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The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Disruption In Container Logistics With John Murnane

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 51:57


The North American inbound supply chain was well-run and extremely cheap before the pandemic brought disruption to the logistics and transportation space. Since the pandemic, the shipping industry had to adapt and is still adapting to this uncertainty. Prices are going up, congestion is at an all-time high, and these we won't recover from these challenges overnight. Join Joe Lynch as he talks to John Murnane about the disruption in container logistics. John is a senior partner at McKinsey & Company. At McKinsey, he is the leader of the logistics sector. So he covers everything from air & ocean carriers to warehousing & fulfillment. Listen and learn more about the shipping industry, shipper & carrier relationships, sustainability, end-to-end shipping, and much more. Find out about the disruption in container logistics and how it can be solved. Disruption In Container Logistics With John Murnane Thank you so much for joining us. Our topic is disruption and container logistics with my friend, John Murnane. How is it going, John.  I am doing great. Thanks for having me. How are you? Excellent. I am glad we are talking about this topic. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are? I am a Senior Partner at McKinsey. I am based in Atlanta. I lead McKinsey's Logistics Sector globally with a colleague named Martin Joerss, who is based in Hamburg. Tell us what you guys do over in that McKinsey's Logistics Practice. We call it a sector, but we serve the logistics industry. For us, that is all the different, interesting, fascinating parts of logistics throughout the global supply chain, ocean and air carriers, forwarders, folks doing container leasing, and Marine services. We do a lot of work in ground handling and transport, terminal operators, and rail trucks, both asset-based and brokerage. We also do a lot of work in the warehouse and fulfillment. I serve companies that operate fulfillment, real estate, and industrial developer. We also do Last Mile post and parcel returns, plus all the folks that are in and around that space doing data, transparency, tech, robotics, and all the fascinating, fun companies that are trying to knit it all together. Do you work more with shippers or the actual logistics providers? We work with both. In the group I lead, the logistics sector, we serve companies that make a living in moving stuff around. I have got a number of colleagues in a practice that is adjacent to ours that are in manufacturing and supply chain. Those consultants and partners serve the big retailers and manufacturers who pay to have the goods moved. I do not know what you guys did at McKinsey but it was not so long ago that there was no logistics practice. It was logistics and supply chain or supply chain and logistics or manufacturing supply chain and logistics. It was always the tail end of something else. We have arrived because we have a McKinsey partner who is responsible for watching over us. We have got 100 McKenzie partners that I do not know if we are responsible for it. [caption id="attachment_7990" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: The pandemic hit the shipping industry in many ways. People started buying a lot more, which meant more containers being moved while the staff was low. There was just a lot of congestion.[/caption]   The business needs some babysitters. Tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up? Where did you go to school? Give us some career highlights before you joined McKinsey. I grew up in California, pretty close to the ports of LA and Long Beach, but did not get into logistics. At a young age, I was a Mechanical Engineer at Duke. I worked in entertainment for many years at Disney and the NBA in finance and design roles, which was a lot of fun. It is not as entertaining as logistics. When I got into logistics, it was at McKinsey. I went to Business School at Michigan and then I joined McKinsey. You joke about logistics being the end. I got recruited into the travel and logistics practice because I knew a thing or two about travel. I started serving logistics companies back in the day. This is 2003 or 2004. It was not sexy. Logistics was not quite as hot as it is now, but I found the work fascinating. I liked the people. I got into rail, parcel, and trucking, and then I moved to South America to lead our logistics practice. I was in Chile for three years and then I got into the ocean space and Marine terminals. I have been hooked ever since. It has become more fascinating given all the things that we have seen in the last years, from the eCommerce boom to automation to the push for sustainability and what happened with the pandemic. It is fantastic that you have got that South America experience because I feel like we have had so much stuff in China for so long. I have nothing against China, but it makes more sense to ship stuff from Mexico or South America in general. We do not do nearly that much business with our South American partners who we fully understand compared to China. There are lots of bags coming in and out in a lot of air freight. I was in Chile, which does a lot of flowers and salmon, and exports a ton of copper and minerals. Let's talk about our topic, which is the disruption in container logistics. Why don't you take us back to before there was this disruption? Talk about what was going on in the space back in the day? You hear a lot about underinvestment in infrastructure and “failing” logistics infrastructure in the US. Many years ago, things were working well. If you were a manufacturer or a consumer, you probably had the lowest cost supply chain in the world that was able to get you products from anywhere in the world any time. The cost was quite low and the supply chain runs very well. It is smooth. As such, it was something that a lot of people took for granted. It seemed very opaque compared to now. Many years ago, if you were moving freight, your stuff disappeared into the ocean for three weeks or a month. There is also opaque because no one has looked into it. We have all learned how important it is. I used to serve clients and I did a lot of marketing and sales work, helping people with sales and pricing. I serve clients in logistics. I remember hearing sales executives complain to me. I can't make these value-based arguments. I can't talk about our value prop because I can't get access to anyone that matters. Ten years ago, people had a well-ran, extremely cheap North American inbound supply chain. And they took it for granted. I am talking to a procurement leader four levels down and they do not care about our value. It was opaque because, to some extent, there was not engagement on this topic at the highest levels, and certainly, there is now. Many years ago, you had a well-run, extremely cheap North American inbound supply chain. The infrastructure did not get bad overnight. The pandemic hit us in three ways. One is we all started buying a lot more stuff. We did not spend any less. We stopped spending on travel and restaurants. No new car, no vacation, but I can buy crap online. I can upgrade my house. I did some of that myself. I am in the house more and I invest in doing some things around the house. I got an indoor bike to stay in shape, but we spent 20% more money on stuff. I always call it not your grandparents or great-grandparents pandemic. In the 1920 pandemic, 50 million people died worldwide and there was poverty. We joke that the COVID-19 or 20 that we gained from sitting around eating and buying stuff. That is not to discount all of the misery that it brought, but most of the misery was isolation for us. When you have a situation where there is more volume being purchased, that means more containers and more trucks move. At the same time, global capacity fell by about 14% or 15% over a similar timeframe. If you have been paying attention, that probably feels intuitive. We had people that were sick so we could not stack. We had operations that were shut down at times. We had congestion because people were stacking and storing containers because they could not get them to the next place and they were waiting and also every stage in the value chain. We all saw the earnings releases that talked about, “I am 65% short of the team. I need to operate these warehouses.” They are open, but they are not running anywhere near full capacity. If it is 20% up in demand and 15% down in supply, you have got a congestion problem. On top of it, those increases weren't smooth. If those increases were smooth, our logistics industry might have had a chance, but it was overnight, then it stopped and started again. That made for some challenging times, and you ended up getting what you got, which is pretty poor service, long lines, congestion, delays, and uncertainty where things were. You also have price increases because the companies that were moving the goods were trying to manage to make sure that they were at least taking good care of the clients that were willing to pay the most. It became challenging for our shippers. I do not think it hit the biggest shippers, the Home Depots or the Lowe's. Those guys had contracted rates. They call them the bat phone when they call the shipping companies. They did not all of a sudden get double or triple the cost of a container. They were okay. It was a lot of the other smaller players. You mentioned this spike 20% up in demand, 15% less in capacity, but if you were 20% or 30% off in your headcount in your consulting practice, you could address that internally because you are all a team. This was across a whole bunch of supply chains that are spread out across the world. Communication was always difficult given time zones, languages, and the lack of computer systems. The coordination and fixes were all slow. I was talking to my daughter and she is in Portland. She was excited. She called and said, “The couch that I ordered in October 2021 is going to be here. I forgot what it looks like.” We are all getting used to waiting a little longer than we used to, but it is nice when they arrive.   We still seem to have these shocks every once in a while. Shanghai had more COVID. In the US, we are seeing shortages of headcount in a lot of places, especially in warehousing, dock workers, and trucking. There is a lack of capacity when it comes down to it. [caption id="attachment_7991" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: The two things to watch to know when congestion and prices will moderate are consumer spending on goods in North America and labor availability.[/caption]   I know everyone wants to know and figure out when this is going to be over. I do not think it is going to be overnight, partially because I do not think that the disruption is going to be over soon. The fact that we have got basically almost no trucking going on in China despite the manufacturing plants being open, but the trucking operation is pretty much ground to a halt. It means we have got days of inventory that are going to stack up and then need to be pushed through the system. The disruption and uncertainty are going to be a part of our new normal. With regard to when the average demand and supply get back closer to where they used to be, it is going to be a matter of consumer spending and labor. We love the idea of things normalizing and getting to a new normal, but we are seeing inflation and other problems. We see the war in Ukraine and the recurrence of issues in China with COVID. We have trade issues with China. In a lot of ways, the new normal is not normal. The new normal is going to change because of events outside of our control of weather or geopolitical. Change is going to be more prevalent in the coming decade than it was in the last few, which is why to some extent, I think we did have that false sense of security that everything was working. We did have a period of relative sanity, which allowed us to fine-tune the system despite its insufficient infrastructure. We talked about the way it used to be pre-COVID years ago and what happened. What is next? What is next is recovery. I think that, in time, we would expect to see supply improve and consumer spending on goods moderate a little bit. We are seeing an increase in consumption of services, which makes sense because there is the ability to do that. My wife works in travel and she has never been busier. People are eager to get back out and travel again. I do not think we are going to see the end of events and discontinuities. Those are two things to watch to tell us when congestion and prices are going to moderate are going to be consumer spending on goods in North America and labor availability. Talk about those shocks. There are many ways we can describe this. We could say our supply chains got a little brittle, meaning they broke rather than being bent. Another way to describe it is we have too many risks in there and a lack of resiliency, depending on how you want to talk about it. We know we are going to have some more shocks in this system. How do we deal with all that? There are a few things. A lot of this is ongoing. It is already happening. We need to stop looking at the supply chain as a simple commoditized part of the operation. It is not a simple call center. It is not something that should be managed by a small team in procurement focused on the cost lever. This is a C-level topic. The supply chain is and forever will be a C-level topic. Shippers need to be thinking about all the things that they can do to accept the fact that the logistics industry will always be more complicated than it used to be. Part of that is more safety stock. I know you are an auto guy. The old just-in-time Math assumed simple, easy commodity-priced trucking and logistics operation. The world is more complicated than that. Certainly, some companies are looking at how I can think about de-risking my supply chain, both in terms of the number of locations that I sourced from, to increase the number so I have more flexibility. If I lose one node, they will be looking at nearshoring and reshoring. The math on those deals is never easy, but they are certainly spending time thinking through that, especially thinking about that in light of new sustainability targets. All of my clients are hearing calls from their clients who are hearing calls from their customers to say, “How can I be more sustainable? How can I meet the new carbon aspirations?” You hit a whole bunch of topics. I want to break them down a little bit. It speaks to where we are at in this business. The first thing you said is this is no longer a small decision. When I used to sell logistics and supply chain services, the way I sold mostly less than truckload in some truckloads, but we had the technology. I remember I would call and say, “I want to talk to the owner, the CEO, the head of operations, or a general manager.” We impact finance because we are going to take some of those functions away. We do it as part of our service. We interface with the sales guys because they are the ones who are always saying, “Where is my stuff?” We work with your ops team on the inbound and we work with your logistics team. A lot of times, when I would call that C-level guy, they would say, “Talk to Tony in the back.” The disruption and uncertainty in the shipping industry will be a part of the new normal. It's not changing overnight. I would go see Tony and back, and he did not want to have a strategic discussion. He did not care if the finance guys had to audit the bills. I said, “We audit the bills because we have a TMS,” and I start my whole spiel. I am going to parody this a little bit. He was like, “Those guys got me Kid Rock tickets.” That is why he bought from that logistics company. He did not have that strategic focus that I wanted my customer to have. One of the things we have all been through is when you call that guy and say, “I want to manage all your freight. I want you to use our technology and you are going to see all of your shipments there. He says "I will give you an Excel spreadsheet with all our loads in it. You put your price in and if you are cheaper, I will give you those lanes tomorrow.” I was like, “I do not want to save you $50 on tomorrow's load. I want to save 10% on your annual spend.” It would be like, “What are you talking about?” The number might have been used to bend. We spend $500,000 a year, which is bad enough to leave it to somebody who does not care about the strategic function of logistics. Now that number got to $5 million, you go, “What the hell, guys?” There is a lot of change on both sides of that transaction that we are going to go through over the next few years. I have a good friend who is a former CEO of one of the container lines. He says, “Enough with this value base. I lose customers for $50 a box. It does not matter how much better we are.” That was the history. In that world, you do not have the right executives in the decision on the shipper side. You do not have the head of sales, marketing, or operations. You have someone in procurement. When you have someone in procurement, they have one metric, which is how they can get the unit costs down. You also need to get better on the sales side. The guys that I work with, the carriers, trucking companies, and railroads, now have an opening to say, “It was not so commodity-based,” but they have got to be able to deliver. They got to be able to go and articulate what they do that is different than the next guy and why that is worth it. I always use the same analogy back in the olden days when we had stockbrokers. They are transactional. You would always hear the term churn. They wanted to churn your account, “I want to sell your Dell stock and move you over to Apple.” They make money on both of those transactions. Those guys did not care about your overall financial picture. They cared about what you had in your investment account. Now we have moved to financial planners. You do not hear anybody say in their stockbroker. Financial planners are aligned with their clients. They say, “We are going to get paid 1% or 1.5% of what you have in your account. I want to make you rich so I can get 1% or 1.5% of that every year.” It is the same thing in this business. We have to switch out of this transactional thinking and move to that financial planner. A lot of companies want to do that. They do not want to be ringing the bell and having the siren go off that they made $1,000 on a transaction and celebrating at the office that day. That is a lack of alignment and it is yesterday's news. You will see more gain share partnerships and relationships like that between carriers and shippers. It takes real change on both sides. This will be the shock that gets the awareness to a place where those things are pursued. Not just between carriers and shippers, but to some extent, between different players in the logistics chains, carriers and ocean terminals, railroads and trucking lines, warehouse fulfillment operators and last-mile parcels. One of the things I want to touch on briefly is the timeout containers. We will get more back to the containers for a second. We started using containers a lot in the late ‘50s and ‘60s. There is a book, The Box That Changed the World. Prior to that, we could not even do global trade because the cost of logistics was so high. That was a tremendous innovation. We have seen this change the world. We would not be doing nearly the global trade we do now without it, but we have not seen a lot of innovation in that space. Now we are starting to see information technology. That is another piece of that. Speak to that and the sustainability that is important to us. The technology has come along in terms of tracking. It is available. You will see more adoption of that, especially in the reefer space, but also in dry boxes. I have seen a lot of startups and investments in foldable boxes and alternative equipment. The main way we are going to get better sustainability on our container fleet is by finding better ways to extend their lives.   I never heard that. We are throwing a lot of those out. [caption id="attachment_7992" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: 75-80% of containers are leaving LA empty so they can be filled up in China with more goods while there is a shortage. That's because the supply chain has always been an afterthought.