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Best podcasts about south american

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Latest podcast episodes about south american

How God Works
Transcendence: Why Chemicals Need Rituals

How God Works

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 26:27


For centuries, Central and South American cultures have used psychedelics to induce mystical states. And while in the US they've mostly been used as recreational drugs, interest in their power to offer a rapid route to transcendence has recently been growing. But in our haste to use these chemicals to alter, and perhaps even heal, the mind, we might be losing sight that with speed comes risk. Join Dave as he talks with author Michael Pollan and researcher David Yaden about the nature of self-transcendent experiences, the science of how psychedelics can bring them on, and the dangers of disregarding centuries of shamanic knowledge about how to use them wisely.

HistoryPod
28th November 1520: Ferdinand Magellan leads the first European fleet into the Pacific Ocean from the Atlantic as part of his planned circumnavigation of the globe

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


The channel they found through the South American landmass was named the Strait of All Saints, but is now known as the Strait of ...

TonioTimeDaily
I am recovering from religious imperialism, religious colonialism, religious elitism, religious nationalism, authoritarian religion, religious regimes, dictatorship religion, and totalitarian religion

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 38:43


"Christian Colonialism: The verb “to colonize” can be described as the process of appropriating a place or domain to establish political and economic control. Throughout history, nations have invaded not only their neighbors' lands, but also territories clear across the globe for their own use. During the practice, the dominant nation attempts to colonize not only indigenous peoples' domains (territorial imperialism), but also their minds, their customs, their language, in fact, their very way of life. In countries with a historical legacy of colonization, and even in those without this history, members of dominant groups have accumulated unearned privileges not accorded to others. Though the official terms “colonization,” “colonizer,” and “colonized” may have changed somewhat, nowhere in the world have we experienced a truly post-colonial society. Imperialism remains, though at times possibly in less visible forms. In 1455, Pope Nicholas called his Christian followers to “to invade, search out, capture, vanquish, and subdue all Saracens and pagans,” take their possessions, and “reduce their persons to perpetual slavery.” This edict known as the Doctrine of Discovery gives license to the genocide of black, brown, and non-Christians across the world. It was the stimulus for Columbus' travels and is based on Christian white supremacy. Beginning the first day Europeans stepped foot on what has come to be known as “the Americas” up until this very day, decisions over who can enter the United States and who can eventually gain citizenship status has generally depended on issues of “race.” U.S. immigration systems have reflected and have served as this country's official “racial” policies at any given point in time. Europeans on the North and South American continents established their domination based on a program of exploitation, violence, kidnapping, and genocide against native populations. For example, the “Puritans” left England to the Americas to practice a “purer” form of Protestant Christianity. They believed they were divinely chosen to form “a biblical commonwealth” with no separation between religion and government. They tolerated no other faiths or interpretations of divine precepts. In fact, they murdered and expelled Quakers, Catholics, and others. The “American” colonies followed European perceptions of “race.” A 1705 Virginia statute, the “Act Concerning Servants and Slaves,” read: [N]o negroes, mulattos or Indians, Jew, Moor, Mahometan [Muslims], or other infidel, or such as are declared slaves by this act, shall, notwithstanding, purchase any christian (sic) white servant…. In 1790, the newly constituted United States Congress passed the Naturalization Act, which excluded all nonwhites from citizenship, including Asians, enslaved Africans, and Native Americans, the later whom they defined in oxymoronic terms as “domestic foreigners,” even though they had inhabited this land for thousands of years. The Congress did not grant Native Americans rights of citizenship until 1924 with the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act, though Asians continued to be denied naturalized citizenship status." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

National Day Calendar
November 27, 2021 - National Craft Jerky Day | Small Business Saturday

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 3:30


Welcome to November 27, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate protein on the go and supporting the small guys. The preservation of meat by smoking or drying has been around for a very long time. Evidence of meat jerky is even found in the tombs of ancient Egypt. And this makes sense when you realize that refrigeration has only been around a relatively short while. But today we celebrate the artisanal flair of the folks who produce craft jerky with everything from elk to buffalo and even soybeans and mushrooms. Your taste buds may only be geared for the traditional beef kind originally produced by the South American tribes of the Andes.  On National Craft Jerky Day prepare your palate for something savory and something more adventurous if you dare. Small Business Saturday reminds us of the prime shopping opportunities right in our own backyards. These places offer lots of gift-giving possibilities with hands-on service and quality, thoughtful gifts. Small businesses feed our communities. They keep our main streets thriving and employ nearly half of the American workforce. You'll feel good knowing that your holiday shopping puts food on the tables of the folks you know. And plenty of the people on your list prefer handmade items anyway! Don't hesitate to browse a small business website as well as the traditional brick and mortar kind. You may be surprised to discover just what you've been looking for. On Small Business Saturday, celebrate the moms and pops who put the fun and goodwill back into the season of giving.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Atmospheric Tales
Building climate resilience in South American cities

Atmospheric Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 35:42


In this episode we discuss inequalities and segregation as drivers of climate risks and vulnerability.

Moving Iron Podcast
MIP Markets w. Shawn Hackett - Big Develment in South American Weather

Moving Iron Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:57


MIP Markets with Shawn Hackett – Big Development South American Weather 561-573-3766, HackettAdvisors.comA Stratospheric Warming Event over Antarctica could cause a drier forecast for second crop corn in Brazil. Ag News By @theherdbookPresented By @AxonTire @ArrowCRM_Music By: @TalbottBrothers @casey9673 @traderbrent @Aaronfintel #AgEquipmentBusinessTalk#LetsGoMoveSomeIronContact me @: MovingIronLLC.comMovingIronPodcast@MovingIronPodcast.com#AgEquipmentBusinessTalk #LetsGoMoveSomeIron #agmarkets #combine #combinetires #corn #idlechatterpodcast #AgTires #Harvest21 #Tillage #plant21 #till21 #tractor #BushelandCents #tractorzoom #worldeconomy #IronComps #PrecisionDonor #BornThatWay #Soybeans #TaxMoves #TheHerdBook #AuctionMarket #EquipmentAuction #FarmEquipmentAuction https://www.spreaker.com/user/9810017/mip-markets-w-shawn-hackett-big-develmen

