Podcasts about us state department

United States federal executive department responsible for foreign affairs

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Dubious
Falling for Putin: The Windows, The Stairs, and The Oligarchs

Dubious

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 29:40


In a phenomenon dubbed "Sudden Russian Death Syndrome", over two dozen oligarchs, media executives, and high ranking military personnel have died in "accidental" deaths since the start of the Ukraine war.Most have "fallen" out of windows. One fell from his boat and "died instantly" upon hitting the water. One even died from the poisoned toad venom he took from a couple of guru-healers in Moscow who gave him the toxin as a hangover cure. All of these victims of SRDS have run afoul of Putin's favor, and met untimely deaths in the past couple of years. If you like our content please become a patron to support the podcast. You'll get all of our episodes ad-free. 1 We're also talking a bit about the Wagner group, recently declared an international criminal organization by the US State Department. Its leaders have a penchant for Nazi tattoos and brutality, but they also seem to have much more leeway in terms of criticizing the Kremlin than all of the unfortunate oligarchs who fell out of their balcony windows or fell down a flight a stairs. Recently the Russian Army took credit for taking the town of Soledar in Eastern Ukraine, and Wagner Group officials publicly corrected them and chastised the Kremlin for "stealing their victory." In a rare moment of backing down, the Kremlin apologized for the mis-statement. 2 Almost half of the two dozen or so "mysterious deaths" since the beginning of the Ukraine war happened prior to the summer of 2022. 3 1. Elaine Godfrey. Sudden Russian Death Syndrome. The Atlantic. December 2022. ⇤2. Leila Sackur. Victory claims over small Ukrainian town expose rift among Russian forces NBC News. January 2023. ⇤3. Giulia Carbonaro. Every Russian Official Who Has Died Since Putin Invaded Ukraine. Newsweek. April 2022. ⇤

Break It Down Show
Matt Hoh - Standing Tall, and Surviving War

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 68:00


Matt Hoh - Standing Tall, and Surviving War - Matt Hoh has been a Senior Fellow with the Center for International Policy since 2010. In 2009, Matthew resigned in protest from his post in Afghanistan with the State Department over the American escalation of the war. Prior to his assignment in Afghanistan, Matthew took part in the American occupation of Iraq. For more on Matt check out One of the things that stands out about Hoh is his willingness to publically call out the US State Department and its failure in Zabul province. Coincidentally, Pete A Turner served in Zabul as well, making another great Break It Down Show coincidence. Hit that triangle button and listen! Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Hey yo, it's Matt Hoh He calls them like he sees them That's Ground Truth for y'all   ​Similar episodes: Erik Kleinsmith  James Rosebush  Mike Guardia  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

The Pete Kaliner Show
New fonts and getting credit for not answering questions (01-18-2023--Hour1)

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 33:58


The US State Department is mandating a change in text for all of their documents. Speaking of documents... the Biden Administration wants some credit for taking questions about all the classified documents found around Joe Bidens' properties. Of course, they're not answering those question. But they'd still like some credit for soliciting the questions.  Get exclusive content here!: https://thepetekalinershow.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Armenian News Network - Groong: Week In Review Podcast
William Bairamian, Arthur Khachikyan: Artsakh Under Blockade: Day 31| Ep 199 - Jan 11, 2023

Armenian News Network - Groong: Week In Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 74:41


Artsakh Under Blockade: Day 31A Conversation with William Bairamian and Arthur Khachikyan“This is a repeat of Srebrenica. To gradually strangle and force the people to leave.”  - Arthur KhachikyanMore than 120,000 people remain trapped in the Republic of Artsakh (or Nagorno-Karabakh) due to Azerbaijan's blockade of the Lachin (Berdzor) corridor, as this crisis enters its 31th day.Guests:William Bairamian, founder and editor of The Armenite. He has written extensively on Armenian politics, culture, and society. He received degrees in international affairs from Columbia University and UCLA.Arthur Khachikyan, International Relations expert from Stanford University, specializing in Intervention. He currently teaches at the Russian Armenian University in Yerevan.This interview is a continuation of the collaboration between Groong and 168 Hours aiming to bring you more English-language coverage on the developments of this very serious humanitarian crisis in progress.Links:  - 168 Hours: https://168.am  - Groong: https://podcasts.groong.orgHosts:  - Hovik Manucharyan @HovikYerevanEpisode 199 | Recorded: January 11, 2023Website: https://podcasts.groong.org/199Subscribe and follow us everywhere you are: linktr.ee/groong

The Cognitive Crucible
#130 Teasel Muir-Harmony on Spaceflight, Foreign Policy, and Soft Power

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 48:38


The Cognitive Crucible is a forum that presents different perspectives and emerging thought leadership related to the information environment. The opinions expressed by guests are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by the Information Professionals Association. During this episode, Dr. Teasel Muir-Harmony of the Smithsonian discusses her book, Operation Moonglow. She argues that its primary purpose wasn't advancing science; rather, it was part of a political strategy to build a global coalition. Operation Moonglow paints a riveting picture of the intersection of spaceflight, geopolitics, propaganda, and diplomacy during the Cold War. Research Question: Dr. Muir Harmony believes more work is needed for evaluating the impact of information dissemination in a public diplomacy context. Resources: Dr. Teasel Muir-Harmony Operation Moonglow: A Political History of Project Apollo by Dr. Teasel Muir-Harmony Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell How to Build a Dyson Sphere - The Ultimate Megastructure How to Move the Sun: Stellar Engines Link to full show notes and resources https://information-professionals.org/episode/cognitive-crucible-episode-130 Guest Bio:  Dr. Teasel Muir-Harmony is a historian of science and technology and the curator of the Apollo Collection. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she earned a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She has held positions as a visiting scholar at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden (KTH), an Associate Historian at the American Institute of Physics, and as a curator at the Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum in Chicago. Muir-Harmony researches and writes on the history of exploring the Moon, from debates about lunar governance to the use of spaceflight as soft power, the topic of her award-winning book, Operation Moonglow: A Political History of Project Apollo (Basic Books, 2020). She is the author of Apollo to the Moon: A History in 50 Objects (National Geographic, 2018) and an advisor to the television series Apollo's Moon Shot. Her scholarship has been featured by CBS, the New York Times, NPR, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and numerous other media outlets. Muir-Harmony's research and writing have been supported by the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation, the Consortium for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, the MIT Presidential Fellowship, the Smithsonian Institution Graduate Research Fellowship, NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and the National Science Foundation.  At the Air and Space Museum, she is the lead curator for the One World Connected gallery and serves on exhibit teams for Destination Moon and the Allan and Shelley Holt Innovations Gallery. Her collection comprises over 2,000 artifacts related to the Apollo program, the Skylab program, and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.  Muir-Harmony co-organizes the Space Policy & History Forum, serves on the Executive Council of the Society for the History of Technology, is a member of the American Astronautical Society History Committee, and participates in the US State Department's Speakers Program. In addition, she teaches in Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn. Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, 1) IPA earns from qualifying purchases, 2) IPA gets commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
America's SHOCKING Opposition to Jews Living in the Land of Israel

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 26:36


Plan a trip to Israel in 2023: https://serveisrael.com/volunteer/ Nearly thirty Jews were murdered in Israel in 2022 simply because they were Jews. The world was silent. An Israeli Minister visited the Temple Mount on a Jewish holy day and the world flew into an outrage, saying that this could spark violence, and was a violation of the status quo. A vineyard was destroyed in Samaria this week. Only 300 meters away, a mosque, which is located in Area C, and has had a demolition order for the past 15 years, sits untouched.  The US could not have been more strong in their condemnation of Itamar Ben Gvir's visit to the Temple Mount this week. The US State Department also roundly condemned Israel's announcement that they plan to legalize a yeshiva in Homesh, the same site where a Jewish community was destroyed in 2005.  Watch today's program to find out just how vehemently opposed the State Department is to Jews living in the Heartland of Israel.  Follow The Israel Guys on social media:  Twitter: https://twitter.com/theisraelguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theisraelguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theisraelguys Purchase TIG Merch:  Heartland Tumbler: https://shop.theisraelguys.com/store/... “Israel” Leather Patch Hat: https://shop.theisraelguys.com/store/... Next Level T-shirt: https://shop.theisraelguys.com/store/... #israelnews #theisraelguys #americaisrael  Source Links:   https://www.israelhayom.com/2023/01/0... https://arlenefromisrael.info/from-is... https://www.israel365news.com/364865/... https://www.pbs.org/newshour/world/wa... https://www.timesofisrael.com/illegal... https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7... https://www.jns.org/2-67-million-tour... https://www.jns.org/opinion/the-biden... https://www.theyeshivaworld.com/news/... https://twitter.com/regavimeng/status...

1001 RADIO DAYS
THE SECRET CODE and STEVE'S MURDER DANGEROUS ASSIGNMENT

1001 RADIO DAYS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 63:34


Dangerous Assignment was an NBC radio drama starring Brian Donlevy broadcast in the US 1949–1953. It preceded the James Bond character and books and may well have inspired them. "The Commissioner" sent US special agent Steve Mitchell to exotic locales all over the world, where he would encounter adventure and international intrigue in pursuit of some secret. Each show would always open with a brief teaser scene from the episode to follow. After the intro, Steve Mitchell would be summoned to the office of 'The Commissioner', the regional head of an unnamed US State Department agency created to address international unrest as it affected U.S. interests. "The Commissioner" would give background information, explain the current situation and tell Steve his assignment. Steve's cover identity, in almost all his adventures, was that of a suave debonair foreign correspondent for an unnamed print publication — his assignments invariably involved deceit, trickery, and violence, all tied together into a successful resolution by the end of the episode. Dangerous Assignment started out as a replacement radio series broadcast in the US on the NBC radio network in the summer of 1949; it became a syndicated series in early 1950. Reportedly, star Brian Donlevy himself was the one who brought the show to NBC. In the American radio shows, Donlevy was both the protagonist within the action and the narrator, giving the show "a suspenseful immediacy." The only other regular actor on the radio shows was Herb Butterfield, who played "The Commissioner." Many stage and screen actors appeared as guest-stars including, among many others, William Conrad, Raymond Burr, Richard Boone, and Eddie Cantor The radio show started out as a seven-week summer replacement series broadcast on NBC Saturdays 8:30–9 PM EST. It premiered July 9, 1949; the last episode was on August 20, 1949. A character portraying the Commissioner's secretary, 'Ruthie', was played by Betty Moran — it is hinted that there was some romantic history between Ruthie and Steve Mitchell. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Alan Sanders Show
McCarthy debate, Constitutionality and Twitter and the FBI Belly Button

The Alan Sanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 41:57


Today's show opens with my thoughts on Kevin McCarthy and the vote for Speaker of the House. I remind everyone where I was after the midterms of 2022, that we should not reward failure. Whether we like the people or not, several in GOP leadership continue to want to be rewarded for failing to keep up with the Democrats over the last few election cycles. Lauren Boebert was questioned about why her and over two dozen GOP members are not interested in unity and getting behind Kevin McCarthy. She reveals they have been pushing hard for just that very thing. However, when she said he was given a proposal for certain expectations, he scoffed and rejected them. Boebert claimed all of the opposition would have supported McCarthy on the first vote if he would have agreed to three specific terms. The first, put forth legislation for border the security. The second, put forth legislation for term limits in the Congress. Third, put for legislation to get to a balanced budget in the Federal government. These are not "conservative" ideas; these are CONSTITUTIONAL ideas. The fact that McCarthy rejected those terms seems befuddling to me. Now, maybe Boebert is leaving out more or maybe she is embellishing. I can only take her at her word, but if those are the three sticking points for McCarthy, then maybe we really don't need him as the next Speaker of the House. Jim Jordan was nominated as well, but said he did not want to serve as Speaker. However, when he took to the floor to suggest three initiatives the 118th Congress needs to address. When you listen, you hear what true leadership sounds like – true Constitutional leadership. Whomever is going to be Speaker, Jim Jordan's objectives should be at the very top of their list of To-Do's, especially in getting answer to all who have been trampling on our First Amendment rights. This leads me into the next Twitter Files drop from Matt Taibbi entitled, "Twitter and the FBI Belly Button." According to the latest drop, an entity within the US State Department called the Global Engagement Center decided it's mission was to also worm it's way into Twitter to have accounts banned and censored. The group used a fabricated notion that people who questioned the narrative about Covid were actually Russian actors or sympathizers. Any accounts calling Coronavirus an "engineered bioweapon," blaming it on "research conducted at the Wuhan Institute," and attributing the arrival of the virus "on the CIA," were considered guilty of being part of a Russian disinformation campaign. New media news entities like ZeroHedge were banned for sharing such truthful information and even Democrat Adam Schiff, head of the Congressional Intelligence Committee, wrote a letter to Twitter demanding a journalist be banned and his content removed. This has been going on since at least 2017, slowly building steam and eroding Twitter's ability to resist calls for censorship. As we enter 2023 and await the convening of the 118th Congress, we must demand to know what our elected officials are going to do about those people, elected or not, who willfully trampled over the First Amendment? We cannot allow them to remain in their positions and must do all we can to never let this happen again. Take a moment to rate and review the show and then share the episode on social media. You can find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GETTR and TRUTH Social by searching for The Alan Sanders Show. You can also support the show by visiting my Patreon page!

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
Israeli Air Force STRIKES Military Targets Near Damascus

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 21:49


Israel's new government was sworn in on Thursday, meaning that all the new ministers are taking over their respective ministries. Itamar Ben Gvir has declared that he will ascend the Temple Mount during his first week in office, which would make him the first sitting Israeli Minister to visit the Holy site in 5 years. Is it true that Israel launched airstrikes at targets near Damascus last night? Why is the US State Department quick to condemn Israel for statements made by her government officials but remains silent when the PA leadership openly praises terrorism.