[/caption]   We lose track of a lot of them because we do not know quite where they were. Telematics, tracking, and things like that will help there. How long does a container last? There are containers out there that have been in the fleet for twenty-some-odd years. The average is probably closer to 12 to 15. There are all sorts of uses. One of them is use for alternative storage. If anybody from the container ship lines is reading, give me a call and I will deliver you 50 containers. I live about 25 minutes out of Ann Arbor. There are some farms and not quite rural, but I always drive by and think, “What are you doing with that container?” They only need them where they need them. Our supply chain is imbalanced. They need them to pick up soybeans and send those to São Paulo. The fact that they are in Ann Arbor does not help them a whole lot because of the amount of money and time spent to get them down there. Managing that global fleet better and extending its life would be great from a sustainability standpoint. It comes up a little bit on my show about sustainability. Some people might be shaking their heads and say, “I do not believe that the man is causing global warming.” I always say, “I do not care what you think. It does not matter what I think.” This is what consumers and brands are asking for it. When one of those big brands says, “What are you doing?” you better have an answer. It is too late to do anything at that point. You do have to embrace it now. There are a lot of small ways. When it is over the road, we are trying to get rid of empty miles. That starts with measuring the empty miles, which brings me to another point. We were saying that 75% to 80% of containers are leaving LA and Long Beach empty so they can go be filled up in China with more goods for us. Meanwhile, we have a shortage and we have gone mad. It is illogical, but the understandable conclusion from the supply chain is an afterthought. The supply chain has always been an afterthought. It is not designed. It just happened. There are many forces well beyond the global supply chain that decide what is our import and export balance with China and where do we manufacture intermediate goods for auto? There is nothing logistics can do to account for the fact that there is that much import-export balance on goods. With empty backhaul and empty miles within the US, there are a lot of things that the logistics industry can do to help. There are smarter ways to reroute though there are still a lot of empty miles even in the US. I have become more aware of this. There is the empty truck that is moving from LA to New York, and you go, “That should never ever happen.” I do not think that happens nearly as often as it used to, but what is becoming more of a concern is the half-empty trucks and you go, “I had 10,000 half-empty trucks leave this location. Is there a way?” I know there are technologies and the guys over at flock freight and others are saying, “We can do something about it.” The main way of getting better sustainability on container fleets is by finding better ways to extend their lives. We will see more shared loads and multi loads where everyone will call multi-stop, where we are going to say, “That truck is full.” That is good for the environment and truckers. For the shippers, we are going to have to figure that out. We do not want to put I-can't-move-your-food onto a truck with auto parts. We have to be careful about how we manage it with the shippers but I think it is going to lower the price of shipping. Once we are fully loaded with the real cost of all of this stuff, whether it be the drivers, assets, new vehicles, or the autonomous and electric vehicles that we bring in to make a more sustainable fleet, the cost per unit is going to be higher. It is going to put the burden on us to figure out how we can make better use of each of the units. Maybe it is two hours later, but that allows me to share a load and double my density on the chunk move. All of those things can happen in time, but it takes great collaboration between carriers and shippers to make it work. The transparency and tools of the data exist to be able to do it, but it takes tremendous collaboration and trust to get it done. I am going to put you on the spot here. I know you work with a lot of different companies. I want to tick off some standard categories and what kind of work you are doing for these companies. Let's say an over-the-road carrier calls you. What do you tell them these days? What would be a typical project you would work on with them? Over the road, carriers were doing a lot of work and helping them think about how their network is going to change as manufacturers figure out a new supply chain or as we try to start to think about electric vehicles and ultimately autonomous vehicles. Not just how should you think about the timing of those technologies, but what are the network decisions you are making now that will feel sub-optimal in 5 or 10 years because the investments that those companies make in assets and infrastructure are not short-term. We are helping them think about sustainability in terms of how they can help their shippers with their sustainability targets. Those are some of the big themes. Do you talk to any brokers, 3PLs, and non-asset-based? What are you doing for them? Sustainability is a topic for them in terms of how I can provide. I am already helping them knit together. A lot of them are trying to figure out, “How can I knit together solutions across modes? How can I optimize those around sustainability targets?” We are doing a lot of work almost across the board in growth. How do companies find growth? There are a lot of new freight flows that are coming, not just because there are always new freight flows that are coming, but sustainability and the targets that all these companies are taking on are creating a whole lot of new goods to move. We are working with a lot of companies, whether they be asset-light, asset-heavy, broker, truckload, but also parcel and the like. It is like, “Where do you find freight? How do you get it? How do you leverage the tools today to find those companies?” Do you work with Final Mile or Last Mile guys? We do. We work with from a pallet and LTL Final Mile, and heavy goods Final Mile. We do a lot of post and parcel work. We have got a huge practice globally that has done tremendous work in helping drive efficiency in the postal space and parcel as well. They need it.   Those companies are struggling. [caption id="attachment_7993" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: Once the real cost of all these new things comes, the cost per unit will increase. It's going to take time to manage that. There needs to be a great collaboration between carriers and shippers to make it work.[/caption]   From what I understand, the Final Mile for home delivery to goods is the most expensive part of the journey. I was not being critical of the post office. We want it to be better, but we put a lot of constraints on it, and I think it is the hard part. I do not want a pallet delivered to my house and then distributed all of those parcels to my neighbors. I would like just my piece delivered to my house. Getting my piece delivered to my house is expensive. The costs are getting better relative to the pallet moves because the density of residential delivery has come up so much. Many years ago, the density of residential delivery was terrible. It was hard to make the economics work for the big parcel companies. As our volumes have gone up, that has improved the relative density, but it is still tough. What about warehousing and fulfillment? We have seen so much change in that space. What is going on when you work with them? First of all, permitting and getting sites are extremely challenging. The sites have to be closer to current consumers. If you want a site or the old model of three sites in the middle of nowhere, you can still get that. If you want the sites that people want now, which is one hour or maybe even less outside of every resident in the country, those sites are hard to come by. We do work with developers on construction and permitting on how to do that well and how to forecast and identify where the sites are going and where you need to be. We are also working with operators on how to drive productivity in those sites. We are doing a lot of work on how to refine, recruit, train and retain talent. That is a theme across all logistics. I was talking to somebody about a paint company and they said, “We do not have anyone retire from this location.” It was their DC. The reason they had no one retired from there is because it was a young man's game. He did not want to walk 10 miles picking stuff up and moving stuff around. We have to make that job in the warehouse easier so you are not breaking your back. If you walked by an auto assembly plant and walked through it, you would see that nobody was doing a job that was backbreaking or that required excessive strength, crouching, or reaching. We have eliminated those and we see that same mindset move into fulfillment. Those guys are going to become technicians rather than strong backs. We have had conversations for years about technology in the fulfillment space. Now it is happening. They made fun of us many years ago because it was early and no one had proven all the economics. It was whizzbang cool stuff, but is it having an impact now. There are certain functions that are being largely automated and you are seeing high ROIs. Also, you have got a lot of technology now that is more flexible than it used to be. Building the $10 million conveyance system just for this client and then hoping you retain them is a scary proposition for a fulfillment operator. Having flexible, robotic assets that can move seasonally or move to a new facility if you lose a client. We are also seeing longer contracts which helps. Fulfillment operators are saying, “I do not want to do a three-year deal.” You can't facilities for that and build a location if necessary for a bigger customer. We are trying robots now. This is becoming somewhat like automotive. In automotive, what we learned is if you give me one year, I am not going to invest in it. From a container line standpoint, a lot of people are trying to figure out how to facilitate end-to-end shipping better. The payback cycles on some of those technologies are getting shorter, but it is hard to make many of them work on a three-year contract. We are seeing a lot of fulfillment players and manufacturers agreeing to 5 or 7-year deals or agreeing to co-invest in the technology that they want to offer something that customers can't get elsewhere. Let's circle back to the beginning. What do you talk to about the container people, the guys with the ships, the rail, drayage, and the modal? From a container line standpoint, a lot of them are trying to figure out, “How can I better facilitate end-to-end shipping? I do not know if I want to own all those pieces of the operation.” It does not do me a whole lot of good to get it to the port if it sits in the port. Much worse is it does not do me a whole lot of good if I am sitting at the pilot station waiting to get into the port. A lot of the conversation and work in the container space is, “How do you collaborate with the terminal, the rail operation, and the consolidation or deconsolidation facility to get boxes and get them back?” The whole concept of end-to-end is probably the strongest when you think about container terminals, dray, rail, or trucks. Figuring out how to create more seamless, more partnerships, and share data to do that. In some of those, you see the metrics and the CMAs of the world that are investing quite a bit in buying companies to knit together that offering, They are buying over the road companies here. They made an extra $100 billion or something in those ship lines during COVID. To your point, they are investing in that end-to-end solution. Somebody said this to me and they work closely with one of these companies. They said, “Do not be surprised if we see single-use containers because we do have a trade imbalance with China.” If that container is only going one way and I have to ship it back on a boat that is filled with containers that are empty, somebody might say, “Why am I shipping it back there?” “It is because these are expensive containers.” Do they need to be expensive containers? Could they be less expensive and single-use? I know somebody is going to say, “What about recycling and all that?” There is a design that has to happen here. We got people like John and his team there. They will figure it out. From my perspective, we see it in automotive. Sometimes, you ship back the containers that brought your stuff. Sometimes, you do not because it does not make sense because it is one way. Do you guys work with air freight companies? We do but it has been a challenging and rewarding a couple of years for air freight. The belly players have been tough because they have not had the majority of their capacity with many of the passenger lines, much of the passenger capacity down. The pure freight players have done extremely well. Airfreight was a key enabler and one of the early winners in the pandemic and continues to be. I think the questions on air freight are how can they use advanced analytics to drive even better forecasting of volumes and, therefore, even better service levels and yield management? We think there is a lot of opportunity in the air freight space around advanced analytics and pricing. I heard it from Flexport and the guys over freight ways. One percent of all overseas volume is on air freight, but it is 30% of the revenue. What it speaks to is you are not shipping auto parts, usually on a plane. You are shipping electronics, chips, medicines, and stuff like that that is high value and small. Mostly high density. Value per cubic foot is off the charts. That ratio feels approximately right. I also heard that 50% of the air freight is passenger planes.   That is why air freight prices absolutely skyrocketed. [caption id="attachment_7994" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: A lot of the work in the container space today is how do you collaborate with the terminal, the rail operation, the consolidation & deconsolidation facilities? It's all about creating partnerships.[/caption]   They were flying anywhere. They moved up first. Ocean container rates have skyrocketed too, but in the air cargo, when your supply chain breaks down at some point, the only option you have is to get it there. It is the last resort for a lot of things and the first resort for high-value cargo. A lot of companies, for the release of the phone, will send enough phones for the first couple of months via air, and then they will send the backup to refill stock via ocean. In a pandemic, it was the first choice. The majority of the global air freight capacity is the belly of the passenger. When so much of our passenger fleet was grounded without anyone to pay for the international passenger move, you lost the belly cargo. I heard somebody use the term preighter, which is passenger freighter. They sometimes took the seats out of planes and filled them up. Other times, they put stuff on the seat that you might have been flying to a conference on. Now, it has got a stack of mobile phones on it. I am going to try and summarize all this and then I want to get some final thoughts before you go into what is new over at McKinsey. The topic is disruption and container logistics. John talked about the steady-state. We will talk about many years ago, pre-COVID, and what happened during COVID, that horrible time with demand spike, capacity down, sick people, and broken supply chains. We learned how brittle our supply chains were. You talked a little bit about what is next and where consumer spending is going. We are spending more on services and a little less on products. We are going to see how the industry reacts to what are still shocks and aftershocks of what happened. We do not even know the implications of the conflict in the Ukraine and inflation. We are better, but we will see. Lastly, we talked about what we learned during this time that logistics is not a commodity and that we have to insist on a seat at the table. We no longer be just a commodity service. John took us through all of the different things he and his team do with their clients. Any final thoughts on this big topic, John? A few final thoughts, two things we did not talk about and one thing I wanted to reinforce. We did not talk about the war in Ukraine. The near-term impact of that has not been huge on the global logistics industry. Carriers have pretty quickly rebalanced their networks in response to that. The long-term impacts could be significant. Ukraine and Russia are large exporters of commodities like wheat, oil and gas. I think we will see a lot of those supply chains shift around. While we are all watching the human tragedy and suffering through it, the near-term impact from a logistics standpoint has not been significant. We have been talking so much about eCommerce. It is going to be omni commerce. You have seen a bit of a drawdown and a correction back. We talked about ten years of eCommerce acceleration in two months. That was true. You have seen brick and mortar make a comeback. Some things are better are bought in person. My kids bought mattresses online and they are like, “We love it.” I was like, “I am going to have that mattress for ten years. I have to lay down on it.” I am not going to look at 5,000 reviews. I love eCommerce, but to your point, some of those shopping experiences are going to have to become experiences, not a pain in the ass experiences. Everyone wants to go to the Farmer's Market or a cool boutique. We have to get back to a cool experience if I am willing to leave the house. For shippers, many of them want to get to a place where they are managing more on Omni channel commerce supply chain. One of the most frustrating parts of the pandemic was when we had out-of-stock items on the website and obsolete items sitting in storerooms in the retail centers. That was painful and was a function of having two supply chains, which is the case for many shippers. They built their old brick and mortar supply chain, then they added a supply attender to eCommerce, and they did not talk to each other. You will see companies now figure out, “How do I have one more flexible Omni commerce supply chain?” There are going to be some variations. There will be times and products where you want to buy online or in-store. Certain companies will have a blend of the two. That is where we are going on that front, which we did not talk about but I think is important. It also needs to be designed. It has to be created. It can't be a bolt-on because we bolted on the gig economy and thought that, “We got an eCommerce solution.” Instacart, Shipt, and some of those solutions for grocery, from what I understand, the grocery store companies are losing money on those and they obviously do not like that. The gig economy stepped up. It is great. We are always going to have it. There's a lot of opportunity in the air freight space around advanced analytics and pricing. We are always going to use it in logistics, but it needs to be managed by logistics guys who are operational experts and good at routing and technology. It can't just be, “Bob down the street buys groceries for the neighborhood. It does not work as the way it needs to.” We are going to see those grocery stores become grocery store/fulfillment centers in some cases or maybe one fulfillment center in the Detroit Metro area that serves all of the eCommerce. Some of those business models will evolve. Even a company as great as Instacart or some of the early applications is adding cost on the top of the already existing flow and retail, brick and mortar, and all that stuff. The ideal way of doing that is to have dark stores that are designed for efficiency and pick, pack, and ship, not for the grocery experience that we have all grown to love. Tell us what is new over at McKinsey and how do we reach out? Do you have any webinars coming up or case studies? We love to have conversations. The best way to get in touch with us is on our website. It is easy to find me or any number of colleagues. You can send an email and we will respond. I will probably get the email. If I am not the right person to talk to, I will find someone else. On the site, we have got an interview with Sanne Manders, the COO of Flexport, which is great. We are putting up content all the time. What conferences are you guy going to?  I know we are excited about TPM in 2023. When is that? TPM is in Long Beach in the early spring every year. It is still a long way away. I do not know what the next conference we have got. We have coming up in May 2022 in Northwest Arkansas. I interviewed a professor from the University of Arkansas, the number one supply chain school carrying Gartner. John, thank you so much for taking the time. Thanks so much for having me. It was a pleasure talking to you. I look forward to keeping in touch. It was my pleasure.    Important Links John Murnane The Box That Changed the World Flexport Sanne Manders https://www.LinkedIn.com/In/JohnPMurnane/  – John Murnane https://www.LinkedIn.com/Company/Mcinsey/ – McKinsey & Company   About John Murnane John advises companies across a variety of industries and continents on their transformation and growth efforts. His broad cross-sector experience ranges from hospitality to global transport—including hotels and airlines, ocean and air freight, and trucking and distribution—and spans the value chain from capital-intensive real estate development to asset-light brokerage and distribution. He advises clients on growth at both a strategic and tactical level including M&A, new product development, value-based pricing, digital sales, and sales force effectiveness.  