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 41:53


Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This episode and next, we tackle one of the most intimidating poets in the American Canon- Walt Whitman.  He is the generally accepted and almost uncontested greatest contribution America has made to the great canon of World Literature- the ones comprised of those that really intimidate- William Shakespeare,  James Joyce, Gustave Flaubert, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Ovid, Goethe, Neitche-, Dante- people like that- there are not too many Americans that make that list.    And he does intimidate me- truly.  And honestly he baffles me.  The things he says seem easy to understand except I don't actually understand them.  They are beautiful and interesting but also uncomfortable.  People love his writing and always have, but he's also very offensive- and he offends all equally- the prude and the religious, but also the secular and intellectual- he offends the socialist as well as the capitalist.  Name an identity- he references it and somewhat dismantles it.  Primarily because he absolutely rejects group identities as we think of them today- even in terms of nations but in every sense.  To use his words, “I am large; I contains multitudes” that's a paraphrase from my favorite selection of his work which we'll read today.      For me he's such a curious person in part because of the time he emerged in what was called then the American experiment- and I honestly think his perspective has a lot to do from this unique time period, of course this is not different than how I feel about all of the writers we discuss.  But being born in 1819, the United States of America is only 36 years older than he is.  His parents were present during the Revolutionary War and have a real respect for what people were trying to do here, and how unusual and fragile democratic government actually was or really is.  We, at least we here in the United States, live with the feeling that this country just always has been- that democracy just happens.  That elections are just things that have always happened.  Most students today in this country don't even think about it. Democracy is the normal order in how things occur; equality and liberty are just virtues that everyone agrees are important- by one definition or another.  But None of this was reality and common understanding in 1819 in almost any part of the planet Earth.  And most of the world looked at the United States with contempt- a bunch of non-educated hillbillies living in some weird schemata that wouldn't stand the test of time.  There was no culture in this country, by international standards.  We had no great art, no history to speak of, we weren't writing great philosophies or composing great music.  We had not produced a Voltaire, or a Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We had no Catherine the Great or Cosimo De Medici sponsoring great artistic ventures.        And so enters Walt Whitman- to which he would say, and did say- whoopdeedoo Europe- you are correct- we have none of that, and I celebrate that we don't.      I want to begin with this famous poem by Whitman.  Of course, it's from Leaves of Grass which we'll introduce in a second, but if you are reading the Death bed edition which is the one I have- again I'll explain all that later, it's in the beginning, that very first part called “Inscriptions”.  Let me read Whitman's famous words on America.     I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,  Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,  The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,  The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,  The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,  The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,  The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,  The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,  Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,  The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.      Garry, I want to hear your first thoughts when you read this poem.  Let me start by saying, notice how celebratory it is.  America is singing carols- not dirges- and the song of the American is the song of hard work- not the Vienna Philharmonic- which by the way was founded in 1842.  America was not building art, as commonly understood- we were building lives- free lives- lives where people lived with the choices they made, but they got to make their own choices.  This is very different than anywhere else- places more cultured, more sophisticated, more idealized.  We don't have serfs working for great lords or ladies.  We have no jet-setters so to speak- or people of privilege or high cultural standing- In America we work hard,  but we work for ourselves-and everyone does it- and that is something we're proud of.  There is no shame in labor.  There's a song to that.      Yes, it's very much about homestead.  It's about individualism and taking responsibility to create it- About creating your own little corner of the world.  This is exactly the idea that Alexis DeToqueville referenced in his important work Democracy in America.  As a Frenchman, he was totally surprised and impressed with this very thing that Whitman is talking about.  This poem is a complete refutation of the English feudal system and that's what Northerners loved about it.  In the South, and what was so offensive to Whitman when he spent time in New Orleans was that they were trying to recreate that hierarchal system where some people outrank others to the point of claiming they weren't even human- and that, to Whitman, was the complete opposite of what the entire American Experiment was about.      His parents were clearly on team America- he had one brother named George Washington Whitman, another named Thomas Jefferson Whitman and a third named Andrew Jackson Whitman.       Ha- I guess that IS a statement.  This unique time of history in which he lived allowed Whitman to see such great contrasts in America- he saw democracy and success found in personal effort.  He saw vast amounts of unpolluted natural beauty, but he also saw evil at its most deranged, and pain and loneliness at its most intense.  We have to remember that his parents lived through the glorious revolutionary war, but he lived during the treacherous Civil War- and his perspective and life experience is very different. He admired the expanse of the West. He loved the natural beauty of this continent, but he also was horrified and despised to its core – the. National plague that has defined and still defines so much of the American story- this legacy of slavery- his views on such, btw- got him fired by more than one employer, btw.  At this time, newspapers were owned and operated by political parties, and he was always slipping in views that the political operatives didn't like- so he got fired.       HA!  Well, I guess some things never change.    One thing that baffles and almost offends most academics is Whitman's absolute nothing of an academic background.  His parents were basically illiterate, his family was excessively large and chaotic; today we would say dysfunctional.  He had one sibling that actually had to be committed to an insane asylum.   His formal education was inadequate because his father sent him out to work.  It's so ironic that the greatest American poet had no formal tutelage to except what he scrounged up for himself in his own self-taught way by reading in libraries and attending operas.  He didn't have that option.  His father was also pretty much a financial failure.  He was a carpenter by trade, but had also had a little property.  His father speculated in real estate after moving to Brooklyn, NY, but wasn't all that great at business and ended up losing most of it.      And of course, that's the problem with the land of opportunity- you are kind of out there on your own to make it or break it.  And people were very aware of this.  There was no guarantee, at all, that America would even survive as a country.  It was still an experiment.  No one else was living like this.  Europeans had monarchies; the South American countries were colonies.  Our neighbors to the East were living in empires.  Only this little backward nation in a corner of North America was trying to do this weird thing.    And Whitman loved it.  He really did.  He loved the land.  He loved the cities.  He loved the people.  He spent the first 36 years of his life walking around and observing life, mostly in New York City and Long Island (which was NOT a suburb of New York at that time).    He loved the libraries and spent tons of time there reading.  He loved music, especially opera, which we'll notice has a strong influence on how he writes.  He loved learning, listening and observing, and this is what he wrote about.  I heard one lecturer say that he was the first non-blind poet- which I thought was weird and what made it stand out.  But what the professor meant was that most poets were writing about their inner life, things from their imagination- think Edgar Allan Poe and “The Raven”, but Whitman, in many cases, was transcribing things that he was seeing and hearing in urban life- and this was very different.  He would catalogue it- to use a word that is often used to describe this thing that we just saw him do in the poem we just read, make these long lists of details in these long sentences.         I also want to point out that it was this desire to self-educate that led him, like many of his day, to be influenced and challenged by the great Ralph Waldo Emerson. We'll do an entire episode or more than one of him, but Emerson's non-conventional ideas about nature and the soul and our inter-connectedness, although ideas that were commonly accepted in the far East, were new on this continent.      True- well, In 1855, something happened.  Whitman self-publishes the book Leaves of Grass.  This first version was only 95 pages long- that's compared to the death bed one which has 415 in my copy.   There was no author's name on the cover.  Instead, on the first page there was this image of a man in laborer's clothes.  Whitman only reveals that he's the author through one of the first unnamed poems calling himself, “Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos.”    If you look up the word Kosmos in the dictionary it will tell you that that word means- a complex orderly self-inclusive system- which is interesting to think about someone describing themselves as- but it's a Greek word.  It's also a Biblical word- which is how I believe Whitman would know it.  It is used in the New Testament to mean the universe or the creation as a whole- that's how Whitman defines himself in this poem “Song of Myself”  and the context of how he wants us to understand his work and who we are as individuals.  We too are kosmos.      Well, it didn't start out very cosmic- that's for sure.  It's a miracle Leaves of Grass came to be read by anyone.  He self-published it, literally type-setting it himself.  He printed 795 copies and sold almost none of them.     Don't you wish you had one of those originals?    I know right, well, people do.  In case you're in the market, there are 200 that are still around, and in 2014, one sold at Christie's for $305,000.  It's so ironic- Whitman struggled financially until the day he died and celebrated working people in everything he wrote.  What do you think he would think of that, Christy?    I have zero doubt, he would love it.  Totally.  Beyond being the book's publisher, he also was the book's publicist.  He sent copies to the leading poets of the day trying to drum up some good reviews.  Whittier was said to thrown his copy into the fire he was so offended and outraged- the homoerotic imagery was more than he could handle, but Ralph Waldo Emerson saw it for what it was and wrote Whitman back an amazing letter of encouragement.  Let me quote Emerson, “I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass. I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”  And of course, to this day, many world class literary scholars still think this about Whitman.       What I find humorous about Whitman is that he wrote glowing reviews of his book himself secretly and published them as if they were written by other people.       Yeah, he was working the influencer thing way back before that was a thing- He also, printed Emerson's actual glowing review when he reprinted the book in 1856, except he didn't get Emerson's permission to do so.  He put Emerson's words, “I greet you at the beginning of a great career” on the spine of the book and he published the entire letter with a long reply andress to Dear Master.”  It was NOT received well by Emerson.      I can see that as being slightly presumptuous.      Of course it was, but I would be tempted as well.  He really admired Emerson, in fact this is what he said about Emerson's influence on his writing.  “I was simmering, simmering, simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”    I want us to read the very first part of Song of Myself which was the first poem    I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  This is what I mean when I say, it seems like it's very simple to understand except I've read this poem hundreds of times and am still slightly confused as to what he means.  The term for this is ambiguous- he makes you, as a reader, put your own interpretation, put yourself into the lines to force the meaning out of it.      True, and if you take it at face value just superficially, it may seem that this is a narcissist celebrating egotism, but it clearly doesn't.  It also could be misunderstood to mean he celebrates idleness and laziness, but that doesn't seem to be right either.    Exactly- I love these first lines.  First of all, they are so iconic.  One thing Whitman is known for besides the cataloguing which I mentioned when we read I Hear America Singing, is this thing that today we call Free Verse. Whitman is often given credit for inventing the concept, although that is debatable.  But what is obvious is that there is no rhyme or meter of any kind at all and there isn't supposed to be.  He doesn't want anything to rhyme.  Instead, he wants to write in these really long sentences.  Every stanza is a single sentence, and he is going to do that through the entire poem.  Whitman felt you couldn't get your idea out in these little short phrases of iambic tetrameter like his Whittier, the guy who threw his book in the fire, was doing.  Whitman wanted, above all else, to create a sense of intimacy between himself and the person reading- and so he wanted to make sure you could follow his idea- from idea to idea.  He got this idea from two places- first he copied the idea from the one book he had been familiar with since his childhood- the King James Version of the Bible.  He copied the style like you see in the Psalms or even the Sermon on the Mount.  He also got the idea from the opera- if you think about opera- you also have these long phrases- that end with things like figaro figaro fiiiigaro-     Is that your impression of the opera?    Well, as you know, I enjoy the opera.  I haven't always, to be honest.  A few years ago, my good friend, I've mentioned her on the podcast before, Millington AP Literature/ Lang teacher Amy Nolette, coerced me to attend with her- and I did.  She is an accomplished musician so she really taught me how to admire what was going on- and we went every year for several years until Covid hit.  But, having said that, I'm fairly sure, that's my best attempt at singing opera.      But back to Whitman, so one of the first things that Whitman is famous for today is this concept of Free Verse- it was innovative then, but now, it doesn't seem that big of a deal.  That was a big deal, but a bigger deal to Whitman were the ideas he was putting out there.    I celebrate myself- not because I'm so important- not because I have all this amazing heritage or skill or anything- I celebrate myself because I have an essence that is 100% unique to me.  Let's read it again.     I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  It's not accidental that he throws in there that scientific language.  And this is where he will offend the capitalist or competitive side of us.  He makes this bold assertion- in this poetic way- to say- what, do you think you're that much better than me- you are made of the exact same material I am- we're both made of atoms- science teaches us that- and for every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.      In some sense it's the I'm okay- you're okay attitude, but taking it up a notch- I celebrate myself- you celebrate yourself.      For sure, and something we all give lip-service to today but no one actually really believes.  I have a creative writing assignment that I ask my students to do every year.  We take another Whitman poem called “There was a Child Went Forth” that talks about identity and the physical objects and places that influence who you are- it's a wonderful poem, anyway, I ask my students to write a poem using Whitman's style and technique about THEIR lives.  I tell them we're going to read them in small groups, and if they like what they wrote and feel comfortable,  we are going to print them and put them outside my door in the hallway for everything to read.  At first they are very very resistant to the idea.  They all hate it- first because it's writing, secondly because it's poetry- but mostly because they don't think they want their lives sprawled on the hallway of the school.  I had a sweet darling child, actually a quiet student, raise her hand in protest and literallty say, I don't want to do this.  I can't do this.  All I do is go to school and work- there is nothing interesting at all about my life.      Ha!  She seems to have missed the point.  She didn't want to celebrate herself and she's exactly the kind of person Whitman loved celebrating.    Exactly- and lots of my kids are like that- they work at Sonic, Chick-Fila- the mall- mowing lawns- but in her case, it turns out she is way more interesting and her poem is on the wall right now.  I may take a picture and post it on our website, so you can see them all.  I'm very proud of my kiddos- not just because they produced good poems but because lots of them are hardworking.       I will say, that next phrase leads us to think that Whitman is a lazy person.  He extols the virtue of loafing.  But of course, what I know about his biography which we'll get more into next week when we talk about his experiences in the Civil War and all of that, but Whitman was the very opposite of lazy.  He was an extremely physical hard worker.      True- Let's read the lines you're talking about..    I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  When he says I loaf and invite my soul- he's getting into the philosopher side of him that is so complex and we really don't even have time to go there today, but it's that old idea of contemplating- today what we call mindfulness.  And I have to admit, I'm not good at this.        He really believes in mindfulness although he didn't know we renamed his concept for him.  Loafe- meaning chill out- turn off the phone, turn off the tv, turn off the computer and invite your soul into yourself.  Chill out!!!  Stop and observe a spear of grass.  Just look at it- let your mind go there- let it focus on something small- it's the kind of thing the yoga instructors keep telling us to do, that we rarely heed but we all know we should.      Exactly- attention and silence- he things they are indispensable to a sane existence- and two things I'm not all that good at.  And then we get to these last two sentences in this opening little poem-    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  There's a lot to say- but he's going to say- I'm proud to be from this place- my parents are from this place.  I'm 37- that is not young.  He is not a child prodigy- he's writing his first book late in life, relatively- he knows that- but he says I'm in good health and I begin- and I'm not going to stop until death- I'm going to live well all the way til the end- I'm not going to give up on myself.  Ever.      I can see why he's inspiring.  And I to get back to this idea of origins.  You know being an American today is something lots of people are proud of (although it is very American to trash our own country) but that's part of our national ethos- but even these same people proudly display their passport.  America is a powerful country and a rich country.  At that time it was a new country- and new countries don't have the safety of heritage and sometimes the people who come from them have trouble taking pride in their heritage.    I totally know what you're talking about.  There was a listener who connected with us through our Instagram page and showed us some beautiful pictures he had taken.  They were truly amazing- not only were the mountains breathtakingly gorgeous in their own right, but his eye for framing was genius.  I messaged him back and told him what I thought of his art.  We went back and forth and I finally asked him.  Where are you from? And he would never tell me.  He said he was from Central Asia and so fort which I eventually gathered he is from one of the new countries formally part of the USSR.   I'm not saying he was ashamed of where he was from, I didn't get that sense, but he seemed intimated that we were from America- a place that seems so far away and idealized from his point of view.  Whitman would tell this young man- you're from that wonderful air,  from wonderful heritage, from atoms just like ours- not just accept it celebrate it.    Because, as I read onward, he seems to imply, this is the attitude that breeds great things that breeds beautiful things but if it doesn't- that's okay as well- keep going all the way til death- compete not with others but with yourself- as he goes to self- publish the same book 8 more times until he does .    Ha!  I guess that's true.      I want to read the last sentence again of that opening because he sets up a lot of the rest of his writings with something of a warning-    Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  Again- that language seems simple but at the same time I have to really work at what he's going to say.  But I have an interpretation- he's going to say this- put away your school learning and your religious training when you read this.  Sit back because I'm going to say some really hard things- that's what he means with that word “hazard”- but they are not mean- they are natural- it's about the energy of being alive.  It's the beauty of being you, of being a physical body, of being an inter-connected spirit with connections to other people and part of this physical space.      And of course, it's that celebration of the physical body that kept getting him censored. Even Ralph Waldo Emerson later when he was reproducing his book begged him to self-censor what was thinly veiled homo-erotic passages, but he just wouldn't.  He didn't see them as erotic- he didn't even see sex like that.  For him sexuality and the physical body had a self-evidence important place in our lives and had to be brought out in the open- be it a hazard or not.  And again, it kind of was a hazard, he lost a really good job in Washington at one point because his boss found a copy of leaves of Grass in his desk and found it obscene.      Poor guy- well, that takes us to the title- Leaves of Grass- and what that even means.  I mentioned that Whitman was famous for his style or innovative literary technique, he has been increasingly praised for his innovative ideas about the body, the self, consciousness- he was one of the first America poets to even write about consciousness- the other one btw is Emily Dickinson.  But probably the thing I like the best about Whitman, and this is me, personally, is his ability to really capture a wonderful metaphor.  He could just say things in an understandable and pretty way- and this is what poetry really is all about- for my money.    This phrase that is the title – Leaves of Grass- it means something.  First let's read the first part of Song of Myself that talks about grass- I'd ask you to read all of it but I think we might get lost. Song of Myself number 6.      A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;  How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.  I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.    Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,  A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropt,  Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say Whose?    Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.    Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,  And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,  Growing among black folks as among white,  Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.  And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.  When Whitman loafs around and stares at grass- he sees a picture of America- or a picture of any democracy any group of people that understand that they are one poeple- of which America was the example he knew, but he's not exclusionary by any means.  He says, look, every single blade of grass is totally different and yet in some sense the same.  He calls it a uniform hieroglyphic- what an interesting turn of phrase.  It's and I use his words here “black folks as among white, kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congreeman, Cuff, I give to me the same, I receive them the same.”    For Whitman, the picture of America was a field of grass.  If we look at it, we see hopeful green woven stuff. The handkerchief of the Lord- but if we look at it closely we're all so different- and both things are truly beautiful.  It's a paradox.   He goes on to say, it's from the land, it's made up of the dust that is made up of the people of the land- I know it gets philosophical- and you can take it as far deep as you want to plunge with him.   But you don't have to get all that deep or esoteric if you don't want to.  You can just lay on the grass, and smell it and enjoy it- loaf on it- to use his words.    You know what I like about that entire image and about Whitman's entire philosophy.  He absolutely spoke of diversity, but he did not celebrate diversity- not like we think of doing that today.  He celebrates unity- and that's why this metaphor is the title.  Whitman had a very refined understanding of how easy we can rip each other apart- there is not more divisive time in American history than the 1850s and of course the 1860s- which are the war years.   He lived through the most divided time in American history and he could see it coming even in 1855.  But during his life time, he would see 2.5% of America's population die killing each other that was 750,000 people- if we would compare it to the population of America today- that would be over 7 million people.  Next week we will see how much he admired Lincoln and what he stood for, but as he understood the American experiment,  he believed in admiring differences and loving them, but identifying as a single group- first and foremost.  The dominant image here is of a single landscape- beautiful and united across time and space respecting the past not judging or condemning it- allowing ourselves to spring from it renewed and refreshed.   And I think that's where the universal appeal comes from.  If Whitman was just about American patriotism, maybe we'd like him in this country, but it would feel propagandistic.  His ideals are universal and apply to any group of people- anywhere.  And he's not afraid to admit-some of thing may be self-contradictory.  The first time I ever read Whitman was in college.  I went to school studying political science, but in my junior year I decided I didn't want to do that anymore and I was going to get an English major, well this meant I had to take almost exclusively classes that demanded intense reading- and all at the same time.  I read so much that they all ran together and my grades were not as good as they could have been had I had a healthier pace.  And in all that reading, not a whole lot stood out- but this little poem by Whitman actually did- I underlined it, and I kept the trade book I purchased at the time.  I actually still have it after all these years and so many moves.  In this little section, Whitman is talking in that intimate way that he talks to his reader- it's personal- it's in the second person- and at that time of my life- it was a very chaotic time to be honest- I had no idea what I was doing in my life, my mother had recently died, I had very little idea what I should do in the future- I had changed directions at the last moment- and these famous words just stood out.  Will you read them?  51  The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them.  And proceed to fill my next fold of the future.  Listener up there! what have you to confide to me?  Look in my face while I snuff the sidle of evening,  (Talk honestly, no one else hears you, and I stay only a minute longer.)  Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict myself,  (I am large, I contain multitudes.)  I concentrate toward them that are nigh, I wait on the door-slab.  Who has done his day's work? who will soonest be through with his supper?  Who wishes to walk with me?  Will you speak before I am gone? will you prove already too late?  Christy- what did that mean to you.      I really have no idea.  I think the line that I liked is the line everyone likes, “Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict. Myself.”   It just made me feel better.  I knew I was full of inconsistencies. And Whitman just seemed to be saying- of course you are- everyone is- to understand that is just being honest.  Let it go.  Just concentrate on what is near- what you're doing today, supper- that sort of thing.  If you're successful- that's great- if you're a failure- what difference does it make- we're all the same atoms, we're all just leaves of grass.   He just made me feel okay.    Which I guess that would probably have made him happy- the bard of democracy- known as the good gray poet- speaking across time and space about what it means to be a human- to be a leaf of grass.  Thanks for listeninging- next episode- we will delve a little more into his adult life, read some of his most famous poems – those tributes to Abraham Lincoln- and finish our discussion of this amazing American.  AS always, please share about us with a friend or colleague- push out an episode on your social media feed, text an episode to a friend.  Connect with us on our social media at howtolovelitpodcast on facebook, Instagram, twitter, or Linkedin.  If you are a teacher, visit our website for teaching materials that provide ideas scaffolding for using our podcasts as instructional pieces in your classroom.      Peace out.      

Last Word On Spurs
'Spurs In Focus Ft. Tim Vickery'

Last Word On Spurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 100:41


Host Ricky Sacks was joined by John Wenham from Lilywhite Rose and returning special guest Tim Vickery who is a freelance English football journalist, who has lived in Brazil since 1994. He is the South American football correspondent for BBC Sport, contributing to the corporation's output online, on TV and radio.  An independent Tottenham Hotspur Fan Channel providing instant post-match analysis and previews to every single Spurs match along with a range of former players, managers & special guests. Please can we ask you to take this opportunity to *SUBSCRIBE* to the Last Word On Spurs and THANKS FOR WATCHING. Whilst watching our content we would greatly appreciate if you can LIKE the video and SUBSCRIBE to the channel, along with leaving a COMMENT below.  - DIRECT CHANNEL INFORMATION: - Media/General Enquiries: lastwordonspurs@outlook.com - SOCIALS: * Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/LastWordOnSpurs * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/LastWordOnSpurs * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LastWordOnSpurs * Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/@LastWordOnSpurs * YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbqK092y4W290g_C3tuKEbg WEBSITE: www.lastwordonspurs.co.uk #THFC #TOTTENHAM #SPURS

The Final Bell
The Friday Fontanelle Final Bell with Jeff Peterson with Heartland Farm Partners

The Final Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 13:25


11-19-21 *How did the corn and soybean markets perform for the week? *What does the ethanol margins and corn demand for ethanol look like? *How are soybean crush margins and soybean crush doing? *What does the corn exports look like? *How does the soybean exports look? *How is South American weather looking? *What do you think happens to corn and soybean basis levels down the road?

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: China Bans Feminine Men

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:03


China bans feminine men on TV, meanwhile a South American snake's venom can help combat the coronavirus.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaStand with Patriot Mobile. Free activations with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comStart your day a new way and receive a 30-day supply of SuperBeets Heart Chews with your first purchase.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: China Bans Feminine Men

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:03


China bans feminine men on TV, meanwhile a South American snake's venom can help combat the coronavirus.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaStand with Patriot Mobile. Free activations with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comStart your day a new way and receive a 30-day supply of SuperBeets Heart Chews with your first purchase.

Sew What?
Molas of the Kuna: A Central and South American Indigenous Textile Tradition

Sew What?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:21


In the second mini episode of the season, Isabella discusses molas made by the Kuna, an indigenous people in Panama and Colombia. Molas are reverse appliquéd textiles central to Kuna women's clothing and the region's tourist industry.Images and sources are available at @sewwhatpodcast on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. The podcast has a website, sewwhatpodcast.com, and a Patreon, patreon.com/sewwhatpodcast.

Houston Matters
COVID and the holidays, & the importance of being uncomfortable (Nov. 18, 2021)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:15


On Thursday's Houston Matters: Many of us will travel over Thanksgiving and the holidays that follow. How might it impact the state of the pandemic? We talk it over with Dr. James McDeavitt from Baylor College of Medicine. Also this hour: On this date in 1978, 900 people died at The Peoples Temple in Jonestown, a settlement in the South American jungle of Guyana, in an act carried out by followers of cult leader Jim Jones. The shocking event had a Houston connection, as our Michael Hagerty learned in his 2018 conversation with writer Jeff Guinn, author of The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and The Peoples Temple. Then, there's been a lot of attention and hand-wringing lately over what public schools teach about sexuality and race. For example, books in Texas schools came under scrutiny recently because they cover some perceived uncomfortable subject matter. But aren't we regularly encouraged to get outside our comfort zones? We discuss the importance of sometimes being uncomfortable in our everyday lives. And we talk with Texas bee expert Jack Neff.

Adams on Agriculture
AOA - November, 15 2021

Adams on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:50


Monday on AOA DTN meteorologist John Baranick looks at the impact of LaNina on US and South American weather, Stone X economist Arlan Suderman breaks down impact of China talks and inflation on the markets and PERC's Mike Newland discusses propane supply and price for this winter.

Esports Minute
Complexity Returns To RLCS, Perkz Leaves C9 For EU, DrDisrespect Shadowbanned

Esports Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 2:42


Complexity signed the players from True Neutral's South American roster. Perkz leaves Cloud 9 just one year after joining them and uprooting Western LoL. DrDisrespect hasn't worked closely with a major developer since his Twitch ban, why? Watch The Gamer Hour - Esportz Network's new show from Times Square. (https://youtu.be/H2OBkNLYAaw) If you are interested in being a sponsor for the Esports Minute, Esports Network Podcast, College Esports QuickTake or The Gamer Hour, please reach out to Esportz Network CEO Mark Thimmig by emailing mthimmig@esportznetwork.com. If you enjoyed the podcast, please rate and subscribe, it helps us out a ton! New episodes Monday through Friday. For more in-depth news check out our feature show the Esportz Network Podcast The Esports Network Podcast (https://www.esportznetworkpodcast.com/). If you are interested in learning more about college esports, subscribe to the College Esports QuickTake. (https://esportzcollegequicktakecom.fireside.fm/) Follow Kevin on Twitter @Correa24 (https://twitter.com/Correa24) Follow Esportz Network on Twitter (https://twitter.com/EsportzNetwork), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/esportznetwork/), and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/EsportzNetwork) @EsportzNetwork Or visit our website esportznetwork.com (https://www.esportznetwork.com/) for updates on what's to come!