Dope People
Season 4 Episode 37 Polaryss

Dope People

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 42:03


She is #DopePeopleFrom the east to the west, global and beyond, Polaryss' zone of genius is at the intersection of art, math, science, & tech, taking her to places like Uganda, Benin & Brazil! Polaryss is an educator, Hip Hop artist, and activist whose synergy and passion are unmatched. Born and raised in the Mecca of Hip Hop, The Bronx, New York, Polaryss incorporates her art and life experiences into every aspect of her work. Whether she's performing on stage or promoting cultural diplomacy globally, she is always educating and entertaining. As an educator and social entrepreneur, Polaryss uses her craft to advocate for women in Hip Hop as well as educational equity in underserved communities. She uses Hip Hop in the classroom as a tool to teach and promote self-advocacy, effective communication, and critical thinking. She also utilizes the skill of improvisation (freestyle) to teach social and fiscal responsibility, classroom curriculum, and self-awareness. As an educator and Hip Hop Ambassador, Polaryss takes pride in the innovative ways she brings Hip Hop into the classroom, pairing it with STEAM and project-based learning to increase literacy. The founder of The Intentional Movement Project, an arts-based literacy program that uses Hip Hop to identify and address giftedness in historically underserved youth, Polaryss has made a significant impact on the global Hip Hop community and seeks to do the same in the field of education. She created The Intentional Movement Project (TIMP) to put emphasis on historically underrepresented gifted learners and aims at partnering with academic stakeholders to increase access to STEAM-based arts education. TIMP offers standards-based quality programming that shines a spotlight on self-advocacy, effective communication, and critical thinking using curriculum-based instruction. From the global stage to the classroom to the boardroom, Polaryss is reimagining education and the world through the lens of Hip Hop Culture. Founding member and former Co-chair of MC Lyte's Hip Hop Sisters (www.hiphopsisters.org, www.hiphopsisters.com), On the board for the Women In Hip Hop Division of the Universal Hip Hop Museum, Director of Creative Operations, Education Advisor and Lead Facilitator for Toni Blackman's Rhyme Like A Girl (@RhymeLikeAGirl on IG), and Hip Hop Cultural Ambassador to the US State Department.To support Dope People, purchase some of our merchandise by visiting https://scottsteward.com/merchTo show love to the Dope People Podcast, be sure to subscribe to us on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiD7tgj9ezb7Xuk7IOFHRBg.You can also purchase Dope People merch at https://scottsteward.com/merch

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)
My Top-5 Sustainable Stories of 2022 to Inspire

Seeking Sustainability LIVE (SSL)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 23:20


It's the last day of 2022 and I'm almost recovered from my 4th booster (apologies for the scratchy voice) as I look back on the year of the tiger at 5 interesting stories of sustainable success, innovation and resilience which give us hope and food for thought as we head into 2023 the year of the rabbit. This is a spoken version (with added extras) of my article on MEDIUM Read the article on MEDIUM here. LINKS I refer to in this podcast:Reuters report on the Andrew Tate arrest https://www.reuters.com/world/romania-detains-ex-kickboxer-andrew-tate-human-trafficking-case-2022-12-30/US State Department report on Trafficking: https://www.state.gov/humantrafficking-about-human-traffickingLink to Greta Thunberg viral tweet: https://twitter.com/GretaThunberg/status/1608735970131849217?s=20&t=fU2rnTM9SAuoQs_H---uSgGreta Thunberg's Glastonbury Speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yK_N11pGEs&feature=youtu.beUK's Channel 4 News Interview with Greta Thunberg about her upcoming The Climate Book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXezjC_s2Vw&feature=youtu.beSupport the Greta Thunberg foundation: https://thegretathunbergfoundation.org/#where-the-money-goesSupport the Reaching Out Romania foundation https://www.reachingout.ro/about-reaching-out-romania/Booking.com 2021 survey reveals travelers frustrated when stopped from sustainable actions https://www.sustainability.booking.com/post/booking-com-s-2021-sustainable-travel-report-affirms-potential-watershed-momentFootprintus.com 2022 consumer survey shows how annoyed customers are about lack of sustainability at businesses (too much plastic) https://news.footprintus.com/en/consumer-studySupport Glass Half Full NOLA https://glasshalffullnola.org/Glass Half Full NOLA CEO and Co-founder Franziska Trautmann Twitter: @ecofran PBS feature: https://youtu.be/L3TU_hoaa_YReuters (2021) Climate Impacts of Sand Mining https://www.reuters.com/graphics/GLOBAL-ENVIRONMENT/SAND/ygdpzekyavw/MyMizu organization https://www.mymizu.co/en/businessSupport MyMizu

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love
#280/Modernism + Diplomacy: Angel Dizon + Mina Chow + Musical Guest Oleta Adams

US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 62:15


Since the 1950's, the US Government has hired Modernist architects like Edward Durell Stone, John Johansen, Walter Gropius, Marcel Breuer, Richard Neutra, and more recently Kieran Timberlake to design US Embassies all over the world.  Modernism most clearly expresses the idea of freedom and these buildings are a showcase for America.  But as Dr. Phil might say, “how's that working for us?” Joining us are Angel Dizon, who supervised $2B worth of construction projects for the US State Department and is now with the GSA - and returning podcast guest Mina Chow, architecture professor at USC and producer of the documentary Face of a Nation: What Happened to the World's Fair?  Later on, musical guest Oleta Adams. 

Tell Craig Your Story
Kirk Kenney - USA - Multi Instrumentalist /Educator / Recording Artist

Tell Craig Your Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 76:04


Episode 112- Please welcome to the podcast the very talented musician Kirk Kenney. Born in St Petersburg Florida USA, Kirk has a major in Education Technology. For over a decade, he has been the leading figure in American Folk Music in China, using his music to bridge the gap in the cultural divides and create positive energy when playing live. 2016 he was awarded a full grant from the US State Department of Cultural programming in China. Kirk has recorded on Fiddle, Guitar, Banjo and Dulcimer and has played with bands The Hutong Yellow, The Mountain High, China first old time square dance band, China's "Poet Rocket" and Rockabilly group "Rolling Bowling. He has also performed with the JZ band. He also is an avid music educator, coordinating international musicians visiting China and organises music camps and events. The 2 songs we heard on the podcast were "Candy Girl' and "Shady Little Grove" www.kirkkenney.com wechat- @Kirk_Kenney https://tellcraigyourstory.podbean.com https://www.linktr.ee/tellcraigyourstory @tellcraigyourstory Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcCr6P3Ja395SkapnECvOFw?view_as=subscriber #kirkkenney #tellcraigyourstory #multiinstrumentalist #fiddle #dulcimer #banjo #shanghaichina #stpetersburgflorida #americanfolkmusic #poetrocket #rollingbowling #educationtechnology #culturaldivides #thehutongyellow #themountainhigh #jzbar #candygirl #shadylittlegrove

The Campus Exchange
Dr. Kori Schake on Nuclear Threats

The Campus Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 26:08


Dr. Kori Schake is a senior fellow and the director of foreign and defense policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. Before joining AEI she was the deputy director-general of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London. She has had a distinguished career in government, working at the US State Department, the US Department of Defense, and the National Security Council at the White House. Kori joins Caleb Sampson of Hillsdale College to discuss nuclear risks in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the role of nuclear weapons in contemporary conflict, and how the United States should respond to nuclear threats and blackmail. To learn more about our 2023 Summer Honors Program, visit https://www.aei.org/summer-honors-program/

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 741: Nyyera Haq and Michael Cohen

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 87:40


HELLO!!!! Thank you soooooo much for reading this because I write it all alone my shed every night and I appreciate and am so grateful that you read it. I have a 15 minute news segment and cover the signing of the codification of gay and interracial marriage. I hope you like today's show! Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 740 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more 15 mins Nayyera Haq is an energetic and versatile broadcast journalist. She hosts hours of conversation on SiriusXM talk radio. She launched and hosted the nightly newscast, The World Tonight and was Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent for the Black News Channel. Nayyera leads conversations in response to breaking news, helping people around the country understand the political and social currents of the moment. Nayyera's insights and personal appeal make her a regular television guest of hosts like Bill Maher, Joy Reid, and Jake Tapper. She publishes in outlets as varied as The Daily Beast, The Washington Post, Refinery 29, and The Root. Nayyera previously served as a Senior Director in the White House and Senior Advisor at the State Department, advising our nation's top leaders on issues of international security and diplomacy. 50 mins Michael A. Cohen is a regular contributor for The Boston Globe on national politics and foreign affairs. He is also the author of “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division.” Michael has written for dozens of news outlets, including as a columnist for the Guardian and Foreign Policy and he is the US Political Correspondent for the London Observer. He previously worked as a speechwriter at the US State Department and has been a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Please check out and hopefully subscribe to Michael's Substack newsletter Truth and Consequences!  Stand Up subscribers get a discount on Michael's new newsletter!   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Catholic News
December 6, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 2:22


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - The Vatican's charity office is holding a drive to collect thermal shirts for people in Ukraine as they face an energy emergency amid the war. Cardinal Konrad Krajewski, the pope's almoner, said December 5 that the charity office of the Vatican is “already stocking up” on thermal shirts for men, women, and children. Others are encouraged to join the initiative by bringing or shipping shirts to the Dicastery for the Service of Charity by the beginning of January, when the shipment of shirts will be brought to Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city, by truck. Systematic bombing by Russia has damaged Ukraine's energy infrastructure, and the country's government has warned that the networks will not withstand winter's increased demands. People in Ukraine are facing freezing weather without electricity, heat, or water, as January, the country's coldest month of the year, approaches. Temperatures in Kyiv are already below freezing, with a mixture of rain and snow in the near forecast. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252995/vatican-holds-thermal-shirt-drive-for-ukraine For the second year in a row, Nigeria has been left off of the US State Department's list of countries that engage in or tolerate the world's worst religious freedom violations, despite regular reports of kidnappings and killings of Christians, sparking outcry from members of a bipartisan government watchdog group. In Nigeria as a whole, at least 60,000 Christians have been killed, many by their Muslim countrymen, over the past two decades. The US Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) said in a statement that its leaders were “outraged” by Nigeria's exclusion from the list as well as the exclusion of India, where reports of Hindu nationalism and violence against Christians have emerged in recent years. Nigeria was included in the State Department's list in 2020 but not in the 2021 or 2022 lists, despite Christians reporting little to no improvement in their situations. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252992/observers-decry-exclusion-of-nigeria-india-from-religious-freedom-watchlist Today, the Church celebrates Saint Nicholas of Myra. Saint Nicholas was a bishop in the early church who was known for generosity and love of children. One of the most famous stories of the generosity of Saint Nicholas says that he threw bags of gold through an open window in the house of a poor man to serve as dowry for the man's daughters, who otherwise would have been forced into prostitution. The gold is said to have landed in the family's shoes, which were drying near the fire. This is why children leave their shoes out by the door, or hang their stockings by the fireplace in the hopes of receiving a gift on the eve of his feast. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-nicholas-of-myra-75

Femininity by Rachel V
Watch The Company You Keep!!! R.I.P Shanquilla Robinson

Femininity by Rachel V

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 38:52


The friends who were with Shanquilla Robinson, 25, when she passed away last month while on holiday in Mexico put the death down to alcohol poisoning.However, Mexican authorities confirmed to The Daily Beast on Thursday that a homicide investigation is now being conducted into the death of the North Carolina hairstylist.The new information also goes against a previous claim made by the US State Department that the evidence did not necessarily prove Robinson was killed.The State Attorney General's Office for the northwest Mexican state of Baja Sur stated in an email that the investigative file was initially opened as a femicide, referring to a particular category of hate crime.A representative for the AG's office said, "The simple fact that the victim is a woman doesn't determine that it's a femicide. If the investigation does not suggest that Robinson was killed because of her gender, it will be reclassified as a conventional homicide."When Robinson and six pals went to San Jose del Cabo to celebrate one of their birthdays, he passed away under strange circumstances late last month. Robinson had a successful hair-braiding business in Charlotte. The group chose to remain in on their first night in town because they were staying in a pricey, five-bedroom luxury villa that cost upwards of $1,600 per night. When Robinson called her mother to let her know she had arrived safely and would be in touch again the following day, she claimed everything was good, local outlet WJZY said. A personal chef had made dinner for the travelers.Robinson passed away in less than twenty-four hours.Pease be careful of the company you keep. You don't know how their jealousy will manifest.National attention has been drawn to the case, and activists and celebrities, including Cardi B, have called for justice.Follow Me On:Instagram: @celebutonstyleInstagram: @femininity_byrachelvTiktok: CelebutonCheck Out My Website : rachelvmedia.com/Purchase Your Femininty Brand Merch Here: https://femininitybyrachelv.myshopify...

Spiritual Dope
Giten Tonkov Biodynamic Breathwork

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 42:17


  Giten Tonkov The creator of the Biodynamic Breathwork and Trauma Release System BBTRS. Co-founder of the Integral Body Institute and the director of the Energy of Breath Institute (http://www.energyofbreath.com) in New York. Giten was born in the Ukraine, and has been living in New York since 1988, though his many travels make him a citizen of the world. His path to “self-knowledge” began in the early 1990s. Giten has extensive experience in therapy focused on bodywork and breath work. Since 1994 he has been a licensed massage therapist (Swedish Institute of Massage and Therapy in New York) and since 2001 a certified Breath Therapist (Osho Multiversity, Pune, India). He has worked as a therapist at the Osho Multiversity (Osho International Meditation Resort in Pune, India) where he ran a group “Your Body – Your Emotions”. Giten is a Sannyasin (a student of the Indian mystic Osho). He is an experienced leader, running workshops and training courses all over the world. After over 20 years of searching, studying, experiencing and working with multiple clients, both individually and in groups, he created the method of Biodynamic Breath work and Trauma Release System BBTRS. He also created a unique therapy Breath Work on the Ball™. Currently, Giten leads “Biodynamic Breath work and Trauma Release” training courses in the United States, India, Taiwan, China, Russia, Ukraine, Colombia, Costa Rica, Greece and other countries. Thanks to IBI he is also in Poland. https://www.biodynamicbreath.com/ https://www.gofundme.com/f/ukraine-traumaresilience-project     Introduction to today's episode. 0:00 The six elements of biodynamic breathwork. 1:53 Breathwork is a body-oriented therapy. 6:50 What is a natural release system in the body? 13:58 An example of an external resource. 21:21 What's it like to be able to provide a modality for people to work through their trauma. 28:07 The training is divided into two parts. Part of it is online and part is in-person. 30:53 How do you experience this resource in your body? 36:27 Intro Guy 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general, you're so limited thought process Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the question you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you this world the people in it? Most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't even have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another hit of spiritual dub with your host, Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:42 Hey there spiritual dope. I'm on here today with Giten Tonkov who is the founder and director of biodynamic breathwork and trauma release Institute. He's a co founder and director of the integral body Institute in Poland and lead facilitator in BV T ri screenings, I came across Gaetan by by way of trying to learn more about breathwork and came across his book, which was feel to heal releasing trauma through body awareness. And I chased them all around the world, asking him to come on to the podcast, Keaton, thank you for being on here today. So, you know, let's talk a little bit about, I think, just your work as it pertains to breathwork. And your work is multiple disciplines involved in it. And I believe you've got what we call six pillars in your that illustrate the modalities, would you mind sharing that with the audience, and we dig a little bit into it from there. Giten Tonkov 1:53 Absolutely. So biodynamic breathwork is a multi modal approach, it brings together the six elements. The first one is deep connected, breathing, conscious, connected breathing. And the way that we use the breath is to activate our sympathetic response, or D activate the sympathetic response that to bring into parasympathetic activation. So breath is used in many different ways in this modality. So when we're beginning to go into a deeper breath, we are activating the system, and then the charge that's stuck in the body has a chance to to complete the interrupted response. So this is the first element, the element of breath, the second element is movement, the movement is kind of ingrained into breath. So when we're fully deeply breathing, there is so much movement already happening in our body of this diaphragm moving, there's lungs expanding, contracting, there is all auxiliary muscles that assist in the breathing are involved. So we take that internal movement that's already happening in our physical body and express it through the outward movement, a lot of it is on the winding of the spine. So this way, we are actually engaging the fascia, the deep core tissues as well to release to support the release of tension that's at the core of the body that's related to past traumatic event. The next element is the element of touch. And touch is used as in a form of body work, as well as in the form of resourcing to assist in the session. So touch can support the release of tension. And touch can bring the person back into the deeper connection with themselves. So there's ways that we use touch in the, in the in person workshops when we do hands on assist, and there's also self touch that's involved in the online setting. So it's very important element is touch. So the next element is sound. So we have breath, movement, touch and sound, the sound is used in the form of our own voice, as well as external sound in the form of music that supports the session that supports and bringing up emotion as well as live instruments that actually impact the body through the sound healing the vibration of the sound when it enters the body. It's of course it impacts ourselves. But the most powerful musical instrument we have is our own voice. So the voice really is reports that layers of release and expression, as well as letting go, as well as the vibration of the sound is healing from the inside out. So if you have the elements of breath, movement type sound, this combination supports the emergence of the next element, which is emotional expression. When we begin to release the tension in our physical body, the emotional charge that lives in that physical tension begins to come up to the surface. So moving those stuck emotions that are related to past unresolved experiences to past traumas, this is the key to creating more freedom in the body, more relaxation in the body. So we are moving through all these different various elements, breath movement, sound, tai chi, emotional expression, to support the emergence of silence, the last element is the element of meditation. So when we are clearing ourselves from past trauma, from busy mind, we are completing interrupted impulses, which trauma is actually in its essence, interrupted impulses that are stuck in the physical body. So we are coming into a place of silence, which is naturally emergent. So this gives us an opportunity to look at ourselves objectively, to allow anything that needs to still complete, to compete in the physical body. So this kind of in a nutshell, the six elements of biodynamic breathwork Brandon Handley 6:49 I love, I love this, because if you take a look at your history, you know, you started with, you know, kind of hands on doing massage therapy, you joined a couple of breathwork sessions if I recall correctly, you would attended an Osho event as a facilitator as a translator for somebody who was Russian there. And that was like one of your first taste to that and then you you figured out ways to incorporate that in other modalities and you put these all together for one complete and cohesive kind of packaging system. So I think that that's that's super interesting one of the things that I really need to go ahead get getting Giten Tonkov 7:54 I was gonna say it's a 20 Brandon Handley 7:55 years. And this is this isn't something that you just came up with either as I believe, right around 20 years of active work on this is that correct system? Giten Tonkov 8:22 Yes, it's around 20 years of working with these modalities and experimenting, seeing what works, what doesn't work, how they support each other. Brandon Handley 8:32 And one of the things that I think that you found was really were was the idea and the concept. Maybe not you but you stumbled on it in one area, it's the seven bands of tension. Right? Could you talk to us a little bit about this seven bands of tension and how they might even aligned to the chakra system? Were was the idea and the concept? Maybe seven bands of 10 Right. Talk about this? Giten Tonkov 9:03 Chakra. Yes. So the seven belts of tension is the whole western body oriented psychology is actually rooted in the concept of Reichian approach which German therapist will Unbreak who was student contemporary of Freud found that the the past traumatic event manglik mainly developmental trauma is distributed in the form of tension in the body in we're in seven bands of tension. And sure enough of these seven Bell bends of tension are more or less in exactly the same areas of the chakra system. But the way that we work in the seven belts of tension, it's actually the biodynamic breathwork is it is a body oriented therapy. So we took that as, as a foundation, the working with the, with the distribution of physical tension in the in the body, and how these bands hold that developmental trauma effects in our physical body. So their ocular belt of tension that is involves the eyes, the forehead, the top of the head. And then we move down into the oral belt of tension with you, which is a jaw and the mouth and the back of the head. And then moving down into cervical, which is our throat expression and creativity also blocking our expression through our throat is very common, then moving down into a thoracic belt, which includes the chest, the heart, the lungs, this, this kind of armoring that we build to protect our heart, from feeling pain, pretty much this is this, all of these belts are in essence have formed for us to feel protected from feeling emotional pain, pretty much. So this in essence, creates this physical armoring that she has right talked about a lot and this physical armoring blocks the flow of energy through our our physical body. So moving down through the through the body, under the thoracic belt of tension is diaphragmatic belt, which includes our diaphragm, our ribcage. And of course, the movement of the diaphragm is very important. The big range of movement of the diaphragm is important because it controls the flow of impulses from the sex to the heart. So as well as how intensely we feel, the more you want to block your feelings, the shallower you will breathe. So that diminishes the movement of the diaphragm and brings the tension around the ribcage, of course. And then moving down into the belly, we have abdominal belt of tension, which includes the abdomen, all the organs, it houses as well as the lower back. And of course, the base is our pelvis, our sex organs, our reproductive organs, and of course, our legs, which is all involved in the in this belt of tension. So the theory behind the Reich's formation of personality structures that the Sexual Energy wants to arise from the pelvis it wants to move up into the belly into the heart and the flow higher turned into expression. But we are conditioned to block these impulses. And because these impulses are blocked, for whatever reason, the physical tension is created. And then after some years, this physical tension is settled in the body in this form. So what we do with biodynamic breath work, we approach working with these belts of tension in very specific order to support the release of tension, the emotion that they this tension holds, as well as supporting the flow of natural impulses through the physical body. In this way we complete the interrupted impulses and heal from developmental trauma as well as any form of trauma. It could be a shock trauma, it could be acute traumas. So this approach works pretty much for a wide variety of Brandon Handley 13:58 offers is great, you've got all the you know what I think is really cool. First of all, I'm thank you for walking through the the belts attention. It's, it aligns so closely to the chakra system, and you know, Eastern medicine and the way they look at the body, that I was pretty shocked to find that and your book. The other thing that I thought that was really neat in your book is that even the very beginning talks about what you're talking about, right? Is this this tension that gets trapped in our bodies, and how animals have a natural release system. And humans, I guess, we tend to do to whatever conditioning, we're kind of blocking and trapping this energy within us. Can you talk a little bit about that? And like what would be Have you found what a natural release system may be for humans if we go through all of this, biodynamic, you know, work and we get the tension releases? What is a natural release for us? Giten Tonkov 15:17 Well, we are in like all mammals are programmed to release the tension in more or less the same way to release the shock to release the trauma and more or less the same way by completing the response that that naturally is released in the term into in time of the traumatic event. But we are as humans are the only ones that learn to interrupt that natural impulse and the impulse is to shake to tremor. So when we work with biodynamic breathwork, we actually support the practitioner, the participants to complete the interrupted response to tremor, a lot of the times the interrupted response comes in tremoring. And other times it comes in the movement in, Brandon Handley 16:15 so we're talking, I lost you like, right around, I guess, you know, some of the tremoring and allowing that movement to complete to run through its motions. And that would be the natural thing. Whereas we typically we've been trained to kind of interrupt that. Giten Tonkov 16:31 So we we somehow, as humans interrupt that natural response for the body to complete the activation. And the key for our work is to support this natural response to complete the activation to come back. Because it's still there, no matter how long the activation has been interrupted in the body, our body looks for chances to complete it. And once our body is given that chance, it will take it. So pretty much what we provide in the session is the chance for our physical body to complete the activation, therefore, move in out of living as a traumatized individual. Brandon Handley 17:24 So releasing all that stored trauma in the body, right, letting that energy dissipate, right, you're allowing for for, it's kind of like coming back, and just, you know, turning the machine back on to allow for it to turn the faucet back on or whatever, it just allows for that energy to flow out. Yeah, Giten Tonkov 17:43 pretty much, pretty much yes, it's the the response. Like I said, no matter how long it's been stuck in the body, it's, it's still there. And it's settled in the form of change, which is pretty much Brahma is interrupted response. If the response is that the moment of the traumatic event, there is no trauma, we move through it. But the fight or flight is, is that's been interrupted, that turns into freeze, which is still has fight or flight running under the freeze. So this is the way to work with with this modality like any other trauma oriented modality. Brandon Handley 18:34 I love it. And then one of the things that you talk about is resourcing in the book and you brought it up today. Let's know a little bit more about that. I think I got a little bit confused, especially like if we're trying to self resource in a breath working space, can you bring it talk us through what resourcing is and what that would look like in a full in person session as well as a you know, at home session. Giten Tonkov 19:02 So, resource is pretty much based on the concept that we use Pendulo ation within the session ventilation meaning that we move between activation, we create the support the activation in the body, that kind of so we have something to work with. And then after sustaining this activation for a certain amount of time, as long as the person is able to be with this activation without feeling overwhelmed. After a while we move the attention back to the place in the body which feels safe and connected which is called internal resource which For this we use the concept of felt sense. So we sense our physicality without attaching much meaning to it. We just look for physical sensations that feel comfortable this as a resource, so we have internal resource which can be located within the physical body. And we have external resource, which is something from outside of ourselves that can be also translated into how it affects us physically. So, in the use of this, of the resources gives an opportunity to feel safe within the session. So we're not going into a place where we feel overcharged or overstimulated, so we can go through the process of releasing without feeling overwhelmed. This is the reason for using a resource. And it's very, it's a very effective way to release trauma because usually, trauma means that we are disconnecting from our physical sensations, it's too much to experience, a lot of the times they're painful. So we disconnect from physicality. So now we're providing an opportunity to come back into feeling our physical bodies in safety. So resource provides that. Could you Brandon Handley 21:21 give me an example of like, what some people might use as an outside resource? Giten Tonkov 21:26 Nature is a fantastic external resource, going into a tree being with the tree, touching a tree, getting your feet, in the sand or on the ground, feeling how that actually feels for you. A memory from the past where you can remember yourself, feeling very good physically. Pat's friends saw their people are amazing, external resources. So anything from the outside that makes you feel safe and connected to your physical body in a positive way? No, thank you. Brandon Handley 22:11 I appreciate that. Because again, you know, like you're saying, if we're going through this trauma, we want to stay connected. I think that you've also mentioned it in the book and some several videos. We don't want to go into a state of catharsis where we disconnect, right? Because then we're not working through that trauma and releasing it. And since it is such a deep is sensation, does processes seeing the trauma, when we connect and have a place of safety to go to that would be what you consider a resourcing. Right, that would be the thing that we can use to help us through that situation. Okay, thank you. Thank you. That's perfect. So there's a couple more pieces I want to get get to here for you. One of the things is, you know, this is a modality that what you what you brought, is something to heal through trauma, and there's trauma and a lot of different ways throughout the world. And one of the things that's happening right now is the War of the Ukraine. And we did not mention the beginning here. I believe that your your Ukrainian descent, and you've recently just come back from there where you've been raising awareness, as well as teaching others in Ukraine, how to leverage this to work through their traumas. Would you like to share a little bit about that? Giten Tonkov 23:30 Yes. Thank you for asking Brandon. Yes, I'm originally from Ukraine. I left Ukraine as a refugee. In fact, when I was 18 years old, and with my parents, we were leaving from my ethnic persecution in Ukraine, and back then it was Soviet Union. And as well as political persecution. So when this conflict started when Ukraine was attacked, completely unprovoked by by Russia, we, I was in Poland and we had already running training for biodynamic breath work and trauma release training, so we to couple of Ukrainian students on scholarship to, for them to bring this work more into the into the field. And once the training is was finished, this was already we were going on to about three weeks of conflicts at that point. And we set up in Warsaw in Poland, a hub for Ukrainian refugees to come and receive the trauma release technique. So we created a very special approach which is geared for acute trauma. which is mostly the trauma that people are experiencing now with this situation. So this, this project is still ongoing, the hub is operational in Warsaw. And now we are in contact with the US State Department, an organism in organization that is subdivision for US State Department, that is actually bringing the work going to bring the work to a Ukrainian aid workers. So we are sending a team going to be sending a team in Warsaw, again, as well as in western Ukraine. And we've so this is a very much needed response. And this is where the modality gets to show up in in actual action, where it's needed most for people that are dealing with a very acute trauma. And as well as the aid workers, they're, they're exposed to, first of all, through vicarious traumatization through through the people that they're helping, as well as being on the territory of Ukraine. It's, it's a very traumatic situation for the entire country for the entire population. Right now, there's over 5 million refugees that left Ukraine, and many of them more than half of them are in Poland. So that's why we set up this hub in Poland, specifically more so. But now, with First of all, we have no idea how long this conflict is going to last. And there are still people are fleeing Ukraine, there are still people that are traumatized, and for sure, we want to, as much as possible avoid for the trauma to continue to build within the country. So it we no matter how you look at it, there will be long lasting consequences from this conflict. And so my organization, biodynamic breathwork, and trauma release Institute, we are fully committed, and we are also started the foundation. Based on this project, we're fully committed to support people who are on the front line, as well as the refugees as well as the people who've been in active combat, to support them to do whatever is possible to release the effects of this horrible events from their physical body. So we don't have to pass it on to future generations. We know how it all ended up after World War Two, and many conflicts that followed. Throughout the world people hold this trauma did becomes generational, and we pass it on to our children and their children's children. This it doesn't go away, just simply with time it gets passed on. Brandon Handley 28:07 Yeah, and so I think that it's great that you're able to get out there and provide a modality like this something that they can do, by themselves, both the refugees and the frontline workers that are out there, and something that, you know, they can do as a community, right. It's a visual, it's something that, you know, shows community and I think that in, given the circumstances, to be accepted into a community like that, and then the work through that, and probably to release that. And that's got to be a moment in their lives that that they end up being eternally grateful. So for for you to do that. I know you've got a I think it's a GoFundMe set up, that I'll be able to share out as long as that's going. And I can share out some links about the ongoing work that you're doing. And I think that that's, it's tremendous that you've been able to find something throughout these years. And as unfortunate as this event is now you're able to go home as it were to provide this incredible resource. Giten Tonkov 29:14 Thank you. Thank you, Brendan. Yes, we have a GoFundMe account, one of the it's for for another week or so until next Friday, so it would be awesome to to receive some donations to support this project. And yes, this is this is real help in action. It's support to the people that really need it. And the it's great that I mentioned community. Community Building is part of what we're doing, bringing people together where they can share in a safe environment where they can share in the environment where they when they speak They are supported in that process. Storytelling is also used as we brought it in as part of one of the tools that are very creative trauma, healing storytelling, where people can tell their stories without feeling. Like they're being re traumatized by telling it. So this is a very specific way that we included in it as well. Wonderful. Brandon Handley 30:31 And so, you know, let's say that I wanted to train in this, I think this modality speaks to me, I've tried other modalities like Wim Hof, you know, getting the heileman supply, but I feel like there's more, you know, and as his work has been great, so is this, talk to me a little bit about, you know, what it would look like to train with you, and how would I go about doing that? Giten Tonkov 30:53 Yes, we have a training running for many years, the training is divided in two parts, part of it is online, and part of it is in person. So it though, in person workshops are happening in Poland, US and Mexico. So pretty much, we're also adding in one in Australia, we had it going in Australia as well. So people pretty much it's accessible from anywhere in the world, whether it's in the in the Americas or in Europe. And so that's an in person part, and there is an online, five months training that just that is part of the practitioner training. Next enrollment, it begins in September. I mean, the enrollment is already happening now. But the next course begins in September. And the training is very flexible to people can go first in person and then continue online or start online and then continue in person. So altogether, it's around 400 hours of training. And it's certified training was certified by Australian breathwork Association as well as international breathwork Foundation. And the it's a registered us continuing education courses by licensing divisions of massage therapy and acupuncture. So this is a very serious training program, especially now when after COVID. So many people left their jobs and looking for a career change and something new in their lives. This is a fantastic way to stay connected to yourself to heal your own body and learn a very valuable modality to support others in their growth. Whether you are already a practitioner of any body oriented modalities or a psychology, this will definitely add to your training that's awesome. Brandon Handley 33:19 Thanks for Thanks for sharing that. One of the use a couple pieces here to left in my mind. One is you've got an exercise, I believe that can help to release like some of the myofascial tissues, right, like and some of the tension. What is that exercise? Would you mind sharing with the audience? Something they could do at home by themselves to try and relieve some of the tension in their body? Giten Tonkov 33:43 Yeah, I absolutely the exercise I can, I can guide the audience for the next five minutes into the exercise and the exercise. It's called tans release, unwind. So there is a certain process happens in our physical body. If we consciously tense the tissues, hold it for 30 seconds, and then release that holding. So the energy that's been held in the body releases and it releases to the deeper tissues as well. So once the release is happening, we take that energy, this bio energy and move it through the body with this unwinding, undulating movement. So this exercise can be done at any time of day. It can be done at any areas in the body. You can start with the face, you can do it the holding your jaw, you can hold your shoulders and then release and then unwind. So the three major step is tensing, holding for 30 seconds, letting go of the holding, releasing, and the final step is to unwind to laugh that movement come up as an expression of the energy that the body is releasing. So let's take a moment you can sit or be standing and take a few deep, full breaths, one after the other. Bring your attention to where the breath is flowing in your physical body. Be aware of the felt sensations that are present in this area. And now let's start by bringing our attention to our shoulder. So I want to ask you to raise your shoulders up to your ears and tense that area and hold that tension. And let's hold it for about 30 seconds. And I'm gonna time it for 30 seconds, and then I'll let you know when to release. And hold it, hold it, hold it. And now let's begin to bring that holding to a peak. Let's hold it tighter. And you have about 10 More seconds left. And 54321 now releasing the tension, letting your shoulders flow down, releasing, relaxing, and let your body softly move, letting that movement come from the inside out. Especially bring in that movement into your spine. So moving your shoulders, moving your head and neck, let this movement come down your spine. Now bringing the breath back, breathing deeply in through the nose, out through the mouth. Deep full breath in through the nose out through the mouth, and let your body softly drop into this movement. There's still this energy that wants to move you if you simply let go of your control, the body will move on its own Yeah, very good. The brain some movement into your neck and head into your lower face into your jaw. Yeah. And take another deep, full breath. Noticing how the when the breath comes in, it fills you up from the inside. It's kind of DISRE rubber ball that expands with the breath. And when you exhale, letting yourself go dropping letting the the gravity work and letting the movement arise. Your body naturally wants to release tension by movement. Yes. And then now the deep full breath. Being aware of your physicality of your whole body as a one unit as a whole. Being aware of your felt sensation, being aware of the place of comfort that we talked earlier about resource How do you experience this resource in your physical body and take a deep full breath and once again, shift your attention to just outside of yourself and whenever you're ready, you can open your eyes even short few minutes of practice already make a difference Brandon Handley 39:44 feel tingly? You know I feel great. Even just even with just short exercise and the reminder to the guidance is always great. The reminder to kind of find the resource is absolutely wonderful and Um, you know, just feeling that kind of release, right, letting that natural movement happen. So that's, that's, that's definitely feels wonderful. So I appreciate you sharing that with me walking me through it myself and, and doing it once like that. So listen, you know, I know we've got a short period of time today's thank you for hopping on today. Hopefully, we recorded and we did everything we're supposed to do it it all works out Where Where should I send some people to connect with you Giten Tonkov 40:31 biodynamic breath.com is our website it has ways to get in touch with our organization, there's contact form at the schedule of all the events. There's links to videos and many resources. It's biodynamic breath.com We'd love to see you at our workshops. We have a weekly class free, free, biodynamic, breathwork session running every Sunday. And you can sign up on our website through it to receive the link and join us every Sunday for free for 490 minutes of breath exploration, myself and our teaching staff running these sessions as they're happening regularly on 10am pacific time on Sunday. Brandon Handley 41:30 So that's very generous of you to offer that and host that thank you so much Keaton and appreciate you taking the time here today and excited to see how this work continues for you. Thank you. Intro Guy 41:46 I really hope you enjoyed this episode of the spiritual dope podcast. Stay connected with us directly through spiritual dove.co. You can also join the discussion on Facebook, spiritual and Instagram at spiritual underscore Joe. If you would like to speak with us, send us an email there Brandon at spiritual dove.co And as always, thank you for cultivating your mindset and creating a better reality. This includes the most thought provoking part of your day. Don't forget to like and subscribe to stay fully up to date. Until next time, be kind to yourself and trust your intuition Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Street Smart Podcast
CHAD ROBICHAUX - MIGHTY OAKS FOUNDATION / SAVE OUR ALLIES

The Street Smart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 78:57


Chad Robichaux has had an amazing life of service.Chad is a #USMC Force Recon Veteran, best-selling author, Pro MMA Champion and #Founder and #President of the Mighty Oaks Foundation, a leading non-profit playing an instrumental and pivotal role in helping our nation's Veterans, active duty military and first responders combat trauma and build resiliency.In addition to the Mighty Oaks Foundation, Chad co-founded Save our Allies during the disastrous withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2021. Save our Allies successfully evacuated 17,000 people, rescuing them from the Taliban and is now serving on the ground in Ukraine.In addition to Chad's military service, he has served our nation as a Special Agent with the US Federal Air Marshal Service and the US State Department as a Surveillance Detection Senior Program Manager. Chad is a Medal of Valor recipient for his bravery beyond the call of duty in law enforcement. Chad has earned an MBA from New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) and is a board-certified pastoral counselor with a focus on PTSd. Chad is married to his wife Kathy of 27 years, and they have a daughter and two sons and two granddaughters. Hunter and Hayden are both 3rd generation Marines in the Robichaux family and share Chad's passion as lifelong martial artists. Chad is also a 4th degree Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt under the legendary Master Carlson Gracie Jr and is a former Professional Mixed Martial Arts Champion having competed at the highest levels of the sport.Enjoy listening to what makes Chad Robichaux “Street Smart”.

CounterVortex Podcast
State capitalism and the Uyghur genocide

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Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 29:46


In Episode 149 of the CounterVortex podcast, Bill Weinberg notes that the UN Human Rights Office determination that China may be guilty of "crimes against humanity" in its mass detention of Uyghurs in Xinjiang province is dismissed by the tankie-left ANSWER Coalition as "propagadistic." Meanwhile, it falls to Radio Free Asia, media arm of the US State Department, to aggressively cover the very real conditions of forced labor faced by the Uyghurs and other Turkic peoples of Xinjiang—and how Western corporations benefit from it. While the Western pseudo-left betrays the Uyghurs, US imperialism exploits their suffering for propaganda against a rising China in the Great Game for the Asia-Pacific region. Figures such as Australia's Kevin Rudd incorrectly portray a "Return of Red China," blaming the PRC's increasingly totalitarian direction on a supposed neo-Marxism. Fortunately, the new anthology Xinjiang Year Zero offers a corrective perspective, placing the industrial-detention complex and techno-security state in the context of global capitalism and settler colonialism. Listen on SoundCloud or via Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/countervortex Production by Chris Rywalt We ask listeners to donate just $1 per weekly podcast via Patreon -- or $2 for our new special offer! We now have 50 subscribers. If you appreciate our work, please become Number 51!

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Episode 720 News from the Weekend - Maura Quint and Michael Cohen on the Mid Terms and More

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 68:13


Hey Gang!  Thank you for reading these words that my fingers are typing at 6am. Sorry the pod didnt get posted lastnight but I was really tired from the weekend and I decided to go to bed at 8pm and wake at 3:30. Do you ever do that? Well it was worth the wait because I have a good opening and 2 awesome guests who both are super smart people that help me make sense of things.  Stand Up is a daily podcast that I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Maura Quint  is a humor writer and activist whose work has been featured in publications such as McSweeneys and The New Yorker. She was named one of Rolling Stone's top 25 funniest twitter accounts of 2016. When not writing comedy, Maura has worked extensively with non-profits in diverse sectors including political action campaigns, international arts collectives and health and human services organizations. She has never been officially paid to protest but did once find fifteen cents on the ground at an immigrants' rights rally and wanted to make sure that had been disclosed. She was the co founder and executive director of TaxMarch.org  She is now the Wealth Tax Campaign Director at the Americans for Tax Fairness Michael A. Cohen is a regular contributor for The Boston Globe on national politics and foreign affairs. He is also the author of “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division.” Michael has written for dozens of news outlets, including as a columnist for the Guardian and Foreign Policy and he is the US Political Correspondent for the London Observer. He previously worked as a speechwriter at the US State Department and has been a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Please check out and hopefully subscribe to Michael's Substack newsletter Truth and Consequences!  Stand Up subscribers get a discount on Michael's new newsletter!     Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

EZ News
EZ News 11/10/22

EZ News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 6:06


Good afternoon, I'm _____ with today's episode of EZ News. **Tai-Ex opening ** The Tai-Ex opened down 82-points this morning from yesterday's close, at 13,556 on turnover of 3.8-billion N-T. The market moved sharply higher on Wednesday as strong investor interest pushed up Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing by more than 4.5-per cent amid liquidity-driven buying. The semiconductor sector also got a boost from solid gains enjoyed by their counterparts on Wall Street overnight as concerns ease over the possibility of more aggressive rate hikes by the U-S Federal Reserve. **Biden to Discuss Cross-Strait Stability at US-ASEAN Summit ** A senior White House official says U-S President Joe Biden will emphasize (強調) the importance of peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait at a meeting with leaders of ASEAN countries this weekend. Biden will be traveling to Phnom Penh for the annual US-ASEAN summit and the East Asia Summit this weekend, before continuing on to Bali, Indonesia for the G20 leaders' summit next week. According to the U-S official, Biden will highlight Washington's "enduring commitment to the rules-based international order, including in the South China Sea," and talk about the importance of peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait at both summits. **Amnesty International Slams Plans to Fine Coronavirus-Positive Voters ** Amnesty International's Taiwan office is slamming plans to fine coronavirus patients who break their mandatory quarantine to vote in the upcoming local government elections. According to office secretary-general Qiu Yi-ling, prohibiting coronavirus-positive voters from casting ballots is a violation of legally protected political rights. The statement comes after the Central Epidemic Command Center said patients who break quarantine to vote will face a fine of up to 2-million N-T. However, Amnesty International Taiwan says current laws cannot justify the government decision's to prohibit an estimated 300,000 people from exercising (應用) their voting rights. **US Biden on Midterm Results ** US President Joe Biden says US Democrats are breathing a "sigh of relief" after not suffering massive losses in America's mid-term elections. But the race for the House of Representatives and the Senate remain evenly poised (平衡的), despite the Republicans failure to mobilize the tidal wave of voter support they were promising. From Washington, Simon Marks reports. **Cuba US Meeting on Consular Services ** Cuban and US State Department officials have met in Havana to discuss the expansion of consular and visa services on the island. Cuba issued a brief statement confirming the meeting took place Wednesday. The U.S. Embassy closed in 2017 following a series of health incidents. While a full reopening has yet to be announced, U.S. officials have said visa processing would resume (恢復) in January. A State Department official who spoke on condition of anonymity told The Associated Press that Washington's delegation also discussed concerns about human rights in Cuba. The official said the US "urged the Cuban government to unconditionally release all political prisoners.” That was the I.C.R.T. news, Check in again tomorrow for our simplified version of the news, uploaded every day in the afternoon. Enjoy the rest of your day, I'm _____.

The Internal Comms Podcast
Episode 70 – Reaching across the aisle

The Internal Comms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:23


Shelby Scarbrough, author of 'Civility Rules! Creating a Purposeful Practice of Civility', shares her deep insight and experience ‘reaching across the aisle' on episode 70 of The Internal Comms Podcast. Throughout an illustrious career at the White House and US State Department, Shelby honed her approach to tackling complex, high-stakes communication. In an increasingly polarised world, she is a champion of communicating civilly across the divide – be it social, cultural or political. In this thought-provoking episode, Shelby explains how she conducts herself around a core set of values and shares some useful advice for working alongside people of different creeds, races, cultures and experiences. Indeed, this conversation is a masterclass in what civility really means, why it's crucial to communications, and how to practise it with purpose.

Pod Hostage Diplomacy
Free Eyvin Hernandez, American held in Venezuela | Pod Hostage Diplomacy

Pod Hostage Diplomacy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 36:23


Last month on 1st October, seven innocent Americans who were wrongfully imprisoned in Venezuela were released in a prisoner swap between the US and Venezuela. Eyvin Hernandez, an innocent American citizen who works for the Los Angeles County Public Defender's Office was left behind. He has been held in Venezuela since March this year. The US government has classified Eyvin as wrongfully detained. On this episode, we have the honour of speaking to Eyvin's brother, Henry Martinez. Henry walks us through what happened to Eyvin including his disappearance while he was on holiday in Colombia and how his family eventually found out that he was being held in prison in Venezuela, the conditions of his detention, the last time Henry spoke to Eyvin, how the family have been coping with this trauma and what it was like to be left behind in last month's prisoner swap. We also discuss what the Venezuelan government should do, what the US government should do better including current issues with the US State Department's process for classifying Americans held abroad as wrongfully detained as well as what journalists and the public can do to help bring Eyvin home.If you prefer, you can watch the video version of this interview on YouTube. For more information on Eyvin Hernandez, please check out the following:Bring Eyvin Home websiteBring Eyvin Home Change petitionBring Eyvin Home GoFundMeBring Eyvin Home Facebook accountBring Eyvin Home Twitter accountBring Eyvin Home Instagram accountBring Eyvin Home Tik Tok accountSocial media hashtag: BringEyvinHomeGet the latest updates on hostage cases we at Pod Hostage Diplomacy are working on including new episodes by subscribing to our fortnightly newsletter, the Hostage Briefing. Subscribe here.You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.Support the show

CovertAction Bulletin
The U.S. State Department in the Metaverse: How the CIA Infiltrated Facebook With Alan MacLeod

CovertAction Bulletin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 46:10


Why is Facebook so desperate to make the Metaverse happen? Are the techno feudalists right when they say Facebook is too big to fail? With the decline of Meta, it seems a new era may be dawning in Silicon Valley as Facebook's failed projects continue to pile up. A new reporting in The Intercept outlines how the Department of Homeland Security is looking to increase the US government's influence on social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and more. We examine Meta's expansion strategy and the role that U.S. intelligence has played in the last few years within the social media giant's ranks. To talk about all of this and in particular how the US state inserts itself into these networks, we're joined by Alan MacLeod, Senior Staff Writer/Podcast Producer, @MintPressNews. Alan has written about the many ex-CIA employees who now work at Facebook, and overall the government's efforts to influence social media.Support the show

Inside the Lab
S3Ep3: Regional Medical Laboratory Scientists

Inside the Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 46:47


So, you like your job as a medical laboratory professional, but you're restless. You have dreams of a bigger life. One that allows you to serve others and satisfy your wanderlust. You might consider becoming a Regional Medical Laboratory Scientist with the US State Department, a role that requires an affinity for travel, a passion for service, and a well-rounded background on the bench. On this episode of Inside the Lab, our host, Ms. Kelly Swails, is joined byMs. Danielle Forester, MLS(ASCP)CM, former Microbiology Specialist at Quest Diagnostics and current RMLS in Beijing, China, Mr. Dave Keddington, MLS(ASCP)CM, former Technical Supervisor at ARUP Laboratories and current RMLS in Jakarta, Indonesia, and Ms. Stacy Deckard, MLS(ASCP)CM, former Medical Technologist at Carle Foundation Hospital and current RMLS in New Delhi, India, to share their experiences working with the Foreign Service as Regional Medical Laboratory Scientists. Our panelists discuss the pros and cons of working as an RMLS, describing how they serve the diplomatic community, embassy staff and their local communities. They explore how being a Regional Medical Laboratory Scientist impacts work-life balance and explain how the compensation package compares to working in a lab in the US. Listen in for advice on applying to be a Regional Medical Laboratory Scientist and learn how becoming an RMLS gives you the opportunity to experience other cultures firsthand and expand your worldview. Topics Covered · How each of our panelists found out about working with the Foreign Service and what prompted them to apply· How a well-rounded background and experience in training prepares you to work as an RMLS with the Foreign Service· How RMLSs serve the diplomatic community, embassy staff and their local community· What Ms. Forester, Mr. Keddington & Ms. Deckard like best about working as a Regional Medical Laboratory Scientist· The most challenging aspects of working as an RMLS for the US State Department· How RMLSs and their families benefit from experiencing other cultures firsthand and expanding their worldview· How being an RMLS impacts your social life, personal travel and work-life balance· What it's like for the family members of Regional Medical Laboratory Scientists· How the compensation package for an RMLS compares to working in a lab in the US· Advice to anyone applying to be an RMLS in the Foreign Service Connect with ASCPASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Mr. KeddingtonMr. Keddington on LinkedInConnect with Ms. DeckardMs. Deckard on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. SwailsMs. Swails on Twitter Resources USAJOBSCAP Inspector Tools and TrainingAffinity Groups at the US State DepartmentInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 

Hikikomori
#68 - Tokyo Rose

Hikikomori

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 70:42


Tokyo Rose was an infamous radio host operating during WWII, helping to spread pernicious Japanese propaganda with the aim of breaking the spirits of Allied troops. Despite the fact that the US State Department would eventually claim that a Japanese American woman, Iva Toguri, was the culprit, the truth is that Tokyo Rose never even existed.  Today's guest is Hannah Lane! You can find her via her Instagram page, and she is also the co-host of our horror movie review podcast that we do together, Not Another Film podcast. For more content follow me on @hikikomoripodcast on Instagram where I'll be posting photos relevant to this episode! You can also find me on Twitter @sequencepod, or you can listen to my other podcasts Final Fanservice and Not Another Film on any big podcast app. Sources: The Guardian - Obituary of Iva Toguri PBS History Detectives - Transcript John Juji Hada - The Indictment And Trial of Iva Ikuko Toguri D'Aquino - “Tokyo Rose” Chicago Tribune - '91 Retrospective on Iva Toguri The National Registry of Exonerations  CBS - '76 Report on Iva Toguri Military History Wiki - Zero Hour FBI Website - Iva Toguri and Tokyo Rose Wikipedia - Iva Toguri D'Aquino Wikipedia - Tokyo Rose

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
10/21/22 James Carden on the Need for Strategic Empathy

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 31:38


 Download Episode. This week on Antiwar Radio, Scott talked with James Carden about an article he co-wrote recently with Katrina vanden Heuvel of The Nation. The article compares the current level of tension between the U.S. and Russia with the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis sixty years ago. They argue that two factors make today's flare-up more dangerous: a lack of communication channels and an absence of empathy for the other side. Carden explains why we do not need to sympathize with the Russian invasion to recognize that there is room for diplomacy.  Discussed on the show: “How did we avoid a Cuban Missile ‘Armageddon'? Strategic empathy.” (Responsible Statecraft) American Committee for US-Russia Accord James Carden is the executive editor for the American Committee for US-Russia Accord and former adviser on Russia policy at the US State Department. He is a contributing writer at The Nation. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; and Thc Hemp Spot. Get Scott's interviews before anyone else! Subscribe to the Substack. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
10/21/22 James Carden on the Need for Strategic Empathy

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 32:53


This week on Antiwar Radio, Scott talked with James Carden about an article he co-wrote recently with Katrina vanden Heuvel of The Nation. The article compares the current level of tension between the U.S. and Russia with the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis sixty years ago. They argue that two factors make today's flare-up more dangerous: a lack of communication channels and an absence of empathy for the other side. Carden explains why we do not need to sympathize with the Russian invasion to recognize that there is room for diplomacy.  Discussed on the show: “How did we avoid a Cuban Missile ‘Armageddon'? Strategic empathy.” (Responsible Statecraft) American Committee for US-Russia Accord James Carden is the executive editor for the American Committee for US-Russia Accord and former adviser on Russia policy at the US State Department. He is a contributing writer at The Nation. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; and Thc Hemp Spot. Get Scott's interviews before anyone else! Subscribe to the Substack. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hear us Roar
161: Harriet Cannon- Author of Exiled South

Hear us Roar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 33:17


Our podcast guest this week is Harriet Cannon (Exiled South, Koehler Books, January 2022). Hear how Harriet, who has dyslexia, works around this in her writing, including using foam story boards and memorizing passages to read at presentations. Her background as a family therapist and work with addictions helps her dig deep into character's motivations and she also writes a detailed study of the location of her books, stating that “place” is just as important sometimes as a character for a novelist. Harriet Cannon is a writer with Southern roots and wanderlust who has lived in seven US States and Internationally. Harriet's first career, for thirty years, was as a psychotherapist with an intercultural specialty.  In addition to private practice, she served as a consultant to the Boeing company, International Schools, and worked for the US State Department in Chile. Harriet is co-author of Mixed Blessings: A Guide to Multicultural and Multiethnic Relationships. After a decade participating in writing groups and classes, writing essays and short stories as a side hobby, Harriet now writes fiction full time. Exiled South is her debut novel. Harriet and her husband live in on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State and have two grown children and four grandchildren nearby. To learn more about Harriet, click here.

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

2 https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seems to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

JAF Project Podcast
Counterparts - Kevin Eubanks - October 11th 2022

JAF Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 63:55


https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist, and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seem to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

Going Rogue With Caitlin Johnstone
US Rejection Of Moscow's Offer For Peace Talks Is Utterly Inexcusable

Going Rogue With Caitlin Johnstone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 7:26


Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Tuesday that Moscow was open to talks with the the US or with Turkey on ending the war in Ukraine, claiming that US officials are lying when they say Russia has been refusing peace talks. Lavrov's claim was given more weight when US State Department spokesman Ned Price dismissed the offer for peace talks shortly after it was extended, citing Russia's recent missile strikes on Kyiv. Reading by Tim Foley.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 155: “Waterloo Sunset” by the Kinks

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-five of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Waterloo Sunset” by the Kinks, and the self-inflicted damage the group did to their career between 1965 and 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a nineteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Excerpt From a Teenage Opera" by Keith West. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this week, as there are too many Kinks songs. I've used several resources for this and future episodes on the Kinks, most notably Ray Davies: A Complicated Life by Johnny Rogan and You Really Got Me by Nick Hasted. X-Ray by Ray Davies is a remarkable autobiography with a framing story set in a dystopian science-fiction future, while Kink by Dave Davies is more revealing but less well-written. The Anthology 1964-1971 is a great box set that covers the Kinks' Pye years, which overlap almost exactly with their period of greatest creativity. For those who don't want a full box set, this two-CD set covers all the big hits. And this is the interview with Rasa I discuss in the episode. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, this episode has some mentions of racism and homophobia, several discussions of physical violence, one mention of domestic violence, and some discussion of mental illness. I've tried to discuss these things with a reasonable amount of sensitivity, but there's a tabloid element to some of my sources which inevitably percolates through, so be warned if you find those things upsetting. One of the promises I made right at the start of this project was that I would not be doing the thing that almost all podcasts do of making huge chunks of the episodes be about myself -- if I've had to update people about something in my life that affects the podcast, I've done it in separate admin episodes, so the episodes themselves will not be taken up with stuff about me. The podcast is not about me. I am making a very slight exception in this episode, for reasons that will become clear -- there's no way for me to tell this particular story the way I need to without bringing myself into it at least a little. So I wanted to state upfront that this is a one-off thing. The podcast is not suddenly going to change. But one question that I get asked a lot -- far more than I'd expect -- is "do the people you talk about in the podcast ever get in touch with you about what you've said?" Now that has actually happened twice, both times involving people leaving comments on relatively early episodes. The first time is probably the single thing I'm proudest of achieving with this series, and it was a comment left on the episode on "Goodnight My Love" a couple of years back: [Excerpt: Jesse Belvin, "Goodnight My Love"] That comment was from Debra Frazier and read “Jesse Belvin is my Beloved Uncle, my mother's brother. I've been waiting all my life for him to be recognized in this manner. I must say the content in this podcast is 100% correct!Joann and Jesse practically raised me. Can't express how grateful I am. Just so glad someone got it right. I still miss them dearly to this day. My world was forever changed Feb. 6th 1960. I can remember him writing most of those songs right there in my grandmother's living room. I think I'm his last living closest relative, that knows everything in this podcast is true." That comment by itself would have justified me doing this whole podcast. The other such comment actually came a couple of weeks ago, and was on the episode on "Only You": [Excerpt: The Platters, "Only You"] That was a longer comment, from Gayle Schrieber, an associate of Buck Ram, and started "Well, you got some of it right. Your smart-assed sarcasm and know-it-all attitude is irritating since I Do know it all from the business side but what the heck. You did better than most people – with the exception of Marv Goldberg." Given that Marv Goldberg is the single biggest expert on 1950s vocal groups in the world, I'll take that as at least a backhanded compliment. So those are the only two people who I've talked about in the podcast who've commented, but before the podcast I had a blog, and at various times people whose work I wrote about would comment -- John Cowsill of the Cowsills still remembers a blog post where I said nice things about him fourteen years ago, for example. And there was one comment on a blog post I made four or five years ago which confirmed something I'd suspected for a while… When we left the Kinks, at the end of 1964, they had just recorded their first album. That album was not very good, but did go to number three in the UK album charts, which is a much better result than it sounds. Freddie "Boom Boom" Cannon got to number one in 1960, but otherwise the only rock acts to make number one on the album charts from the start of the sixties through the end of 1967 were Elvis, Cliff Richard, the Shadows, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and the Monkees. In the first few years of the sixties they were interspersed with the 101 Strings, trad jazz, the soundtrack to West Side Story, and a blackface minstrel group, The George Mitchell Singers. From mid-1963 through to the end of 1967, though, literally the only things to get to number one on the album charts were the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, the Monkees, and the soundtrack to The Sound of Music. That tiny cabal was eventually broken at the end of 1967 by Val Doonican Rocks… But Gently, and from 1968 on the top of the album charts becomes something like what we would expect today, with a whole variety of different acts, I make this point to point out two things The first is that number three on the album charts is an extremely good position for the Kinks to be in -- when they reached that point the Rolling Stones' second album had just entered at number one, and Beatles For Sale had dropped to number two after eight weeks at the top -- and the second is that for most rock artists and record labels, the album market was simply not big enough or competitive enough until 1968 for it to really matter. What did matter was the singles chart. And "You Really Got Me" had been a genuinely revolutionary hit record. According to Ray Davies it had caused particular consternation to both the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds, both of whom had thought they would be the first to get to number one with a dirty, distorted, R&B-influenced guitar-riff song. And so three weeks after the release of the album came the group's second single. Originally, the plan had been to release a track Ray had been working on called "Tired of Waiting", but that was a slower track, and it was decided that the best thing to do would be to try to replicate the sound of their first hit. So instead, they released "All Day And All Of The Night": [Excerpt: The Kinks, "All Day And All Of The Night"] That track was recorded by the same team as had recorded "You Really Got Me", except with Perry Ford replacing Arthur Greenslade on piano. Once again, Bobby Graham was on drums rather than Mick Avory, and when Ray Davies suggested that he might want to play a different drum pattern, Graham just asked him witheringly "Who do you think you are?" "All Day and All of the Night" went to number two -- a very impressive result for a soundalike follow-up -- and was kept off the number one spot first by "Baby Love" by the Supremes and then by "Little Red Rooster" by the Rolling Stones. The group quickly followed it up with an EP, Kinksize Session, consisting of three mediocre originals plus the group's version of "Louie Louie". By February 1965 that had hit number one on the EP charts, knocking the Rolling Stones off. Things were going as well as possible for the group. Ray and his girlfriend Rasa got married towards the end of 1964 -- they had to, as Rasa was pregnant and from a very religious Catholic family. By contrast, Dave was leading the kind of life that can only really be led by a seventeen-year-old pop star -- he moved out of the family home and in with Mick Avory after his mother caught him in bed with five women, and once out of her watchful gaze he also started having affairs with men, which was still illegal in 1964. (And which indeed would still be illegal for seventeen-year-olds until 2001). In January, they released their third hit single, "Tired of Waiting for You". The track was a ballad rather than a rocker, but still essentially another variant on the theme of "You Really Got Me" -- a song based around a few repeated phrases of lyric, and with a chorus with two major chords a tone apart. "You Really Got Me"'s chorus has the change going up: [Plays "You Really Got Me" chorus chords] While "Tired Of Waiting For You"'s chorus has the change going down: [Plays "Tired of Waiting For You" chorus chords] But it's trivially easy to switch between the two if you play them in the same key: [Demonstrates] Ray has talked about how "Tired of Waiting for You" was partly inspired by how he felt tired of waiting for the fame that the Kinks deserved, and the music was written even before "You Really Got Me". But when they went into the studio to record it, the only lyrics he had were the chorus. Once they'd recorded the backing track, he worked on the lyrics at home, before coming back into the studio to record his vocals, with Rasa adding backing vocals on the softer middle eight: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Tired of Waiting For You"] After that track was recorded, the group went on a tour of Australia, New Zealand, and Hong Kong. The flight out to Australia was thirty-four hours, and also required a number of stops. One stop to refuel in Moscow saw the group forced back onto the plane at gunpoint after Pete Quaife unwisely made a joke about the recently-deposed Russian Premier Nikita Khruschev. They also had a stop of a couple of days in Mumbai, where Ray was woken up by the sounds of fishermen chanting at the riverside, and enchanted by both the sound and the image. In Adelaide, Ray and Dave met up for the first time in years with their sister Rose and her husband Arthur. Ray was impressed by their comparative wealth, but disliked the slick modernity of their new suburban home. Dave became so emotional about seeing his big sister again that he talked about not leaving her house, not going to the show that night, and just staying in Australia so they could all be a family again. Rose sadly told him that he knew he couldn't do that, and he eventually agreed. But the tour wasn't all touching family reunions. They also got into a friendly rivalry with Manfred Mann, who were also on the tour and were competing with the Kinks to be the third-biggest group in the UK behind the Beatles and the Stones, and at one point both bands ended up on the same floor of the same hotel as the Stones, who were on their own Australian tour. The hotel manager came up in the night after a complaint about the noise, saw the damage that the combined partying of the three groups had caused, and barricaded them into that floor, locking the doors and the lift shafts, so that the damage could be contained to one floor. "Tired of Waiting" hit number one in the UK while the group were on tour, and it also became their biggest hit in the US, reaching number six, so on the way home they stopped off in the US for a quick promotional appearance on Hullabaloo. According to Ray's accounts, they were asked to do a dance like Freddie and the Dreamers, he and Mick decided to waltz together instead, and the cameras cut away horrified at the implied homosexuality. In fact, examining the footage shows the cameras staying on the group as Mick approaches Ray, arms extended, apparently offering to waltz, while Ray backs off nervous and confused, unsure what's going on. Meanwhile Dave and Pete on the other side of the stage are being gloriously camp with their arms around each other's shoulders. When they finally got back to the UK, they were shocked to hear this on the radio: [Excerpt: The Who, "I Can't Explain"] Ray was horrified that someone had apparently stolen the group's sound, especially when he found out it was the Who, who as the High Numbers had had a bit of a rivalry with the group. He said later "Dave thought it was us! It was produced by Shel Talmy, like we were. They used the same session singers as us, and Perry Ford played piano, like he did on ‘All Day And All Of The Night'. I felt a bit appalled by that. I think that was worse than stealing a song – they were actually stealing our whole style!” Pete Townshend later admitted as much, saying that he had deliberately demoed "I Can't Explain" to sound as much like the Kinks as possible so that Talmy would see its potential. But the Kinks were still, for the moment, doing far better than the Who. In March, shortly after returning from their foreign tour, they released their second album, Kinda Kinks. Like their first album, it was a very patchy effort, but it made number two on the charts, behind the Rolling Stones. But Ray Davies was starting to get unhappy. He was dissatisfied with everything about his life. He would talk later about looking at his wife lying in bed sleeping and thinking "What's she doing here?", and he was increasingly wondering if the celebrity pop star life was right for him, simultaneously resenting and craving the limelight, and doing things like phoning the music papers to deny rumours that he was leaving the Kinks -- rumours which didn't exist until he made those phone calls. As he thought the Who had stolen the Kinks' style, Ray decided to go in a different direction for the next Kinks single, and recorded "Everybody's Gonna Be Happy", which was apparently intended to sound like Motown, though to my ears it bears no resemblance: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Everybody's Gonna Be Happy"] That only went to number nineteen -- still a hit, but a worry for a band who had had three massive hits in a row. Several of the band started to worry seriously that they were going to end up with no career at all. It didn't help that on the tour after recording that, Ray came down with pneumonia. Then Dave came down with bronchitis. Then Pete Quaife hit his head and had to be hospitalised with severe bleeding and concussion. According to Quaife, he fainted in a public toilet and hit his head on the bowl on the way down, but other band members have suggested that Quaife -- who had a reputation for telling tall stories, even in a band whose members are all known for rewriting history -- was ashamed after getting into a fight. In April they played the NME Poll-Winners' Party, on the same bill as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Animals, the Moody Blues, the Searchers, Freddie And The Dreamers, Herman's Hermits, Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders, the Rockin' Berries, the Seekers, the Ivy League, Them, the Bachelors, Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames, Cilla Black, Dusty Springfield, Twinkle, Tom Jones, Donovan, and Sounds Incorporated. Because they got there late they ended up headlining, going on after the Beatles, even though they hadn't won an award, only come second in best new group, coming far behind the Stones but just ahead of Manfred Mann and the Animals. The next single, "Set Me Free", was a conscious attempt to correct course after "Everybody's Gonna Be Happy" had been less successful: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Set Me Free"] The song is once again repetitive, and once again based on a riff, structured similarly to "Tired of Waiting" but faster and more upbeat, and with a Beatles-style falsetto in the chorus. It worked -- it returned the group to the top ten -- but Ray wasn't happy at writing to order. He said in August of that year “I'm ashamed of that song. I can stand to hear and even sing most of the songs I've written, but not that one. It's built around pure idiot harmonies that have been used in a thousand songs.” More recently he's talked about how the lyric was an expression of him wanting to be set free from the constraint of having to write a hit song in the style he felt he was outgrowing. By the time the single was released, though, it looked like the group might not even be together any longer. There had always been tensions in the band. Ray and Dave had a relationship that made the Everly Brothers look like the model of family amity, and while Pete Quaife stayed out of the arguments for the most part, Mick Avory couldn't. The core of the group had always been the Davies brothers, and Quaife had known them for years, but Avory was a relative newcomer and hadn't grown up with them, and they also regarded him as a bit less intelligent than the rest of the group. He became the butt of jokes on a fairly constant basis. That would have been OK, except that Avory was also an essentially passive person, who didn't want to take sides in conflicts, while Dave Davies thought that as he and Avory were flatmates they should be on the same side, and resented when Avory didn't take his side in arguments with Ray. As Dave remembered it, the trigger came when he wanted to change the setlist and Mick didn't support him against Ray. In others' recollection, it came when the rest of the band tried to get Dave away from a party and he got violent with them. Both may be true. Either way, Dave got drunk and threw a suitcase at the back of a departing Mick, who was normally a fairly placid person but had had enough, and so he turned round, furious, grabbed Dave, got him in a headlock and just started punching, blackening both his eyes. According to some reports, Avory was so infuriated with Dave that he knocked him out, and Dave was so drunk and angry that when he came to he went for Avory again, and got knocked out again. The next day, the group were driven to their show in separate cars -- the Davies brothers in one, the rhythm section in the other -- they had separate dressing rooms, and made their entrance from separate directions. They got through the first song OK, and then Dave Davies insulted Avory's drumming, spat at him, and kicked his drums so they scattered all over the stage. At this point, a lot of the audience were still thinking this was part of the act, but Avory saw red again and picked up his hi-hat cymbal and smashed it down edge-first onto Dave's head. Everyone involved says that if his aim had been very slightly different he would have actually killed Dave. As it is, Dave collapsed, unconscious, bleeding everywhere. Ray screamed "My brother! He's killed my little brother!" and Mick, convinced he was a murderer, ran out of the theatre, still wearing his stage outfit of a hunting jacket and frilly shirt. He was running away for his life -- and that was literal, as Britain still technically had the death penalty at this point; while the last executions in Britain took place in 1964, capital punishment for murder wasn't abolished until late 1965 -- but at the same time a gang of screaming girls outside who didn't know what was going on were chasing him because he was a pop star. He managed to get back to London, where he found that the police had been looking for him but that Dave was alive and didn't want to press charges. However, he obviously couldn't go back to their shared home, and they had to cancel gigs because Dave had been hospitalised. It looked like the group were finished for good. Four days after that, Ray and Rasa's daughter Louisa was born, and shortly after that Ray was in the studio again, recording demos: [Excerpt: Ray Davies, "I Go to Sleep (demo)"] That song was part of a project that Larry Page, the group's co-manager, and Eddie Kassner, their publisher, had of making Ray's songwriting a bigger income source, and getting his songs recorded by other artists. Ray had been asked to write it for Peggy Lee, who soon recorded her own version: [Excerpt: Peggy Lee, "I Go to Sleep"] Several of the other tracks on that demo session featured Mitch Mitchell on drums. At the time, Mitchell was playing with another band that Page managed, and there seems to have been some thought of him possibly replacing Avory in the group. But instead, Larry Page cut the Gordian knot. He invited each band member to a meeting, just the two of them -- and didn't tell them that he'd scheduled all these meetings at the same time. When they got there, they found that they'd been tricked into having a full band meeting, at which point Page just talked to them about arrangements for their forthcoming American tour, and didn't let them get a word in until he'd finished. At the end he asked if they had any questions, and Mick Avory said he'd need some new cymbals because he'd broken his old ones on Dave's head. Before going on tour, the group recorded a song that Ray had written inspired by that droning chanting he'd heard in Mumbai. The song was variously titled "See My Friend" and "See My Friends" -- it has been released under both titles, and Ray seems to sing both words at different times -- and Ray told Maureen Cleave "The song is about homosexuality… It's like a football team and the way they're always kissing each other.” (We will be talking about Ray Davies' attitudes towards sexuality and gender in a future episode, but suffice to say that like much of Davies' worldview, he has a weird mixture of very progressive and very reactionary views, and he is also prone to observe behaviours in other people's private lives and make them part of his own public persona). The guitar part was recorded on a bad twelve-string guitar that fed back in the studio, creating a drone sound, which Shel Talmy picked up on and heavily compressed, creating a sound that bore more than a little resemblance to a sitar: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "See My Friend"] If that had been released at the time, it would have made the Kinks into trend-setters. Instead it was left in the can for nearly three months, and in the meantime the Yardbirds released the similar-sounding "Heart Full of Soul", making the Kinks look like bandwagon-jumpers when their own record came out, and reinforcing a paranoid belief that Ray had started to develop that his competitors were stealing his ideas. The track taking so long to come out was down to repercussions from the group's American tour, which changed the course of their whole career in ways they could not possibly have predicted. This was still the era when the musicians' unions of the US and UK had a restrictive one-in, one-out policy for musicians, and you couldn't get a visa to play in the US without the musicians' union's agreement -- and the AFM were not very keen on the British invasion, which they saw as taking jobs away from their members. There are countless stories from this period of bands like the Moody Blues getting to the US only to find that the arrangements have fallen through and they can't perform. Around this time, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders were told they weren't notable enough to get permission to play more than one gig, even though they were at number one on the charts in the US at the time. So it took a great deal of effort to get the Kinks' first US tour arranged, and they had to make a good impression. Unfortunately, while the Beatles and Stones knew how to play the game and give irreverent, cheeky answers that still left the interviewers amused and satisfied, the Kinks were just flat-out confusing and rude: [Excerpt: The Kinks Interview with Clay Cole] The whole tour went badly. They were booked into unsuitable venues, and there were a series of events like the group being booked on the same bill as the Dave Clark Five, and both groups having in their contract that they would be the headliner. Promoters started to complain about them to their management and the unions, and Ray was behaving worse and worse. By the time the tour hit LA, Ray was being truly obnoxious. According to Larry Page he refused to play one TV show because there was a Black drummer on the same show. Page said that it was not about personal prejudice -- though it's hard to see how it could not be, at least in part -- but just picking something arbitrary to complain about to show he had the power to mess things up. While shooting a spot for the show Where The Action Is, Ray got into a physical fight with one of the other cast members over nothing. What Ray didn't realise was that the person in question was a representative for AFTRA, the screen performers' union, and was already unhappy because Dave had earlier refused to join the union. Their behaviour got reported up the chain. The day after the fight was supposed to be the highlight of the tour, but Ray was missing his wife. In the mid-sixties, the Beach Boys would put on a big Summer Spectacular at the Hollywood Bowl every year, and the Kinks were due to play it, on a bill which as well as the Beach Boys also featured the Byrds, the Righteous Brothers, Dino, Desi & Billy, and Sonny and Cher. But Ray said he wasn't going on unless Rasa was there. And he didn't tell Larry Page, who was there, that. Instead, he told a journalist at the Daily Mirror in London, and the first Page heard about it was when the journalist phoned him to confirm that Ray wouldn't be playing. Now, they had already been working to try to get Rasa there for the show, because Ray had been complaining for a while. But Rasa didn't have a passport. Not only that, but she was an immigrant and her family were from Lithuania, and the US State Department weren't exactly keen on people from the Eastern Bloc flying to the US. And it was a long flight. I don't know exactly how long a flight from London to LA took then, but it takes eleven and a half hours now, and it will have been around that length. Somehow, working a miracle, Larry Page co-ordinated with his co-managers Robert Wace and Grenville Collins back in London -- difficult in itself as Wace and Collins and Page and his business partner Eddie Kassner were by now in two different factions, because Ray had been manipulating them and playing them off against each other for months. But the three of them worked together and somehow got Rasa to LA in time for Ray to go on stage. Page waited around long enough to see that Ray had got on stage at the Hollywood Bowl, then flew back to London. He had had enough of Ray's nonsense, and didn't really see any need to be there anyway, because they had a road manager, their publisher, their agent, and plenty of support staff. He felt that he was only there to be someone for Ray Davies to annoy and take his frustrations out on. And indeed, once Page flew back to the UK, Ray calmed down, though how much of that was the presence of Rasa it's hard to say. Their road manager at the time though said "If Larry wasn't there, Ray couldn't make problems because there was nobody there to make them to. He couldn't make problems for me because I just ignored them. For example, in Hawaii, the shirts got stolen. Ray said, ‘No way am I going onstage without my shirt.' So I turned around and said to him, ‘Great, don't go on!' Of course, they went on.” They did miss the gig the next night in San Francisco, with more or less the same lineup as the Hollywood Bowl show -- they'd had problems with the promoter of that show at an earlier gig in Reno, and so Ray said they weren't going to play unless they got paid in cash upfront. When the promoter refused, the group just walked on stage, waved, and walked off. But other than that, the rest of the tour went OK. What they didn't realise until later was that they had made so many enemies on that tour that it would be impossible for them to return to the US for another four years. They weren't blacklisted, as such, they just didn't get the special treatment that was necessary to make it possible for them to visit there. From that point on they would still have a few hits in the US, but nothing like the sustained massive success they had in the UK in the same period. Ray felt abandoned by Page, and started to side more and more with Wace and Collins. Page though was still trying to promote Ray's songwriting. Some of this, like the album "Kinky Music" by the Larry Page Orchestra, released during the tour, was possibly not the kind of promotion that anyone wanted, though some of it has a certain kitsch charm: [Excerpt: The Larry Page Orchestra, "All Day And All Of The Night"] Incidentally, the guitarist on that album was Jimmy Page, who had previously played rhythm guitar on a few Kinks album tracks. But other stuff that Larry Page was doing would be genuinely helpful. For example, on the tour he had become friendly with Stone and Greene, the managers who we heard about in the Buffalo Springfield episode. At this point they were managing Sonny and Cher, and when they came over to the UK, Page took the opportunity to get Cher into the studio to cut a version of Ray's "I Go to Sleep": [Excerpt: Cher, "I Go to Sleep"] Most songwriters, when told that the biggest new star of the year was cutting a cover version of one of their tracks for her next album, would be delighted. Ray Davies, on the other hand, went to the session and confronted Page, screaming about how Page was stealing his ideas. And it was Page being marginalised that caused "See My Friend" to be delayed, because while they were in the US, Page had produced the group in Gold Star Studios, recording a version of Ray's song "Ring the Bells", and Page wanted that as the next single, but the group had a contract with Shel Talmy which said he would be their producer. They couldn't release anything Talmy hadn't produced, but Page, who had control over the group's publishing with his business partner Kassner, wouldn't let them release "See My Friend". Eventually, Talmy won out, and "See My Friend" became the group's next single. It made the top ten on the Record Retailer chart, the one that's now the official UK chart cited in most sources, but only number fifteen on the NME chart which more people paid attention to at the time, and only spent a few weeks on the charts. Ray spent the summer complaining in the music papers about how the track -- "the only one I've really liked", as he said at the time -- wasn't selling as much as it deserved, and also insulting Larry Page and boasting about his own abilities, saying he was a better singer than Andy Williams and Tony Bennett. The group sacked Larry Page as their co-manager, and legal battles between Page and Kassner on one side and Collins and Wace on the other would continue for years, tying up much of the group's money. Page went on to produce a new band he was managing, making records that sounded very like the Kinks' early hits: [Excerpt: The Troggs, "Wild Thing"] The Kinks, meanwhile, decided to go in a different direction for their new EP, Kwyet Kinks, an EP of mostly softer, folk- and country-inspired songs. The most interesting thing on Kwyet Kinks was "Well-Respected Man", which saw Ray's songwriting go in a completely different direction as he started to write gentle social satires with more complex lyrics, rather than the repetitive riff-based songs he'd been doing before. That track was released as a single in the US, which didn't have much of an EP market, and made the top twenty there, despite its use of a word that in England at the time had a double meaning -- either a cigarette or a younger boy at a public school who has to be the servant of an older boy -- but in America was only used as a slur for gay people: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Well Respected Man"] The group's next album, The Kink Kontroversy, was mostly written in a single week, and is another quickie knockoff album. It had the hit single "Til the End of the Day", another attempt at getting back to their old style of riffy rockers, and one which made the top ten. It also had a rerecorded version of "Ring the Bells", the song Larry Page had wanted to release as a single: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Ring the Bells"] I'm sure that when Ray Davies heard "Ruby Tuesday" a little over a year later he didn't feel any better about the possibility that people were stealing his ideas. The Kink Kontroversy was a transitional album for the group in many ways. It was the first album to prominently feature Nicky Hopkins, who would be an integral part of the band's sound for the next three years, and the last one to feature a session drummer (Clem Cattini, rather than Avory, played on most of the tracks). From this point on there would essentially be a six-person group of studio Kinks who would make the records -- the four Kinks themselves, Rasa Davies on backing vocals, and Nicky Hopkins on piano. At the end of 1965 the group were flailing, mired in lawsuits, and had gone from being the third biggest group in the country at the start of the year to maybe the tenth or twentieth by the end of it. Something had to change. And it did with the group's next single, which in both its sound and its satirical subject matter was very much a return to the style of "Well Respected Man". "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" was inspired by anger. Ray was never a particularly sociable person, and he was not the kind to do the rounds of all the fashionable clubs like the other pop stars, including his brother, would. But he did feel a need to make some kind of effort and would occasionally host parties at his home for members of the fashionable set. But Davies didn't keep up with fashion the way they did, and some of them would mock him for the way he dressed. At one such party he got into a fistfight with someone who was making fun of his slightly flared trousers, kicked all the guests out, and then went to a typewriter and banged out a lyric mocking the guest and everyone like him: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Dedicated Follower of Fashion"] The song wasn't popular with Ray's bandmates -- Dave thought it was too soft and wimpy, while Quaife got annoyed at the time Ray spent in the studio trying to make the opening guitar part sound a bit like a ukulele. But they couldn't argue with the results -- it went to number five on the charts, their biggest success since "Tired of Waiting for You" more than a year earlier, and more importantly in some ways it became part of the culture in a way their more recent singles hadn't. "Til The End of the Day" had made the top ten, but it wasn't a record that stuck in people's minds. But "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" was so popular that Ray soon got sick of people coming up to him in the street and singing "Oh yes he is!" at him. But then, Ray was getting sick of everything. In early 1966 he had a full-scale breakdown, brought on by the flu but really just down to pure exhaustion. Friends from this time say that Ray was an introverted control freak, always neurotic and trying to get control and success, but sabotaging it as soon as he attained it so that he didn't have to deal with the public. Just before a tour of Belgium, Rasa gave him an ultimatum -- either he sought medical help or she would leave him. He picked up their phone and slammed it into her face, blacking her eye -- the only time he was ever physically violent to her, she would later emphasise -- at which point it became imperative to get medical help for his mental condition. Ray stayed at home while the rest of the band went to Belgium -- they got in a substitute rhythm player, and Dave took the lead vocals -- though the tour didn't make them any new friends. Their co-manager Grenville Collins went along and with the tact and diplomacy for which the British upper classes are renowned the world over, would say things like “I understand every bloody word you're saying but I won't speak your filthy language. De Gaulle won't speak English, why should I speak French?” At home, Ray was doing worse and worse. When some pre-recorded footage of the Kinks singing "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" came on the TV, he unplugged it and stuck it in the oven. He said later "I was completely out of my mind. I went to sleep and I woke up a week later with a beard. I don't know what happened to me. I'd run into the West End with my money stuffed in my socks, I'd tried to punch my press agent, I was chased down Denmark Street by the police, hustled into a taxi by a psychiatrist and driven off somewhere. And I didn't know. I woke up and I said, ‘What's happening? When do we leave for Belgium?' And they said, ‘Ray it's all right. You had a collapse. Don't worry. You'll get better.'” He did get better, though for a long time he found himself unable to listen to any contemporary rock music other than Bob Dylan -- electric guitars made him think of the pop world that had made him ill -- and so he spent his time listening to classical and jazz records. He didn't want to be a pop star any more, and convinced himself he could quit the band if he went out on top by writing a number one single. And so he did: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Sunny Afternoon"] Or at least, I say it's a single he wrote, but it's here that I finally get to a point I've been dancing round since the beginning of the episode. The chorus line, "In the summertime", was Rasa's suggestion, and in one of the only two interviews I've ever come across with her, for Johnny Rogan's biography of Ray, she calls the song "the only one where I wrote some words". But there's evidence, including another interview with her I'll talk about in a bit, that suggests that's not quite the case. For years, I thought it was an interesting coincidence that Ray Davies' songwriting ability follows a curve that almost precisely matches that of his relationship with Rasa. At the start, he's clearly talented -- "You Really Got Me" is a great track -- but he's an unformed writer and most of his work is pretty poor stuff. Then he marries Rasa, and his writing starts to become more interesting. Rasa starts to regularly contribute in the studio, and he becomes one of the great songwriters of his generation. For a five-year period in the mid-to-late-sixties, the period when their marriage is at its strongest, Ray writes a string of classic songs that are the equal of any catalogue in popular music. Then around 1970 Rasa stops coming to the studio, and their marriage is under strain. The records become patchier -- still plenty of classic tracks, but a lot more misses. And then in 1973, she left him, and his songwriting fell off a cliff. If you look at a typical Ray Davies concert setlist from 2017, the last time he toured, he did twenty songs, of which two were from his new album, one was the Kinks' one-off hit "Come Dancing" from 1983, and every other song was from the period when he and Rasa were married. Now, for a long time I just thought that was interesting, but likely a coincidence. After all, most rock songwriters do their most important work in their twenties, divorces have a way of messing people's mental health up, musical fashions change… there are a myriad reasons why these things could be like that. But… the circumstantial evidence just kept piling up. Ray's paranoia about people stealing his ideas meant that he became a lot more paranoid and secretive in his songwriting process, and would often not tell his bandmates the titles of the songs, the lyrics, or the vocal melody, until after they'd recorded the backing tracks -- they would record the tracks knowing the chord changes and tempo, but not what the actual song was. Increasingly he would be dictating parts to Quaife and Nicky Hopkins in the studio from the piano, telling them exactly what to play. But while Pete Quaife thought that Ray was being dictatorial in the studio and resented it, he resented something else more. As late as 1999 he was complaining about, in his words, "the silly little bint from Bradford virtually running the damn studio", telling him what to do, and feeling unable to argue back even though he regarded her as "a jumped-up groupie". Dave, on the other hand, valued Rasa's musical intuition and felt that Ray was the same. And she was apparently actually more up-to-date with the music in the charts than any of the band -- while they were out on the road, she would stay at home and listen to the radio and make note of what was charting and why. All this started to seem like a lot of circumstantial evidence that Rasa was possibly far more involved in the creation of the music than she gets credit for -- and given that she was never credited for her vocal parts on any Kinks records, was it too unbelievable that she might have contributed to the songwriting without credit? But then I found the other interview with Rasa I'm aware of, a short sidebar piece I'll link in the liner notes, and I'm going to quote that here: "Rasa, however, would sometimes take a very active role during the writing of the songs, many of which were written in the family home, even on occasion adding to the lyrics. She suggested the words “In the summertime” to ‘Sunny Afternoon', it is claimed. She now says, “I would make suggestions for a backing melody, sing along while Ray was playing the song(s) on the piano; at times I would add a lyric line or word(s). It was rewarding for me and was a major part of our life.” That was enough for me to become convinced that Rasa was a proper collaborator with Ray. I laid all this out in a blog post, being very careful how I phrased what I thought -- that while Ray Davies was probably the principal author of the songs credited to him (and to be clear, that is definitely what I think -- there's a stylistic continuity throughout his work that makes it very clear that the same man did the bulk of the work on all of it), the songs were the work of a writing partnership. As I said in that post "But even if Rasa only contributed ten percent, that seems likely to me to have been the ten percent that pulled those songs up to greatness. Even if all she did was pull Ray back from his more excessive instincts, perhaps cause him to show a little more compassion in his more satirical works (and the thing that's most notable about his post-Rasa songwriting is how much less compassionate it is), suggest a melodic line should go up instead of down at the end of a verse, that kind of thing… the cumulative effect of those sorts of suggestions can be enormous." I was just laying out my opinion, not stating anything as a certainty, though I was morally sure that Rasa deserved at least that much credit. And then Rasa commented on the post, saying "Dear Andrew. Your article was so informative and certainly not mischaracterised. Thank you for the 'history' of my input working with Ray. As I said previously, that time was magical and joyous." I think that's as close a statement as we're likely to get that the Kinks' biggest hits were actually the result of the songwriting team of Davies and Davies, and not of Ray alone, since nobody seems interested at all in a woman who sang on -- and likely co-wrote -- some of the biggest hit records of the sixties. Rasa gets mentioned in two sentences in the band's Wikipedia page, and as far as I can tell has only been interviewed twice -- an extensive interview by Johnny Rogan for his biography of Ray, in which he sadly doesn't seem to have pressed her on her songwriting contributions, and the sidebar above. I will probably continue to refer to Ray writing songs in this and the next episode on the Kinks, because I don't know for sure who wrote what, and he is the one who is legally credited as the sole writer. But… just bear that in mind. And bear it in mind whenever I or anyone else talk about the wives and girlfriends of other rock stars, because I'm sure she's not the only one. "Sunny Afternoon" knocked "Paperback Writer" off the number one spot, but by the time it did, Pete Quaife was out of the band. He'd fallen out with the Davies brothers so badly that he'd insisted on travelling separately from them, and he'd been in a car crash that had hospitalised him for six weeks. They'd quickly hired a temporary replacement, John Dalton, who had previously played with The Mark Four, the group that had evolved into The Creation. They needed him to mime for a TV appearance pretty much straight away, so they asked him "can you play a descending D minor scale?" and when he said yes he was hired -- because the opening of "Sunny Afternoon" used a trick Ray was very fond of, of holding a chord in the guitars while the bass descends in a scale, only changing chord when the notes would clash too badly, and then changing to the closest possible chord: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Sunny Afternoon"] Around this time, the group also successfully renegotiated their contract with Pye Records, with the help of a new lawyer they had been advised to get in touch with -- Allen Klein. As well as helping renegotiate their contracts, Klein also passed on a demo of one of Ray's new songs to Herman's Hermits. “Dandy” was going to be on the Kinks' next album, but the Hermits released it as a single in the US and took it into the top ten: [Excerpt: Herman's Hermits, “Dandy”] In September, Pete Quaife formally quit the band -- he hadn't played with them in months after his accident -- and the next month the album Face To Face, recorded while Quaife was still in the group, was released. Face to Face was the group's first really solid album, and much of the album was in the same vein as "Sunny Afternoon" -- satirical songs that turned on the songwriter as much as on the people they were ostensibly about. It didn't do as well as the previous albums, but did still make the top twenty on the album chart. The group continued work, recording a new single, "Dead End Street", a song which is musically very similar to "Sunny Afternoon", but is lyrically astonishingly bleak, dealing with poverty and depression rather than more normal topics for a pop song. The group produced a promotional film for it, but the film was banned by the BBC as being in bad taste, as it showed the group as undertakers. But the single happened to be released two days after the broadcast of "Cathy Come Home", the seminal drama about homelessness, which suddenly brought homelessness onto the political agenda. While "Dead End Street" wasn't technically about homelessness, it was close enough that when the TV programme Panorama did a piece on the subject, they used "Dead End Street" to soundtrack it. The song made the top five, an astonishing achievement for something so dark: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Dead End Street"] But the track also showed the next possible breach in the Kinks' hitmaking team -- when it was originally recorded, Shel Talmy had produced it, and had a French horn playing, but after he left the session, the band brought in a trombone player to replace the French horn, and rerecorded it without him. They would continue working with him for a little while, recording some of the tracks for their next album, but by the time the next single came out, Talmy would be out of the picture for good. But Pete Quaife, on the other hand, was nowhere near as out of the group as he had seemed. While he'd quit the band in September, Ray persuaded him to rejoin the band four days before "Dead End Street" came out, and John Dalton was back to working in his day job as a builder, though we'll be hearing more from him. The group put out a single in Europe, "Mr. Pleasant", a return to the style of "Well Respected Man" and "Dedicated Follower of Fashion": [Excerpt: The Kinks, “Mr. Pleasant”] That was a big hit in the Netherlands, but it wasn't released in the UK. They were working on something rather different. Ray had had the idea of writing a song called "Liverpool Sunset", about Liverpool, and about the decline of the Merseybeat bands who had been at the top of the profession when the Kinks had been starting out. But then the Beatles had released "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane", and Ray hadn't wanted to release anything about Liverpool's geography and look like he had stolen from them, given his attitudes to plagiarism. He said later "I sensed that the Beatles weren't going to be around long. When they moved to London, and ended up in Knightsbridge or wherever, I was still in Muswell Hill. I was loyal to my origins. Maybe I felt when they left it was all over for Merseybeat.” So instead, he -- or he and Rasa -- came up with a song about London, and about loneliness, and about a couple, Terry and Julie -- Terry was named after his nephew Terry who lived in Australia, while Julie's name came from Julie Christie, as she was then starring in a film with a Terry, Terrence Stamp: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Waterloo Sunset"] It's interesting to look at the musical inspirations for the song. Many people at the time pointed out the song's similarity to "Winchester Cathedral" by the New Vaudeville Band, which had come out six months earlier with a similar melody and was also named after a place: [Excerpt: The New Vaudeville Band, "Winchester Cathedral"] And indeed Spike Milligan had parodied that song and replaced the lyrics with something more London-centric: [Excerpt: Spike Milligan, "Tower Bridge"] But it seems likely that Ray had taken inspiration from an older piece of music. We've talked before about Ferd Grofe in several episodes -- he was the one who orchestrated the original version of "Rhapsody in Blue", who wrote the piece of music that inspired Don Everly to write "Cathy's Clown", and who wrote the first music for the Novachord, the prototype synthesiser from the 1930s. As we saw earlier, Ray was listening to a lot of classical and jazz music rather than rock at this point, and one has to wonder if, at some point during his illness the previous year, he had come across Metropolis: A Blue Fantasy, which Grofe had written for Paul Whiteman's band in 1928, very much in the style of "Rhapsody in Blue", and this section, eight and a half minutes in, in particular: [Excerpt: Paul Whiteman, "Metropolis: A Blue Fantasy" ] "Waterloo Sunset" took three weeks to record. They started out, as usual, with a backing track recorded without the rest of the group knowing anything about the song they were recording -- though the group members did contribute some ideas to the arrangement, which was unusual by this point. Pete Quaife contributed to the bass part, while Dave Davies suggested the slapback echo on the guitar: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Waterloo Sunset, Instrumental Take 2"] Only weeks later did they add the vocals. Ray had an ear infection, so rather than use headphones he sang to a playback through a speaker, which meant he had to sing more gently, giving the vocal a different tone from his normal singing style: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Waterloo Sunset"] And in one of the few contributions Rasa made that has been generally acknowledged, she came up with the "Sha la la" vocals in the middle eight: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Waterloo Sunset"] And the idea of having the track fade out on cascading, round-like vocals: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "Waterloo Sunset"] Once again the Kinks were at a turning point. A few weeks after "Waterloo Sunset" came out, the Monterey Pop Festival finally broke the Who in America -- a festival the Kinks were invited to play, but had to turn down because of their visa problems. It felt like the group were being passed by -- Ray has talked about how "Waterloo Sunset" would have been another good point for him to quit the group as he kept threatening to, or at least to stay home and just make the records, like Brian Wilson, while letting the band tour with Dave on lead vocals. He decided against it, though, as he would for decades to come. That attitude, of simultaneously wanting to be part of something and be a distanced, dispassionate observer of it, is what made "Waterloo Sunset" so special. As Ray has said, in words that seem almost to invoke the story of Moses: "it's a culmination of all my desires and hopes – it's a song about people going to a better world, but somehow I stayed where I was and became the observer in the song rather than the person who is proactive . . . I did not cross the river. They did and had a good life apparently." Ray stayed with the group, and we'll be picking up on what he and they did next in about a year's time. "Waterloo Sunset" went to number two on the charts, and has since become the most beloved song in the Kinks' whole catalogue. It's been called "the most beautiful song in the English language", and "the most beautiful song of the rock 'n' roll era", though Ray Davies, ever self-critical when he's not being self-aggrandising, thinks it could be improved upon. But most of the rest of us disagree. As the song itself says, "Waterloo Sunset's fine".

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BYLINE TIMES PODCAST
Truss "Goes Trump" Over Jerusalem

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 23:55


Is Liz Truss about to go full Trump by relocating the UK Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem? If so, it's a decision which would be loaded with political signifigance.The PM told her Israeli counterpart Yair Lapid at the UN summit in New York last month that a move was under consideration.The proposal has been condemned both nationally and internationally with the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby warning that it could damage peace prospects.Adrian Goldberg hears from former diplomat Alexandra Hall Hall – her 30 years in The Foreign Office included heading the Middle East Peace Process Section. She was also head of the UK's Human Rights Department and advised the US State Department on Human Rights and Democracy in the Middle East.Produced by Adrian Goldberg.Funded by subscriptions to Byline Times. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 696 Musical Comedian Rob Paravonian and Journalist/Writer Michael Cohen

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 108:59


Hey Friends! I have a great show today with 2 great guests and a 15 minute news recap. I really appreciate you checking out today's show. Let me know what you think! Standupwithpete@gmail.com Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more With the mind of a comedian and the soul of a musician, Rob Paravonian seamlessly fuses sharp comedy performances with top notch musicianship. This perfect blend is evident everywhere from his viral Pachelbel Rant, his observations on popular music, to his well-crafted original songs. Rob's act is accessible and he works with minimal profanity so there are few limitations on where he can perform or where his albums can be played. He regularly works comedy clubs and cutting edge venues in New York, as well as cruises, all-ages venues and corporate events. In college Rob found an outlet for his love of humor writing in the open mic comedy stages of greater Los Angeles. When Rob began mixing songs and music into his sets it was a revelation and the enthusiastic response was immediate. By the time he graduated (cum laude) he was getting regular booked and paid spots around L.A. Though music and a promising original rock band took Rob back to Chicago, he continued to explore comedy through classes at Second City and performing stand-up. He soon became a regular at the Chicago Improv and Zanies clubs, and started working the road touring clubs throughout the Midwest and colleges coast to coast. Rob has been a prolific comedian both on the stage and with recordings. From his first studio album Don't Crowd the Plow, which had a track featured on the Dr. Demento Show's Funny Five, to his most recent live concert album Rob P. Rocks a Jazz Club, which is getting a great reaction from fans and comedy outlets alike, Rob's albums have helped propagate and preserve his work. On stage Rob's wealth of material extends beyond his comedy music. He has staged three solo shows, presenting them in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles; he was a staff writer for the NYC-based sketch group Spurn for several years, he has written three one-act plays that have been performed in New York. Michael A. Cohen is a regular contributor for The Boston Globe on national politics and foreign affairs. He is also the author of “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division.” Michael has written for dozens of news outlets, including as a columnist for the Guardian and Foreign Policy and he is the US Political Correspondent for the London Observer. He previously worked as a speechwriter at the US State Department and has been a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Please check out and hopefully subscribe to Michael's Substack newsletter Truth and Consequences!  Stand Up subscribers get a discount on Michael's new newsletter!   Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Qualitative Conversations
Episode 37: Episode 37. Being a Doctoral Candidate in Times of War with Mariia Vitrukh

Qualitative Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 33:53


SUMMARY KEYWORDSukraine, war, people, ukrainian, asu, research, students, education, happening, invasion, qualitative research, february, questions, crimea, russia, universities, fled, podcast, family, momentSPEAKERSTim, MariiaTim  00:15Hello and welcome to qualitative conversations, a podcast hosted by the qualitative research SIG through AERA, the American Education Research Association. I am Tim wells, a postdoctoral research scholar at Arizona State University and guest host for this episode of the podcast. The qualitative conversations podcast doesn't have a regular host. Instead, each episode is organized by our podcast committee. Normally, my role resides in the background coordinating episodes and editing audio, but today I'm behind the mic. In conversation with Mariia Vitrukh. Mariia is a doctoral candidate in the Education Policy and Evaluation Program at Arizona State University. She serves on the QR sig's graduate student committee. In the fall of 2021, Ma