Don't Shit On The Bus
Tour Check-in with Hannah Filbey (Greta Van Fleet)

Don't Shit On The Bus

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 64:53


We are having another tour check-in, lets's welcome on the bus, Hannah Filbey. Hannah is a production coordinator currently on the road with Greta Van Fleet and was kind enough, after a 20-hour travel day, to chat with us. Thank you so much for taking the time to not sleep and helping us learn more about your job Hannah. In this episode of the Don't Shit On The Bus podcast we will learn: • The difficulties of being a woman on the road • How Hannah went from local catering to touring internationally with Greta Van Fleet • What it's like being on a headlining tour and a supporting act tour • Which local jobs you can do get to gain the skills to be a production coordinator (00:00) Intro (01:58) Patreon (02:27) Hannah gets on the bus (02:34) How Adam met Hannah (04:36) Events that Hannah has planned on tours (07:30) Hannah touring with Gretta Van Fleet (10:20) How Hannah went from Korn to Gretta Van Fleet (15:28) South America tour (16:15) Difference between a headliner tour and a supporting tour (18:02) Knowing what needs to be done for a tour (23:27) What Hannah to prep to do for the South American tour (31:17) Catering stories (33:07) What you need to do to become a production coordinator (38:52) What a support band can and can't do on a tour (45:29) Being a woman on tour (54:08) What makes Hannah accept or decline a tour (01:01:42) Wrap up notes (01:04:07) Shower Shoes --- Hannah Filbey - Guest ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hanclairabelle ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hanclairabelle --- Don't Shit On The Bus Podcast ► Website: http://www.dontshitonthebus.com ► Spotify: http://bit.ly/DSotBspotify ► Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/DSotBapple ► TikTok: https://tiktok.com/@dontshitonthebus ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/DSotBpodcast ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/DSotBpodcast ► Facebook: https://facebook.com/DSotBpodcast ► Patreon: https://patreon.com/DSotB --- Adam Elmakias - Host ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/elmakias ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elmakias ► Website: https://www.adamelmakias.com --- Edited & Produced by Connor Gaskey

World Football Index Podcast
SAFS - Copa Libertadores Roundup

World Football Index Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 47:45


Tom Robinson is joined by Jordan Florit and Mike Rice to discuss the latest goings-on in South American football, focusing on the Copa Libertadores.

Market Trends with Tracy
Turkey Troubles & Wheat Woes

Market Trends with Tracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 5:00


Avian Flu now has been detected in 34 states adding two more states to the list.  Around 38 million birds have been depopulated and removed from the food supply which is up about 1 million for the week. We are seeing slower growth each week and as I understand it this virus is not hardy in warmer weather.  Heading into summer we should see things calm down, but the effects of this outbreak should not be minimized.  Egg layers and turkey producers have been severely affected.  Expect  turkey products to be tight and expensive, and I'm not even talking about the holidays.  Looking at chicken and this song is the same.  Breast meat is higher still and no sign of stopping.  Wings maybe are about as low as we are going to see.  I'm not expecting wings to move higher just seems we may be at the bottom here.  Production numbers are not increasing to keep pace with the strong demand.  Things could be getting tight on breast meat in the next few weeks.  Hard to buy ahead on fresh product but I would not recommend running this inventory tight.    BEEF  Beef production continues strong with 657K head harvested last week, up from 649K the week prior.  This strong production is keeping beef available.  But weaker than expected Easter demand and early looks at Mother's Day seem disappointing I don't see this market roaring into Memorial Day but I do think we will see some deals and a bargain or two to keep the product moving.  Other than ground beef which is pretty steady, all the other cuts are moving lower, some faster than others.  Middle meats are coming off a bit, rounds and chucks are down as well.  While still relatively expensive, beef is not pushing higher right now.  PORK.  Let's look at pork and bellies are finally back in reasonable pricing territory.  Yesterday's bellies closed at $136 down from last week $154.  A month ago we were at $189.  Time to buy.  Butts and ribs are moving higher, export demand is not strong at present but this time of year harvest is reduced and we usually see an increasing market.  As I always say.. the pork loin is the value.   Grains Corn closed just over $8 at $8.01 up from last week's $7.97. Corn planting continues well behind schedule with 22% of the crop planted compared to the 5 year avg of 50% at this time.  Not much changed from news out of South America with less than hoped for production.  Demand for US corn will continue and pricing isn't coming down any time soon.  Soy is also running behind with 12% planted compared to the 5 year avg of 24% at this point.  South American harvest is about complete with again, less product than hoped for.  Indonesia has not removed their ban on exports of palm oil continuing to push soy higher.  Fortunately we did break the three week streak of ever higher market prices, but there continues to be high demand for soy.  Wheat and same story as corn and soy  with the spring wheat crop, 27% in the ground vs expectations of 47%.  Winter wheat crop is rated at 29% good/excellent and 39% poor/very poor compared to last year at 49% good/excellent and 18% poor/very poor.  So a poor winter wheat crop, word India is having a poor crop this year as well, late planting spring crops, and we find ourselves again with wheat pricing moving higher and availability staying tight.  DAIRY –  Through Thursday, Barrel is up 4, block is down 5 and butter is unchanged.  Milk seems to be adequate to meet current demand both cheese and butter.  Typically we see increasing markets in late spring but think any increases will be muted and pretty moderate.  Support the show

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast
AvTalk Episode 163: The passenger landed the plane!

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:53


On this episode of AvTalk, a passenger lands a Cessna 208 Caravan in Florida after the pilot becomes incapacitated. Republic wants a change in how pilots can earn their certificates. And there's more consolidation coming to South American airlines. An update on the breaking news regarding the Tibet Airlines A319. Everyone made it off the … The post AvTalk Episode 163: The passenger landed the plane! appeared first on Flightradar24 Blog.

JAZZIZ Backstage Pass
JAZZIZ Travel: Vincent Peirani

JAZZIZ Backstage Pass

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 38:35


Vincent Peirani is one of the world's foremost accordionists, especially prominent in today's jazz scene. He is also the latest guest of our JAZZIZ Travel conversation, where we discuss two of his latest projects, each of which showcases a different side of the French composer/musician's creative personality. The first is Abrazo, a collaborative project with saxophonist Emile Parisien released last year, which offers the two artists' unique vision of the tango tradition, as well as playing with other South American idioms and rhythms. The second, Jokers, was released earlier this year and is a trio album where Peirani makes prominent use of electronics and effects, perhaps more than ever before in his internationally acclaimed career. The result is exciting, experimental, expressionistic and, often, cinematic. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jazziz/support

Bside
Bside Incoming: Sunni D

Bside

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:37


Bside incoming: Sunni D In episode #152 we welcome Sunni D! Beginning his journey on the airwaves of local radio stations, Daniel has now become an exciting prospect within the London circuit, having performed at venues such as Spiritland and booked to play under the likes of John Morales and Kirollus in early June. Nowadays, he is no stranger to the radio airwaves, busying himself by backpacking around his hometown armed and ready with the finest feel-good selections for his respective monthly shows on LooseFM, Voices Radio and Brixton Radio. Daniel's reverence for uplifting dance music encompasses retro disco, funk and soul from all corners of the globe, persistently delving into genres such as zouk, soca, brazilian and rare disco, as well as the more hard-hitting sounds of Brazilian house and UK breakbeat. Expect an eclectic mix of goodies this episode, starting off with some soothing soul and grooves from across the African and South American continents, then moving all the way through to early 2000s Brazilian house and 90s breakbeat, and finally finishing off on a euphoric high with some blissful funk and soul classics. Sunni D's soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/daniel-niemis-180776510 And Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sunni.d__/ Thanks to Molly Hickey for the beautiful artwork as always. www.instagram.com/mollyth.art/ Follow the Bside Instagram for updates/news/vinyl and general music chat: www.instagram.com/bsidepodcasts/

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Brazilians Tried of Racism | CONMEBOL

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 3:42


CONMEBOL has finally started to take action against racism in Latin American football; as Brazilian clubs and fans continue to face racism in both Copa Libertadores and Copa Sudamericana. The South American Football Confederation is the continental governing body of football in South America, and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. The CONMEBOL Libertadores, also known as the Copa Libertadores de América, is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 1960. It is the highest level of competition in South American club football. The CONMEBOL Sudamericana, named as Copa Sudamericana, is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 2002. It is the second-most prestigious club competition in South American football. CONCACAF clubs were invited between 2004 and 2008.

OTB Football
Are City unstoppable with Haaland? | What is Messi's motivations with Saudi Arabia? | Marcela Mora y Araujo & Dan McDonnell

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:57


Joe Molloy is joined in-studio by The Irish Independent's Dan McDonnell, before South American football expert Marcela Mora y Araujo joins to chat about Lionel Messi becoming an ambassador to Saudi Arabia. Football with @SkyIreland

1A
What Overturning Roe v. Wade Could Mean For Global Abortion Access

1A

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 31:12


As abortion gets harder and harder to access in the U.S., Latin America is moving in the opposite direction. In December 2020, Argentina legalized abortion up to 14 weeks and became the largest nation south of the U.S. to do so. Mexico and Colombia's courts did the same shortly after. The feminist movement responsible in part for this change is known as "the green wave" and has gained traction in a region where the Catholic Church has significant influence over politics and social beliefs. Now, activists have their sights set on Chile and Brazil.However, the latest news of the leaked draft opinion on Roe v. Wade is concerning for Colombians. The U.S. Supreme Court's potential decision could sway the South American country's own courts which legalized abortion up to 24 weeks in February.We speak with experts on Latin America about the lessons the U.S. can take away from these movements and what overturning Roe v. Wade could mean for global abortion rights.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The Mike Madison Show
Tu 5.10.22 Covid Research Pouring In - Including Athlete Deaths / The US School For Dictators?

The Mike Madison Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 81:27


While the establishment goes silent on Covid, research worldwide is show more and more how dangerous our response was. And what is the truth around the recent deaths of athletes worldwide? Putin spoke - what did he say? And what are we doing? And the School for the Americas - a neocon Pentagon program to stir constant trouble in Central and South American countries.

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Chile Protest Over Ecuador's Byron Castillo Identity | Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 5:45


Football Federation of Chile file a compliant in an attempt for Chile to play in the World Cup by protesting over the identity of Ecuador's Byron Castillo. Byron David Castillo Segura is an Ecuadorian footballer who plays for Barcelona SC and the Ecuador national team. Mainly a right back, he can also play as a right winger. The 2022 FIFA World Cup is scheduled to be the 22nd running of the FIFA World Cup competition, the quadrennial international men's football championship contested by the national teams of the member associations of FIFA. It is scheduled to take place in Qatar from 21 November to 18 December 2022. The Ecuador national football team represents Ecuador in men's international football and is controlled by the Ecuadorian Football Federation. They joined FIFA in 1926 and CONMEBOL a year later. The Football Federation of Chile is the governing body of football in Chile. It was founded 19 June 1895, making it the second oldest South American association football federation, and is a founding member of CONMEBOL in 1916. FIFA is a non-profit organization that describes itself as an international governing body of association football, futsal and beach soccer. It is the highest governing body of association football.

Paddock Chat
Biochar - The Potential, The PhD, The Project

Paddock Chat

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:01


It is believed that ancient South American cultures would use a rudimentary form of biochar to increase soil productivity thousands of years ago. Fast forward to the present day and the word Biochar is used to describe a substance that looks almost like charcoal, but that is actually biomass carbonized and made into a solid material, used in a multitude of ways from filtration to improving soil function and fertility.One of the key impacts of climate change is its inevitable threat to the agricultural industry and food security as a whole. As the focus of WMG Cropping Systems Officer Md Zahangir Hossain's recently completed PhD, Biochar's use as a soil amendment has the potential benefits of bigger yields, healthier soils, lower acidity levels, richer microbial activity, and better water retention to name just a few.This episode forms an introduction of sorts to one of our newest team members Zahangir, while Executive Officer Nathan Craig also joins the conversation, bringing his technical expertise and knowledge to help us delve deeper into Biochar as a soil amendment, its benefits and limitations, and how WMG will be innovatively utilising it within the Sandy Soils Project. For more information on the Biochar, the Sandy Soils Project or any of Zahangir's work, be sure to get in contact with us at comms@wmgroup.org.auSupport the show

The Final Bell
The Monday Fontanelle Final Bell with Don Roose with U.S. Commodities

The Final Bell

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 13:51


5-9-22 • Update on the South American crop • Down day in the grains • Export trade • Two sides to the equation we are focusing on • Warm weather optimism • Mixed to lower livestock • Lower corn-why not higher cattle?

Ciampa and Klein: The Knight Rider Years
#156 - Papa Dom's Big Black Hat (Airwolf S3E19)

Ciampa and Klein: The Knight Rider Years

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 63:32


Father Dom and Sister Caitlin walk into a South American prison in an effort to free Hawke. But Hawke's got his own plan for freedom. Listen in this week as we discuss chocolate bars, wood fired lasagna and much, much more!Episode Title: Break-In At Santa PaulaOriginal Airdate: February 22, 1986Find The Knight Rider Years on this feed!: Episodes 1 - 95Sinjin Lover: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsJ9spoGEFoDom's Delight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ar6UpCt-NesLike and Follow The Jean Bruce Scott Archive on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JeanBruceScottArchive-----Airwolf Years Opening Theme Song by: Steve Corning, http://thinkfishtank.comAirwolf Years Closing Theme by: Lee Hutchings (Instagram: @leehutchings84)Airwolf Years Logo Design by: Luke Larsson, http://www.meaningfullymaed.comFollow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ciampakleinInstagram: @airwolfyearsTwitter: @AirWolfPodEmail us: letusblowyourmind@gmail.comCall our Hotline: (207) 835-1954Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts!-----The Airwolf Years is a proud member of The Podfix Network. Check us out and all the other amazing podcasts at www.podfixnetwork.comInstagram: @official_podfixTwitter: @podfixFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/podfixnetwork

Chasing Kangaroos - An International Rugby League Podcast
RLA #202 | NRL in the USA, South America crushing it, Naples 9s, & MORE

Chasing Kangaroos - An International Rugby League Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 70:52


Your 14th and 32nd favorite Americans in Rugby League are back with the REAL opinions you wanted to hear regarding the NRL/US news. We recap the Ravens v. Redtails, discuss the booming South American competitions, and sit down with Curtis Goddard of the SW Florida Copperheads as they prepare for the Naples 9s tournament. We got you covered this week on Rugby League in America.

It Gets Weird
Episode 302 - A Scheduled Abduction (Super Soldier Talk)

It Gets Weird

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 79:21


Hey there friends and weirdos! This week, Nile gets deep into the story of "Bruce" from the Super Soldier discussion website, "Super Soldier Talk." We get into Bruce's history of alien and CIA abduction during his childhood, all the way to his recruitment into the secret operation Wraith, assassinating 14-foot tall Reptilian Martians and for some reason South American drug kingpins. We also discuss James Rink's personal quantum DMT computers. All this and more!

Amazing Wildlife: A San Diego Zoo Podcast
Andean Bear: The Bear with Many Names

Amazing Wildlife: A San Diego Zoo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 26:11


Amazing Wildlife takes a look at a tree-loving bear known for the light-colored fur around its eyes that looks like a pair of eyeglasses... the Andean bear! The Andean bear is special because it is the closest living relative of the extinct species of North American short-faced bear. Hosts Ebone Monet and Rick Schwartz explore the background of how this South American native has received its many names and how the prehistoric mammal has survived long after most of its closet relatives died out during the Ice Age. Dr. Russ Van Horn, a San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance Scientist in Population Sustainability, joins the conversation to disclose how this remarkable bear has managed to survive and his role in leading the Alliance's Andean bear conservation program. If you have a question for Amazing Wildlife you can send them to wildlife@iheartmedia.com for your chance to hear it on the show! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - JOANIE EISINGER - Personal Encounter With Star Beings

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 50:50


Personal Encounter With Star Beings - Joanie received her Master of Social Work degree from Columbia University and she holds a post-graduate certificate in Gestalt therapy. In New York City, she provided individual and group therapy for ten years. Her path took a detour when she became acutely chemically sensitive. She left conventional medicine, found complementary (alternative) healing, and ventured on a spiritual journey. As Joanie healed, she spent a great deal of time reading and researching spirituality and healing. She realized her newfound knowledge far exceeded the training she had received. She worked with a shaman of South American tradition and taught herself Gary Craig's Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Joanie received the ability to facilitate hands-on healing after listening to a friend describe what he had learned in a series of workshops. As she opened, she became gifted with an array of healing and channeling abilities. In April 2011, Joanie was ordained as a Reverend in The Church of All Creation in High Bridge, New Jersey. Her extensive spiritual library is filled with information that she has incorporated into her work. Her "teachers" include: Esther Abraham-Hicks, Ted Andrews, Luke Chan, Rabbi David A. Cooper, Wayne Dyer, Donna Eden, David Feinstein, Shakti Gawain, David Hawkins, Lao Tzu, Louise Hay, Stephen Lewis, Carolyn Myss, Sanaya Roman and Duane Packer, Don Miguel Ruiz, Robert Schwartz, Eckhart Tolle, and Doreen Virtue, to name a few. Today, Joanie is based in Central New Jersey and employs her gifts for those who wish a greater sense of well-being. She helps bring comfort and clarity to one's daily life. Many seek her guidance on a myriad of issues, including finances, health, relationships, spirituality, career, and family. Joanie is the recipient of Natural Awakenings Magazine's coveted 2012 Natural Choice Award recognizing her as Favorite Energy Healer in North Central, New Jersey. - www.joanieswhitelighthealing.com For Your Listening Pleasure for these Lockdown / Stay-At-Home COVID and Variants Times - For all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv. Our radio shows archives and programming include: A Different Perspective with Kevin Randle; Alien Cosmic Expo Lecture Series; Alien Worlds Radio Show; America's Soul Doctor with Ken Unger; Back in Control Radio Show with Dr. David Hanscom, MD; Connecting with Coincidence with Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD; Dick Tracy; Dimension X; Exploring Tomorrow Radio Show; Flash Gordon; Imagine More Success Radio Show with Syndee Hendricks and Thomas Hydes; Jet Jungle Radio Show; Journey Into Space; Know the Name with Sharon Lynn Wyeth; Lux Radio Theatre - Classic Old Time Radio; Mission Evolution with Gwilda Wiyaka; Paranormal StakeOut with Larry Lawson; Ray Bradbury - Tales Of The Bizarre; Sci Fi Radio Show; Seek Reality with Roberta Grimes; Space Patrol; Stairway to Heaven with Gwilda Wiyaka; The 'X' Zone Radio Show with Rob McConnell; Two Good To Be True with Justina Marsh and Peter Marsh; and many other! That's The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - JOANIE EISINGER - Personal Encounter With Star Beings

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 50:50


Personal Encounter With Star Beings - Joanie received her Master of Social Work degree from Columbia University and she holds a post-graduate certificate in Gestalt therapy. In New York City, she provided individual and group therapy for ten years. Her path took a detour when she became acutely chemically sensitive. She left conventional medicine, found complementary (alternative) healing, and ventured on a spiritual journey. As Joanie healed, she spent a great deal of time reading and researching spirituality and healing. She realized her newfound knowledge far exceeded the training she had received. She worked with a shaman of South American tradition and taught herself Gary Craig's Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Joanie received the ability to facilitate hands-on healing after listening to a friend describe what he had learned in a series of workshops. As she opened, she became gifted with an array of healing and channeling abilities. In April 2011, Joanie was ordained as a Reverend in The Church of All Creation in High Bridge, New Jersey. Her extensive spiritual library is filled with information that she has incorporated into her work. Her "teachers" include: Esther Abraham-Hicks, Ted Andrews, Luke Chan, Rabbi David A. Cooper, Wayne Dyer, Donna Eden, David Feinstein, Shakti Gawain, David Hawkins, Lao Tzu, Louise Hay, Stephen Lewis, Carolyn Myss, Sanaya Roman and Duane Packer, Don Miguel Ruiz, Robert Schwartz, Eckhart Tolle, and Doreen Virtue, to name a few. Today, Joanie is based in Central New Jersey and employs her gifts for those who wish a greater sense of well-being. She helps bring comfort and clarity to one's daily life. Many seek her guidance on a myriad of issues, including finances, health, relationships, spirituality, career, and family. Joanie is the recipient of Natural Awakenings Magazine's coveted 2012 Natural Choice Award recognizing her as Favorite Energy Healer in North Central, New Jersey. - www.joanieswhitelighthealing.com For Your Listening Pleasure for these Lockdown / Stay-At-Home COVID and Variants Times - For all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv. Our radio shows archives and programming include: A Different Perspective with Kevin Randle; Alien Cosmic Expo Lecture Series; Alien Worlds Radio Show; America's Soul Doctor with Ken Unger; Back in Control Radio Show with Dr. David Hanscom, MD; Connecting with Coincidence with Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD; Dick Tracy; Dimension X; Exploring Tomorrow Radio Show; Flash Gordon; Imagine More Success Radio Show with Syndee Hendricks and Thomas Hydes; Jet Jungle Radio Show; Journey Into Space; Know the Name with Sharon Lynn Wyeth; Lux Radio Theatre - Classic Old Time Radio; Mission Evolution with Gwilda Wiyaka; Paranormal StakeOut with Larry Lawson; Ray Bradbury - Tales Of The Bizarre; Sci Fi Radio Show; Seek Reality with Roberta Grimes; Space Patrol; Stairway to Heaven with Gwilda Wiyaka; The 'X' Zone Radio Show with Rob McConnell; Two Good To Be True with Justina Marsh and Peter Marsh; and many other! That's The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv

Coming Clean Podcast
Discover The Fire In You with Natalia Castillo - Miss Texas Latina 2014, Ep #124

Coming Clean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 41:02


I am excited to announce a series of events I will be hosting in Texas this year with incredible Latin speakers and changemakers. One of those speakers is Natalia and I loved hearing her story on the podcast because it's an incredible example of making the most out of the opportunities you find.Born and raised in the beautiful South American country of Colombia, Natalia prides herself in her Latin Heritage and cultural traditions. After moving to the United States at the tender age of 18, Natalia received her B.A. in Advertising and Public Relations from the University of Houston in 2012. Her friends and colleagues call her a Colombian firecracker with her bubbly personality and also setting sparks in the Fitness and Pageant world as a 3X Ms. Bikini Universe Pro Champion, Model Champion America, Miss Houston Latina 2014, Miss Texas Latina 2015; now current Director of Miss Texas Latina and Founder of Fireyoup Movement. She's also a social connector and female motivator like no other! This powerhouse brings along with her a wealth of knowledge about Nutrition and Fitness. She definitely knows how to bring the heat on any stage. She is excited and passionate to continue to use her forces to further empower America's women. You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in...Why moving to the U.S. from Colombia helped Natalia to challenge herself (2:31)How she found the support to go to college and succeed (7:27)Why communicating in the U.S. presented a challenge for her (14:20)How her experiences with the Miss Texas Latina organization has helped her to open doors and network (19:43)The importance of overcoming the stigma of mental health in your community (24:32)How Fireyoup has helped women to succeed (30:35)Connect with NataliaTheir websiteOn InstagramOn TwitterOn LinkedinConnect With Peter O. Estévezwww.peteroestevezshow.com Follow on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/PeterOEstevezShow/Follow Peter O. Estevéz Show on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/peteroestevezshow/Follow Peter on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/peteroestevez/

The Final Bell
The Thursday Fontanelle Final Bell with Todd Hultman with DTN

The Final Bell

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:22


5-5-22 *Beat up of the stock market *Diesel making new highs *Helpful rains *Slow planting place but warm next week *India wheat *South American drought *Ukraine still in the background

Growing Native
Goodding Verbena

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 4:15


I started my nursery/horticulture career in the spring of 1980 at Desert Trees Nursery northwest of Tucson. It was and still is a wholesale nursery that grows and sells to folks in the trade. The popular verbenas we grew then were South American cultivars with names like Peruvian Red or Trailing Bubblegum…short-lived ornamentals…ugh. We also grew a weedy verbena called Verbena tenuisecta and that's still in the trade, but as Glandularia pulchella. Pretty plant, but again, a native to SA. I think it was Mountain States Nursery out of Phoenix that started growing and selling the native Goodding verbena back then AND that's who Ms. Mesquitey and I were contract growing 5,000 verbenas for a dozen years later. Goodding verbena (Glandularia gooddingii) is a beautiful native verbena with a sweet wild fragrance. Stick your nose in the flowers and you’ll catch yourself saying, “Oh my, the desert is beautiful.” Yeah, it is. The photos are mine of the seedlings I came across by our barn…scruffy and small, but still with the floral fragrance to die for.

Last Word
Yvonne Blenkinsop (pictured), Dr Margaret Carswell, Mikhail Vasenkov, Denise Coffey

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 27:58


Matthew Bannister on Yvonne Blenkinsop, one of the four so-called 'Headscarf Revolutionaries' from Hull who campaigned for better safety regulations on fishing trawlers after three were lost at sea in 1968. Margaret Carswell, the doctor and ornithologist who treated survivors of the Ugandan civil war and in her spare time compiled the definitive guide to the country's bird population. Mikhail Vasenkov, the Russian spy who assumed a South American identity and lived undercover in the United States for decades. Denise Coffey, the talented comic actor who made her name in the TV show 'Do Not Adjust Your Set'. Producer: Emily Finch Interviewed guest: Nell Carswell Interviewed guest: Grace Carswell Interviewed guest: Gordon Corera Interviewed guest: Dr. Brian W. Lavery Interviewed guest: Humphry Barclay Interviewed guest: Michael Coveney Interviewed guest: Miriam Margolyes Archive clips used: British Pathé, Hull - Trawlers Lost At Sea - Wives Demand Stricter Safety Measures 1968; BBC World Service, Witness - Hull's Headscarf Revolutionaries 12/02/2018; BBC TV, Look North - Yvonne Blenkinsop gets freedom of the city of Hull 20/12/2018; YouTube, Triple Trawler Disaster - Hull 1968; xeno-canto, XC292779 Speckled Tinkerbird / XC291649 Woodland Warbler; BBC World Service, Witness - The Fall of Idi Amin 29/04/2014; BBC News 24, Russia/US Spy Swap 09/07/2010; Rediffusion, Do Not Adjust Your Set Ep 05 25/01/1968; BBC Radio 4 Extra, Alison and Maud 20/05/2009.

JAF Project Podcast
Counterparts - Camila Meza - April 28th 2022

JAF Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 54:40


We have a special Thursday show! We are so excited to have the amazing Camila Meza on the show! https://camilameza.com/home Meza is musically inspired by jazz guitarists like George Benson and Pat Metheny as well as being influenced by South American music and folk, she first studied with Jorge Vidal and Jorge Díaz. Increasingly oriented to Claudia Acuña from the mid-2000s she worked on the jazz scene of her hometown, where her first recording Giovanni Cultrera, Espinoza y Cia (Navidad en Jazz) was released in 2005. In 2007 she presented her debut album Skylark (Stateside). In 2009 Meza moved to New York to study guitar at The New School with Peter Bernstein, Vic Juris and Steve Cardenas. Since then she also has worked on the New York jazz scene with Ryan Keberle (Into the Zone, 2014), Lucas Pino, Fabian Almazan and directs her own jazz octet, The Nectar Orchestra. She recorded for Sunnyside Records the album Traces (2016, with Shai Maestro, Matt Penman, Kendrick Scott, Bashiri Johnson, Jody Redhage, Sachal Vasandani), sings Spanish and English, and won two Independent Music Awards as the Best Adult Contemporary Album and Best Latin Song ("Para Volar"). Also on the albums Find the Common, Shine a Light by Ryan Keberle and Sounds from the Deep Field by Bryan Copeland she seemed outstanding in the opinion of the critics. As a singer she can also be heard on Carolina Calvache's Ballad "La Última Vez". In 2017 the Camila Meza Quartet performed at the Festival Jazzahead. The following year she brought Gina Schwarz as part of her Pannonica project, Porgy & Bess in Vienna. Meza was nominated in the category of guitarist and female singer as a Rising Star in the critics poll of the Down Beat in 2018 Nate Chinen described Meza's vocals as "an appealing combination of lightness and depth, that sings with a bright, clear voice against the agile uproar of a world-class band." in The New York Times. The discographer Tom Lord lists them between 2005 and 2015 with participation in eight recording sessions. Wany more information on our show? Visit www.counterpartsshow.com We thank you for the amazing response to our show! John & George

Better Than Human
The Great American Interchange: When Two Continents Meet, Weird Things Happen

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 53:25


The Great American Interchange, also called Great American Biotic  Interchange (GABI), is the epic geological event that occurred when the South American continent, which had been isolated for 50 million years,  connected with the North American continent. The Great American Interchange is one of the most important events in the history of land mammals in the Americas.The landmass that is South American used to be home to many unique animals, like Australia is today. However, when the volcanic Isthmus of Panama came up from the ocean floor resulting in the formation of a connected Americas, animals could now migrate back and forth. This immigration of animals should have been uniform, but (spoiler alert) North American animals ultimately won out over their South American counterparts. Scientists are still trying to figure out why, though fossil evidence has shed light on the event. So check our newest episode where we dive into the animals of South America before the interchange and why these native animals were at a disadvantage when the continents connected.In the Good the Bad the NewsLitter of red wolf pups born for the first time in four years, which is good news for this critically endangered animal.Also, Pokemon Go might help young people with depression. Follow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!

Liveaboard Sailing Podcast
A five year adventure through South American rivers

Liveaboard Sailing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 48:58


This week I'm bringing you a true adventure story and a very unique one at that! ⛵️ You will hear what it's like to go way off the beaten path to the river systems of South America on a small and ultralight sailboat. My guest is Stephen Ladd, the author of a new book, the 5 year voyage - exploring Latin American coasts and rivers.Stephen and his wife started their voyage in Florida, sailed down the coastal areas of Central America, and then went through the middle of South America all the way down to Buenos Aires, before they turned around for their return journey. It was quite the trip and in this interview, Stephen tells what it was like doing such an epic adventure. Get Stephen's book ⬇️

Live in the Lab
Power Jawns: Juanita Euka - Aaron Abernathy - King Garbage

Live in the Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 19:53


What's Good, Good People! Supercharge your day with the positive vibes of these highly energetic bangers! So open your ears and your mind and just vibe out :40 Juanita Euka is a force to be reckoned with. The emerging Congolese superstar just dropped her album Mabanzo, an opus deeply rooted in her African and South American lineage. I've got one of many great singles on deck for your listening pleasure. Delve deep into the vibes her record “Blood” as her illustrative words elevates your day. You can get all of that dopiness and support her music by clicking the link below: https://strut.k7store.com/juanita-euka 5:25 It's been a while since we've heard new music form Aaron Abernathy, but the wait is over! The illustrious soul crooner just dropped some new heat. He joined forces with British producer Greg Jong and the duo are dropping some bonafide jewels. I have one of those jawns called “Looking Up” ready for your vibing pleasure. Make sure you hit the link below to grab this phenomenal opus: http://www.aaronabernathy.com/ 12:00 You know what time it is… It's time for Buy or Slide! We're checking the latest from the buls King Garbage. The in demand producers are taking a break from creating for others and are focusing on creating their own jewels. They just released their album Heavy Metal Greasy Love, which is making noise all over the globe. I got one of their singles off this jawn “Let Em Talk” queued up right now. So is the juice worth the squeeze? Take a listen and check it out for yourself. https://king-garbage.bandcamp.com/album/heavy-metal-greasy-love Send me some music to review. Go to iamtheonemangang.com/submissions While you're there, you can get exclusive content, behind the scenes footage, and some cool merch. Follow me on Social Media: @iamthe1mangang Thanks for your continued support! -1MG

Pinnacle Podcast
South American soccer insights: Episode 8

Pinnacle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 68:34


Pinnacle's podcast dedicated to all things South American soccer returns for an eighth episode. South American soccer insights, hosted by Argentinian soccer expert Peter Coates, features fellow specialists Tom Robinson and Simon Edwards each month as they delve into all the betting action across the whole continent, picking out their best value bets for listeners. This episode runs the rule over the nations who have qualified for World Cup 2022 and those who still could (over to you Peru). The trio analyse the opportunities at World Cup glory for well-organised Brazil and unbeaten Argentina, before discussing the chances for a transitioning Uruguay and entertainers Ecuador. The second part of the show goes in depth on the first two rounds of both Copa Libertadores and Copa Sudamericana. In particular delving into some impressive team displays including Chilean giants Colo Colo as they help our bettors find value in the markets. (18+) Bet on South American soccer here: https://bit.ly/3kd19Um Follow the team on: Peter Coates: twitter.com/Pedro_Coates Tom Robinson: twitter.com/tomrobbo89 Simon Edwards - @SimonEdwardsSAF Twitter - twitter.com/Pinnacle Instagram - Pinnacle.betting Facebook - www.facebook.com/PinnacleSports/ Soundcloud - @pinnacle-podcast Download the Pinnacle Live Scores app: www.pinnaclescores.com/ Gamble responsibly: bit.ly/3izDVaA Read Simon Edwards' article on 'How to bet on South American soccer' here: [Part 1] bit.ly/3o2q8LI [Part 2] bit.ly/3mU2O3x

This Week in Virology
TWiV 893: Yellow fever virus escapes antibodies

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 88:29


Kartik, Denise, and Gorka join TWiV to discuss their finding that changes in the surface glycoprotein of South American yellow fever virus lead to reduced neutralization by antibodies induced by the vaccine, which is derived from an African isolate. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Brianne Barker Guests: Kartik Chandran, Denise Haslwanter, and Gorka Lasso Cabrera Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Prometheus project (TWiV 578) Reduced neutralization of South American yellow fever virus (Cell Host Microbe) Letters read on TWiV 893 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson – Earth Day and Earth Day History Brianne – XKCD: Family Reunion Vincent – Tokaido: A Journey (DVD) Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

Financial Survival Network
Coppernico Metals: Discovering A World-Class Copper-Gold District in South America

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 17:29


Ivan Bebek Co-Founder, President, Chief Executive Officer of Coppernico Metals, formerly known as Sombrero Resources, was on to bring you the latest sponsor update. (We own shares). First off, Ivan explained the recent name change. Coppernico plays off the words copper and nickel and the legendary mathematician/astronomer Copernicus, who discovered that the planets revolve around the sun. It's all part of his plan to make legendary discoveries of copper and nickel. There have been a number of recent personnel changes, which will prove crucial to Coppernico's future. Marie-Hélène Turgeon is now a director and ESG advisor. She has 20+ years of environment management and compliance, working with Latin American mining concerns. She will help the company finalize its community agreements. Tim Kinglesy comes on as VP of Exploration. He has 18+ years of precious and base metal exploration in the Americas (Peru, Canada and Alaska). Upon joining the company, he stated, “I'm not here to drill 50-meter step-outs. I want to drill 500 to 1000-meter step-outs and go find something really big.” Completing the team is Margaux Villalpando, investor relations manager, with extensive mining sector experience in client and stakeholder relations. Coppernico's TSX listing is contingent upon its access to the Sombrero project, which is awaiting community consent. It's a complicated process to which the company has already devoted much time and effort. Ivan believes project access will soon be a fait accompli, as the affected communities have already benefited greatly from Coppernico's efforts, and have so much more to gain. As usual, there's much more coming. The team is currently reviewing a number of other potential large-scale South American projects. As Ivan said, “The opportunities have never been greater.” If anyone could do these projects, the upside wouldn't be so enormous. The reconstituted team is now quickly working towards a successful conclusion. www.CoppernicoMetals.com

After School Democracy
S3E6: Responce to Whatifalthist: Understanding Colonialism and Communism

After School Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 21:03


Responce to original video by Whatifalthist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U24gLMx_B08 When You Realize You Might Be Living on Earth 3 https://youtu.be/9v8qqkz7tn4 How the CIA gave America dissociative identity disorder https://youtu.be/UAanBHdcQ_s What the Heck is communism? https://youtu.be/sFFAs4qfpYo New Africa https://www.youtube.com/c/NewAfrica Home Team History https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC12lU5ymIvSpgl8KntDQUQA From Nothing https://www.youtube.com/c/FromNothing Behind that Bastards Congo After Leopold (futher explaining the colonial caste system) https://podcasts.apple.com/gh/podcast/the-congo-after-leopold/id1373812661?i=1000418217526 The Skeptical Buddha the Tao of Science https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09NGRY4L6/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_S4QADT8DCWYNX68KREGX Also available in most european, North and South American nations, Indian, Japan and Australia Amazon website. Twitter @Anubis2814 Friendica anubis2814@friendica.myportal.social Peertube ("new" old videos daily) Anubis2814@peetube.stream Leftish Peertube ("new" old videos daily) Anubis2814@watch.breadtube.tv Vaults of Anubis and After School Democracy Podcasts are Available on Stitcher, Apple podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify IheartRadio youtube.com/user/anubis2814 Also please support me on patreon https://www.patreon.com/Anubis2814 https://anubis2814.wordpress.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/after-school-democracy/support

Spectrum Commodities Wheat & Cattle Markets Analysis

Wheat sees pullback; Indonesia bans palm oil exports; South American corn prices declining; weather outlook.

Boating Industry Insider Podcast
The Five-Year Voyage

Boating Industry Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 24:55


Imagine spending five years with your wife in a 21-foot boat with an 8'x3' cabin, on a trip through 19 countries, covering some 18,000 miles. That's what Stephen Ladd did - and he - and the marriage - survived, though the boat did not. The author of the solo adventure story Three Years in a 12-Foot Boat is back at it, detailing a new adventure with a new book, The Five-Year Voyage. Teaming up with his now-wife Virginia, they sailed from the Gulf of Mexico to Argentina and back, largely via South American rivers, in a 21-foot Sea Pearl, even having a baby along the way. The pair are among only a handful of living people who have navigated from the Caribbean to the Amazon via the Brazo Casiquiare. Their range and variety of encounters with wildlife, indigenous peoples, gold-dredgers, fishermen, and even robbers make for good reading - and interesting podcasts!

American Ag Network
April WASDE Report: No Surprises, Big Impact

American Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 1:59


The April 2022 WASDE report made more changes to South American production numbers. Learn what global market predictions could mean for U.S. farmers.

Adams on Agriculture
April WASDE Report: No Surprises, Big Impact

Adams on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 4:19


The April 2022 WASDE report made more changes to South American production numbers. Learn what global market predictions could mean for U.S. farmers.

No Future
Episode 5: The Secret in Their Eyes (2009, Argentina)

No Future

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 33:03


Our first South American movie and it's a great one. In this episode, we're talking about the Argentine mystery/ thriller/ workplace romance film The Secret in Their Eyes with Andrea Cardenas and Dustin Molina. We hate law movies, learn to love Chile, and apparently we need to go rewatch Strangers with Candy ASAP. Juan Jose Campanella has a very surprising filmography.You can follow us:On Instagram (@nofuturenyc)On Twitter (@nofuturenyc)On Letterboxd (@nofuturenyc)Email us at:nofuturemailbag@gmail.com

The Filmreelcast
The Expendables - Review

The Filmreelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 91:52


Barney Ross leads the "Expendables", a band of highly skilled mercenaries including knife enthusiast Lee Christmas, martial arts expert Yin Yang, heavy weapons specialist Hale Caesar, demolitionist Toll Road and loose-cannon sniper Gunner Jensen. When the group is commissioned by the mysterious Mr. Church to assassinate the merciless dictator of a small South American island, Barney and Lee head to the remote locale to scout out their opposition. Once there, they meet with local rebel Sandra and discover the true nature of the conflict engulfing the city. When they escape the island and Sandra stays behind, Ross must choose to either walk away and save his own life - or attempt a suicidal rescue mission that might just save his soul.

California Ag Today
Latest WASDE Slightly Disappointing for Wheat and Corn

California Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022


On Friday USDA released its April Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates, commonly known as the WASDE report. Changes this month are normally focused on U.S. old crop demand and South American production. For this year, the March and April reports also hold more interest given the potential impacts from Ukraine and Russia.

Best of the Worst
Bat-Hombre

Best of the Worst

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 8:15


Batman franchises his operation out to a South American country in 1949 and the result (basically the same Batman, but with a mustache and colorful poncho speaking Spanglish) is something that has not aged well. Bat-Hombre's first, and thankfully only, appearance was in Batman #56 The Batman Gambit: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BatmanGambit -- Hold on to your hat! The Haticopter will be slicing its way into your life (but hopefully not your collarbone!) soon. Check it out at https://HaticopterFit.Transport/Now  

It Holds Up
S3E11: Arachnophobia

It Holds Up

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 72:02


A species of South American killer spider hitches a lift to the U.S. in a coffin and starts to breed and kill. Will this comedy thriller hold up? Or will it be sent out on the infamous iceberg?? Feel like seeing our goofy mugs? Check us out on YouTube! https://youtube.com/channel/UClnj902B3DYwAmT4HDQhe_g -------------- Write us what you want to hear us talk about: hello@itholdsup.com Follow us: @itholdsup to vote every week! -------------- It Holds Up is a movie review podcast wherein the three hosts, Jason, Jason, and Jeremy take a look at movies we've loved since the 80's and see if they stand the test of time. When it comes to movies and movie reviews, the game is full of reviews for movies coming out now. But what about the classics we watched with our dad's back in the 90s? We're watching movies from the 80's, 90's, and 00's and putting them through our gauntlet of segments to see if these classics hold up or should never be watched again!

The Final Bell
The Wednesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Arlan Suderman

The Final Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 14:12


4-13-22 • Inflation • E15 into the summer • Update on the South American harvest • Winter wheat conditions

Purdue Commercial AgCast
April Corn & Soybean Outlook Update

Purdue Commercial AgCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 44:42


Purdue agricultural economists Michael Langemeier and James Mintert discussed the corn and soybean outlook following USDA's April World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report and provided implications for crop marketing strategies. Updates on South American corn and soybean production expectations, corn and soybean export prospects, ethanol demand, ending stock estimates, and corn and soybean basis along with farm income projections were all featured in the webinar. Slides from the discussion can be found at https://purdue.ag/webinar041222.  Podcast provided by Purdue University's Center for Commercial Agriculture. For more information on the current ag outlook and farm economy, visit us at http://purdue.edu/commercialag.

Discovery
Wild Inside: Jungle royalty - the Jaguar

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 27:19


Wild Inside embarks on something we hardly ever witness – a look inside some of nature's most wondrous animals. Its a rare chance to delve deep into some enigmatic and very different wild animals – from a reptile, to a mammal to a fish – unravelling the intricate internal complexity inside three of the most amazing animals ever to evolve. What makes the ultimate predator? What are the keys to successful survival in an ever-changing environment? Whilst we've gained a lot by observing their behaviour from the outside, to truly understand these animals, we need to look at what's on the inside too. Ben Garrod, Professor of Evolutionary Biology and Science Engagement at the University of East Anglia, together with friend and expert veterinary surgeon Dr Jess French, open up and investigate what makes each of these animals unique. During each animal post mortem, they're joined by experts in comparative anatomy, evolution and behaviour as they put these enigmatic animals under the knife. Along the way they reveal some unique adaptations which give each species a leg (or claw) up in surviving in the big wild world. The series begins with one of the truly exotic loaners of the cat family – which at just over two metres long, covered with beautiful gold and black rosette markings, is pure jungle royalty - the greatest of the South American big cats - the Jaguar Part 2: One of the largest predatory reptiles - the Burmese Python whose extraordinary singular body plan has enabled nearly 4000 species of snakes to succeed in inhabiting nearly every part of the planet, Part 3 : The largest bony fish you might never have heard of – the bizarre looking Oceanic Sunfish which is being spotted increasingly in UK waters Presenters: Prof Ben Garrod, Dr Jess French Producer: Adrian Washbourne

The MetalSucks Podcast
#433: Destruction's Schmier

The MetalSucks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 68:30


Destruction frontman Schmier is our guest this week! We discuss the 40th anniversary of the band, how writing music for their new album Diabolical was his personal savior, how influential GBH was during the the early days of Destruction, if the punks vs. metalheads feud of the ‘80s was a positive for thrash's image, and how Destruction got hate from their South American fanbase for canceling shows in Russia. He also discusses his thoughts on how social media became nothing more than a propaganda tool, his surprise at how easy it was to divide the world between vaxxers and anti-vaxxers during the pandemic, the story behind the Chef Schmier's Cooking Studio videos on YouTube, what the first stop always is when Destruction tour America, and why he feels he is the best guy to man the  grill when the band is on the road. Petar and Brandon also discuss Dragonforce not getting paid a ton for Guitar Hero, the impact of video games and music in their youths, and Chris Jericho admitting to using backing tracks at live shows Song: Destruction “No Faith In Humanity” Song: Destruction “State of Apathy” Thank you to our sponsor, Metal Blade Records, for their continued support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Perch Pod with Jacob Shapiro
55: Civil Unrest in Peru with Elohim Monard

The Perch Pod with Jacob Shapiro

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 43:55


Elohim Monard joins us from Peru to discuss the growing instability in the South American country. The two discuss the emerging civil unrest in response to soaring inflation and Pedro Castillo's polarizing report card as Peru plunges into a state of emergency. Link to Civiclass https://civiclass.com/ (here). Download the transcript https://perchperspectives.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Perch-Pod-Episode-55-Civil-Unrest-in-Peru-with-Elohim-Monard.pdf (here). Questions? Comments? Reach out at: info@perchperspectives.com Subscribe to the Perch Perspectives Newsletter https://perchperspectives.com/reports/ (here). Socials: Twitter: @https://twitter.com/PerchSpectives (PerchSpectives) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/perch-perspectives/ (Perch Perspectives) Website: https://perchperspectives.com/ (https://perchperspectives.com/)

Chus & Ceballos presents Stereo Productions Podcast
ADRIAN HOUR | Stereo Productions Podcast 449

Chus & Ceballos presents Stereo Productions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 60:01


When talking about South American electronic music artists, there is one that leads the pack: his name is Adrian Hour, from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Having been producing music from an early age, Adrian is now taking the world stage by storm with a run of stand-out releases on some of the world's leading underground labels. 01. Adam Shelton, Subb-an - Only Now (Akufen Remix) 02. subb-an - hypno 03. Bangana - Dead End (D'Julz Remix - Jerome Sydenham Special Edit) 04. Roy Ayers feat. Terri Wells - Holiday (Ben Rau Meta Remix) 05. Guti - Hope 06. iO (Mulen) - Flirt 07. Adrian Hour - Spoiler Boom 08. Unknown Artist - Something Else 09. Adrian Hour - Those Kids 10. Saliva Commandos - Sidewalk 11. Sam Holland - Does It Feel 12. Leon (Italy) - Disco 3000 13. Adrian Hour - Seconds  

Real Estate Espresso
To Infinity and Beyond

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 5:47


To infinity and beyond. That's the line from the famous Pixar movie “Toy Story”. Here in the West we are concerned with climate change and the impact that our relentless consumption is having on the planet. We're talking about some finite resources on our planet. But we have a moral dilemma. Those countries who are living with first world luxuries are consuming more than their fair share of energy. In fact, we have 40% of the world's energy being consumed by 15% of the world's population. So why are we talking about energy? After all, this is a real estate podcast. Well it turns out that energy and a few other critical resources are the underpinning of the entire economy. For every unit of GDP, there is a corresponding unit of energy consumed somewhere in the world to product that economic output. It's everywhere. Energy affects the production of food. Without burning of fossil fuels, you can't manufacture synthetic fertilizer. Without fertilizer, agriculture yields would be 50% or less than they are today. We can expect to see the linkage between energy security, cascading to food prices, and eventually food insecurity in many parts of the world. One of the principal inputs to fertilizer is ammonia. Back in 2020, the European spot price for ammonia was around 200 Euros per tonne. Today, that same metric ton of ammonia is pricing at 1450 Euros. Ammonia and lots of energy is critical to the nitrogen component of synthetic fertilizer. Brazil is getting its last wave of much-needed fertilizer from Russia before supplies plunge due to the Ukraine war, potentially hurting harvests in the biggest grower of crops from coffee to sugar to soybeans. A fertilizer shortage in Brazil could result in smaller harvests and higher food costs globally, given the importance of the South American nation to world crop supplies. When you look throughout history, every time there has been a spike in energy prices, it leads to price increases in food, which leads to food insecurity, which ultimately leads to social unrest. The armed conflict is making headlines. Interest rates are making headlines. What's not making headlines is the impact to global food security from the conflict. The reality of globalization is that the world is far more interdependent than it has been at any time in history. The impact of these disruptions will be far greater than ever before. -------------- Host: Victor Menasce email: podcast@victorjm.com

Your Brain on Facts
Gregor MacGregor (ep. 190)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 17:46


People used to say "If you believe that, I have some swampland in Florida to sell you," but they really should have said, "I have some lovely acres in the Republic of Poyais you can buy, but you have to act now!"  Presenting one of my favorite con artists ever, the man who declared himself prince of a South American country that didn't exist, Gregor MacGregor (yes, that's really his name). Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Remember back in episode 155, Hate to Burst your Bubble, we talked about, among other things, the Florida real estate boom and bust of the 1920s?  It's where we get the phrase, “if you believe that, I have some real estate in Florida to sell you.”  100 years before that, we could have been saying, “I have some acreage in Poyais to sell you.”  Never been to Poyais?  Trust me, it's amazing.  The weather is always perfect, sunny and warm.  Located along the eastern coast of present-day Nicaragua and Honduras, the soil of Poyais is so fertile, you can get three harvests of corn a year.  The trees are heavy with fruit and the forests teem with entrees in the form of game animals.  If you look into the rivers, you'll not only see water cleaner and more pure than you've ever seen in your life and more fish than you could hope to catch, but in the river bed, the sparkle of gold fills your eyes, not from flecks and dust, but nuggets as big as walnuts, just laying there, waiting for you to scoop them up.  The only thing missing is settlers to develop and leverage its resources to the fullest.  Wanna get your share?  Better hurry; hundreds of people are investing all their savings in a piece of the perfect Poyais.  All you have to do is [] to the Cazique or prince.  Who is the prince of this equatorial new world paradise?  A Scotsman named Gregor MacGregor.     MacGregor was born in 1786.  His father, who died when Gregor was 4, was a captain sailing with the East India Company, so adventuring on a quest for riches might well have been in his blood.  A clever chap from the get-go, Gregor enrolled in the University of Edinburgh at age 15, though he never finished his degree.  No shade thrown there, I'm a 3-time community college drop-out and look how I turned out!  (pause, sigh)  At age 17, he took after his grandfather and joined the British Army, where he quickly rose up the ranks to lieutenant, captain, and major, largely by buying the next rank up, but that's pretty much how it was done back then.  Two years after enlisting, MacGregor married a Royal Navy Admiral's daughter, and a mere five years after that, probably because he'd married into money, he retired from the army.  The young couple moved to London, where Gregor called himself Sir and claimed to be a baronet, which ranks underneath baron in British noble hierarchy and is apparently a modest enough lie that no one would think to put the effort and time into checking it out.     But ‘easy street' only lasted another year before his wife died.  No more wife meant no more wealthy in-laws, so MacGregor sold his Scottish estate and relocated to Caracas, Venezuela, where he married another wealthy family's daughter.  Never let it be said he's not consistent.  Wife 2 was actually a cousin of Simon Bolivar, of Bolivia fame.  He was able to sell his military prowess to Francisco de Miranda, the Venezuelan revolutionary general.  There was rather a lot of revolution going on in Spanish colonies at the time while Spain was well distracted dealing with a certain actually-of-average-height French emperor.  At least MacGregor wasn't lying about his soldiery, securing a number of victories and becoming a notable figure for the revolutionary set all across LatAm.     In 1820, MacGregor moved to a former British Colony, in Nicaragua, which, true to its name, a swampy and pest-infested area that Europeans had until that point left to the Mosquito Natives.  In 1830, MacGregor traded jewelry and rum for eight million acres of land.  Now that was either an F-ton of rum or the land was utterly worthless.  I'll give you three guesses.  The land was completely useless for farming, kinda of a big deal, being the production of foodstuff and whatnot.     Realizing there was no way he could draw settlers in with the land as it was, MacGregor decided to draw them in with the land as it wasn't.  So he headed back to England, where he was well-known in society circles for his military achievements, leading his men into battle against great odds.  Society not knowing that he'd also abandoned his men.  Twice.  But he rubbed elbows with the muckety-mucks nonetheless, telling them all about his new world paradise, the Republic of Poyais.  And he went so far beyond Baron Munchausenian story-telling.   Gregor made up a whole country and everything that goes along with it.  To hear him tell it, the Republic of Poyais was not an impenetrable, parasite-ridden jungle, but a glorious tableau with a thriving civilization with a parliament, banks, an opera house and cathedral.  The weather was ideal, a perpetual summer that was very appealing to Londoners.  The soil was so rich that farming required almost no labor.  The rivers that wound down the mountains teemed with fish and the surrounding forests were thick with game animals.  In this dubious district, the capital of St Joseph had a massive infrastructure and a population of about 20,000 people.  The economy was robust, if you felt like doing anything other than scooping up all the gold that was just laying around.  MacGregor had pamphlets promoting printed, and they sold in the thousands around the streets of London and Edinburgh.  He started a nationwide campaign to attract investment, taking out big ads in newspapers and even opened sales offices.     The world-building that went into this scam would have made GRRM blush.  Maybe even JRR Tolkien.  Feel free to at me on social media; I love a spirited nerd debate.  He came up with a tricameral Parliament and a commercial banking system.  Like an African dictator, he designed Poyaian military uniforms, several, different ones for different regiments.  He published a 350 page guidebook, under the pen name Thomas Strangeways, with a sliver of real facts about the region, but the Pacman portion of the pie chart all came from his preposterous posterior.  The book was full of detailed sketches and MacGregor had a seemingly endless supply of official-looking documents.  He had offices set up in London, Glasgow and Edinburgh to sell land certificates, which people eagerly bought.  The whole operation looked completely legit; you wouldn't even think to doubt it.  MacGregor didn't just succeed in his con, he was *wildly successful.  Not only did MacGregor raise £200,000 directly – the bond market value over his life ran to £1.3 million, or about £3.6 billion today – but he convinced seven ships' worth of eager settlers to make their way across the Atlantic. It became a popular investment, and many sank their life savings in land deed in Republic of Poyais.  A London Bank underwrote a £2000 pound loan, £23mil or $30mil today, secured with the land sales.     MacGregor was signing up settlers left and right.  Settlers meant development, which meant the value of bonds and land certificates would go up, which would attract more settlers and investors, driving the price up further.  Gee, it's like crime does kinda pay.  Skilled tradesmen were promised free passage and ostensibly, supposedly government contract work.  Don't think it was only the under-educated among the population that bought into this – bankers, doctors, civil servants, you name it.  Whole families signed up and backed their bags.   In September 1822, the first fifty settlers sailed for Poyais and were very confused when the landed.  There was…nothing there.  No port, not even a dock.  I mean, there were trees and snakes and mosquitos, but no city, no road, no nothing.  The settlers believed they were lost, but they couldn't get a ride to the “right” place because that ship had sailed.  Literally, the ship left them immediately.  So they set up camp.  150 more people, including children, shortly joined them.  They searched for civilization as best they could, but the rainy season descended on them, bringing on clouds of mosquitos, whose tiny bags were packed with yellow fever and malaria.  A few settlers who were saved by a passing ship informed the British Colony of Honduras about the situation. The colony organized a rescue mission, but only a third of the population was still alive and rescued. In the meantime, five more ships set for Poyais had to be stopped by the Honduras government.  They were informed that Poyais did not exist. It was Mickey Mouse, mate, spurious, not genuine.  Twisting the knife counter-clockwise, the King revoked the land grant and told them they were now illegal squatters and had swear allegiance or GTFO.  Dozens were too weak to leave.  In a particularly depressing bit of math, of 250 or so who had set sail for Poyais, with all their hopes and dreams pinned to this mythical land, 180 died.      That's not even the crazy bit.  Of those 70 who barely survived their ordeal, many of them did *not blame MacGregor.  Six of the survivors, including one man who lost two children to the ordeal, signed an affidavit insisting that blame lay not with MacGregor but with Hector Hall, a former army officer who was supposed to be in charge of the settlement.  They declared "[W]e believe that Sir Gregor MacGregor has been worse used by Colonel Hall and his other agents than was ever a man before, and that had they have done their duty by Sir Gregor and by us, things would have turned out very differently at Poyais". MacGregor claimed he's been a victim too, defrauded and embezzled from by his own agents and undermined by merchants in British Honduras because the richness of Poyais threatened their profits   Now I love a Scottish accent, but this must have been one charming melon-farmer.  MacGregor didn't know it, but he had actually been using “the six principles of persuasion.”  These comes from a 1984 book by Robert Cialdini, “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion,” which looked at the factors that affect the decisions that people make, especially as pertains to sales, naturally.  At the core of his work is the idea that decision-making is effortful, so individuals use a lot of rules of thumb and decision making shortcuts (heuristics) when deciding what to do, and of course once you know what those things are, you can manipulate them to your advantage.  They are authority (in the sense that they're an authority on the subject), scarcity, reciprocity (i.e. you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours), consistency (I still believe in this idea as much as I always have), social validation (everyone you know is buying one of these), and friendship or liking (picture the smile on a used car salesman).  MacGregor seemed to know these instinctively.   Mcgregor skipped town when the scandal broke, claiming he needed to take his wife to warm, dry Italy for her health, and headed across the channel to France and began the whole thing all over again.  In Paris, he persuaded the Compagnie de la Nouvelle Neustrie, a firm of traders looking to break into the South American market, to seek investors and settlers for Poyais in France.  In a matter of months, he had a new group of settlers and investors ready to go.  Concurrent to all this, he tried to get in good with King Ferdinand VII of Spain, proposing to make Poyais a Spanish protectorate and a base of operations from which Spain could reconquer Guatemala.  Spain, at least, ignored MacGregor.  MacGregor might not have realized that France was more stringent than England in its passport requirements: when the government saw a flood of applications to a country no one had heard of, a commission was set to investigate the matter.  Or maybe he figured he was on a roll and utterly bulletproof.  This time, Mcgregor et al were arrested and tried.  But he was found not guilty on all accounts, mostly because one of his accomplices was hiding in the Netherlands with a ton of incriminating documents.  Once he felt that London had probably forgotten his colossal scam, he headed back…and started another scam.  Smaller this time; I guess he's learning.  But the bonds didn't sell well this time, and what's worse -for everyone- other fraudsters started pulling their own fake paradise scams following his model.  He retired to Edinburgh, then to Venezuela after the death of his wife, where he was granted citizenship and a pension as a retired general.  He never faced any consequences for his actions and when he died in 1845, Gregor MacGregor was buried with full military honors.  So the moral of the story is … crime does pay?  That's a terrible lesson.     Crocker Land   In 1907, Robert Peary was the most famous, and most experienced Arctic explorer in the world, but he had a problem—he hadn't yet managed to become the first to visit the most arctic of arctic places, the North Pole, and his cash reserves were becoming nonexistent. The previous year, he had almost made it—supposedly getting within 175 miles or 280 kilometers—but was turned around by a combination of storms and depleting supplies, but Robert Peary was sure he could get there if he just had another try. He possessed the kind of confidence that only a man with a Lorax level mustache can have. All he needed to make another journey was money. However, the arctic adventure capital market was a bit reluctant to give him more after the previous failures, so, Peary hatched a plan. The key to that plan was a wealthy San Francisco financier named George Crocker, who had previously donated $50,000 to Peary's failed 1906 voyage. This was, of course, a time when 50k bought you more than two buckets of movie theatre popcorn and a calculus textbook. Peary wanted Crocker to help fund his new voyage but, considering the previous trip he financed achieved diddly squat, this could be tough. But what if, and hear me out, the previous voyage wasn't a colossal failure. Peary thought of a way to not only convince Crocker that the previous voyage hadn't been a failure, but also to butter him up a little bit by doing the one thing that rich people love more than anything else—naming things after them. And so, Peary revealed that on his 1906 voyage, though he hadn't made it to the North Pole, he had seen, from a distance, an enormous, previously undiscovered land mass. He wrote that he spotted, “faint white summits,” 130 miles northwest of Cape Thomas Hubbard, and that once he got closer, he could make out, “the snow-clad summits of the distant land in the northwest, above the ice horizon.” In honor of George Crocker, the San Francisco financier, Peary named this beautiful, snow-peaked land mass, “Crocker Land.” But then Robert Peary had two problems. The first problem? George Crocker had already given most of his money to boring causes like rebuilding San Francisco after the earthquake of 1906, and so as flattered as he may have been, there wasn't money left for funding Peary's arctic antics. The second problem? The island was totally, 100%, made up. Now normally, this might not be such a big deal. Guy makes up an imaginary island, who cares? Captain James Cook did so three centuries ago and still nobody's called him out, but this fake island ended up mattering a lot. You see, eventually, Robert Peary did manage to secure funding for another voyage, mostly from the National Geographic Society. On April 6, 1909, he finally made it to the North Pole, or at least, he said he did. He had a picture, but this could be any old pile of snow. He returned home proudly proclaiming that he was the first man ever to reach the North Pole, to which a guy named Frederick Cook, another Arctic explorer, replied, “um…I was there, like, a year ago,” but, Cook said that he'd sailed through where this giant land mass called Crocker's Land was supposedly located. If I know anything about boats, it's that they don't work well on land and, since Cook hadn't found a thing except for cold water and walrus farts, someone's lying here. But, because of this, the existence of Crocker Land became crucially important as it would prove who had really gone to the North Pole first. If it did exist, then Frederick Cook must be lying about going to the North Pole. If it didn't exist, Frederick Cook did go to the North Pole, and Robert Peary was the liar. Of course, at that time you couldn't just fire up your handy household satellite to check and so, to settle it, a man named Donald McMillian decided to go on another expedition to find the land. Not only would this prove who was telling the truth, but it would possibly give McMillan the opportunity to be the first to step onto what was considered, “the last great unknown place in the world.” That voyage was, incredibly, a failure. In addition to their ship getting stuck in the ice for three years before they could return home, the only bright spot came when a crew member saw what looked to be the island—a beautiful, snowy-peaked landmass—but it turned out to be a mirage. In light of that fact, some have suggested that Peary didn't lie about the island, but was actually just seeing a mirage, but unfortunately for Peary's reputation, it looks like that's letting him off too easy. Historians looked at Peary's original notes and logs for the date that Crocker's Land was supposedly discovered, and they found that he doesn't mention anything about it. All he says happened that day was that he climbed up some rocks, and then climbed down the rocks. Plus, the early drafts of his book even didn't include anything about it, but then three paragraphs about Crocker Land mysteriously showed up just before the book was published—just when Peary needed to get more money. In other words, Crocker Land was a load of crock. One of Peary's major issues, aside from inventing an island, was that, when he supposedly went to this north pole, his crew did not include a single navigator who could make their own independent observations as to whether or not they were truly at the pole, or just some pile of ice, and so people didn't believe him. In the archives of the American Geographical Society in Milwaukee lies a century-old map with a peculiar secret. Just north of Greenland, the map shows a small, hook-shaped island labeled “Crocker Land” with the words “Seen By Peary, 1906” printed just below.   The Peary in question is Robert Peary, one of the most famous polar explorers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the man who claimed to have been the first to step foot on the North Pole. But what makes this map remarkable is that Crocker Land was all but a phantom. It wasn't “seen by Peary”—as later expeditions would prove, the explorer had invented it out of the thin Arctic air.   By 1906, Peary was the hardened veteran of five expeditions to the Arctic Circle. Desperate to be the first to the North Pole, he left New York in the summer of 1905 in a state-of-the-art ice-breaking vessel, the Roosevelt—named in honor of one of the principal backers of the expedition, President Theodore Roosevelt. The mission to set foot on the top of the world ended in failure, however: Peary said he sledged to within 175 miles of the pole (a claim others would later question), but was forced to turn back by storms and dwindling supplies.   Peary immediately began planning another attempt, but found himself short of cash. He apparently tried to coax funds from one of his previous backers, San Francisco financier George Crocker—who had donated $50,000 to the 1905-'06 mission—by naming a previously undiscovered landmass after him. In his 1907 book Nearest the Pole, Peary claimed that during his 1906 mission he'd spotted “the faint white summits” of previously undiscovered land 130 miles northwest of Cape Thomas Hubbard, one of the most northerly parts of Canada. Peary named this newfound island “Crocker Land” in his benefactor's honor, hoping to secure another $50,000 for the next expedition.   His efforts were for naught: Crocker diverted much of his resources to helping San Francisco rebuild after the 1906 earthquake, with little apparently free for funding Arctic exploration. But Peary did make another attempt at the North Pole after securing backing from the National Geographic Society, and on April 6, 1909, he stood on the roof of the planet—at least by his own account. “The Pole at last!!!" the explorer wrote in his journal. "The prize of 3 centuries, my dream and ambition for 23 years. Mine at last."   Peary wouldn't celebrate his achievement for long, though: When the explorer returned home, he discovered that Frederick Cook—who had served under Peary on his 1891 North Greenland expedition—was claiming he'd been the first to reach the pole a full year earlier. For a time, a debate over the two men's claims raged—and Crocker Land became part of the fight. Cook claimed that on his way to the North Pole he'd traveled to the area where the island was supposed to be, but had seen nothing there. Crocker Land, he said, didn't exist.   Peary's supporters began to counter-attack, and one of his assistants on the 1909 trip, Donald MacMillan, announced that he would lead an expedition to prove the existence of Crocker Land, vindicating Peary and forever ruining the reputation of Cook.   There was also, of course, the glory of being the first to set foot on the previously unexplored island. Historian David Welky, author of A Wretched and Precarious Situation: In Search of the Last Arctic Frontier, recently explained to National Geographic that with both poles conquered, Crocker Land was “the last great unknown place in the world.” American Geographical Society Library. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries. After receiving backing from the American Museum of Natural History, the University of Illinois, and the American Geographical Society, the MacMillan expedition departed from the Brooklyn Navy Yard in July 1913. MacMillan and his team took provisions, dogs, a cook, “a moving picture machine,” and wireless equipment, with the grand plan of making a radio broadcast live to the United States from the island.   But almost immediately, the expedition was met with misfortune: MacMillan's ship, the Diana, was wrecked on the voyage to Greenland by her allegedly drunken captain, so MacMillan transferred to another ship, the Erik, to continue his journey. By early 1914, with the seas frozen, MacMillan set out to attempt a 1200-mile long sled journey from Etah, Greenland, through one of the most inhospitable and harshest landscapes on Earth, in search of Peary's phantom island.   Though initially inspired by their mission to find Crocker Land, MacMillan's team grew disheartened as they sledged through the Arctic landscape without finding it. “You can imagine how earnestly we scanned every foot of that horizon—not a thing in sight,” MacMillan wrote in his 1918 book, Four Years In The White North.   But a discovery one April day by Fitzhugh Green, a 25-year-old ensign in the US Navy, gave them hope. As MacMillan later recounted, Green was “no sooner out of the igloo than he came running back, calling in through the door, ‘We have it!' Following Green, we ran to the top of the highest mound. There could be no doubt about it. Great heavens! What a land! Hills, valleys, snow-capped peaks extending through at least one hundred and twenty degrees of the horizon.”   But visions of the fame brought by being the first to step foot on Crocker Land quickly evaporated. “I turned to Pee-a-wah-to,” wrote MacMillan of his Inuit guide (also referred to by some explorers as Piugaattog). “After critically examining the supposed landfall for a few minutes, he astounded me by replying that he thought it was a ‘poo-jok' (mist).”   Indeed, MacMillan recorded that “the landscape gradually changed its appearance and varied in extent with the swinging around of the Sun; finally at night it disappeared altogether.” For five more days, the explorers pressed on, until it became clear that what Green had seen was a mirage, a polar fata morgana. Named for the sorceress Morgana le Fay in the legends of King Arthur, these powerful illusions are produced when light bends as it passes through the freezing air, leading to mysterious images of apparent mountains, islands, and sometimes even floating ships.   Fata morganas are a common occurrence in polar regions, but would a man like Peary have been fooled? “As we drank our hot tea and gnawed the pemmican, we did a good deal of thinking,” MacMillan wrote. “Could Peary with all his experience have been mistaken? Was this mirage which had deceived us the very thing which had deceived him eight years before? If he did see Crocker Land, then it was considerably more than 120 miles away, for we were now at least 100 miles from shore, with nothing in sight.”   MacMillan's mission was forced to accept the unthinkable and turn back. “My dreams of the last four years were merely dreams; my hopes had ended in bitter disappointment,” MacMillan wrote. But the despair at realizing that Crocker Land didn't exist was merely the beginning of the ordeal.   MacMillan sent Fitzhugh Green and the Inuit guide Piugaattog west to explore a possible route back to their base camp in Etah. The two became trapped in the ice, and one of their dog teams died. Fighting over the remaining dogs, Green—with alarming lack of remorse—explained in his diary what happened next: “I shot once in the air ... I then killed [Piugaattog] with a shot through the shoulder and another through the head.” Green returned to the main party and confessed to MacMillan. Rather than reveal the murder, the expedition leader told the Inuit members of the mission that Piugaattog had perished in the blizzard.   Several members of the MacMillan mission would remain trapped in the ice for another three years, victims of the Arctic weather. Two attempts by the American Museum of Natural History to rescue them met with failure, and it wasn't until 1917 that MacMillan and his party were finally saved by the steamer Neptune, captained by seasoned Arctic sailor Robert Bartlett.   While stranded in the ice, the men put their time to good use; they studied glaciers, astronomy, the tides, Inuit culture, and anything else that attracted their curiosity. They eventually returned with over 5000 photographs, thousands of specimens, and some of the earliest film taken of the Arctic (much of which can be seen today in the repositories of the American Geographical Society at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee).   It's unclear whether MacMillan ever confronted Peary about Crocker Land—about what exactly the explorer had seen in 1906, and perhaps what his motives were. When MacMillan's news about not having found Crocker Land reached the United States, Peary defended himself to the press by noting how difficult spotting land in the Arctic could be, telling reporters, “Seen from a distance ... an iceberg with earth and stones may be taken for a rock, a cliff-walled valley filled with fog for a fjord, and the dense low clouds above a patch of open water for land.” (He maintained, however, that "physical indications and theory" still pointed to land somewhere in the area.) Yet later researchers have noted that Peary's notes from his 1905-'06 expedition don't mention Crocker Land at all. As Welky told National Geographic, “He talks about a hunting trip that day, climbing the hills to get this view, but says absolutely nothing about seeing Crocker Land. Several crewmembers also kept diaries, and according to those he never mentioned anything about seeing a new continent.”   There's no mention of Crocker Land in early drafts of Nearest the Pole, either—it's only mentioned in the final manuscript. That suggests Peary had a deliberate reason for the the inclusion of the island.   Crocker, meanwhile, wouldn't live to see if he was immortalized by this mysterious new land mass: He died in December 1909 of stomach cancer, a year after Peary had set out in the Roosevelt again in search of the Pole, and before MacMillan's expedition.   Any remnants of the legend of Crocker Land were put to bed in 1938, when Isaac Schlossbach flew over where the mysterious island was supposed to be, looked down from his cockpit, and saw nothing. Bradley Land was the name Frederick Cook gave to a mass of land which he claimed to have seen between (84°20′N 102°0′W) and (85°11′N 102°0′W) during a 1909 expedition. He described it as two masses of land with a break, a strait, or an indentation between.[1] The land was named for John R. Bradley, who had sponsored Cook's expedition.   Cook published two photographs of the land and described it thus: "The lower coast resembled Heiberg Island, with mountains and high valleys. The upper coast I estimated as being about one thousand feet high, flat, and covered with a thin sheet ice."[2]   It is now known there is no land at that location and Cook's observations were based on either a misidentification of sea ice or an outright fabrication. Cook's Inuit companions reported that the photographs were actually taken near the coast of Axel Heiberg Island.[   Cook described two islands lying at about 85 degrees North, which he named Bradley Land.  These islands, like Peary's “Crocker Land,” do not exist, yet Cook's partisans have tried to resuscitate Cook's credibility by linking “Bradley Land” to a discovery made in the Arctic only since Dr. Cook's death.      After World War II, aerial reconnaissance revealed a number of large tabular bergs drifting slowly clockwise in the arctic basin north of Ellesmere Island. Several arctic researchers and scientists have suggested these so-called ice islands—breakaway pieces of its ancient ice shelf—are probably what Cook mistook for “Bradley Land,” and Cook's advocates have repeated these statements to support the doctor's claim.       Cook gave this description of “Bradley Land”: “The lower coast resembled Heiberg Island, with mountains and high valleys. The upper coast I estimated as being about one thousand feet high, flat, and covered with a thin sheet ice.”      Ice islands are no more than 100 to 200 feet thick, total. They are nearly flat with only rolling undulations and rise only about 25 feet above sea level. Cook's “Bradley Land” therefore does not remotely resemble an ice island, or even an ice island magnified by mirage. And Cook published two pictures of the high, mountainous land he called “Bradley Land.”        Cook's Inuit companions are reported to have said these pictures were of two small islands off the northwest coast of Axel Heiberg Island; others believe they are of the coast of Heiberg Island itself, though the pictures have never been duplicated.      Ren Bay  has been suggested as the site.  Ellesmere trekker Jerry Kobalenko reports he could not match the picture exactly to that site, but Cook might have taken it at a time when fog obscured prominent landmarks, as he did in Alaska, making it impossible to duplicate now.  In each picture the photographer is standing on a point above the flat ice.  Kobalenko's was taken off a ten-foot hillock.   Sources: https://www.jetsetter.com/magazine/islands-to-visit-before-they-disappear/ Brigadoon https://www.history.com/news/the-con-man-who-invented-his-own-country https://www.huffpost.com/entry/sandy-island-doesnt-exist_n_2184535 https://interestingengineering.com/10-islands-on-maps-that-never-actually-existed https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/8350278/mysterious-island-that-didnt-exist-four-years-ago-is-now-teeming-with-life-sea-volcano/ https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20160127-the-conman-who-pulled-off-historys-most-audaciou s-scam https://www.spurlock.illinois.edu/collections/notable-collections/profiles/crocker-land.html https://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/article/crocker-land-peary-arctic-continent https://research.bowdoin.edu/crocker-land-expedition/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=th_KQOeh-Co http://humbug.polarhist.com/bland.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Island,_New_Caledonia https://www.historytoday.com/miscellanies/gregor-macgregor-prince-poyais   There are Islands that have disappeared and not in the global warming, vanishing coastline type of way. These Islands are called Phantom Islands. To be considered a Phantom Island, a piece of land must have been agreed to exist at one point before eventually being undiscovered or corrected. Basically, academics and cartographers thought an island was real and then eventually found out it wasn't. For example, Atlantis would not be considered a Phantom Island because it was always considered a legend. But perhaps the best example of a Phantom Island is Burmeja. Bermeja first appeared on maps in the year 1539, and for nearly 400 years, it was accepted as a real island located in the Gulf of Mexico. But in the 2000s, the United States and Mexico were in a dispute over an oil field in the Gulf of Mexico. Basically, Burmeja marked the outermost limit of Mexico's economic territory. The oil field would have been within that border marked by Burmeja, thus making it Mexico's property. But when the Mexican government set a team to verify the island's position, it was gone. The team had the exact coordinates for the island, and Bermeja had appeared on maps for 400 years, but it just wasn't there. The team searched all over the Gulf of Mexico and concluded that Bermeja simply no longer existed. There are a few theories about how Bermer disappeared. One is that it vanished into the ocean as a result of natural geographic shifts. This has happened elsewhere in the world, so it's entirely plausible. There's also a theory that Birmingham was intentionally destroyed by the United States so they could gain access to the oil field. It's a bold strategy, and you would think someone would have noticed an entire island being blown up. But America has done worse things in the name of oil. Some people say early Mexican officials may have added it to the map in an effort to just expand their borders. This, again, would be a pretty bold strategy, but perhaps an effective one in the 15th century. The most likely explanation is that Burmeja never existed. It was a mistake by some cartographer in the 1500s, and everyone just went with it. Early cartographers were also known to add fake Islands to their maps to prevent plagiarism. These fake Islands would tip them off if their map was ever copied. But Burmeja has appeared in various ships, logs, and inventories, some of which were official documents from the Mexican government. Ultimately, Burmette was never found, and no one really knows why. But Bermuda has not been the only Phantom Island. The Baja Peninsula was believed to be the island of California for years before it was corrected. A fictitious place called Sandy Island appeared on maps for over a century near Australia. It was even on Google maps. Today, scientists think early explorers just saw a large piece of pumice stone floating in the ocean. Arctic Explorer Robert E. Pierre made up the Island Crocker land in an effort to scam some money from one of his investors. There have been dozens more of these Phantom Islands over the years with each having been undiscovered for different reasons. Today, though, thanks to satellite imagery, Phantom Islands are probably a thing of the past you. Con artists have long recognised that persuasion must appeal to two very particular aspects of human motivation – the drive that will get people to do something, and the inertia that prevents them from wanting to do it. In 2003, two social psychologists, Eric Knowles at the University of Arkansas and Jay Linn at Widener University, formalised this idea by naming two types of persuasive tactics. The first, alpha, was far more frequent: increasing the appeal of something. The second, omega, decreased the resistance surrounding something. In the one, you do what you can to make your proposition, whatever it may be, more attractive. You rev up the backstory – why this is such a wonderful opportunity, why you are the perfect person to do it, how much everyone will gain, and the like. In the other, you make a request or offer seem so easy as to be a no-brainer – why wouldn't I do this? What do I have to lose? Psychologists call it the ‘approach-avoidance' model of persuasion They called the juxtaposition the approach-avoidance model of persuasion: you can convince me of something by making me want to approach it and decreasing any reasons I might have to avoid it. According to Columbia University psychologist Tory Higgins, people are usually more likely to be swayed by one or other of the two motivational lines: some people are promotion-focused (they think of possible positive gains), and some, prevention-focused (they focus on losses and avoiding mistakes). An approach that unites the alpha with the omega appeals to both mindsets, however, giving it universal appeal – and it is easy to see how MacGregor's proposition offered this potent combination.