Expanded Perspectives
Grey Wolf: Classic Rewind

Expanded Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 74:49


On this episode of Expanded Perspectives Classic Rewind, we go all the way back to January 27, 2014, when we spoke with author, researcher,  and friend Gerrard Williams about his book Grey Wolf - The Escape of Adolf Hitler!  Gerrard Williams is an international journalist and historian with an esteemed career spanning over thirty years. His resume includes acting as Duty Editor for Reuters, the BBC and Sky News. Williams' groundbreaking reporting has taken him to the front lines of the fall of the Soviet Union, the Rwandan Genocide, the 2004 tsunami in Thailand and the US occupation of Iraq, among many other international stories. Ten years ago, while reporting in Argentina, Williams came across evidence in a local archive that changed the way he looked at historical reporting–Nazi war criminals, potentially including Adolf Hitler, used clandestine international routes to flee defeated Germany for safe haven in Argentina and other South American countries. Using these archives, eye-witness reports and other local histories, Williams published the book, Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler. Despite the rigor in his journalism and his adherence to facts and evidence, the international community has largely ignored him. Today, with the release of classified FBI and OSS documents, his work is finally getting the credit and respect it deserves. Williams has taken over a dozen trips to Argentina, and visited locations like Hotel Eden, Bariloche and the Inalco House years before the FBI files pointed them out as potential locations of intrigue. Unlike his previous efforts, which lacked the finances and technology to dig deep enough to truly uncover anything, he believes that this team won't be held back in the same way. Williams understands how sensitive to discuss and unfathomable to comprehend this subject is, but he stands by his work and welcomes a spirited debated revolving around the newly released facts. All of this and more on this episode of Expanded Perspectives Classic Rewind! Show Notes: Email: expandedperspectives@yahoo.com Hotline: 888-393-2783 Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler Want to help out the show? Expanded Perspectives Elite Music: All music for Expanded Perspectives is provided by Epidemic Sound!

AgriTalk
AgriTalk-November 11, 2021

AgriTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:40


Ethan Lane, vice president of government affairs at the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, is back for the second time this week and this time it's to discuss the recent announcement regarding the Cattle Price Discovery and Transparency Act. Soybean & Corn Advisor's Dr. Michael Cordonnier joins us to discuss the South American crops and other topics related to crop production. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: The Role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Antonio Flores, president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), leads a conversation on the role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in higher education. FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted and honored to have Dr. Antonio Flores with us today to discuss the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions. Dr. Flores is president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Established in 1986, HACU represents more than five hundred colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Europe. During his tenure as president of HACU, the association has nearly tripled its membership and budget, expanded its programs, and improved legislation for Hispanic Serving Institutions, and increased federal and private funding for HSIs. He previously served as director of programs and services for the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority, and the Michigan Higher Education Student Loan Authority. And, needless to say, he's taught at public and private institutions, conducted research and policy studies on higher education issues. And so it really is wonderful to have him with us today to talk about HACU, how HACU is committed to the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions, and to serving underrepresented populations. Obviously, we are very much looking to develop talent for the next generation of foreign policy leaders, and really look forward to this conversation. So, Antonio, thank you for being with us. It would be great if you could talk about the Hispanic Serving Institutions, their role in higher education, and your strategic vision for HACU broadly. FLORES: Thank you, Irina, for those very flattering remarks and introduction. And of course, we're delighted to be part of the series here today and talk a little bit about what HSIs are doing and how they can do more of the great work they've been doing for the nation, and HACU's role as well in promoting them. And suffice to say that Hispanic Serving Institutions have become the backbone of not only Hispanic higher education, but also the American labor force. Because there are more—there are more than 560 now HSIs across the nation, enroll the vast majority, more than 5.2 million of them, of underserved students who historically have not been adequately served in higher education, including Latinos. And it just happens that this population, the Hispanic population, is contributing more than half of all the new workers joining the American labor force today. And that proportion is likely to continue to increase in the years ahead. In addition, of course, they serve scores of African Americans, of Asian Americans, Native Americans, and all Americans. So they are really a microcosm of American diversity. And for that very reason, going forward as these populations continue to increase demographically, their representation in the labor force will only continue to develop. The latest Census Bureau report for 2010 to 2020 indicates that more than 51 percent of all the population growth in the nation is attributed to Hispanics. So there we have it. It's just the reality of the facts. And therefore, HSIs are now the backbone of America's labor force, because ultimately the demands of the global economy are such that we need to step up to the plate and really educate at a much higher level, and train at a much higher level those underserved populations, particular Hispanics, so that we can remain competitive in that global economy. And that includes the preparation of top-notch leaders for foreign service careers. And so if we were to summarize how we view HSIs with respect to America's challenges today, and opportunities in the future, I would say that there are three dimensions that define HSIs vis a vis the United States of America and its future in the world. Number one is diversity. And I already alluded to some of that. But diversity is not just with respect to the fact that they have the most diverse student population on their campuses. But it's also the diversity across types of institutions because we have community colleges, we have regional universities, and we have research-intensive, or R1 institutions. So we have within campuses tremendous diversity, and we have across campuses nationwide institutionally diversity as well. And so that's the name of the game. And that's the name of the game for America, is diversity. And it's the name of the game for the world. It's a very diverse world out there. And so the more attuned those top-notch leaders that were looking to educate in our institutions are with respect to their diversity, the more not only knowledgeable and experienced and sensitive to that diverse reality of the world and of America, the much better leaders they are going to be. And so diversity, again, is that one unavoidable element of our world and of our country. The second, I think, very important element or dimension of HSIs is the dynamism. They are very dynamic institutions that are really doing a magnificent job with fewer resources than the rest of the field. They don't have the big pockets or big endowments. They don't have the applications they need from the federal government they should get. And yet, they excel at educating those who come to their campuses. Just to give you an idea, Opportunity Insights is a name of an organization that does socioeconomic analysis of graduates from students from colleges across the country. And particularly they focus on how institutions educate and position in careers those who come from the lowest quintile of entering freshmen to college. And they believe that those who graduate, they graduate and see what proportion of those who came in the lowest quintile move to the top quintile in terms of earnings. And in the last report I saw, nine of the ten top institutions in that regard were Hispanic Serving Institutions. Nine of the top ten. It's not the Ivy League institutions, for sure. It is those institutions that I mentioned that are part of our group of HSIs. And in fact, the number one is Cal State LA in that report that I saw. And so, again, because they are very dynamic, creative, innovative, and resourceful with respect to using what little they have to optimize the educational outcomes of those who come to their campuses. And not just educational outcomes, but career outcomes. Once they are in the workforce, their earnings are higher than those of others from the same lowest quintile when they enter college. So dynamism is the second major component. And I would say deliverance. Deliverance for underserved populations is another important quality that HSIs represent, because they are ultimately serving—for the most part, the majority of their students are first-generation college students, many of them from immigrant families who are unfamiliar with the educational system and with the intricacies of going through a college education, because they themselves never had that opportunity to pass down. So they are at a very distinct socioeconomic disadvantage coming from those types of families who are also low income, because to be an HSI not only does an institution have to have more than 25 percent of its enrollment being Hispanic, but also they have to show that the majority of their students are Pell Grant eligible—in other words, needy, low-income students. And the other criterion is that they have to spend on average per student less than the average of their peer institutions. So they are efficient, very cost-effective, and they serve the neediest of our society. So there you have it. Diversity, dynamism, and deliverance for the most needed in our society. That's what HSIs are all about. And so they really are in need of much greater support from the federal government, the state governments, and from the corporate community and the philanthropic community. And our association advocates for that to be the case, with some success but not enough. We have been able to increase the appropriations for them from Congress over the years, but they are way behind other cohorts of minority-serving institutions that get much more money per student than HSIs do, despite the fact that they—for instance, they not only educate 67 percent of all the 3.8 million Hispanics in college today; they also educate three times as many African Americans as all the HBCUs combined. Let me repeat that: More than three times as many African Americans go to HSIs as they go to HBCUs, OK? And more than 42 percent of all the Asian Americans in college today attend HSIs. They also educate more than twice as many Native Americans as all the tribal colleges and universities put together. And then we have other groups of different national origins who come to our campuses. So they are extremely diverse. And so that's, in a nutshell, what HSIs are all about. And they've been growing, about thirty new HSIs per year, because demographically it's how the country's moving. There are more Hispanic young people emerging from high school and going to college than from any other group. And conversely, the non-Hispanic White student enrollment has been declining continually year after year for the last ten years. Look at the numbers. And that's not going to stop. In major states, like California and Texas, for example, the two largest in the nation, more than 50 percent—about 52-55 percent of the K-12 enrollment is Hispanic. If you add the other minority populations, overwhelmingly these states futures are diverse and Hispanic. And so is the country. Other states are moving in the same direction, whether it's Florida, or Illinois, or New York, New Jersey. The main states in the nation are moving in those—in that direction. So that's why it's so essential for Congress, the states, corporate America, and philanthropic America to invest in these institutions much more than they have been doing, because they represent the very future of this nation. To the extent that the new generations of graduates coming out of them are equipped with the right tools to succeed as scientists, as technicians, as professionals in whatever field they choose, our country will thrive. And the opposite will happen if we don't. It's that simple. And so that's what I wanted to just briefly say as an introductory commentary on HSIs. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Thank you very much for that. We're going to go to the group now for their questions. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I'm going to first go to Manuel Montoya, who has raised his hand. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And, Dr. Flores, it's a real pleasure to have you on the call. I appreciate all the work that you do for HACU and for Hispanic Serving Institutions. I am with the University of New Mexico. I'm an associate professor in international management at UNM, but I also do a lot of work with my cohorts on supporting HSI—our HSI designation. We are a Hispanic Serving Institution and an R1 institution as well. All of the things you said are really important. And I had a comment and then a question. I think this question of—this idea of diversity being the name of the game is not to be underestimated. I think that the students that go through HSI-designated institutions, I think that they have the potential to reshape and recalibrate what we mean when we say we are ambassadorial in the world. And the United States needs to upgrade and change its relational dynamics, political and economic, to include diverse voices that come from the learned and lived experiences of people who traditionally come from first-generation families, first-generation students. And HSIs are equipped to do that. So my question becomes, you mentioned wanting to track some people into the foreign service exam. But what other types of experiences or opportunities do you think are best practices for students that are coming out of HSIs to participate in the larger international relations frameworks and careers that are setting the global agenda? FLORES: That's a good question, Professor Montoya. And let me share with you briefly something that I mentioned before we started the webinar to friends at CFR. And that is that HACU has a very robust national internship program that places upwards of five hundred undergraduates, and some of our graduate students, with federal agencies, including the State Department. We signed an MOU with the late Secretary Powell, who at that time was very much committed to increasing the number of Latinos in the Foreign Service, and other underrepresented populations. And that remains in place, although not with the numbers that we would like to see. And yet, there are other agencies that also have a foreign or abroad projection, like Department of Agriculture, for example. And others that have offices across the world. And so we are very much into helping them find the right talent they need, and getting them also as interns experience those agencies, and putting them on the right track to become full-fledged employees once they graduate. So that's one of the things that we've been doing. We need to do much more of that. I accept that the number is, as impressive as they may sound, are very minute when it comes to the populations that we're talking about. And our own association has made it a priority to expand its international reach. And we have, depending on the year, anywhere from forty to fifty universities across Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain that are affiliated with us to do precisely what you suggest, which is student mobility and experience abroad. And so—and in both directions, also that they would come to be in the U.S. And so we have the beginnings, I think, of a major push to make sure that many, many more young people who—they have a kind of an almost organic connection to international affairs, in this case Latinos, because most of them come from families who immigrated or have roots in other countries, and are really very much culturally adept to international roles. So your point is well-taken. And you'll see a lot more activity from our end as an association in that regard. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Shoshana Chatfield. Q: Yes, hello. I wanted to say thank you for such a wonderful presentation and for really exposing me to some of the issues that I wasn't aware of previously. I am the president of the United States Naval War College. And since I've been here over the past two years, I have been actively trying to expand our recruiting effort to make our vacancies on our faculty available to members of the community. And yet, I'm not seeing any appreciable difference in the applicant pool. And I wondered if you could advise me how I might approach this differently to raise awareness about hiring to these war colleges who have not traditionally had a high representation of faculty who come from the same backgrounds that you described. FLORES: Thank you. Thank you for your very timely question, President Chatfield. Let me say that one of the first things that I would suggest is that you join our association as a college. Why would that be helpful to your effort? Because then you will connect with presidents and CEOs of five hundred-plus community colleges, regional university, and so forth, and school districts that are also affiliated with that, that are defined as Hispanic-serving school districts. So that even in high school you will have a presence through our association's outreach to them, and that you also would network with peers of diverse institutions across the country who may have robust pipelines of Ph.D. graduates and others who could fit your own aspirations, in terms of getting some of those faculty on your campus, some of those administrators, and some of those as students. Because, at the end of the day, probably—you probably want to have a much more diverse student body. And that can come from precisely that opportunity to not only interact but formally establish relationships with some of those colleges to transfer, for instance, from community colleges or from high schools that we interact with on a regular basis. So that would be one suggestion. We also have in our association a very, very nimble system called ProTalento. It's online. That is P-R-O-T-A-L-E-N-T-O, ProTalento. And that that—you can go to our website, find it. And we have on that website a very robust database of individuals who are looking for opportunities at different colleges. That are already teaching, or doing research, or both, and are looking for other opportunities. And also, we have institutions that are looking for them. And the system basically matches them. So you can go there and find a goldmine, so to speak, of talent. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Great question. And we have a written question, a couple written questions in the chat. This one comes from Andrea Purdy, who is an associate professor of Spanish at Colorado State University. We are anticipating reaching HSI status. And in talking to my students, a comment they have made to me is that they don't always feel welcomed all over the university. There are niches, but overall the sense of belonging is not felt. They also commented that while they are beginning to see themselves in classrooms, they don't see themselves in the faculty. What suggestions do you have for universities to make sure that the inclusivity is felt at all levels? FLORES: Well, it's similar to the previous question in some—in some regards, because ultimately the first thing you want to do as a college or university, it has to be job number one, is to create a climate—a campus climate of support and welcoming feelings for the students, that they feel not only appreciated but they feel really supported and welcome to the institution. And so the point made is how can we recruit or how can we diversify faculty and staff? Well, again, you go—you know, when you want to catch fish, you go fishing where the fish are. And the fish are in some of the HSIs, those that are already more developed institutions. And many of them are regional universities or R1s or R2s. And those could be a source of talent for institutions like Colorado State, that is lacking some of their representation. And of course, I want to insist that please visit ProTalento. And you may be surprised how much success you could have in getting people from that database to consider your institution. But of course, faculty and staff who look like the students are essential to create that culture, that campus climate of appreciation and welcoming, I would say. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Rosa Cervantes, who has a raised hand. And please unmute yourself and tell us your affiliation. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you for taking my questions. My name is Rosa Isela Cervantes. I'm the director of El Centro de la Raza at the University of New Mexico, and also special assistant to the president on Latino Affairs. And I really interested in what you said, Mr. Flores, about the diversity of students at HSIs, and that we serve three times the amount of—if I heard correctly—of African American students at HSIs than BCUs, is that correct? Is that— FLORES: That is correct, yes. Q: OK. And I wanted to see if you could expand a little bit about that, and also maybe think through or talk to how we can do some coalition building with folks. Because I really feel like HSIs are completely underfunded, right? You've stated it, we've heard it. But yet, they're so robust and they do so many different things for so many different students. I wonder how we might continue—and we're a member of HACU—but I wonder how we maybe think through some conversations to really get out the word about that idea, that HSIs are that robust, that HSIs do served large populations of students. And sometimes some of the most neediest students that require more money, right, for their funding. And so I just think that's very interesting. I think—I don't think a whole lot of people know about it or understand that. I had a faculty member at a different institution actually question me, because I had read that somewhere. And I think we need to talk more about it. So I'm just wondering your thoughts about coalition building and what else we can do, and how other ways that HACU needs our support to make that happen. FLORES: Thank you for your excellent question, Ms. Cervantes. And let me share with you that last week I was in Washington, D.C. most of the week and met with a number of Congress individually, including your great senator, Mr. Lujan. And guess what? There was a lot of good conversation about that point. And I have also talked with a number of African American members of Congress who didn't know that, and who actually had themselves—(background noise)—and who actually have themselves a significant number of HSIs in their districts. And they didn't know that they had all these HSIs in their districts. And so I think the word is getting out there. And, more importantly, the appreciation for the fact that these institutions really are very diverse, and not only do they educate the vast majority of Latinos and Latinas, but they also educate a larger number, as we said, of African Americans and others than the HBCUs, for example. And they didn't know that. And then—so I think that mindset might begin to change, because at the end of the day the funding and support should be focused on the students. And ultimately, if you help the neediest of students you have the more diverse population, but you have the fewest dollars per student coming from Congress. There has to be something wrong there with that equation. So there is an inequity that we are, as an association, trying to remedy. And we need all the help we can get from all—our own Latino organizations and HSIs, but also from others including the HBCUs. It's not about reducing funding for them or anything like that. They can and should be getting even more. But not—but HSIs shouldn't be treated as second-class institutions. They are not. They are the backbone, again, of America's labor force, in terms of training that labor force to be competitive in the global economy. So they have to be treated appropriately and equitably. Basically, it's about equity in terms of funding. And right now, things are not at all equitable, but we're changing that gradually. And thank you for your question. Q: Gracias. FASKIANOS: So we have a written—several written questions. So Sandra Castro, who is assistant dean of the undergraduate programs at Adelphi University says: What recommendations do you have for institutions that are striving to become HSIs in preparing for this designation? What internal changes and institutional infrastructure is necessary to truly serve the Latino student body? FLORES: I will suggest three things. One is, begin to work more closely with institutions that are already HSIs and that are doing a good job being HSIs, that are recognized for having, as they say, best practices with respect to being an HSI. And learn from them. Learn how it is that they do what they do well. And begin to then—and the second point is, educate your own leadership at your institution about how they can be much more effective and receptive to the inevitable demographic change in their student population to become an HSI, and how they can make the most of it in terms of student success, and also learning the ropes of how to get grants and funding to improve services for this population. And the third thing that I would recommend very strongly is that, you know, take a very hard look at all of your outreach and marketing materials, and revise them accordingly so that you reflect that commitment to diversity, in particular to Latino inclusion, in terms of bilingual materials and outreach to families and communities. Because many times the decision about whether to go to college or where to go to college by a student is really influenced very heavily by the family, the parents particularly, because of the tremendous pressure that many of them have in starting to work to contribute to the family income, because they come from low-income families. So working with those families and making them aware of the importance of getting a degree, a college degree, and postponing some of that lower-income—some of the minimum-wage salary that they could get as a high school graduate, and working with those families is very important. Working in their language and culture is even more important for some of them. FASKIANOS: Great. I think this is a good segue to the next question from Eric Hoffman, who got an upvote. He's the dean of the Honors College at Miami Dade College. And his question is: How can we get the Hispanic and Latinx students out of their community and expand their aspirations to colleges and universities in states and areas far from home? FLORES: Well, you know, it's an excellent question, in the sense that historically—because these are first-generation college students for the most part, whose families have not had the opportunity to educate themselves in college. And their temptation is to stay home. Especially sometimes it's worse for female students to move away from home. And my suggestion is that you, again, will work with those families as closely as you can to make them aware of the fact that moving away doesn't mean—moving away physically doesn't mean moving away from the family otherwise, that they will ultimately remain connected to the family. And now with technology it's even easier. You know, we have Facetime. We have all kinds of other ways of interacting that were not available just some years ago. And they ultimately need to consider the best options in terms of financial aid and the quality of education they're going to get, and a few of the studies that they want to pursue. Sometimes all of those things are not available locally, so you have to go where all of those are. And I think that once there is a process of education for the family in that regard, they tend to be much more flexible. We experience some of that with our own national internship program, because we place them primarily in the Washington area, but also in other places. And I personally get to intervene sometimes with some families in their language, in Spanish, to reassure them that the young woman that was going to be placed somewhere else in Washington, D.C. or elsewhere was going to be OK, and she was going to come back home after the ten-week experience, or fifteen-week internship. And, guess what? After they experienced that, their siblings—they were trailblazers for their siblings and for neighbors, and all that. Now we don't have that problem, at least with our internship program. We have thousands of applicants and, unfortunately, we can only place about five hundred a year, annually. And so it does pay off to invest in working with families closely. And again, it's a generational effect, because then younger siblings or relatives will not have that kind of issue going forward. FASKIANOS: You had mentioned that you were in D.C. last week meeting with members of Congress. And we obviously have a new secretary of education, Dr. Cardona. Have you seen a shift from the Biden administration in their approach and what they're doing from a federal level to support the HSIs? FLORES: Oh, absolutely. I mean, there is just no question about that. The shift has been dramatic. And this administration and Congress are—have shifted gears and are actually investing more than anything else in people, investing in the economy to create more jobs, investing in education to prepare the labor force much better, investing in health to protect people from not just the pandemic but from other diseases that we experience. And just in general, the infrastructure, they just passed that bill in the House, is to improve the lives of people across cities, across states, by improving their infrastructure. It is not just about roads and bridges. It is also about water systems that are decaying and are affecting the health of people. It is about the lack of access to broadband connectivity. It is all of those things that will improve the lives of people. And so there, no question. And HSIs have improved—again, not to the extent that they should be supported. But we are in a much better situation now than we were just a couple of years ago. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take Nathan Carter's written question, and then Mike Lenaghan, I know you wrote a comment/question in the chat, but I'd love for you just to raise it and speak it, because I'm afraid I might not get it exactly correct. So Nathan Carter from Northern Virginia Community College in the Washington D.C. metro area. I am the—NOVA's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer. We are an emerging HSI. When we look at our enrollment data here in fall 2021, we see a clear decline in quote/unquote “new” Hispanic students, both male and female. We wish to discuss this growing issue and recognize what may be the current obstacles or community issues happening right now in the Hispanic community that will help us explain what we see and how we can reach out to the Hispanic community to help address what could be a growing problem across various states. So I think if you could comment on that, and how to, you know, have that discussion. FLORES: Well, thank you for that question. It's something that, of course, has been exacerbated by the pandemic. Because a lot of our colleges and universities, HSIs and others, did not have the endowments or the money to immediately make—shift gears in the direction of the technology required to move from in-person to online teaching and learning, and to train faculty and staff to manage all of those new systems. And that's on the institutional side, that there was that kind of reality of not getting all of the necessary resources to make that shift immediately and successfully. On the receiving end you have families and communities that do not always have the connectivity to broadband and the devices at home and the space at home to learn online. And so it was a one-two punch—institutional and students were hit very hard. And therefore, many of them withdrew. And apart from the fact that when it comes to the rate of infection, hospitalization and death, Latinos were worse hit than any other population, so much so that during the pandemic Latinos shrank their life expectancy by three years, compared to two years for Black and 0.68 years, so less than a year, for non-Hispanic Whites. So you do have all of those things. And ultimately, that means that the students served by these institutions come from those very families that were hardest hit in their health as well. So they couldn't go to school. They were trying to survive. And many did not. And so there was a drop in the enrollment, and particularly at community colleges, is where the—they were the hardest hit with respect to that, just like that community that is emerging as an HSI. So we are pushing very hard for that to be remedied, not just for the pandemic, but for the long term. Because I think the hybrid models of teaching and learning should—will remain in place for the long haul. And we need to make sure that those families, those communities that have been historically underserved and underfunded get that necessary technology at home to do that type of educational experience. We also need to make sure that the institutions that are suffering the most get the most help to beef up their infrastructure. And not just in terms of technology, but also in terms of expanding classrooms and also creating labs that are very expensive to create for technology of science or engineering types of degrees, which are the most in demand. And in some states, it's even—it's worse than in others because a lot of students are homeless. A lot of students are homeless. And in a state like California, where we have the largest concentration of Latinos, for example, that problem has been rampant and recognized by the state as a huge priority. So what they need to do is also build affordable housing even on campuses, so that those students have a place to live in a decent, humane way. And so there are many things that come to create this perfect storm against populations like low-income Latinos, and African Americans, and others. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to ask Mike Lenaghan to ask his question live. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And it's a pleasure to see you, Dr. Flores. I am Mike Lenaghan from Miami Dade College, and truly cherish the empowerment we've enjoyed through the vehicle of HACU. It's been my experience, basically with a great deal of labor-intensive and purposeful leadership development, to have my scholars—just me, as one faculty member—successfully transfer to over 139 colleges and universities in the United States, all of whom required financial support and almost all of whom were able to avoid loans. This is over a twenty-year period. My question is: How might I, as a faculty member, also someone who's labor-intensive, be empowered, possibly mediated by HACU, to share basically how to set up my Hispanic students and their families and their relatives for the kind of success my scholars have enjoyed at Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Georgetown, UVA, Duke, UCal Berkeley, and so on? Which, when the right combination of chemistry and self-identification occurs, each of my Hispanic/Latinx scholars basically knows what they uniquely bring and add, as well as what they uniquely can address and engage in each school. I realize I am just a microcosm in a larger macrocosm, but I'm wondering does HACU have a role to play that might mediate some education and sharing, not just a book or a strategy, but something that could be shared, including some of what I like to call my all-stars, who have enjoyed operating in the context of HACU as a launching pad. Thank you, sir. FLORES: Thank you for your very, very important work, Professor Lenaghan. And thank you for your very caring teaching and supporting our students, your scholars. And ultimately, you have a lot to offer to the academic community as a faculty who cares about these students not only doing well but excelling and going to places that perhaps their families never thought of them being able to go. And I think it begins with learning from people like you what is it you've been doing so well to help those that you have helped to excel. And HACU can be a platform for you to share that. We ultimately have annual conferences and other meetings where your expertise and your success can be shared with others to adapt it to their own needs and replicate what you've been doing so well in other places, so that many more can go onto those very selective institutions, and others. And of course, I don't know if we've been connecting—I insist on this point, on connecting with families, because many of the Latino families—and maybe in the Miami area it's a little different because a lot of the Cuban and South American families perhaps come from a more middle-class background than in places like Texas or California. And maybe they had already some collegiate experience in their home countries, and they immigrated there, or whatever. But that helps a lot, OK? When they come with that background. But when they don't, when they are immigrants who come without even a high school diploma from their home countries, and they don't know the language, their highest expectation is at least to get their high school diploma and start working somewhere. And so taking them to the next level, it takes a lot of work. And it takes a lot of work in terms of making sure that they understand that if their child has the talent, and has the persistence and discipline, et cetera, et cetera, to go places, that they can be very helpful to him or her in ensuring that there is a space at home where they can study, that they do concentrate on their studies, and that they really aim for those places that you mentioned and don't settle for second-best of going to some institution, but make that their goal: I'm going to go to X or Y Ivy League or very selective institution because I have with it takes, but it's going to take a lot of nurturing and support. And the parents can be very helpful, even if they don't have an education, by really making sure that their child has the space and the time at home to concentrate and study. That will go a long way. But really, let them flourish. And so HACU can be a platform in three different ways. One is, allowing individuals like yourself, who are excelling in their teaching, to share their best practices with others. Secondly, we also, of course, have to recognize that we have some programs already in HACU that are very effective, especially those that are focused on moving a critical mass into STEM degrees. And we're going to emphasize that even more going forward. And thirdly, that we, as an association, have the ability to influence federal agencies and others—and corporations to invest in the kinds of practices that you may be successful at. And I'll give you a couple examples. We just got a planning grant from NSF, HACU did. And we are almost done with the planning for one year, because we want to submit a multiyear, multimillion grant to NSF with an emphasis on moving as high as possible, to the PhD. in fact, Latinos all the way from community college up to the research one institutions. And we are working on that proposal to be submitted early next year. But we could, I'm sure, learn from what you're doing. And so we could influence agencies to also invest more. We have a new program under NSF for HSIs that you can apply for a grant to expand what you're doing with more students, more parents. And the same thing is true with respect to other agencies. I was just in Washington last week and met with the undersecretary of the Department of Commerce to discuss the technology program, where our institutions will each have a role to play. And so we have the role of advocating and influencing agencies and Congress to invest in institutions like yours, Miami Dade, and professors like you, so that you can do more of exactly what you are doing. So please feel free to send us an email at HACU. You can send it to my attention. And I'll make sure that it finds its way to the right staff in charge of the kinds of programs that you are dealing with. We do have great staff that follows up on situations like yours. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. We will circulate after this an email with some of the resources you've mentioned and the email that we should be sharing, Dr. Flores. So we have another question, and it follows onto Mike's question, from Arturo Osorio, who's an associate professor at Rutgers University. Any advice or programs that you know to help connect the parents of the Hispanic Latino Students to the higher education experience? Many of our students are first-generation Americans and also first-generation college students. This creates a large cultural and experiential gap for parents to bridge on their understanding of what kids are going through and support them. As a result, many of the students have very stressful moments as they navigate away from the family to their college life. FLORES: Yeah. Excellent question. And my suggestion is that please send us an email. We have an office in HACU that is designated to promote pre-K-12 and higher education collaboration. The executive director of that office is Jeanette Morales. Jeanette Morales has a team, and they work with clusters or consortia of colleges, universities and K-12 schools, particularly secondary schools, to move out successfully many more of those underserved students to college and be better prepared to succeed in college. It is more substantive than just a college visitation thing or admissions officers talking with them at an event. They actually have early college interventions for high school students. So they actually earn even college credit when they are creating high school for the most advanced students. But they also have opportunity for professors from some of those universities and community college to teach as visiting teachers in those high schools, where they may not get the resources to hire faculty for advanced courses and for the courses that are required to be successful in especially STEM degrees, like advanced math, advanced science, and so forth. So that office and our association has been in place for the last seventeen years. It was that far back when we first saw that more than half of the battle to succeed in college has to be won in K-12. And it has to be won with families on your side, because first-generation college students do depend largely on families to make decision after high school. So please feel free to contact Jeanette Morales or myself in my email at our San Antonio headquarters. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. We are at the end of our time. I just wanted to ask if you could just do really briefly what you're doing internationally to encourage—you know, and we don't have a lot of time. But I don't want to leave without—you had told me in our pre-call just a little bit. So if I you could just give us a wrap-up on that, that would be fantastic. FLORES: Yeah. We think of international education not as an appendage, not as a luxury, not as an add-on proposition, but as an integral part of a college education, in this case. And we hope that the vast majority of our young people will have a chance to experience a study abroad. And of course, it's like a big dream, because right now if you look at the numbers, only about 5 to 7 percent, max, of all the 350,000 American students going to study abroad are Latino. And the same number, roughly the same percentage, is African Americans and others. And conversely, only about maybe 3 percent of all the students coming from other countries come from Latin America—1.3 percent only from Mexico, which is right next door to us, OK? So that has to change. And it has to change because people who have an international experience ultimately expand their horizons and their vision of the world and are more effective not only professionals but citizens of the world. And we feel that it is very important for our young people to do that, not as a—as a kind of a luxury, or anything like that, but as an integral part of their development as professionals. And so we plan on being even more keen on affecting legislation that will provide more resources for our institutions and international programming, and ourselves as an association being much more engaged in getting more international institutions to affiliate with us to promote that mobility, that experience, independent of whether the government decides to invest or not. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you very much. Antonio Flores, this has been really a great discussion. And thanks to everybody for their terrific questions and comments. We really appreciate it. HACU is lucky to have you. We're fortunate to have you leading this great association. As I mentioned, we will send out a link to this webinar, also some of the resources you mentioned, email addresses and the like. And I'm sure everybody knows it, but it's worth repeating, the HACU website, HACU.net. You can follow them on Twitter at @HACUnews. So go there. You can also follow us at @CFR_Academic. And please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for CFR's resources on international affairs and the like. So I hope you're all staying well. Dr. Flores, thank you again. And we look forward to your continuing involvement in this webinar series. The next invitation will be for December, and we will be sending that out under separate cover. FLORES: Thank you very much, Irina. Thank you, everyone. (END)

The Fear of God
Episode 248 - The Mission

The Fear of God

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 92:16


We're back this week with a particularly heartfelt and lovely film in our ongoing but temporary series called #whatsavesus, where we briefly intermission our usual excursions into horror to look at films beyond that genre. This week's film by Roland Joffe is called THE MISSION, starring Jeremy Irons and Robert DeNiro. It's an achingly beautiful and often melancholy exploration of the efforts of a small group of Jesuit priests to establish and defend a mission among an indigenous South American community from the political and institutionally religious forces which would uproot, enslave, and destroy them. At times profoundly inspiring and painfully sorrowful, the film evokes a vulnerable and honest conversation about Christ's place in this world, within and often despite the larger understanding of "the church".Including a brief excursion through Richmond once again for TED LASSO Season 2, episodes 3 & 4, this is a film we strongly encourage you to see and a conversation we think you won't want to miss.4:58 - TED LASSO, Season 2, Episodes 3 & 4 #tvguideposts20:25 - THE MISSION See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pinnacle Podcast
South American soccer insights: Episode 3

Pinnacle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:10


Pinnacle's brand new podcast dedicated to all things South American soccer returns for it's third episode. South American soccer insights, hosted by Argentinian soccer expert Peter Coates, features fellow specialists Tom Robinson and Simon Edwards each month as they delve into all the betting action across the whole continent, picking out their best value bets for listeners. In episode three, the trio preview November's CONMEBOL World Cup qualifiers and discuss a selection the nations' chances including Bolivia, Uruguay and how Colombia respond to the three successive 0-0 draws in October. Moving on, they examine in detail both the Copa Libertadores and Copa Sudamericana finals as they analyse where the value could be in Pinnacle's betting markets. The show concludes by sharing their insight into the Brazilian Serie A, as Simon and Tom discuss the power shift in the league with so many historic clubs vying for supremacy. Follow the team on: Peter Coates: twitter.com/Pedro_Coates Tom Robinson: twitter.com/tomrobbo89 Twitter - twitter.com/Pinnacle Instagram - Pinnacle.betting Facebook - www.facebook.com/PinnacleSports/ Soundcloud - @pinnacle-podcast Download the Pinnacle Live Scores app: www.pinnaclescores.com/ Gamble responsibly: bit.ly/3izDVaA Read Simon Edwards' article on 'How to bet on South American soccer' here: [Part 1] https://bit.ly/3o2q8LI [Part 2] https://bit.ly/3mU2O3x (18+) Bet on Copa Libertadores here: bit.ly/2ZPnDDY

The Ag View Pitch
Weekly Market Outlook: Nov. 8-12th - USDA Report Discussion

The Ag View Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 26:50


Ryan Moe with Stone X talks with Chris about Tuesdays USDA report. They also discuss market drivers including Chinese demand, South American crops, and Ethanol demand. Finally, they discuss what basis might do depending on the reaction to Tuesdays USDA report.

The Take
What's next for Bolsonaro and Brazil?

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 23:18


After six months, a Brazilian Senate investigative committee has recommended for President Jair Bolsonaro to be indicted for nine crimes related to his handling of the coronavirus pandemic that has killed more than 600,000 people in the South American country. But who decides the president's fate, and will he be impeached or even jailed like his predecessors? In this episode:  Monica Yanakiew (@MonikaKiev), reporter for Al Jazeera English in Brazil Claudio Couto (@claudio_couto), political scientist and professor at the Getulio Vargas Foundation in Sao Paulo  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Market to Market - Market Analysis
Market Analysis: Ted Seifried

Market to Market - Market Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


Better harvest weather and less moisture along with energy sources tugged at the trade. For the week, the nearby wheat contract shed 6 cents while the December corn contract lost 15 cents. Heavy resistance testing in the soy complex as South American beans are racing to completion and being ready for export. The January soybean contract weakened by 44 cents. December meal added a dime per ton. December cotton expanded $2.02 per hundredweight. Over in the dairy parlor, December Class III milk futures fell 96 cents. A green week in the livestock sector. December cattle added $2.52.

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast
#222 | Citizen Hearing: UFOs & South American Encounters – Part 2 | Paranormal Mysteries

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 104:35


In today's episode of Paranormal Mysteries, we'll be once again listening in on the Citizen Hearing as they discuss UFOs and South American Encounters. PODCAST SOURCE: https://www.spreaker.com/show/paranormal-mysteries-podcast TELL YOUR STORY: Email: paranormalmysteriespodcast@gmail.com Voice Message: https://www.speakpipe.com/paranormalmysteries Website: http://paranormalmysteriespodcast.com Forum: https://tinyurl.com/4z4v6rm3 SUPPORT THE SHOW: Patreon Donation or Membership: https://www.patreon.com/join/paranormalmysteries? BuyMeACoffee Donation or Membership: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/paranormal SOCIAL MEDIA: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/ParaMysteryPod EPISODE REFERENCES: “UFOs – South American Encounters / Part 2” * Citizen Hearing on UFO Disclosure: https://www.citizenhearing.org/ * Citizen Hearing on UFO Disclosure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QH6boSEfo0U STOCK MUSIC & MEDIA PROVIDED BY: AndianMusic / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/andianmusic dauzkobza / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/dauzkobza ElectricMoments / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/electricmoments FicusProsound / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/ficusprosound#1/2064 FinalVersionStudio / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/finalversionstudio hitwizard / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/hitwizard#1/2064 LeChuckz / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/lechuckz miksmusic / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/miksmusic#1/2064 Miracle Forest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__iDig5NKcA&list=PLjbSDRHeNjFs5WCK-UypYie-XD2YZ8i2e&index=1&t=1856s RickyValadez / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/rickyvaladez#1/2064 Sound of Muses: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUer-Tto1ZA Sungep / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/sungep#1/2064 TRWorkshop / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/trworkshop#1/2064 zacnelson / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/zacnelson#1/2064 © Copyright Paranormal Mysteries Podcast, 2021. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this audio is prohibited.

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast
#221 | Citizen Hearing: UFOs & South American Encounters – Part 1 | Paranormal Mysteries

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 83:25


In today's episode of Paranormal Mysteries, we'll be once again listening in on the Citizen Hearing as they discuss UFOs and South American Encounters. PODCAST SOURCE: https://www.spreaker.com/show/paranormal-mysteries-podcast TELL YOUR STORY: Email: paranormalmysteriespodcast@gmail.com Voice Message: https://www.speakpipe.com/paranormalmysteries Website: http://paranormalmysteriespodcast.com Forum: https://tinyurl.com/4z4v6rm3 SUPPORT THE SHOW: Patreon Donation or Membership: https://www.patreon.com/join/paranormalmysteries? BuyMeACoffee Donation or Membership: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/paranormal SOCIAL MEDIA: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/ParaMysteryPod EPISODE REFERENCES: “UFOs – South American Encounters / Part 1” * Citizen Hearing on UFO Disclosure: https://www.citizenhearing.org/ * Citizen Hearing on UFO Disclosure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCgp1FKr5hU STOCK MUSIC & MEDIA PROVIDED BY: AndianMusic / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/andianmusic dauzkobza / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/dauzkobza ElectricMoments / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/electricmoments FicusProsound / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/ficusprosound#1/2064 FinalVersionStudio / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/finalversionstudio hitwizard / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/hitwizard#1/2064 LeChuckz / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/lechuckz miksmusic / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/miksmusic#1/2064 Miracle Forest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__iDig5NKcA&list=PLjbSDRHeNjFs5WCK-UypYie-XD2YZ8i2e&index=1&t=1856s RickyValadez / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/rickyvaladez#1/2064 Sound of Muses: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUer-Tto1ZA Sungep / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/sungep#1/2064 TRWorkshop / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/trworkshop#1/2064 zacnelson / Pond5: https://www.pond5.com/artist/zacnelson#1/2064 © Copyright Paranormal Mysteries Podcast, 2021. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this audio is prohibited.

Heal Thy Self
Finding Your Authentic Voice, Guest: Maryn Azoff | Heal Thy Self w/ Dr. G

Heal Thy Self

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 89:59


Maryn Azoff (Tribe of Love, Cura Cura) is a long time singer, musician, Spirit lifter, Soul emancipator and fear crusher. She has been on a mission of connecting people all over the world to the power of the human voice for many years and does so through a unique program and healing modality she created called ‘Vocal Transformation'. The goal of her work is to reawaken the innate intelligence of the body-mind-spirit connection through the faculty of the human voice. Her approach to healing is vibrational. A true student of earth and spirit, Maryn has dedicated many years of her life to studying ancient wisdom by participating in a wide variety of healing circles from many different cultures, ranging from Vedic and Tibetan wisdom traditions to South American shamanism. In addition to working directly with private students, she also facilitates ‘Vocal Transformation' workshops globally, as a mission to help in the awakening of humanity. The driving force behind her work is the aspiration that we can remember who we are and the power that we all have to bring about a true shift in consciousness where we all live as one on Earth. www.vocaltransformation.com BiOptimizers: You can only get this exclusive deal through my link, special for you listeners. You won't find this on amazon, or even the bioptimizers website. Go to www.magbreakthrough.com/drg and use code drg10 to get your discount and free gifts today! Birch Mattress: birchliving.com/healthyself and get $400.00 off of your mattress plus your two free pillows. Be sure to like and subscribe to #HealThySelf Hosted by Doctor Christian Gonzalez N.D. Follow Doctor G on Instagram @doctor.gonzalez https://www.instagram.com/doctor.gonzalez/

Ag News Daily
#MarketMonday with Arlan Suderman

Ag News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


Arlan Suderman is back on the podcast to talk about markets! On this edition of #MarketMonday, we talk about supply chain issues, U.S. cotton demand, South American weather, and more.

Voices of Esalen
Sandor Katz: Fermentation Journeys

Voices of Esalen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 44:48


Sandor Katz has taught hundreds of workshops demystifying fermentation and empowering people to reclaim this transformational process. His book, "The Art of Fermentation" received a James Beard award and was a finalist at the International Association of Culinary Professionals. in 2009, he was named one of Chow magazine's top “provacateurs, trendsetters, and rabble-rousers.” This self-described "fermentation fetishist" treats us to a discussion of his new book, Fermentation Journeys. We talk about food writing and favorite food writers, the benefits of fermentation, being an adventurer in the kitchen, and what's fermenting in his refrigerator. Coming soon at Esalen: Gratitude Healing Wisdom for Modern Times Join wisdom keeper Erika Gagnon November 8–12 for Healing Wisdom For Modern Times: You are Your Greatest Healer, a sacred journey to explore the healing wisdom of the “Americas.” Students will learn about the importance of ancestral lineage, rites of passage, ceremonies and rituals, sacred altars, medicinal plants, and the origins of dis-ease in our physical, mental/emotional, and spiritual bodies. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in a water prayer blessing, a sound healing journey, and a traditional South American healing ceremony. Book your spot now: https://www.esalen.org/workshops/healing-wisdom-for-modern-times-you-are-your-greatest-healer-110821 Esalen End of Year Campaign: Help Us Make 300 New Friends Last year, Friends of Esalen helped us to survive closures due to the pandemic, fires and mudslides. We're here today because of our friends. When you become a Friend of Esalen with a donation, your contribution helps us finance our day to day operations in Big Sur-from staff to infrastructure. This year, our goal is to raise 450K and make 300 new friends so that we can continue to keep our doors open for generations to come. Become A Friend Now: https://www.esalen.org/give Becoming Of The Land: Right Relationship Without Dominance - Understanding The Terrains We Inhabit In this workshop which runs from December 17-20 Vivien Sansour will guide students to humble themselves so they can become one with the ground under their feet, and listen to the world around them. Through a series of exercises that involve contemplation, walking meditation, and explorations of plants, writing, and storytelling, students will unlock the sacred trilogy of bird, soil, and plant in order to develop a deeper understanding of the terrain. Sign Up Today https://www.esalen.org/workshops/becoming-of-the-land-right-relationship-without-dominance-understanding-the-terrains-we-inhabit

Postcard Academy Travel Podcast
Montevideo, Uruguay: South American Style with a European Flair

Postcard Academy Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 67:11


Ever thought about visiting Uruguay? This small nation between Argentina and Brazil isn't well known to people outside the region, and Karen Higgs is trying to change that.Home to the world's longest carnival — it lasts 40 days each year — Uruguay is a laid back country with a European flair. You'll walk around plenty of colonial and art deco buildings as candombe music drums in the streets. You'll also find beaches, wineries, and a burgeoning culinary scene in Uruguay, one of the most progressive countries in the world.And, if you can work remotely or are retired or have your own money, you don't even need a visa to live and work there. So why aren't we there already??In today's episode, Karen is going to tell us how to become an expat in Uruguay, as well as give us her best tips on what to eat, drink, and do in her adopted hometown of Montevideo, a place, she says, that has become quite vegan-friendly.  Karen, originally from Wales, has lived in Uruguay since 2000 and is the unofficial tourism ambassador for the country. In fact, her website is a mashup of the words guru and Uruguay: Guru'Guay and is a great resource for anyone thinking of traveling or moving to the country. She also wrote The Guru'Guay Guide to Uruguay and The Guru'Guay Guide to Montevideo.Show notes at sarahmikutel.comEnjoy!❤️Hello! I'm your host, Sarah Mikutel. But the real question is, who are you? Where are you now and where do you want to be? Can I help you get there?Visit sarahmikutel.com to learn how we can work together to help you achieve more peace, happiness, and positive transformation in your life.Book your Enneagram typing session by going to sarahmikutel.com/typingsessionIt's not super easy for U.S. citizens to get visas to live and work abroad (and the U.S. gov doesn't make it easy for people to come in either). But millions of Americans have figured out how to create a life overseas, and so can you.Here's my cheat sheet of the nine easiest countries to move to from the U.S.https://www.sarahmikutel.com/countryguide

Market to Market - Market Analysis
Market Analysis: Shawn Hackett

Market to Market - Market Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


A weather market played out on two sides of the trade – too wet for some, too dry for others. For the week, the nearby wheat contract added 17 cents while the December corn contract improved 30 cents. China bought some U.S. beans, but still lagged behind pace to keep up with USDA projections while the planting of the South American crop surged. The January soybean contract gained 19 cents. December meal increased $5.20 per ton. December cotton expanded $6.59 per hundredweight. Over in the dairy parlor, December Class III milk futures fell 91 cents.

Scouted Says
87: Road to Qatar: CONMEBOL with Tim Vickery

Scouted Says

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 50:53


Joe is joined by broadcasting legend and South American football expert Tim Vickery for the beginning of a new series on the Scouted Football Podcast. Building up to next year's World Cup in Qatar, we will be exploring the U23 storylines and assessing the standout U23 players throughout the confederations. Expect case studies, expert insight and new names on your radar. First up: CONMEBOL. Don't miss this. 01:52: World Cup qualifying in South America 08:04: Raphinha's Selecão introduction 12:58: Big Ben Brereton Díaz, Chile's newest hero 17:26: Brazil vs Argentina COVID drama explained 22:27: Ecuador - a youth football case study 31:24: Independiente del Valle - a platform to Europe 35:24: Ecuador's next generation 44:17: CONMEBOL standouts - Carlos Cuesta and co

Travelling Inside Out
Ep. 146 - Ajiru Chan | Caster & Twitch Streamer | Guest #20

Travelling Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 58:39


Today's episode is coming from Paraguay, where Ajiru lives. Alina met today's guest back in 2018 on her South American trip and they finally got reunited for a conversation about the video game world, League of Legends, how does it feel to be a female in a technical work environment and much more. Find Ajiru here: https://www.twitch.tv/ajiru https://www.instagram.com/ajiruchan/ https://www.facebook.com/ajiru/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/travellinginsideout/message

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst
Episode 97: Fuel Your Firm's Growth by Tapping into the Hispanic Market with Founder and President of Abogados NOW

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 23:40


What you'll learn in this episode:   How tapping into the Spanish-speaking market can fuel new growth for law firms   Why simply translating a website or marketing copy into Spanish isn't enough to connect with the Hispanic market Why a Spanish-language marketing strategy that works in Los Angeles may not work in San Antonio or Miami  When to create a Spanish sister website and brand strategy for your firm How to work with Spanish-speaking clients—even if you don't speak Spanish      About Hugo Gomez Hugo Gomez is Founder and President of Abogados NOW, a national bilingual digital marketing consultancy exclusively exclusive to attorneys. The company was founded in Los Angeles in 2018 and has since expanded nationally to help law firms reach Spanish-speaking markets throughout the U.S.  Additional resources: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hgomezmktg/  Abogados NOW website: https://www.abogadosnow.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abogadosnow Twitter: https://twitter.com/abogados_now  Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast Spanish speakers in the U.S. need lawyers, and lawyers need new clients—but these two groups often fail to connect due to barriers in language and culture. Hugo Gomez set out to solve this problem by founding Abogados NOW, a legal marketing firm that specializes in the bilingual market. Hugo joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about why Spanish digital media presents a cost-effective opportunity for growth; how to choose the best website and brand strategy to reach bilingual clients; and how you can reach Spanish speakers, even if you don't speak Spanish yourself. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Welcome to the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast. Today, my guest is Hugo Gomez, founder of Abogados NOW. The firm specializes in legal marketing, working with their client law firms to help them maximize their share of the bilingual market. Today, we'll hear all about Hugo's path and how the firm works with clients. Hugo, welcome to the program. Hugo: Thank you so much for having me, Sharon. I'm super excited to be here. Sharon: I'm so glad to have you. Tell us about your career path. Did you want to go into law? Hugo: No, I was actually working in personal and commercial finance for most of my early career, doing a lot of high-volume lead generation. Those are great organizations I worked with. They were super fun, but having done most of what I could do in the financial sector, I wanted a new challenge. I was fortunate enough to get a role as a director at one of the nation's largest lead generators for attorneys. What I learned very quickly was that there's an opening in the market to advertise in Spanish on behalf of attorneys. After learning about the legal industry a little more, I decided to start Abogados NOW to empower smaller firms, sole practitioners and medium-size firms to own their marketing, to grow on their own terms, essentially to have their own lead generation sources in Spanish that most attorneys simply do not have. Sharon: Do they not have it because they think it's going to cost too much, they're too small, they don't know how to do it? What is the opening you saw? Hugo: Yeah, most attorneys largely advertise in English because digital marketing agencies, all they know is advertising in English. The opening we saw was that the fastest-growing audience segment is Spanish-speaking consumers in the United States, and there wasn't anyone really giving attorneys specific strategies to connect with these consumers authentically. And I say authentically because a lot of attorneys, when they attempt to advertise in Spanish, they'll simply translate their marketing into Spanish. We all know what works in Spanish won't work in English, and vice versa. The opening we saw, the opportunity we saw, was the ability to connect attorneys to these communities the right way, the authentic way, so that attorneys who don't have that footprint in these communities can be trusted authorities. Sharon: I can imagine people might hand off website copy to somebody who can translate it and say, “Translate it into Spanish.” You don't know what's actually happening or whether they're doing it right, or whether I need to get out my high school Spanish book. Hugo: Precisely. Sharon: I would assume all attorneys today know that digital marketing is important, that online marketing is important, so I assume they have some sort of program in place when they call you in. Is that true? What's your first step in terms of O.K., let's take a look at this? Hugo: Typically speaking, when we onboard a new member, we onboard them after discussing a few qualifying questions. We want to know if they are on a growth path. If an attorney or a firm wants steady business, we're probably not the right fit. We're more equipped for hypergrowth strategies. We want that solo practice to grow, to find new revenue, so we reverse engineer their business goals. As much as we are a digital marketing partner, I think we are a great business partner as well. It all comes down to what the end goal is. Are you pointing yourself to an exit? Are you trying to increase the valuation of your company? Are you simply trying to grow for growth's sake? There are many different goals attorneys have, so we try to determine what that goal is.  More often than not, the low-hanging fruit is Spanish media online, because Spanish media online is competitively priced. Online marketing for attorneys in English is quite competitive. We hear the horror stories from attorneys who don't do well on Google search for this very reason. We're able to hedge against that reality by owning Spanish-speaking consumers when they're looking for an attorney. Sharon: Is that mostly when they're looking for a plaintiff attorney? Do you work with defense attorneys, intellectual property attorneys? What kind of practices do you work with? Hugo: That's a great question. We work with a variety of practices areas. We're most popular in personal injury, workers' comp, immigration, bankruptcy and criminal defense. Anything that hits a large mass of the population, we're able to generate qualified calls, forums, chats, etc. for attorneys looking to grow their practice. Sharon: How do you measure that? Do you help them? Do you work with them on lead intake, or do you just get the phone to ring and they're on their own after that? Hugo: It's pretty inclusive. We don't consider ourselves an agency. We believe we have way more value than most agencies do in that the marketing, the lead generation aspect, that's standard. That's something everybody gets in our program, and we're very proud to do that quite well and competitively priced. Now, what happens when those calls are generated? A variety of things. A firm may have an intake center that's bilingual already on site, which is amazing. We love to hear that. Sometimes they only have a receptionist, which is fine if they're a low-volume player in the beginning, but if they're confused or they're not really familiar with intake operations, we connect them to the right partners for intake.  There are amazing answering services for attorneys. We work directly with LEX Reception—they are our official service partner—so for any attorney who is worried about answering calls in Spanish, we have a high degree of confidence saying, “Hey, we already have a solution for you; they are Abogados NOW's certified answering service partner.” They'll answer your calls 24/7. They'll walk you through the script. They already know the best practices in getting personal and sensitive information from these markets. We're proud to say that as much as we are a digital marketing partner, we are a great business operations partner. Sharon: You would come in and say, “Let's see what we would do in terms of your strategy, your positioning.” You're working from the ground up. Hugo: Absolutely. More often than not attorneys don't have a Spanish strategy, and if they do, 99 percent of the time we have to break it down and build it from scratch again. It's because the market's changing quite fast. The census data that was released I believe a month ago, the 2020 census data, shows that this market has a very high purchase power. They make a lot of life decision on their mobile phones. Even the Pew Research Center confirmed that the vast majority of Spanish speakers use their phones as a primary source for the web, at a higher rate than the general English-speaking population. That surprises a lot of people, but the data supports that you really have to understand the market and build a strategy for them in that particular metro market, because the strategies that work in California will oftentimes not work in San Antonio and Miami and Newark, New Jersey. They're very different markets, and you have to have a deep understanding of the value systems in these metro areas to build the right marketing program for them. Sharon: So, you work across the county. Hugo: Yeah, we're national now. We started in California. That's where our headquarters are, here in Los Angeles County. We knew the demand was there. Sometime late last year, we did a soft launch nationally. Just a few months ago, we announced our official national rollout. Right now we're in nine or 10 states. Sharon: Do you have people in San Antonio and Miami, or somebody that understands that market as opposed to Long Beach? Hugo: Yeah, absolutely. We are fundamentally a post-Covid organization. Sharon: I'm sorry; I didn't hear that. Hugo: We are fundamentally a post-Covid organization. Sharon: Post-covid? Hugo: Yeah, we're nearly fully remote. Most of our team members work from the comfort of their own home offices or at libraries, wherever they feel most comfortable. We've made it work. We have a great culture that's virtual. Our team loves the flexibility of working on their terms, but with strict standards and deadlines.  Because of that, we're able to say, “We're not that familiar with the Spanish-speaking market in Louisiana. Maybe we should reach out to some copywriters or designers out there who are part of the community and get a sense of what the market's like.” Again, the Spanish-speaking market is not a monolith. What we do is not a translation exercise; it's a brand positioning exercise within your local community. To answer your question, we're able to find great talent based on our infrastructure. Sharon: That's very interesting. I know markets vary, but I hadn't thought that the Hispanic market in Miami might be very different from the market here. Hugo: It is. Just by definition, if you look at the numbers, there are more Dominicans and Cuban-Americans per capita in South Florida than there are in Southern California, where it's largely Mexican, Central American and, to various degrees, South American as well. Those value systems are very different because of how relatives, your immigrant roots, immigrated to the United States. They all came through various channels and have different political systems. The way in which you land in this country will set the tone for your values and potentially the values of future generations after you. Sharon: It's very interesting and I'm sure very, very true. I'm thinking about people like me, whose ancestors came over at the turn of the century from Eastern Europe, and it still echoes today. Are your clients ever bilingual? Do they ever call in and say, “Hey, this is just too much for me”? Hugo: The majority of our members do not speak Spanish. I think that's why they choose us as their digital marketing and business partner, because they realize that in order to scale, you have to find other markets. You have to find lead generation sources. You have to find other media channels that your competition has not figured out yet, and because marketing in Spanish isn't a translation exercise, the bar is quite high to do it the right way. We often tell attorneys at the very beginning, “It's O.K. if you don't speak Spanish; however, someone on your staff should.” That is a requirement. Whether you have a partner who comes to every Zoom or in-person meeting with you, or you have a paralegal who might be bilingual, that is a requirement in our program. Otherwise, there's no way the Spanish-speaking market is going to be able to communicate effectively with your practice. We do make that a requirement, to have bilingual staff, but it is certainly not a requirement for attorneys to speak Spanish. Sharon: We've worked with quite a few law firms, and they've been great law firms, but they're like, “We should go after this ethnic market. Nobody here speaks anything but English, so who can find someone who knows something?” What do you do? Do you say, “We'll assign somebody”? How do you handle that? Hugo: If the attorney is at the point that their firm does not have a Spanish-speaking resource, that's when we immediately default to our answering service partners. What we've learned is—and this is a really interesting phenomenon—that a Spanish speaker will handle the call wonderfully. They'll establish trust. They'll get the personal information. They'll set up the engagement. What our answering service partner is very effective at doing is telling that person, “Hey, you might want to bring a relative who speaks English,” and more often than not, they will. The consumer will bring someone who speaks English, whether it's a loved one, a neighbor, a friend. So, there's always a way to market effectively in these languages, but it really does start with the strategy. If you don't have a credible website, credible advertising, a credible message, you're never going to be able to establish that communication they're after. Sharon: If the firm already has their website, will you then build—I'm not saying translate directly—but will you build a parallel site in Spanish for them? Hugo: There are a few options. Depending on how well their website is built, we may be able to add what we call a “translation switch.” It's a deceiving name because there are no translations happening. You'll see the “en Español” button on the website, and when you click it, you'll see the interpretations, not direct translations, of the English copy throughout the site. It's almost like you have two websites in one. That is a popular option; however, this also depends on the market.  We oftentimes recommend a sister website because of the state bar Rules of Professional Conduct as they relate to advertising, because some states do not allow different trade names. If trade names are allowed, like separate trade names where an attorney can incorporate or use a DBA or do something legally to file that name, we absolutely recommend that. I'll give you an example. Javaheri & Yahoudai, they're two personal injury attorneys in Los Angeles. They've been with us for over three years now, and their name—we had an honest discussion—is kind of difficult to say quickly, difficult to memorize. So, we pared it down to J&Y, and that's their English strategy; J&Y, Javaheri & Yahoudai. They're known as J&Y Law, and they're very successful in arguably the most competitive PI market in the country.  However, in Spanish, we don't use the J&Y name, because in California we could use separate trade names. So, we created Abogados Campeones, which means “Champion Attorneys.” This separate trade name has a completely different marketing angle, branding, website, video strategy, ad strategy. The way we describe it to potential members is we're not just building this marketing program; we're effectively building a new business that's tacking onto your existing infrastructure.  Abogados Campeones does extraordinarily well. Some months, it outperforms their English marketing. That name came about after many discussions with the brand team, many discussions with development, many discussions with the firm to find the values we want to evoke. In Southern California, we've done a lot of polling. The immigrant population likes to win, win at all costs, so we knew this name was going to be a homerun. When we acquired it, it essentially established the model for how we operate today. We try to find out that value system, the right branding. We know that if we pump some ad dollars behind all that research, you're going to have a successful launch in Spanish. Sharon: I can see how a name like that would be compelling. Do your clients call you in when they feel like, “O.K., I'm spending a fortune on Google. I've maxed it out. I have been effective at competing with everybody and his brother, but I've been spending millions every month on paperwork. I want to find a different way. I think there's more here.” What are they saying to you? Hugo: The majority of clients that are members who sign up for an employment with us, I would say four out of five times they are very unhappy with the way things are going in their current marketing. The feedback we hear—and we're very glad to hear—is that attorneys see the value in working with a consultancy that only works with attorneys, that essentially doubles the value of your marketing reach because of English and Spanish. Attorneys see that we're all native English speakers, but we also come from Latin American countries; we all come from Spanish-speaking families and we're all fully bilingual. I think the logic with attorneys, what they oftentimes tell us is, “We're not happy with the way things are going, and we see a lot of value in being fully bilingual rather than focusing on this one area of the market that's super-crowded.” Sharon: You mentioned several times that you have members. I'm trying to think of some of the other legal membership groups. They escape me, but is this something where you're calling your clients members, or is this a membership program? Hugo: The reason we don't use clients is because the nomenclature gets confusing, because we generate clients for our clients. We just established that if you're a part of Abogados NOW, you are a member of our program. There's no network referral opportunity. There is a community of sorts, an unofficial one, but generally speaking, there's no formal discussion board or anything of the like. We are working towards that. We do anticipate having our first in-person event in Q2 next year to further establish our reach in person, just because we've been so virtual the last four years. Our members are members mainly because of the nomenclature, but also we do feel they're part of something new. They're part of something that's original that hasn't been established anywhere else in the country. Sharon: Do you track your success by whether they're increasing the number of leads? Everybody's going to ask that—“How do I measure success with you?” Hugo: I think this is why we don't sign everybody, because we like to ask these questions day one. What are you looking for? Then, how do you and I agree on the metrics or key performance indicators that are going to tell us whether we're winning or losing? Oftentimes attorneys say, “I don't know. I don't know how many more clients I want,” and then we'll schedule another call, but I love it when an attorney is ready with their game plan for the next quarter, the next year, the next five years. We do focus on what we call the frontend metrics. Yes, there are costs per lead; there are costs per click. Ultimately, we never really get into these discussions with attorneys. What they're most interested in is, “How much have I invested in advertising and what was my direct output?” I think attorneys appreciate that because they know we're not just celebrating cost-per-lead goals. Cost per lead is all relative. All that matters is how many are you converting, how many are you signing and what value each signed client has for your firm. Sharon: That's very true. What's the value? If you're not getting quality people calling in, quality meaning—it sounds awful, but a serious brain injury, that's what every personal injury attorney wants. Not to make fun of anybody, but there's a lot of money in that. Hugo, thank you so much. This is very, very interesting.  Hugo: Thank you so much. For any attorneys listening who are serious about scale, who are serious about making that trusted connection with your Spanish-speaking community, please make an appointment with us on our website. We're at AbogadosNow.com. You can create a meeting invite per your availability and we can discuss your goals. That's what we want to talk about. We want to talk about how to grow your business and then work backwards from there. Thank you so much, Sharon. I appreciate your time. Sharon: I greatly appreciate yours. Thank you so much.

Leave It To The Prose
Ep076 – House of the Spirits Part 1 by Isabel Allende

Leave It To The Prose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 36:00


House of the Spirits Part 1 by Isabel Allende Isabel Allende’s debut novel, House of the Spirits, is a journey in magical realism. House of the Spirits follows four generations of the Trueba family against the backdrop of an unspecified South American country (Chile). In this first discussion of the story, Isaac and Reid dig … Continue reading Ep076 – House of the Spirits Part 1 by Isabel Allende →

Independent Music Podcast
#344 – Jlin, Rival Consoles, Helm, Simo Cell, Aging & Land Trance, Reiko and Tori Kudo - 25 October 2021

Independent Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 75:11


Two sublime reissues bookend this week's Independent Music Podcast. We open with the gospel soul from Pastor T.L. Barrett and close with the gorgeous avant-folk from Japan courtesy of Reiko and Tori Kudo. Between those, we go on a wild journey, including the mutant techno of Jlin, detective jazz of Aging alongside Land Trance, South American psychedelic electronics from Argentina's Balam and lots more. Tracklisting Pastor T.L. Barrett & The Youth For Christ Choir – Nobody Knows (Numero Group, USA) Jlin – Embryo (Planet Mu, UK) Aging & Land Trance – Shattered Rooms (Tombed Visions, UK) Simo Cell – YES.DJ (TEMƎT Music, France) Helm – Moskito (Dais Records, UK) Balam – Yagé (Hard Fist, France) Elori Saxl – Moss II (touchtheplants, USA) OCD – Nature Abhors A Vacuum (Gegen Records, Germany) Rival Consoles – Monster (Erased Tapes, UK) Reiko and Tori Kudo – We May Be (A Colourful Storm, Australia) Produced and edited by Nick McCorriston.

Simply Walk The Talk
Episode 165 - What is SANANGA and how is it used?

Simply Walk The Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:58


In this short video episode, Josh explains (and demonstrates) what is Sananga and how he uses it. He also adds in a bit of Zen Nasal Spray Hapé to take things up a notch! So, what IS Sananga? Sananga is commonly made from the roots and bark of Tabernaemontana undulata, a shrub which is found in Brazil and other South American countries. The bark and root is ground into a very fine powder and then extracted into a juice. This sacred and powerful medicine is used to treat and prevent ocular diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts, farsightedness, nearsightedness and even blindness. Sananga is mostly utilized by the tribes found in the Amazon region such as, Kaxinawás, Matsés and Yawanawá. Some tribes in the Amazon region use Sananga to sharpen their night vision while hunting, however, Sananga does more than that. This powerful eye drop has a healing power that is more spiritual than physical, and has the capacity to increase insight in the minds of those who use it. Sananga is commonly used in preparation for ayahuasca ceremonies due to its capacity to increase visual perception, enhance colors and remove unwanted energy. Sananga eye drops cause an intense burning sensation that typically lasts for a few minutes, but experienced practitioners claim that the pain is an important part of the healing process. They advise breathing deeply into the discomfort in order to reap all of sananga's benefits. Below are some of the benefits found in Sananga: * Antimicrobial: Studies show that Tabernaemontana pachysiphon and Tabernaemontana angulata, found in sananga, are effective in treating skin infections because of its antimicrobial properties. * Antifungal: Tabernaemontana stapfiana is effective in preventing fungal growth. Antioxidant: Tabernaemontana genus also has strong antioxidant properties which play a critical role in preventing age-related ocular problems. * Anti-inflammatory: Tabernaemontana pandacaqui has anti-inflammatory effects used for treating arthritis.  * Anti-cancer: Study shows that Tabernaemontana species, specifically the T. elegans is an effective cancer killer. The active principle of sananga is ibogaine which is a psychoactive alkaloid and mild stimulant in small doses, but can induce a profound psychedelic state if used in larger doses. Apart from ibogaine, several other alkaloids, such as coronaridine, quebrachidine, heyneanine, 3-hydroxycoronaridine, ibogamine and voacangine are believed to also be contained in sananga. All of these alkaloids have powerful psychoactive effects and can exert strong antibiotic effects. Like other psychedelics, Sananga can cause mental, visual and auditory changes, and an altered state of mind. But many find Sananga to be a unique type of psychedelic not only because of how it is administered but how it effects the body. The burning sensation one can feel after administration causes the release of endorphins, a chemical produced by the body to ease the pain, which stay in the body after the sananga is gone, leading to a feeling of utmost relaxation. And the ZEN Nasal Spray™ is Mitozen's strongest formula, and is made from different medicinal plants from the Amazon to calm and quiet the mind, as well as to reduce anxiety and stress.  ZEN EO Nasal Spray™ is made with Ultra Nano Liposomal terpenes & essential oils. ZEN CBD Nasal Spray™  contains essential oils, terpenes and full spectrum NeuroHEMP™.  The Zen formulas are powerful in the ability to calm the mind and allow for maximum vagal activation (stimulation of the vagal nerve). You will experience a powerful afterglow effect, following the initial temporary burning feeling after administration. ---- View full video on youtube: https://youtu.be/d7sW1O6mT-g ---- Referenced websites: https://psychedelicinvest.com/what-is-sananga/ https://shop.psychedelictimes.com/product/sananga/ — MitoZen/Zen Spray: https://www.mitozen.com/product/zen-nasal-spray/ref/wirkiuvxim/?v=35b5282113b8&campaign=ZenSpray

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography
TCF Ep. 571 - João Velozo

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:06


Based in Pernambuco, Brazil, João Velozo is a freelance photographer specializing in covering urban violence, human rights, and environmental issues, most specifically those taking place in the Brazilian Northeast.  Once a Biology major, he quit the academic area in order to focus on photography, through which he felt he could promote bigger changes and social justice. His work as a photographer reflects his continuous dedication to humanitarian and environmental causes.    Websites Sponsors Charcoal Book Club Lensrentals.com Curious Society   Workshops   Education Resources: Momenta Photographic Workshops   Candid Frame Resources Download the free Candid Frame app for your favorite smart device. Click here to download for . Click here to download Support the work we do at The Candid Frame by contributing to our Patreon effort.  You can do this by visiting or visiting the website and clicking on the Patreon button. You can also provide a one-time donation via . You can follow Ibarionex on and .

Total Soccer Show: USMNT, EPL, MLS, Champions League and more ...
A secondary World Cup, coaching badges, Newcastle's ambition and more listener questions!

Total Soccer Show: USMNT, EPL, MLS, Champions League and more ...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:47


Ryan, Graham, and Joe are here to answer your listener questions! Hurrah! From a new World Cup tournament for the nearly-rans, to the intricacies behind obtaining coaching badges, we have you covered! -Instead of a World Cup every two years, what about a 2nd World Cup with nations that just missed the main World Cup? -Do you think that the new Newcastle owners are being overly outwardly ambitious? -What are coaching badges and how do you obtain them? -Why aren't South American club soccer leagues more popular in the USA? -Why did they change the offside rule to negate an offside if a defender makes a defensive play on the ball? -The US plays its home matches all over the country. In England, all or nearly all of their home matches are at Wembley. Is one or the other more common in international soccer, particularly among the best teams? -I heard that many Rangers fans would rather cheer for England than Scotland (and many Celtic fans cheer for Ireland). Is there any truth to this? Sponsors! BetterHelp! Get 10% off your first month of customized online therapy by going to BetterHelp.com/theathletic! Sonos! Are you looking for some high-quality audio? Head to Sonos.com to find exactly what you're looking for. Harry's! You can get a 5-blade razor, a weighted handle, foaming shave gel, and a travel cover, all for just $3 when you go to Harrys.com/TSS! American Giant! Explore American Giant's collection of durable essentials at american-giant.com and use promo code TSS at checkout to get 20% off! Helix Sleep! Helix is offering up to $200 off all mattress orders and two free pillows to TSS listeners who visit HelixSleep.com/TSS! Papa & Barkley! Go to PapaandBarkleyCBD.com/TSS to get 20% off your first purchase! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Destination On The Left
Episode 251: Creating a Unique Travel Niche Through Collaboration, with Karolina Guilcapi

Destination On The Left

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 38:16


Karolina Guilcapi has managed private luxury tours since 2006, endlessly promoting a hands-on travel approach. With a background from Johnson & Wales University, a school dedicated to food and travel, she has been deeply involved in the growth of the tourism industry. Specializing in Latin America, Karolina represented her product at countless trade shows, organizations, and events around the world, inspiring travelers to become lifelong clients. She has tasted her way across 40 countries continuously inspecting services, meeting local foodies, and searching out the next morsel to offer in her itineraries. She treats food like she does travel – an experience that should utterly satisfy you. In this episode of Destination On The Left, Karolina shares why collaboration with chefs and organizations across the South American continent has allowed her to build a thriving travel business even during the global pandemic. Karolina also discusses why anticipating and addressing travelers' concerns and needs has become a cornerstone of her work. What You Will Learn: How immigrating to New York from Poland at age ten sparked Karolina's passion for travel and exploring new places, and why she focuses her work on Latin American travel Why Karolina chose to start her company, Sated Ventures, and how it has taken off even during the global pandemic How Sated Ventures has carved out a unique niche by focusing on local chefs as guides to the unique flavors, ingredients and culinary history of the region What new skills and talents Karolina has discovered since launching her business, and what challenges she has overcome during the pandemic Why collaboration and being active within the local community as a helpful partner can be a powerful organic way to grow your business What changes, new challenges and opportunities Karolina expects as we begin to return to global travel Why understanding and problem-solving for travelers is a key component of Karolina's work, and why seeing things from the perspective of the traveler is vital Creating a Unique Travel Niche Through Collaboration Karolina Guilcapi is an innovative travel expert who has carved out a unique niche for her company, Sated Ventures, by focusing on the unique culinary adventures and flavors to be found in South America. In this episode of Destination On The Left, Karolina shares why collaboration with chefs and organizations across the South American continent has allowed her to build a thriving travel business even during the global pandemic. Karolina also discusses why anticipating and addressing travelers' concerns and needs has become a cornerstone of her work. Transparency, Being Helpful, and Identifying Partnership Opportunities As Karolina said during our conversation, world travelers often save the South American experience for last, preferring to tour Europe and Asia. However, by leveraging creative partnerships, Karolina is working to change that. Karolina's organization, Sated Ventures, focuses on the unique dining experiences available in South America and works closely with local chefs, restaurants and other food industry organizations to create unique, once-in-a-lifetime travel experiences for her clients. By maintaining a tight focus on this unique niche and by working tirelessly to be helpful to her clients and partners, Karolina has been able to organically grow her business even during the unique travel challenges of the global pandemic. This extends to anticipating and understanding traveler concerns about the coronavirus pandemic and working to address them in an empathetic way. Karolina is truly a facilitator whose specialized knowledge of South American cuisine has allowed her business to thrive even during these challenging times. To learn more about Karolina and her company, Sated Ventures, please check out the contact links below: Website: www.satedventures.com LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/karolina-guilcapi-15670066/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/satedventures Instagram: www.instagram.com/karo.travels.and.eats/ We value your thoughts and feedback and would love to hear from you. Leave us a review on your favorite streaming platform to let us know what you want to hear more of. Here is a quick tutorial on how to leave us a rating and review on iTunes!: https://breaktheicemedia.com/rating-review/

History Storytime - For Kids
The History of the Police

History Storytime - For Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 9:21


Sophie (age 7) and Ellie (age 5) tell the story of the History of the Police.----more---- The first police were in Ancient Egypt. They were used to guard markets and temples. They had sticks to beat criminals with. They also used animals to help. They had trained monkeys and dogs who helped them catch baddies. In Ancient Greece they also had police. Every city was different. In Athens they used special slaves as police to keep order during meetings. We get the word Police from the Greek word “Polis” which means City. The Romans had lots of different types of police. They had the vigiles who used to stop criminals, catch escaping slaves and guard the Roman baths. When things got tricky they would call on the urban cohort. They were more like soldiers than police. They would deal with riots and treason. Roman officials also had their own bodyguards. They were called Lictors and they used to carry rods with them called Fasces. They would hit anyone who got in their way. Nowadays some bad governments like the Nazis are called Fascist governements and they get their name from the Fasces that the Lictors used to carry. Almost all societies have had some sort of police – whether they were the Chinese, Indian or South American societies in the past. In England the Saxons had a different system. They divided up families into groups of ten families. The head of on the families was in charge. He had to make sure that people obeyed the law, catch anyone who didn't and then punish them. Once the Normans conquered England they changed things to made them more organized. They created the job of constable. This was paid for by the King. However, it was the French who made the first proper police force. King Louis XIV wanted Paris to be better run. He created a police force for the city. Later it got uniforms and became the first police force with uniforms. Meanwhile, Britain was struggling. Constables used to pay ordinary people to catch criminals. However, often they would catch ordinary people and try and claim the money. One judge got so annoyed he set up his own thief catchers called the Bow Street Runners. Glasgow copied the French and made a police force for the city. Eventually, the government in Britain made a police force for London called the Metropolitan Police. The special thing about this was that the founder, Sir Robert Peel, said that the job of the police was to serve the people. He also said they the police had to enforce the law and not just do what the government wanted. Other colonies of Britain copied her. Places like Australia and Canada set up their own versions. Even America made police forces for her cities that were based on the same ideas. PATRONS CLUB If you liked this episode then please do join our Patrons Club. We have exclusive episodes there and you can help to choose an episode. You can join at www.patreon.com/historystorytime

Carole Baskins Diary
2014-11-01 Carole Diary

Carole Baskins Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 16:39


    100 Things Howie Brought Into My World or The First 12 Years Howie Anniversary 100 things I didn't have before you.   The day I met you:   1. Some of our cats still lived in small runs in the parking lot and on concrete. 2. We had 10,000 visitors and were down 12% from the year before due to 9/11. 2002 3. We had never created an annual report.  2002 4. Our name was Wildlife on Easy Street and didn't say what we did.  2003 5. There was no prohibition on selling and transporting big cats across state lines. 2003 6. We had no audited statements and could not qualify for larger grants.  Our largest outside gift had been $10,000.  2003 7. Our gift shop was a single room in a 1970's trailer and our register was a tool box in a metal cage.  2003 8. Our front gate was a chain link panel that kept falling off the tracks.  2003 9. We had never had radio ads.  2003 10. No retailer had ever proudly announced they would cease to carry fur.  2004 11. People still defanged and declawed big cats to make them more pliable for cub handling.  2004 12. We didn't have proper zoning and were in danger of developers running us off.  2004 13. We didn't have an Admin branch of the Volunteer Program.  2004 14. We didn't have an Intern Program.  2004 15. We didn't have an Operant Conditioning Program.  2004 16. We didn't have an Education Director.  2004 17. We didn't have a Point of Sale program.  2004 18. We didn't have a way to connect our supporters to their lawmakers.  2004 19. Food prep was a truck body with one row of sinks, one row of tables, and 6 people slinging machetes.  We could only store a couple days' food.  2004 20. We didn't have a dumpster, so we had to carry hundreds of pounds of trash each day to the end of the street and clean up the mess made by people and animals.  2004 21. We had not yet been reviewed by Charity Navigator, but achieved their highest rating right out of the gate.  2004 22. There was no national conference for animal advocacy.  2005 23. We had never had a golf tournament.  2005 24. We needed to increase our budget for whole prey so we could rehab our first baby bobcat, named Faith.  2005 25. We didn't have a recycling program.  2005 26. We had never had a $10,000 in tours.  2005 27. We had no rear entrance and were trapped if a tree fell across Easy Street.  2005 28. We had never created and sold a Big Cat Calendar.  2005 29. We had never had a corporate giving campaign.  2005 30. We had never been able to qualify for the Federal Combined Federal Campaign.  2006 31. Ringling had never attempted a season without tiger acts.  2006 32. We had never been listed in Charity Guide's List of Volunteer Opportunities.  2006 33. YouTube didn't exist.  We had no regular video presence online.  2006 34. People were petting, hand feeding, swimming with and having their photos made with adult lions and tigers.  2007 35. It was still legal to walk lions, tigers, leopards and cougars on leashes in public.  2007 36. Federal rules were finally written to enforce the 2003 Captive Wildlife Safety Act.  2007 37. There had never been an online resource that showed where big cats were kept.  2007 38. The USDI had never defined a sanctuary as a place that did not buy, breed, sell, trade nor allow public contact.  2007 39. Florida did not require any sort of liability insurance or bond for Class I owners.  2007 40. We had never been able to rally advocates enough to halt a big cat exhibit at a fair.  2007 41. We had never been in U.S. News and World Report.  2007 42. We could not afford a proper cemetery nor memorial plaques for our cats.  2007 43. We had not been able to provide meaningful conservation funding for snow leopards, African wildlife nor South American ecosystems.  2007 44. We had never had our PSA's run on T.V.  2007 45. We didn't have a rehab cage that was state of the art.  2007 46. We didn't have worker's comp, so we only had 3 employees.  2008 47. No country had yet banned the use of big cats in circus acts.  2008 48. We had never been a finalist for CFO of the year.  2008 49. Our perimeter wall had been a hodgepodge of chain link until our first solid wall began to go up after 4 years of fundraising.  2008 50. We had never been featured in Encyclopedia Britannica before.  2008 51. There had never been a comprehensive study on captive tigers until TRAFFIC quoted us extensively in Paper Tigers.  2008 52. Our website had never been available in any language other than English.  2008 53. There was no law against killing wild animals by remote control over the Internet.  2008 54. Tony the truck stop tiger had never had a lawyer before.  Nor had any other exotic cat.  2008 55. We didn't have a Legacy Society and had not been effectively soliciting bequests.  2008 56. There was no Twitter.  2008 57. White tigers were all the rage because Siegfried & Roy were deceiving the public into thinking they were Royal White Bengal tigers and zoos were breeding them because the public would pay to see them.  2009 58. There were no written standards for sanctuary accreditation.  2009 59. We didn't have a consolidated Intranet site for storing documents, training staff & volunteers and recording animal records and observations.  2009 60. CITES had never clearly stated "operations breeding tigers on a commercial scale shall implement measures to restrict the captive population to a level supportive only to conserving wild tigers; tigers should not be bred for trade in their parts and derivatives. 14.69" after we funded the Tiger Coalition's presence.  2009 61. In Florida people could still have Cougars as pets.  2009 62. We didn't have FIOS high speed Internet.  2009 63. We didn't have security cameras.  2009 64. We didn't have a fenced parking lot to keep people from getting out of their cars and getting in trouble.  2009 65. We had never had a member voted Citizen of the Year by the chamber of commerce.  2009 66. We had never been able to afford a development person.  2009 67. We had never had a credit card program where our cats were featured and user's were able to donate with every purchase.  2009 68. Facebook didn't exist.  2009 69. The Florida Legislature had never had to force the Florida Wildlife Commission to enforce their own rule, re: the 10k bond for Class I animals.  2010 70. PetSmart had never taken a position and banned exotic cats from their stores in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.  2010 71. We had never won national awards for Best Non Profit.  2010 72. In Florida Bobcats could be legally used as bait in fenced areas where hunting dogs were trained to chase them down and rip them to shreds; all in the name of good, clean, family fun.  2010 73. There was no major animal welfare organization that understood the big cat crises was caused by cub handling.  2011 74. There was no one drawing the obvious line between cubs handled by tourists and lions killed in canned hunts.  Hardly anyone even knew what a canned hunt was, and even those who did, didn't know that exotic cats were killed that way.  2011 75. There had never been a coalition of major animal protection groups working together to save the tiger.  2011 76. We had never had a volunteer hour tracking system, like Volgistics, to accurately account for volunteer hours.  2011 77. We had a static website but needed a content management system.  2011 78. We had never won a new truck before.  2011 79. We had never hosted a sanctuary workshop before.  2011 80. We didn't have outside professionals on our board of directors.  2011 81. We didn't have a generator to protect our food supply.  2011 82. There was no Google Plus.  2011 83. Malls throughout the midwest had cub handling displays every week of the year.  2012 84. We didn't have an endowment fund.  2012 85. We didn't have a Public Relations Director.  2012 86. Oprah had never taken a stand on fur.  2012 87. No city had ever banned the sale of fur.  2012 88. There had never been a federal bill introduced that would ban the private possession and public handling of big cats and their cubs.  2012 89. We had never been the main sponsor of Taking Action for Animals.  2012 90. We had never been able to use solar power.  2012 91. We had never been able to pursue my first passion of saving domestic cats and kittens from euthanasia.  2013 92. We could never have even considered building a 2.5 acre play yard for the cats.  2013 93. We had no way to insure our tour guides were giving accurate and relevant tours until implementing the automated tour and Vox system.  2013 94. We had never orchestrated an advocacy Fly In to D.C.  2013 95. We had never gotten a million dollar judgment against one of the bad guys.  2013 96. I had to supplement Big Cat Rescue's payroll.  2013 97. No one had ever done a study on the state of captive big cats around the world.  2013 98. I had never been able to go to the Animal Care Expo.  2014 99. We had never had our own lobbyist.  2014 100. We had never been able to understand each other on our radios.  2014 101. We had never had our own X-ray and Sonogram equipment.  2014 102. We never had a sufficient barrier between us and urban sprawl.  2014 103. And there was no way I could do much about it because as of the day I met you the sanctuary had been running in the red every year and it was all I could do to keep the cats fed.   The day I met you:   • I suffered from chronic back pain, a psychosomatic symptom of feeling unsupported.  I can't remember any lasting back issues since I met you. • I'd never met a man who loved and supported me. • I'd never known what it was like to not feel frustrated and angry all the time.  I used to journal all the time to try and work out the anger, but have had no reason to write, since meeting you. • No one ever took me to the beach for my birthday. • I'd never had anyone make me coffee. • No one ever spoke from their heart about our love in front of an audience and got choked up when saying, “To love someone is to see the face of God."   I turned this into a printed book for Howie called The First Twelve Years.   Hi, I'm Carole Baskin and I've been writing my story since I was able to write, but when the media goes to share it, they only choose the parts that fit their idea of what will generate views.  If I'm going to share my story, it should be the whole story.  The titles are the dates things happened. If you have any interest in who I really am please start at the beginning of this playlist: http://savethecats.org/   I know there will be people who take things out of context and try to use them to validate their own misconception, but you have access to the whole story.  My hope is that others will recognize themselves in my words and have the strength to do what is right for themselves and our shared planet.     You can help feed the cats at no cost to you using Amazon Smile! Visit BigCatRescue.org/Amazon-smile   You can see photos, videos and more, updated daily at BigCatRescue.org   Check out our main channel at YouTube.com/BigCatRescue   Music (if any) from Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) This video is for entertainment purposes only and is my opinion.

The Ag View Pitch
Weekly Market Outlook: Oct. 18-22nd - Time to Reset Price Opportunity?

The Ag View Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 25:56


Did USDA just give us data that will force us to "reset" our selling decisions and what is a "good" price." With carryout levels rising and some question marks beginning to surface on the demand front, current prices may seem low, but they are still much higher than the past several years. Without a South American production problem, where will the new bullish inputs be found? For many producers, better than expected yields and still good prices, total revenue will exceed expectations. Should this prompt a sales decision more so than just "price"? These are legitimate questions that each producer needs to seriously ponder, as they keep filling their storage bins. ?

Ag News Daily
Harvest Season Weather

Ag News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Eric Snodgrass, Science Fellow for Nutrien Ag Solutions, is here to talk about weather! We talk about drought relief, the possibility of another polar vortex, and South American weather patterns.

The Modern Drummer Podcast
Episode 53: Billy Amendola with Josh Freese.

The Modern Drummer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 80:45


Welcome to this week's Modern Drummer Podcast with Billy Amendola and his guest Josh Freese. If you're not familiar with his enormous body of work, please look up his discography, and it'll make your head spin. Since a very young age, Josh has been a touring musician, a first-call studio musician, a singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist, and a band member as both a leader and hired gun. He recently finished up touring and doing dates with Devo and The Offspring, in between playing on hit albums and songs, and he's getting ready as we speak to head out back on the road with Sting. He is a member of the Vandals (since 1989) and Devo (since 1996), he played drums for Guns N' Roses from 1997 to 2000, A Perfect Circle from 1999 to 2012, Nine Inch Nails from 2005 to 2008, Weezer from 2009 to 2011, and recorded over 400 records. In December 2010, Freese toured with Paramore on their South American tour. In fall 2016, he returned to playing full-time with Sting, whom he toured and recorded within 2005. In 2021, he toured with The Offspring. It's mind-boggling. Let's listen in and discover or be reminded why Josh is one of the greats. Enjoy!

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast
Ep. 242 Alfredo Stroessner

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 72:54


Today we'll be traveling to the oft ignored country of Paraguay to talk about a type of person we haven't covered in a while, a dickhead dictator. Alfredo Stroessner did a lot of dirty shit in his days as evil despot of the country, and we're here to tell you about all of it. And what is a South American fascist regime without a little help from the United States? So don't worry, we pop up in this story too. Enjoy!

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo
NBA Preseason Headlines With Brian Windhorst. Plus Catching Up With Matthew McConaughey.

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 87:53


Russillo is joined by ESPN's Brian Windhorst to discuss the situation with the Nets, Kyrie Irving, and the NYC vaccination mandate, as well as Ben Simmons's return to the 76ers (0:43). Then Ryen talks with actor and author Matthew McConaughey about taking the jump into acting in the 1990s, the “McConaissance,” the differences working with legendary directors Martin Scorsese and Christopher Nolan, disappearing into the South American jungle, and more (25:45). Finally, Ryen answers some listener-submitted Life Advice questions (1:00:32). Host: Ryen Russillo Guests: Matthew McConaughey and Brian Windhorst Producers: Kyle Crichton and Steve Ceruti Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
World Cup Qualifying Picks | Qatar 2022 (Ep. 7) on the Soccer Gambling Podcast

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:45


Billi breaks down 8 hand-picked games from this week's European and South American qualifiers— with the European matches beginning tonight and concluding tomorrow, while the South American matches all take place on Thursday. Qatar 2022 is now just 13 months away— with many sides on the brink of securing World Cup qualification Download SGPN APP today https://sgpn.app and leave us a rating/review. Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Discuss - Slack | Reddit Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Support for this episode - WynnBet | PropSwap.com code “SGP” | Prediction Strike code SGPN Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Soccer Gambling Podcast
World Cup Qualifying Picks | Qatar 2022 (Ep. 7)

Soccer Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:45


Billi breaks down 8 hand-picked games from this week's European and South American qualifiers— with the European matches beginning tonight and concluding tomorrow, while the South American matches all take place on Thursday. Qatar 2022 is now just 13 months away— with many sides on the brink of securing World Cup qualification Download SGPN APP today https://sgpn.app and leave us a rating/review. Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Discuss - Slack | Reddit Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Support for this episode - WynnBet | PropSwap.com code “SGP” | Prediction Strike code SGPN Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Daily Gardener
October 11, 2021 Bulb Planting Tips, Zaccheus Collins, Hermann Wendland, Arthur William Hill, Helena Rutherford Ely, Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourik, and Thích Nhất Hạnh

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 29:59


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a Philadelphia plant lover who we get to know only through his correspondence to other botanists, we'll also learn about the German palm expert and the man who became a director at Kew - but not before becoming an expert in the graves of the fallen during WWI. We'll hear an excerpt from the amateur gardener Helena Rutherford Ely. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book from one of my favorite modern garden experts Robert Kourik. And then we'll wrap things up with a Thay - the Buddhist monk, writer, and peace activist.  And I'll also add naturalist to his list of titles because he draws so much insight from nature - as should we all.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News 14 Tips for Planting Your Favorite Bulbs | BHG | Editors   Important Events October 11, 1818  On this day, the Philadelphia botanist Zaccheus Collins to Jacob Bigelow in Boston. Zaccheus was a big-time plant collector and he had a large herbarium of most of the plants in the vicinity of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Zaccheus never published anything, but he corresponded with the botanists of his time, especially Henry Muhlenberg, Frederick Muhlenberg, Stephen Elliott, and Jacob Bigelow. In his letter to Jacob, written on this day, Zaccheus wrote, The schooner Hero [with] Capt. Daggett... may be at Boston as soon as the present letter. On board [is] a little open box containing a growing plant of Aristolochia serpentaria (Virginia snakeroot), roots of Euphorbia ipecac (American ipecac), Spiraea trifoliata( Bowman's Root), & Convolvulus pandurata (wild sweet potato vine).  These were put up under the direction of the worthy Mr. Bartram, my friend, still living at the old Bot. gardens, home of the father of Amer. Botany.  You will only have to pay the freight. October 11, 1825 Birth of Hermann Wendland, German botanist. He followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, both botanists, and served as director of the Royal Gardens of Herrenhausen in Hannover. Each generation of Wendlends had their specialty; the grandfather worked with ericas or heather, the father's focus was phyllodineous acacias, and Hermann's love was the palm family, the Arecaceae. Hermann's monograph established the classification for palms. He's remembered in the South American palm genus Wendlandiella. During his life, Hermann turned Herrenhausen into the world's leading garden for palm cultivation and research. Herrenhausen's palm collection was unrivaled, and the focus on these stately and elegant trees resulted in Herrenhausen's construction of the tallest glasshouse in all of Europe. In addition to naming over 500 palm species, Hermann named the Arizona palm Washingtonia filifera in memory of George Washington. Hermann is also remembered for calling the genus Saintpaulia (African violet) after Baron Walter von Saint Paul. In 1882, Baron Walter was the Governor of the Usambara (“Ooh-sahm-bar-ah”) District in German East Africa. During his time there, he explored the Usambara Mountains located in northeastern Tanzania. There, in the cloud forests, he collected seeds and specimens of a small herb, which he sent home to Herrenhausen. Hermann immediately cultivated the little plants, and he recognized that they were an entirely new species in an entirely new genus. And so, he named the plant Saintpaulia ionantha (“saint-paul-ee-ah ii-o-nan' thah”). Today we call the plant by its common name, the African violet. Hermann also called it the Usambara veilchen ('Usambara violet'). Today, African violets continue to be one of the most popular house plants. But, at home in their native Usambara Mountains, the plants face extinction.   October 11, 1875 Birth of Arthur William Hill, English botanist, and taxonomist. He served as Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Before he became director of Kew, he worked on a project for the Directorate of Graves Registration and Enquiries, the entity in charge of locating the graves of Britains service members who died during WWI.  In 1915, Arthur became part of this project and served as horticulture advisor. The job required visits throughout Europe and the middle east. Anywhere the war was fought, Arthur visited - from France to Turkey, Italy to Palestine. In 1916, during the month of March alone, Arthur visited thirty-seven cemeteries. In 1917, Arthur visited the Somme Battlefields in France and wrote poignantly about the poppies and wildflowers that grew in the aftermath of the fighting that had occurred in the summer and fall of the previous year. Although the landscape was pockmarked from shells, Arthur wrote, ...One saw only a vast expanse of weeds of cultivation, which so completely covered the ground and dominated the landscape that all appeared to be a level surface. In July, poppies predominated, and the sheet of colour as far as the eye could see was superb; a blaze of scarlet unbroken by tree or hedgerow. No more moving sight can be imagined than this great expanse of open country gorgeous in its display of colour, dotted over with half-hidden white crosses of the dead. In no British cemetery, large or small, however beautiful or impressive it may be, can the same sentiments be evoked or feelings so deeply stirred. Nowhere, I imagine, can the magnitude of the struggle be better appreciated than in this peaceful, poppy-covered battlefield hallowed by its many scattered crosses.   Unearthed Words After five or six years, I dig up my Roses about October tenth, cut the tops down to about twelve inches, cut out some of the old wood, cut off the roots considerably, trench the ground anew, and replant. The following year the Roses may not bloom very profusely, but afterward, for four or five years, the yield will be great. My physician in the[128] country is a fine gardener and particularly successful with Roses. We have many delightful talks about gardening. When I told him of my surgical operations upon the Roses, he was horrified at such barbarity and seemed to listen with more or less incredulity. So I asked him if, as a surgeon as well as physician, he approved, on occasion, of lopping off a patient's limbs to prolong his life, why he should not also sanction the same operation in the vegetable kingdom. He was silent. ― Helena Rutherford Ely, A Woman's Hardy Garden   Grow That Garden Library Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourik  This book came out in 1986. And in 2005, it was back in print by popular demand. Now, as per usual, Robert is ahead of the curve here. He's talking about incorporating edibles into the landscape and he was doing this way back in the eighties. So props to Robert. Now, what I love about all of Robert Kirk's books.   Is how practical and experience-based is advisive. And as with his other books, he puts tons of resources at the end of this book as well.  So make sure to check that out. In this book, Robert mainly focuses on the edible plants you can put in your garden. That will help fertilize the soil and attract beneficial insects like pollinators and then provide additional benefits like helping your garden with issues like erosion or sheltering your home from cold heat and wind. Robert also talks about how to incorporate edibles in trouble spots.  So think about areas where water is a problem or where you maybe don't get that much sun. Well. Robert guides you through all of that and makes edible suggestions for those areas as well. In this book, Robert also talks about making your soil better. He walks you through a ton of tree pruning styles. And he even dishes up some gourmet recipes. Because, of course, if you're growing edibles, You're going to want to eat them. That's the best part. This book is 382 pages of edible landscaping from a master. Robert installed his very first edible landscape back in 1978.  And he brings all of that experience to bear in this fantastic resource. You can get a copy of Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally by Robert Kourik and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $18.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart October 11, 1926 Birth of Thích Nhất Hạnh (“Tick Nyot Hahn”), Vietnamese Thiền Buddhist monk and peace activist. His students call him Thay (pronounced “Tay” or “Tie”), which is Vietnamese for “teacher.” In 1982 he cofounded The Plum Village, a Buddhist monastery in southern France. Thay often uses nature to teach. In 2014, he wrote No Mud, No Lotus: The Art of Transforming Suffering.  He once wrote, Wilting flowers do not cause suffering.  It is the unrealistic desire that flowers not wilt that causes suffering. In Fidelity: How to Create a Loving Relationship That Lasts (2011), Thai wrote, Every time you breathe in and know you are breathing, every time you breathe out and smile to your out-breath, you are yourself, you are your own master, and you are the gardener of your own garden. In his 1992 book, Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life, Thay wrote, I have lost my smile, but don't worry. The dandelion has it.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Great Shot Podcast
ATP Challenger Tour Recap [10-04-21] ft. Damian Kust

Great Shot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:08


Hosts Damian Kust and Jakub Bobro recap another exciting week of ATP Challenger action. They discuss Dimitry Popko's maiden Challenger title, Tallon Griekspoor's forehand, why the upcoming South American stretch offers prime opportunities for rankings jumps, and so much more!! Don't forget to give a 5 star review on your favorite podcast app! In addition, add your twitter/instagram handle to the review for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! This episode brought to you by: Tourna You know them for their world famous Tourna Grip, but did you know they have a lot of award winning strings? 3 of the top 5 SPIN strings (according to Racquet Sports Industry playtests) are Tourna strings! That's just the beginning! Call or email them to get college pricing or free samples. Just email "sales@uniquesports.com" or call 800-554-3707 and mention Cracked Racquets to get a free sample. Tennis Point Discounted Tennis Apparel, Tennis Racquets, Tennis Shoes & Equipment from Nike, adidas, Babolat, Wilson & More! Visit their store today and use the code "CR15" at checkout to save 15% off Sale items. Some Exclusions (MAP Exceptions) apply and code will not work on those items. This code will add 1 FREE CAN of WILSON Balls to the cart at checkout.  Tennis Channel Podcast Network Visit https://www.tennis.com/pro-game/podcasts/ to stay current on the latest tennis news and trends and enjoy in-depth analysis and dynamic debates. Find Cracked Racquets Website: https://www.crackedracquets.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/crackedracquets Twitter: https://twitter.com/crackedracquets Facebook: https://Facebook.com/crackedracquets YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/crackedracquets Email Newsletter: https://crackedracquets.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices