing an alternative form of military mobilization that radically transformed the Chinese state. He is also interested in military history, nomadic history, comparative Eurasian state-building, and the history of maritime interactions in early modern East Asia. He received his BA from UCLA and his MPhil from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Credits Episode No. 13 Release date: July 31, 2022 Recording location: Los Angeles/Berkeley, CA Transcript Bibliography courtesy of Sean Cronan Images Cover Image: A Buddhist monastery in Xishuangbanna (Sipsongpanna), located in Yunnan at the border with Laos and Myanmar. Note the distinct Southeast Asian style architecture. In Ming times this area was called Cheli 車里 and a native official ruled here on behalf of the Ming court. Today it is classified as an autonomous region for the Dai/Tai ethnic group. (Image Source) https://i.imgur.com/tn3BrKI.jpg A 1636 Ming map of Yunnan, from the Zhifang dayitong zhi 職方大一統志. Due to the large file size, it cannot be uploaded here. Please click on the link above to view it. The yellow rectangle denotes the location of Kunming, the prefectural seat of Yunnan. Red squares represent major settlements. Map of the Möeng Maaw Empire at its greatest extent in 1398. . Areas in red were either governed by a Sa clan appointee or had long been conquered and integrated into the Maaw administrative structure. Areas in yellow were seized by more recent conquest or held only loosely. Map courtesy of Sean Cronan. Please do not cite or circulate. A Yuan seal granted to the native official of Cheli. (Image Source) References Daniels, Christian. “The Mongol-Yuan in Yunnan and ProtoTai/Tai Polities during the 13th-14th Centuries.” Journal of the Siam Society, 106 (2018), 201-243. Daniels, Christian and Jianxiong Ma, eds. The Transformation of Yunnan in Ming China: from the Dali Kingdom to Imperial Province. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2020. Fernquest, Jon. “Crucible of War: Burma and the Ming in the Tai Frontier Zone (1382-1454).” SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research, 4:2 (2006), 27-90. Giersch, Charles Patterson. Asian Borderlands: The Transformation of Qing China's Yunnan Frontier. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006. Herman, John E. Amid the Clouds and Mist China's Colonization of Guizhou, 1200–1700. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007. Robinson, David M. In the Shadow of the Mongol Empire: Ming China and Eurasia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. Yang, Bin. Between Winds and Clouds: The Making of Yunnan (Second Century BCE to Twentieth Century CE). New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.

    Interplace
    Bolivian Lithium and Planetary Equilibrium

    Interplace

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 26:02


    Hello Interactors,EVs made headlines this week as members of the U.S. Congress continue to chase their tail in search of remnants of the Green New Deal. I talked about cobalt last week as a key ingredient for lithium-ion batteries, but a new bill offered by congress this week has implications for another, more obvious, mineral — lithium. The biggest source is in an environmentally sensitive area of Bolivia, and U.S.-Bolivian relations are equally sensitive.As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…THE PARADOX OF NATURAL STOCKSToday is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday. These words appeared on a ceramic plaque in the shape of a tea kettle that hung in the kitchen of my grandma’s house. Why do we worry about tomorrow? Is it because we don’t know what it brings? No way to control it? We wake up every day in a past tomorrow living in a future yesterday. Today’s tomorrows are becoming increasingly worrisome on a warming planet that needed help yesterday.Democrats in Washington DC worried about tomorrow focused their action, in part, on Electric Vehicles (EV) this week. As part of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, they hope to expand EV tax credits and invent $10 billion in investment tax credits to build clean-technology manufacturing facilities.There’s a provision on the EV tax credit regarding the sourcing and processing of the minerals needed to make the lithium-ion batteries found in EVs. It says, “with respect to the battery from which the electric motor of such vehicle draws electricity,” a certain percentage of the “critical minerals contained in such battery” must be ‘‘(i) extracted or processed in any country with which the United States has a free trade agreement in effect, or (ii) recycled in North America.”This might explain why Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen called for more ‘friend-shoring’ while in Seoul South Korea earlier this week. That’s a term she uses to woo countries into trade practices agreeable to the U.S. She chose South Korea because we need their lithium-ion battery production. In April, LG announced plans for a $1.4 billion battery plant in Queen Creek, Arizona. They are the number two battery producer in the world behind China.The provision isn’t just about the source of the battery, but the source of the materials in the battery. Their key ingredient – lithium – will most likely come from one or more of three countries in Latin America. They’ll need to be ‘Friend-shored’ if America wants to dominate the EV market. The country with the largest and most accessible source, Bolivia, has no shore and recently have not been friendly with the United States.The world’s largest lithium reserves sit in the Atacama Desert which forms a triangulated region known as the “Lithium Triangle”. It sits within the geopolitical boundaries of Argentina, Bolivia, and Chile which were drawn in the 19th century. Bolivia, now home to the largest population of Indigenous people, became land locked when Chile crushed them in the War of the Pacific from 1879-1884. They took away land that gained Bolivia access to the Pacific Ocean. Bolivia lost even more land in the Gran Chaco region to Paraguay after the Chaco War from 1932–35Much of the international law that governs these disputes were written to advantage American and European colonist expansion. They were part of a neoliberal agenda by the global North to ensure the rights of these borders and those legally living within them, but also to exploit their natural and human resources. Latin American countries rich with natural resources were eager to participate in the global economy. Many in these Latin American countries viewed their natural resources as an economic blessing – a way to secure and grow their new nation’s economic prosperity amidst a burgeoning global economy. But for most, it was a curse that invited environmental degradation and poverty at the hands of outsiders. This paradox was observed as early as 1711 in a British publication, The Spectator, "It is generally observed, that in countries of the greatest plenty there is the poorest living." In 1995 economist Richard Auty saw this geographical pattern occurring in East Asia, Africa, and Latin America and gave it a name: ‘Resource Curse’.Auty observes the curse is often explained away by neoliberals as a factor of work ethic; they are simply too lazy to keep up with ‘advanced’ economies or lack the necessary resources. But he says politics are blamed as well. The U.S. has spent centuries of time, energy, and money backing Latin American neoliberal regimes and schemes toward their globalist agenda. Both overtly and covertly and always rhetorically. Authoritatively from the right, ‘Peace through Strength’, or diplomatically from the left, ‘Friend-shoring.’The United States has long envisioned an American continent that mimics the United States. University of Iowa international law professor, Christopher Rossi, writes, “Latin Americanism emerged from a deeply circumspect nineteenth century regard for hegemonic foreign policy intentions of the United States, which had weaponized the defensive construct of its Monroe Doctrine (1823) with the annexation of Texas (1845), the Mexican-American War (1846-1848), and an assortment of turn of-the-century interventions and power plays in the Caribbean and Central America over future control of the Panama Canal.”One of the most recent power plays came with the suspected ousting of one of only two elected Indigenous leaders in the history of colonized America, in a country rich with lithium, Bolivia’s 65th president, Evo Morales.REAGAN BIRTHS A POLITICIANEvo Morales was born in western Bolivia in a small Indigenous Aymara village to farmers in 1959. As a young boy he helped his dad grow coca and trade it in the markets of Cochabamba, Bolivia’s third largest city. It took two weeks by foot to get there. Coca is an Aymaran word, “Khoka” – ‘the tree’. It is most associated with cocaine, but the leaf has been central to Andean culture for thousands of years. It’s one of the oldest cultivated plants in South America and has been used as currency, tea, and was even the original ingredient in Coca-Cola. (Kola is a caffeinated African nut) Coca is also commonly chewed by Andeans. Saliva breaks down the leaf to release alkaloids; none of which produce the euphoric effects of processed coca for cocaine but are believed to have health benefits.Growing up, Evo Morales learned Spanish and attended the Agrarian Humanistic Technical Institute of Orinoca (ITAHO), but never finished. After his military service, he became a coca grower. As cocaine gained popularity in America in the 70s, the price of coca increased and farming coca became popular. Morales soon joined a farmers union protecting Indigenous rights to farm coca for traditional Andean purposes in the face of competition among many, and hostilities toward some, coca growers.In 1980 a far-right, anti-union, military dictator, Luis García Meza, became displeased with Bolivia’s turn toward a more pro-civilian communitarian government. He also sensed the decline of the Carter administration in the U.S. and gambled on the country swinging to the right in line with his beliefs. So, as Reagan entered the White House Meza took military control of Bolivia. A year later soldiers kidnapped a coca farmer accusing him of trafficking cocaine, beat him up, and burned him to death. This event is what spurred the young Evo Morales into politics.Reagan distanced himself from Meza, who was eventually pressured to resign. His replacement was a leftist moderate, Hernán Siles Zuazo, who had served previously as president in the 1950s. Amid widespread poverty he came to the U.S. for aid. They agreed under the condition Bolivia would adopt their neoliberal economic plan. That plan involved the privatization of Bolivia’s natural resources – including the coca plant.With Siles back in office in the 1980s, Reagan had a neoliberal ally and a partner in his infamous War on Drugs. Reagan pressured Siles to use military force to suppress coca growers. The U.S. sent troops to help burn coca fields. There were reports of beatings should owners resist. Farmers were offered $2500 an acre to voluntarily eradicate their crops. Morales was one of them and he refused. In that moment, the coca plant became a symbol of Bolivian natural resources, and his Indigenous Andean ancestral heritage, and he didn’t like U.S. imperialists threatening to control it. Activists protested chanting, “Long live coca! Death to the Yankees!"Evo Morales organized similar protests throughout the 1980s and 90s and rose through the ranks of various union groups. He took leadership of MAS (Movement for Socialism) – “an indigenous-based political party that calls for the nationalization of industry, legalization of the coca leaf ... and fairer distribution of national resources." By the 2002 elections MAS became Bolivia’s second largest party gaining 20% of the popular vote.In 2003, more protest erupted after a U.S. company offered to buy a nationalized natural gas pipeline for below market value. Activists took to the street resulting in 80 people dead. Morales called for President Sánchez de Lozada to resign. Lozada fled to Miami, Florida and was replaced by Carlos Mesa who had ties to U.S. In 2004 he resigned fearing a civil war between the upper-class White Bolivian elites concentrated in major cities and the rural working and middle class. In 2005, 85% of Bolivians turned out to vote. Evo Morales earned 54% of the total. This was the first victory by absolute majority in Bolivia in 40 years and the highest national vote percentage of any presidential candidate in Latin American history.President Morales maintained focus on state sovereignty over natural resources. His administration nationalized Bolivian oil and natural gas, telecommunications, electricity, and restructured a state-owned mining company. Thanks to high international commodity prices, for the first time since its borders had been ratified, Bolivia experienced a continuous economic public-sector surplus between 2006-2013.Because of his extractive agenda, Morales is sometimes regarded as capitalist; but a communitarian one. Instead of the profits going to privately held companies and select shareholders, they fund social programs. Morales is also regarded as an environmentalist and a voice for climate justice. His philosophy links to Andean Indigenous heritage and a widely held Amerindian belief in natural rights called “Buen Vivir” or “Living Well”. He ensconced many of these philosophies into the Bolivian constitution. His actions made Bolivia a world leader in encoding Indigenous and natural rights into law.His ‘Living Well’ Bolivian laws, were simply following international law. The Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth is part of the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth. It was this ratification that declared April 22 as International Earth Day. The Declaration is intended to spur every country in the world to enact laws and practices that recognize “Mother Earth is the source of life, nourishment and learning and provides everything we need to live well.” (my italics) There is a difference between ‘living well’ and ‘living better’. The current dominant economic philosophy encourages competition between individuals to live better then another, but Morales, and the UN are asking, what if we all could live well?BATTERY POWERED COUPThe aim to for all to live well is why Morales included laws like: “The State and any individual or collective person must respect, protect, and guarantee the rights of Mother Earth for the well-being of current and future generations” There are 58 articles intended to help countries regulate ‘Living Well’, including: “non-commercialization of the environmental functions of Mother Earth; integrality; precautionary action; guarantee to restore Mother Earth; guarantee to regenerate Mother Earth; historical responsibility; priority of prevention; plural participation; water for life; solidarity among human beings; harmonious relation; social justice; climate justice; plural economy; complementarity and equilibrium; and dialogue of traditional knowledges and science.”It also includes a ‘Right to Development’ that Morales was following with his extractive economic policy.“the right to development [as] an inalienable human right by virtue of which every human person and all peoples are entitled to participate in, contribute to, and enjoy economic, social, cultural and political development, in which all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.”The Organization of American States (OAS), an organization largely funded by the U.S. government and headquartered in Washington D.C., helped draft these declarations which Morales inserted into the Bolivian constitution. It’s derived from the 2007 United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that“provides a shared framework for improving temporary situations where two opposed interests collide, that is, the rights of indigenous peoples and State politics.”There are 148 countries who ratified this declaration in 2016, but the United States, Canada, Colombia, and Brazil are not among them. They have issues with ideas of “free determination, consultation, and consent, collective rights, and natural resources, land, and territories.” Which is why the United States may have had issues with Morales.Seeing Bolivia’s lithium stores were the next natural resource to be exploited by the United States, Morales turned his attention to developing lithium according to his ‘Living Well’ constitutional articles. But some Indigenous separatists, and Indigenous people most impacted by lithium extraction, became critical of Evo Morales and his eagerness to capitalize on this economic opportunity.The first attempts at extraction were privatized, but seeking to avoid the ‘resource curse’, Morales formed the state-owned YLB, Yacimientos de Litio Bolivianos, for the sole purpose of lithium development. However, seeing Venezuela’s failure to effectively drill oil without outside investment or expertise, he decided to ease his stance on sole state-ownership and sought public-private partnerships. In 2014 and 2017 he invited a French and a Chinese company to build battery plants. In 2018, he signed on a German company, ACI Systems. And in 2019, the Chinese Xinjiang TBEA Group became a strategic partner to explore new extraction opportunities.In October of that same year, 2019, came the national elections and with it another Morales victory. But he was accused of election fraud. (It’s still disputed, but findings fall along political, ethnic, and cultural lines) Around election time protests erupted in the city where the German plant was built. Locals claimed to unhappy with the ACI deal. In November, Morales cancelled it. A week later the military ousted Morales in what is widely believed to be a far-right coup not unlike the one that spurred Morales to political action in the 80s. Morales escaped in exile to Mexico and then Argentina. He also claims his life had been threatened by U.S. CIA operatives.Predictably, the interim government was led by an opposition senator named Jeanine Áñez. The Catholic pink bible carrying former news anchor not only put lithium projects on hold, but criminal liability for police brutality against protesters enraged by the coup. She also cut off ties to Venezuela, Nicaragua, and Cuba and became cozy with the United States. A year later, October 2020, elections were held again and Morales’s former Minister of Economy, MAS candidate Luis Arce, won in a landslide.Arce is viewed as a pragmatist but also an adherent the principles Morales instilled in the constitution. Including upholding his 2006 implementation of the Productive Community Social Economic Model which distributes economic surpluses to all Bolivian people so they may ‘live well’.Arce said in a recent interview, “Parallel to the economic growth achieved, we managed to reduce moderate poverty from 60.6 percent in 2005 to 37.2 percent in 2019; extreme poverty from 38.2 percent to 12.9 percent and inequality," And just this week Bolivia micro-mobility startup, Quantum, said they hope Arce’s plans to build Bolivian batteries plays out soon, they want to put them in their tiny electric urban micro-cars and motorcycles. They operate out of Cochabamba where Morales traded coca for corn with his dad in public markets decades ago. Bolivian elections come in just three years but even Arce’s allies don’t believe their facilities can bring Bolivian batteries to market before 2030.In the meantime, outside investors continue to court Bolivia, including the United States. But the U.S. hasn’t had an ambassador in Bolivia since Morales kicked Rob Goldberg out in 2008 on counts of espionage. And I’m sure American companies won’t want to legally adhere to the ‘Living Well’ laws of the Bolivian constitution; just as the American government doesn’t want to ratify the UN’s versions into international law. It may be hard for the U.S. to ‘Friend-shore’ Bolivia. Especially when their shore was taken by Chile. Meanwhile environmentalists worry the state’s ambition to curb poverty through extractive mining will continue to harm the environment.Massive amounts of water are needed to lure lithium from their salty beds. Mining operations can use as much water in one day that a single family would use in twenty-two years. Alpine runoff is the only source of water in the ‘Lithium Triangle’ and La Niña can bring extended periods of drought. Furthermore, this area is home to three of the world’s six species of flamingos. Both plants and animals in this rich avifauna area are sensitive to ecological extremes risking further depletion of biodiversity.Little attention is given to the environmental impacts of lithium mining. The largest number of scholarly research on the subject overwhelming comes from the three countries who seek to exploit and consume it the most for the worldwide lithium-ion battery market: The United States, China, and Germany.But if Arce keeps to the laws of his own constitution, as ensconced by his friend and colleague Evo Morales, he must balance “precautionary action”, “guarantees to restore Mother Earth”, “guarantees to regenerate Mother Earth”, and respect “water for life” with “economic, social, cultural and political development” so that “all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.”  There’s a mind twisting saying associated with ‘Living Well’ that reminds me of that plaque in my grandma’s kitchen. It says, “that which already is, is that which will be, without yet being what it already is.” Today, that which already is, is the tomorrow, that which will be, that you worried about yesterday, yet being what it already is. We may worry what tomorrow brings on the horizon of life, but this much is for sure: it depends on the recognition, and lawful ratification, of Mother Earth as the source of life, nourishment, and learning because it provides everything we need to live well.Podcast Music:1.      Loca de Remate: Ronny Lovy.2.      Queremos Saya: Los Kjarkas.3.      Huellas de Mi Llamita - Grupo Aymara.4.      Tarpuricusum Sarata - Captain Planet Remix: Luzmila Carpio, Captain Planet. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

    BFM :: The Breakfast Grille
    Some Haven't Learnt The Lessons Of The Asian Financial Crisis

    BFM :: The Breakfast Grille

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 27:20


    It's been a month since the 25th anniversary of the 1997 Asian financial crisis which wreaked havoc in much of East Asia and Southeast Asia. What were the fundamental impact of the crisis to the region's economic policies and what lessons can we take away from it as concerns of another economic crisis draws near? Russell Napier, author and cofounder of the think tank ERIC explains.

    Then and Now History Podcast: Global History and Culture

    (Bonus) Zaibatsu ("financial clique") is a Japanese term referring to industrial and financial vertically integrated business conglomerates in the Empire of Japan, whose influence and size allowed control over significant parts of the Japanese economy from the Meiji period until the end of World War II. A zaibatsu's general structure included a family owned holding company on top, and a bank which financed the other, mostly industrial subsidiaries within them. Although the zaibatsu played an important role in the Japanese economy from the 1860s to 1945, they increased in number and importance following the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–1905, World War I and Japan's subsequent attempt to conquer East Asia during the inter-war period and World War II. After World War II they were dissolved by the Allied occupation forces and succeeded by the keiretsu (groups of banks, manufacturers, suppliers, and distributors). Equivalents to the zaibatsu can still be found in other countries, such as the chaebol conglomerates of South Korea.

    BFM :: General
    Some Haven't Learnt The Lessons Of The Asian Financial Crisis

    BFM :: General

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 27:20


    It's been a month since the 25th anniversary of the 1997 Asian financial crisis which wreaked havoc in much of East Asia and Southeast Asia. What were the fundamental impact of the crisis to the region's economic policies and what lessons can we take away from it as concerns of another economic crisis draws near? Russell Napier, author and cofounder of the think tank ERIC explains.

    VORW International Podcast
    Random Talk! Rioting - Bigfoot Evidence - Gentleminions Trend - The Backrooms

    VORW International Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 326:03


    You can hear my new airing on 9670 kHz (9.670 MHz) every Friday at the following times: 5 PM British Summer Time Friday 7 PM Eastern European Summer Time Friday 8 PM Samara Time Friday 10 PM Alma-Ata Time Friday Reception should be best for listeners in Europe, Russia, Central and East Asia, the signal may also be heard (with varying strength) in the Middle East, Africa, South Asia. Consider supporting my show with a donation via PayPal to vorwinfo@gmail.com it needs your help to survive!

    Far East Travels Podcast
    I've Been Sick, But Not With COVID! Back With A Travel Update For Asia

    Far East Travels Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 24:56


    It's so glad to be back after a long break due to a cold and sinus infection. In the episode I'll discuss dealing with a common flu or cold after not having one for 2 years. Also more importantly what travel is currently like and the most recent updates for East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. It still looks like it may be still some time before East Asia like Taiwan or Japan reopens to independant travelers. Nepal is open with few travel restrictions if you're considering a trek in the fall. Bhutan will reopen to travelers beginning September 22nd. Thanks again for listening!Thanks as always for your support!If you'd like to support the podcast there are two ways:Patreon-monthly pledges/support-https://www.patreon.com/FarEastTravelsDonations: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/JohnASaboe

    SpyCast
    “The Spies Who Came in From the Cold” – with Chris Costa and John Quattrocki at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library in Chicago

    SpyCast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 67:07 Very Popular


    Summary Chris Costa (LinkedIn; Website) and John Quattrocki (LinkedIn; Website) join Andrew to discuss coming in from the Cold War. They both had long illustrious careers in intelligence. What You'll Learn Intelligence Two Cold War intelligence experiences Two perspectives on the U.S. intel. community in the 80's & early 90's Two reflections on the art and science of counterintelligence Two perspectives on serving on the National Security Council Reflections Career bookends  “Inadequate war termination” And much, much more… Episode Notes The Windy City Episode.  The Pritzker Military Museum and Library (PMML) in Chicago is well worth a visit. Located on Michigan Avenue overlooking Grant Park and Lake Michigan – there's three additional attractions right there – you will not be disappointed. SPY teamed up with PMML to put on what would become this week's episode. To discuss coming in from the Cold War intelligence landscape, Executive Director of SPY Chris Costa and AFIO board member John Quattrocki sat down for a panel discussion with Andrew.  Chris, a former intelligence officer of 34 years with 25 of those in active duty in hot spots such as Panama, Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq, is also a past Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Counterterrorism on the NSC. John retired from the Senior Executive Service (SES - 4) as a Special Agent of the FBI with 19 years of operational experience against the Soviet Union/Russia, the Warsaw Pact, East Asia, Islamic extremist groups, and domestic terrorism. He also served on the NSC as the Director of Counterintelligence Programs. And… Pritzker Military Museum & Library's mission is to “increase the public's understanding of military history.” The International Spy Museum's mission is to “educate the public about espionage and intelligence.” As you can see, then, in the military-intelligence-espionage national security continuum, we are pretty much as good a partnership as it gets.  Quote of the Week "The government has seen the counterintelligence (CI) resources as a kind of a human capital escrow account to draw on for other elements to the government. And in, so doing, we have started to lend our CI bodies to the private sector. So, we are providing indirect cost support to the private sector for their CI responsibilities, rather than causing them to acquit all their own CI responsibilities." – John Quattrocki "I was not entirely satisfied with the idea of being between wars, because we were trained as infantry men. Our job was to prepare to go to war. And then I said, you know what? I wanna fight against our adversaries on a different plane, multilevel chess, if you will. And that's what brought me into the intelligence business." – Chris Costa Resources Headline Resource Video of the live event featuring Chris & John at PMML in Chicago, YouTube *SpyCasts* "The FBI Way" - Frank Figliuzzi (2021) “Army Intelligence” –Mary Legere (2016) “The CI Professional” – John Schindler (2016) Beginner Resources Cold War Overview, Khan Academy (n.d.) HUMINT vs. Counterintelligence, Clearance Jobs (2020) Books To Catch a Spy, J. Olson (GUP, 2019) U.S. Army CI Handbook (Dept. of Army, 2013) Double Cross, B. McIntyre (Crown, 2013) Articles The Best Books on Counterintelligence, J. Olson, Shepherd (n.d.) An Anatomy of Counterintelligence, A.C. Wasemiller, SII (1994) Terms & Definitions of CI, FAS (2014) Website Counterintelligence, FBI Primary Sources National CI Strategy, 2020-22 (2020) The Spy Who Loved Her (1994) A Review of US CI (1986) Church Committee Report (1976) Summary of the “CIA Family Jewels” (1975) *Wildcard Resource* “Gerontion,” T.S. Elliott (1920) This poem is the origin of the phrase often associated with CI: “the wilderness of mirrors.”

    Legends From The Pacific
    108: Japan's Greatest Pirate - Takeyoshi Murakami

    Legends From The Pacific

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 5:44


    Discover the pirate who ensured trade between Japan and East Asia. Featured Song: "Golden Hour" by Honoka and Azita, courtesy of HI*Sessions Join our email list https://legendsfromthepacific.ck.page/32ca50bd23 *We respect your privacy. We will not share your email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Visit our store: https://legendsfromthepacific.com/store Theme Song: "Mystery" by Tavana, courtesy of HI*Sessions Sound Effects: Sound Effects Factory Music Coordinator: Matt Duffy AKA DJ TripleBypass Link to this episode on our website https://legendsfromthepacific.com/108-japan-pirate Please give us a rating, write a review, subscribe, follow us, and share us with your friends and family. ***** Join our email list and claim your exclusive unaired episode today: "Hawaii's Faceless Ghost - Mujina" (Unaired Episode) https://legendsfromthepacific.ck.page/32ca50bd23 *We respect your privacy. We will not share your email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Listen to Kamu's unaired paranormal experiences by becoming a Patreon supporter today: https://www.patreon.com/legendsfromthepacific Send your unusual Pacific experience to be shared on a future episode. https://legendsfromthepacific.com/feedback  Visit our Fan Art Section: https://legendsfromthepacific.com/fan-artwork Instagram: legendsfromthepacific Twitter: LegendsPacific Follow Legends from the Pacific wherever you listen to audio. → Follow via Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/legends-from-the-pacific/id1501091122 → Follow via Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/legends%20from%20the%20pacific → Follow via Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5qhdkYUl8R7hSw6OZYJLye → Here's our RSS feed: https://legendsfromthepacific.libsyn.com/rss www.LegendsFromThePacific.com

    Life on Side B
    S4E14 | Keifer and Jesse on Cross-Cultural Missions (w/ Josh and Ashley)

    Life on Side B

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 89:22


    This week's episode topic was picked by our patrons. Josh and Ashley are talking with Keifer Lucchi, a missionary in Central Europe, and Jesse White, a university student preparing to go into missions in East Asia. From navigating missions organizations to cultural contexts, all four of them share about their experiences in missions from Latin America to Europe to Asia. Thank you to our patrons who chose this topic!

    Stories from the Stacks
    A Medicated Empire: The Pharmaceutical Industry & Modern Japan with Timothy Yang

    Stories from the Stacks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 31:18


    In "A Medicated Empire," Dr. Timothy Yang, associate professor at the University of Georgia, explores the history of Japan's pharmaceutical industry in the early twentieth century through a close account of Hoshi Pharmaceuticals, one of East Asia's most influential drug companies from the late 1910s through the early 1950s. Focusing on Hoshi's connections to Japan's emerging nation-state and empire, and on the ways in which it embraced an ideology of modern medicine as a humanitarian endeavor for greater social good, Yang shows how the industry promoted a hygienic, middle-class culture that was part of Japan's national development and imperial expansion. Yang makes clear that the company's fortunes had less to do with scientific breakthroughs and medical innovations than with Japan's web of social, political, and economic relations. He lays bare Hoshi's business strategies and its connections with politicians and bureaucrats, and he describes how public health authorities dismissed many of its products as placebos at best and poisons at worst. Hoshi, like other pharmaceutical companies of the time, depended on resources and markets opened up, often violently, through colonization. Combining global histories of business, medicine, and imperialism, A Medicated Empire shows how the development of the pharmaceutical industry simultaneously supported and subverted regimes of public health at home and abroad (from the publisher, Cornell University Press). For more Hagley History Hangouts, and more information on the Center for the History of Business, Technology, & Society at the Hagley Museum & Library, visit us online at hagley.org.

    The Lawfare Podcast
    Lawfare Archive: The Forgotten War Remembered

    The Lawfare Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 51:38 Very Popular


    From July 20, 2020: This year marks the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War. Though often called the "Forgotten War," the Korean War has highly conditioned much of our contemporary international politics in East Asia, and the people of Korea continue to live with its aftermath, both in the north and in the south. And the shadow of the Korean War looms large over something we often debate on Lawfare—war powers. To commemorate the 70th anniversary of the U.S. entry into the Korean War, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Katharine Moon, a professor of political science at Wellesley College and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution Center for East Asia Policy Studies; Matt Waxman, a professor at Columbia University Law School and long-time Lawfare contributor; and Scott R. Anderson, senior editor of Lawfare and a specialist on war powers, among other things. They talked about what happened on the Korean peninsula during the war, how it affected the way we talk about war powers, and the international law status of the conflict in Korea.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Readout
    Japan After Abe

    The Readout

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 22:12


    CSIS's Chris Johnstone, former NSC director for East Asia, joins the podcast to discuss the aftermath of the assassination of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and the current policies of Prime Minister Kishida going forward.

    New Books in Literary Studies
    The Kushnameh: The Persian Epic of Kush the Tusked

    New Books in Literary Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 39:39


    The Kushnameh is unique, literally. Only one copy of the “Epic of Kush”exists, sitting in the British Library. Hardly anything is known about its author, Iranshah. It features a quite villainous protagonist, the tusked warrior Kush, who carves a swathe of destruction across the region. And it spans nearly half the world, with episodes in Spain, the Maghreb, India, China and even Korea. It was that last reference that encouraged academics in Korea to study the Kushnameh, and bring Kaveh Hemmat to do its first-ever English translation, published by the University of California Press this year.  Kaveh L. Hemmat is assistant professor, professional faculty in History at Benedictine University, scholar of world history and Islamicate culture, director of the NEH-funded Khataynameh Translation Project, an unusually determined cyclist, and a dabbler in sundry pursuits ranging from sourdough bread baking to drawing. He completed his Ph.D at the University of Chicago in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 2014. His research focuses on interaction between the Islamic world and East Asia and the importance of this interaction to Islamic political thought and premodern global political history. In this interview, Kaveh and I discuss this unique document and the cultural and political context behind its writing.  You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of the Kushnameh. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

    Asian Review of Books
    The Kushnameh: The Persian Epic of Kush the Tusked

    Asian Review of Books

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 39:39


    The Kushnameh is unique, literally. Only one copy of the “Epic of Kush”exists, sitting in the British Library. Hardly anything is known about its author, Iranshah. It features a quite villainous protagonist, the tusked warrior Kush, who carves a swathe of destruction across the region. And it spans nearly half the world, with episodes in Spain, the Maghreb, India, China and even Korea. It was that last reference that encouraged academics in Korea to study the Kushnameh, and bring Kaveh Hemmat to do its first-ever English translation, published by the University of California Press this year.  Kaveh L. Hemmat is assistant professor, professional faculty in History at Benedictine University, scholar of world history and Islamicate culture, director of the NEH-funded Khataynameh Translation Project, an unusually determined cyclist, and a dabbler in sundry pursuits ranging from sourdough bread baking to drawing. He completed his Ph.D at the University of Chicago in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 2014. His research focuses on interaction between the Islamic world and East Asia and the importance of this interaction to Islamic political thought and premodern global political history. In this interview, Kaveh and I discuss this unique document and the cultural and political context behind its writing.  You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of the Kushnameh. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-review

    New Books Network
    The Kushnameh: The Persian Epic of Kush the Tusked

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 39:39


    The Kushnameh is unique, literally. Only one copy of the “Epic of Kush”exists, sitting in the British Library. Hardly anything is known about its author, Iranshah. It features a quite villainous protagonist, the tusked warrior Kush, who carves a swathe of destruction across the region. And it spans nearly half the world, with episodes in Spain, the Maghreb, India, China and even Korea. It was that last reference that encouraged academics in Korea to study the Kushnameh, and bring Kaveh Hemmat to do its first-ever English translation, published by the University of California Press this year.  Kaveh L. Hemmat is assistant professor, professional faculty in History at Benedictine University, scholar of world history and Islamicate culture, director of the NEH-funded Khataynameh Translation Project, an unusually determined cyclist, and a dabbler in sundry pursuits ranging from sourdough bread baking to drawing. He completed his Ph.D at the University of Chicago in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 2014. His research focuses on interaction between the Islamic world and East Asia and the importance of this interaction to Islamic political thought and premodern global political history. In this interview, Kaveh and I discuss this unique document and the cultural and political context behind its writing.  You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of the Kushnameh. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    The Hellenistic Age Podcast
    076: Greco-Bactria - Han China and the War of the Heavenly Horses

    The Hellenistic Age Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 58:01


    In 128 B.C., an explorer and diplomat named Zhang Qian had arrived in the Ferghana Valley in modern Uzbekistan. As the first known Chinese visitor in Central Asia, he was originally tasked by the Han Emperor Wudi to seek an alliance with the Yuezhi nomads, who migrated to Bactria in the 130s and contributed to the collapse of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. Though the alliance fell through, Zhang's reports on the wealthy lands of “Daxia” and “Dayuan” tantalized the Emperor's political ambitions, resulting in waves of Han embassies and armies being sent to the so-called “Western Regions”. A burgeoning trade network soon arose as East Asia and the Mediterranean worlds became ever closer, prompting expeditions by the Chinese to make contact with the mysterious Da Qin (Roman Empire), whose aristocrats demanded the goods produced by the equally mysterious “Seres” (“Silk Peoples”). Episode Notes: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.wordpress.com/2022/07/21/076-greco-bactria-han-china-and-the-war-of-the-heavenly-horses/) Episode 076 Transcript: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.files.wordpress.com/2022/06/076-greco-bactria-han-china-and-the-war-of-the-heavenly-horses.pdf) The Hellenistic Far East Map 3 - Zhang Qian in Central Asia (https://hellenisticagepodcast.files.wordpress.com/2022/06/map-3-zhang-qian-in-central-asia.pdf) Social Media: Twitter (https://twitter.com/HellenisticPod) Facebook (www.facebook.com/hellenisticagepodcast/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/hellenistic_age_podcast/) Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/hellenisticagepodcast) Show Merchandise: Etsy (https://www.etsy.com/shop/HellenisticAgePod) Redbubble (https://www.redbubble.com/people/HellenisticPod/shop?asc=u) Donations: Ko-Fi (https://ko-fi.com/hellenisticagepodcast) Amazon Book Wish List (https://tinyurl.com/vfw6ask)

    Nirvana Sisters
    Do You Know What Chi Means? We Didn't Either. Breaking Down Traditional Chinese Medicine with Dr. Jenelle Kim

    Nirvana Sisters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 48:47


    In this week's episode, Amy and Katie meet Dr. Jenelle Kim to learn all the basics of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Listen in to learn about what TCM actually means and the key modalities. Dr. Jenelle Kim shares what she calls the "3 M's"  and how she uses this in her daily life.  The three also discuss "doe chi" and how powerful this philosophy can be which she leaned from her father, a Korean monk. Other topics include adaptogens, herbal ingredients, what to ask for when looking for supplements, and how to find a doctor with TCM expertise.  Don't miss the end to hear her favorite wellness hack and "5 minute flow" sharing how she gets ready in 5 minutes.About Dr. Jenelle Kim:Dr. Jenelle Kim, DACM, L.Ac., is a prolifically cited wellness expert that has been featured in Forbes, Allure, Meditation Magazine, Time, Forbes, etc., and is a best-selling author. She is devoted to integrating the philosophy, ancient medical wisdom, and expertise of East Asia with the advancements of modern life and medicine of the West to touch and positively affect the lives of others. Dr. Kim is a Doctor of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine and is Nationally Board Certified in Herbology, Oriental Medicine, and Acupuncture. Dr. Kim completed extensive training in East Asia under some of the most respected doctors in the field of Oriental Medicine and is the custodian of her lineage proprietary Bi Bong® formulas.Her book, Myung Sung: The Korean Art of Living Meditation was published on January 11, 2022, by Watkins Publishing and distributed by Penguin Random House. Myung Sung is available globally in ten languages, Czech, Thai, Italian, Croatian, Spanish, Romanian, Turkish, Australia, New Zealand, and Serbian. In her book, Dr. Kim breaks down the principles of Myung Sung, offering a way to achieve a life of balance and happiness by enjoying the positive benefits of meditation every minute of every day. Dr. Kim's unique approach to meditation combines lessons on movement and natural medicine learned from a lifetime of experience studying Eastern philosophy, Eastern medicine, and martial arts.With almost 20 years in the beauty and wellness industry, Dr. Kim has formulated some of the first all-natural luxury products carried in high-end spas across the world including Ritz Carlton, Four Season & Mandarin Oriental high-end retailers such as Nordstrom, Neiman Marcus & Bergdorf Goodman, and in the natural marketplace in stores such as Whole Foods Market & Sprouts.Follow @Dr.JenelleKim on InstagramFollow us @nirvanasisters on InstagramFind us at www.nirvanasisters.comSay hi at hello@nirvanasisters.comPlease subscribe, rate, review and share

    New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
    The Kushnameh: The Persian Epic of Kush the Tusked

    New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 39:39


    The Kushnameh is unique, literally. Only one copy of the “Epic of Kush”exists, sitting in the British Library. Hardly anything is known about its author, Iranshah. It features a quite villainous protagonist, the tusked warrior Kush, who carves a swathe of destruction across the region. And it spans nearly half the world, with episodes in Spain, the Maghreb, India, China and even Korea. It was that last reference that encouraged academics in Korea to study the Kushnameh, and bring Kaveh Hemmat to do its first-ever English translation, published by the University of California Press this year.  Kaveh L. Hemmat is assistant professor, professional faculty in History at Benedictine University, scholar of world history and Islamicate culture, director of the NEH-funded Khataynameh Translation Project, an unusually determined cyclist, and a dabbler in sundry pursuits ranging from sourdough bread baking to drawing. He completed his Ph.D at the University of Chicago in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 2014. His research focuses on interaction between the Islamic world and East Asia and the importance of this interaction to Islamic political thought and premodern global political history. In this interview, Kaveh and I discuss this unique document and the cultural and political context behind its writing.  You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of the Kushnameh. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies