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Southern region of Asia

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Best podcasts about south asian

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Latest podcast episodes about south asian

Family Karma Kast
71. South Asian Holiday Gift and Media Guide

Family Karma Kast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 44:53


Indra and Deana discuss their favorite South Asian gift ideas and TV/film/media recommendations for the holiday season! Gift ideas: One Stripe Chai: https://onestripechai.com/ Holi Chic by Megha: https://www.holichicbymegha.com/ Riya Collective: https://riyacollective.com/ Live Tinted: https://www.livetinted.com/ TV/Films/Books/Podcast recommendations: Eternals: https://www.marvel.com/movies/eternals The Sex Lives of College Girls: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11212276/ India Sweets and Spices: https://bleeckerstreetmedia.com/india-sweets-and-spices/ Hot Mess Holiday: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt15450798/ “You Can't Be Serious,” by Kal Penn: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/You-Cant-Be-Serious/Kal-Penn/9781982171384 Maed in India Podcast: https://www.maedinindia.in/ Subscribe, rate, and review wherever you get your podcasts! Join our Patreon (patreon.com/familykarmakast) and for just $1 a month, get exclusive access to Indra and Deana's weekly Thirsty Thirty Bravo TV and pop culture chats! Follow us on Instagram/Twitter: @familykarmakast

Female Startup Club
South Asian Beverage Brand One Stripe Chai was crushing it… And then the pandemic hit. Farah Jesani shares her lessons

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 47:51


Today we're chatting with Farah Jesani, founder of One Stripe Chai, we're chatting through the B2B side of the biz and what happened when she need to pivot last march, and her advice to entrepreneurs in the beverage space coming into 2022. One Stripe Chai is a woman-owned South Asian beverage brand that offers authentic, small batch masala chai concentrates and blends, crafted to be enjoyed from the comfort of your home or at your favorite coffee shop. Using tea sourced directly from a small organic and biodynamic family-owned farm in Assam, India, One Stripe Chai is brewed in Portland with a focus on taste and simplicity.LINKS WE MENTION:One Strip Chai's InstagramFarah's InstagramFemale Startup Club's InstagramDoone's InstagramIn partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for ecommerce businesses.Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook GroupSay hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.comBook: Supermaker by Jaime Schmidt

Self Evident: Asian America's Stories
Back to School, But Not Back to Normal

Self Evident: Asian America's Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:08


This Fall many public primary schools in the U.S. switched back to in-person learning. But that can mean very different things for students, teachers, and parents — depending on their school system, local political environment, family resources, or language needs. We started getting word from listeners about their back-to-school experiences in July, and checked in with them as these first few months of the school year unfolded. Cathy and our team found out how a Chinese American mother of three navigated the anti-mask and anti-CRT activity surrounding school reopenings in Arizona; learned about the hidden harms of this transition from immigrant mental health advocates in New York City; and heard how having an immunocompromised family member affected an Indian American family in Minneapolis. While these conversations are by no means comprehensive, a recurring theme in these conversations was a sense of loss, which many students haven't had the space to properly heal from. Credits Produced by Julia Shu and James Boo Edited by Julia Shu Sound mix by Timothy Lou Ly Fact checking by Harsha Nahata Music by Blue Dot Sessions and Epidemic Sound Self Evident theme music by Dorian Love Our Executive Producer is Ken Ikeda Resources and Reading WATCH: “Towards An Inclusive Reopening: The Mental Health Needs of Asian Children” discussion panel by the Asian American Federation, Sapna NYC, Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York, Hamilton-Madison House, and the Arab American Association of New York READ: “Anti-mask school law isn't justice, safety for our kids” by Yvonne So for the Arizona Daily Star READ: “Asian American young adults are the only racial group with suicide as their leading cause of death, so why is no one talking about this?” by Amelia Noor-Osho for The Conversation READ: “New York's Once-Thriving Asian Businesses Struggle to Recover From 4,000% Unemployment Spike” by Amy Yee, Adre Tartar, and Christopher Cannon for Bloomberg READ: “Digital Literacy in New York's Asian American Community” by Juo-Hsi (Sylvia) Peng for Advancing Justice | AAJC READ: “Teens in America: How the Covid-19 Pandemic is Shaping the Next Generation” by Maria Abenes for Psychiatric Times

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive
Radio Pyongyang - September 1975 - 15630. Khz - English Propaganda

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


I'm not going to lie - living on the West Coast of Canada in the 1960's and 1970's (and hey - for most of my life…) had its challenges where radio reception was concerned. But, and it is a big but, we sat in front of a looking glass that gave us exquisite access to the Eastern and South Asian radio scene that was unique and often tantalizing. Where else in North America did you have an easy shot to Papua New Guinea, Indonesia (at a time when there were hundreds of little shortwave stations!) and medium wave targets from Japan, Russian (on long wave too!), both Koreas, the Philippines and so on — not to mention the Pacific Islands. Now, 46 years later, I am reopening my cassette files for another look see and mastering all of the stuff that has never been touched — and there is a lot. Here now to share with you! Here is a wonderful snippet of North Korea from my “first DX Home…” in the country on a 4 acre ranch (Apples, pears, hazelnuts and sheep!) - I had my trusty DX150B (since November of 1973) and 5 1/2 wave dipoles which I would switch between with a home-brew antenna switch — hence the clicks on this track! North Korea, at the time, had an English series of broadcasts that were almost always sabre rattling harangues - and yet this particular sound-byte sounds somewhat subdued. Either way, it was pretty indicative of the times — and in some way, North Korea has never really changed with the times. The broadcasts were often cryptic and rambling. This was an excellent example.

Payal Patel
"Serena Singh Flips the Script"

Payal Patel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:40


Sonya Lalli is an author and first generation Canadian South Asian woman. We got a chance to sit down with Sonya to talk about her recent book, "Serena Singh Flips The Script". This is a story of a young woman, Serena, who experiences all the "things" that most South Asian women go through in their adult years as a single woman; marriage pressure, understanding platonic relationships, empathizing with immigrant parents, understanding what love means, and much more. As a South Asian author and first generation Canadian woman, Sonya shared through her book the many ups and downs that young South Asian women experience balancing their Western life while keeping their heritage in mind. Sonya Lalli: http://www.sonyalalli.com/ Where to purchase her books: https://www.amazon.com/Sonya-Lalli/e/B06Y1CK469%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share https://www.instagram.com/sonya_lalli/?hl=en The Dating Culture: https://www.instagram.com/thedatingculture/?hl=en --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thedatingculture/support

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #147: “Muslims Vs. Hindus"

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:36


Pranav talks about life on the road, the boys then discuss PHOOLAN DEVI—badass bandit queen of India as the brown of the week, and then talk Hindu-Muslim tension. Advice for a (Patreon) girl trying to maintain balance between her conservative Muslim family and her life as an independent woman. Thanks for listening and write us a review while you're here! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Sword Guy Podcast
Asian and African Arms and Armour with Natasha Bennett

The Sword Guy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 83:35


The Sword Guy Podcast episode 80 Photo credit: The Royal Armouries Natasha Bennett is the Curator of Oriental Collections at the Royal Armouries in Leeds, working with the Asian and African collections. These include an enormous spread of arms and armour mostly dating from between the 14th and 20th centuries, so her research interests are necessarily wide-ranging. She has presented specialist study sessions and seminars on mounted warfare in Asia, South Asian arms and armour, Islamic arms and armour, Asian swords, and textiles in Japanese armour. In our conversation we talk about guns, specifically the “15 Rupee Jezail” and how the popularity of the matchlock mechanism persisted because of its simplicity and functionality, even when elsewhere in the world newer technologies took over. In case you were wondering, this is what a jezail looks like: Photo credit: The Royal Armouries And this is the Tusken Cycler rifle from Star Wars: We also talk about Natasha's work with the Anglo Sikh Virtual Museum and the amazing benefits of 3-D technology. You can have a good, close-up, 3-D look at the objects on the museum's website: https://www.anglosikhmuseum.com/ This leads us into a discussion about the circumstances in which many items ended up in British museum collections, i.e. as colonial loot, which is a tricky issue for museums to navigate. Listen in to find out whether Indian steel weapons are the best, and also how Natasha plans to get her baby doing horseback archery before they can walk.   For more information about the host Guy Windsor and his work, as well as transcriptions of all the episodes, check out his website at https://guywindsor.net/ And to support the show, come join the Patrons at  https://www.patreon.com/theswordguy  

Family Karma Kast
70. Matchmaker Radha Patel from Single to Shaadi

Family Karma Kast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 67:04


Indra and Deana chat with Radha Patel from the South Asian matchmaking service Single to Shaadi. Radha tells the story of how she started Single to Shaadi, a South Asian matchmaking service in North America. She talks about the common traits her clients often look for, leaving the Aunties out of the process, learning about yourself before looking for a life partner, and what “success” looks like when it comes to matchmaking. She also talks about her cameo on “Meet the Patel's” and her perspective on the Netflix hit ‘Indian Matchmaking' as someone who works in the same business. Finally, Radha gives her expert perspective on some of the relationships in ‘Family Karma' on Bravo: Is Brian ready for a serious relationship? Why didn't things work out with Monica Shah? What does she make of Anisha's new relationship? Are checklists helpful? And are Vishal and Richa a good match? Subscribe, rate, and review wherever you get your podcasts! Join our Patreon (patreon.com/familykarmakast) and for just $1 a month, get exclusive access to Indra and Deana's weekly Thirsty Thirty Bravo TV and pop culture chats! Follow us on Instagram/Twitter: @familykarmakast Follow Single to Shaadi on Instagram: @singletoshaadi Visit the Single to Shaadi website: www.singletoshaadi.com

GRIN Gets Real
Episode 2: How cultural differences affect marketing strategies

GRIN Gets Real

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:10


Featuring Hani Anis, Founder at Kahani DigitalHani Anis founded a luxury South Asian bridal boutique in 2017 called Anis Collections. She went on to work in investment banking and at a venture capitalist firm, but continued helping brands with their digital strategies during the pandemic. It was through her work for Natalie Barby's agency Rella Social that Hanis realized her love for working with small businesses, particularly those owned and operated by people of South Asian descent.In 2021, Hani turned her passion into Kahani Digital – a digital marketing and social media company that helps tell the stories of South Asian-owned and founded brands. Kahani Digital now has a team of six employees and has worked with 20-plus clients in various industries.Episode quote:“When you're a brand owner, typically you have a specific story that ties to some element of either your culture, your background, someway you grew up, or just something you saw. (Telling a brand's story comes) from just sitting down with founders and talking to them to learn about their story.”Visit the complete episode page to learn more. Or subscribe to the GRIN Gets Real podcast where you listen to podcasts.

The YVR Screen Scene Podcast
Episode 197: Meet the cast of Lifetime's first Christmas movie about a South Asian family

The YVR Screen Scene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 33:00


This is the first time the YVR Screen Scene Podcast has dedicated an entire episode to a Christmas movie. But this isn't your typical Christmas movie. This is a Christmas movie about an Indian-American family, and it stars a bevy of beloved South Asian Canadian stars, wearing Christmas sweaters and decking the halls like many South Asians do IRL all over the world. Baking Spirits Bright airs November 21 on Lifetime. It's about a character named Mira Varma who (according to Lifetime) “takes pride in her family's business of making fruitcakes, despite the decline in its popularity of once being America's most-gifted holiday confection. When Mira's parents decide to hire Brady Phillips and his high-powered marketing company to boost sales for the holidays, Mira must fight to hold on to the heart of the company she loves so much.”Baking Spirits Bright features Rekha Sharma as Mira Varma, Dion Johnstone as that dashing, high-powered marketing executive from the big city, Aadila Dosani as Mira's sister, Munisha, who'd rather be vlogging about fashion than baking fruitcakes, and Praneet Akilla as their brother, who'd rather be a snowboarding coach. The film also features fantastic performances from Manoj Sood, Nimet Kanji, Reese Alexander, and Riun Garner, and was directed by Aubrey Arnason.In this highly spirited episode, host Sabrina talks Christmas movies, fruitcake, and representation with Rekha Sharma, Dion Johnstone, Praneet Akilla, and Aadila Dosani. Episode sponsor: Fish Flight Entertainment

Chuski Pop
Episode 109 (Season 7) It's Cuffing Season, Yay!

Chuski Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 88:12


This week on Season 7 Episode 109, we dive in with a round up of the latest news and gossip from around the globe. We chat about the CDFA Fashion awards honouring Zendaya.  And of course we had to mention Malala Yousefzai's surprise marriage accouncement and not to forget the wild story of Zayn Malik and Gigi Hadid's dramatic breakup. And then finally conclude the episode with a spicy dose of Filmi Chakkar!  - // Starring Sweety & Pappu // Visit ChuskiPop.com for more info // Subscribe to us on patreon.com/chuskipop for only $1 a month // Listen To Us On Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher or your favourite podcast app! // Follow Us on twitter.com/chuskipop and instagram.com/chuskipop

Redefining ABCD
Larger Than Us: Realities of being the Eldest in a South Asian Household

Redefining ABCD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 50:15


In this episode of Larger Than Us, Keerthi and Sneha talk about their experiences being the eldest daughter in their family and how that affected them growing up, the parallels they see to media representation of the eldest in a South Asian/Asian household and reflect on how they grew up with the expectations of being the eldest. As they navigate various experiences, they also talk about the expectations for sons vs daughters in a household and how it affects the way society sees the eldest daughter. They wrap up the episode with warm feelings and fun stories about their siblings and give advice for how they hope people can improve their relationship with their parents/loved ones.

Talking Tastebuds
Dr Pragya Agarwal on reproductive justice and parental ambivalence

Talking Tastebuds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:34


Dr Pragya Agarwal is a behavioural and data scientist, writer, speaker and a consultant on bias, anti-racism, social inclusion, power and privilege.She is the author of three books, including SWAY: Unravelling Unconscious Bias and ‘Wish we knew what to say: Talking with children about race', a manual for parents, carers and educators of all backgrounds and ethnicities to talk to children about race and racism.In this episode, we focus on her latest book: (M)otherhood: On the choices of being a woman a hybrid memoir and scientific analysis of women's fertility, and an urgent and timely examination of how political ideas of womanhood and motherhood are constructed. Pragya uses her own varied experiences and choices as a woman of South Asian heritage to examine the broader societal, historical and scientific factors that drive how we think and talk about motherhood.It's an extremely honest book, with Pragya interrogating themes including infertility, childbirth and reproductive justice, making a powerful and urgent argument for the need to tackle society's obsession with women's bodies and fertility, in a truly intersectional way. Find Pragya: @DrPragyaAgarwalBuy her book: bookshop.orgFind me: @venetialamannaFind the show: @ATSTpodcast This episode was produced by Venetia La Manna. It was edited by Nada Smiljanic. The artwork was designed by Alex Sedano and the music was composed by William Haxworth. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Progressive Opinions of Color (POC Podcast) - Politics and Economics with Underrepresented Voices
Prison Abolition with the Formerly Incarcerated South Asian Journalist and Press Secretary Turned Prison Reform Activism, Ashish Prashar

Progressive Opinions of Color (POC Podcast) - Politics and Economics with Underrepresented Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 53:58


Nancy chats with Ashish Prashar about his time in prison for a non-violent crime, how the prison industrial complex discriminates against BIPOC, and how to move toward prison reform and abolition.When you hear Ashish Prashar's lovely soft spoken British accent, coupled with his intellectual stance on the flawed U.S. prison system, it's really hard to believe he spent an entire year of his life in a dark prison at the young age of 17 for a non-violent crime. Sadly, he's one of thousands of BIPOCs whose lives will forever be impacted by a flawed justice system (minorities rep 80% of those with convictions). Incarceration has a profound effect that reaches far beyond prison itself: Millions of people are needlessly unemployed, underemployed or homeless just because they have a conviction. And did you know more than 75% of jail suicides involve people who had not been convicted of a crime?But today, Ash is a transformational leader, innovator and justice reform activist who prides himself as the first formerly incarcerated individual to rise from reporter to press secretary for high-ranking politicians, to the c-suite of an iconic company (R/GA). Ashish fights the good fight: he's campaigned for bail reform, ending solitary confinement, and the restoration of voting rights. He sits on the boards of Exodus Transitional Community, Getting Out and Staying Out NYC, Just Leadership USA, Leap Confronting Conflict, the Responsible Business Initiative for Justice. He champion's R/GA's second chance hiring programs across its 10+ offices globally. You can also check out his contributed articles to CNN, USA Today, Business Insider, Fast Company – all focused on prison advocacy. Ashish has a lengthy career in politics as Press Secretary to the former Mayor of London, campaign leader for former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, supported President Joe Biden's 2020 US Presidential Campaign, played an integral part of Obama's 2008 US Presidential Campaign, the 2018 Midterms for a variety of Democrat candidates, and much more).Nancy: Website, Instagram, Twitter Welcome to Progressive Opinions of Color (POC), a podcast that creates space for people of color in conversations about economics, politics, and culture. Your host is Nancy Wu. Nancy is an Asian American woman, an economist, and a huge politics and policy nerd. Nancy triple majored in Economics, Government (Political Science) and Gender Studies at Dartmouth and has a Master's in Development Economics from Oxford. She works as an Economist full time and has previously worked in economic policy at the White House (under Obama, of course) and progressive think tanks.  The goal of this podcast is to engage the state of the economy, and other pressing topics in politics, economics, and culture, all through perspectives inclusive of the lived experiences of people of color. Whether you're new to politics or already a huge politics nerd, we hope this podcast inspires community and conversation among us. Join us in reimagining politics and economics with underrepresented voices.

Topic Lords
108. Sitting And Being Angry At Your Phone

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 81:57


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Mark * Shirley Topics: * Neuroscience! * Fertility tracking is more complicated than I realized. * When it turns out that a character in a movie is movie-star hot because it's a plot point, rather than because they're portrayed by a movie star, and I guess then the audience is supposed to pretend all the other characters, also played by movie stars, just look like regular schlubs. * Immortal - Call Of The Wintermoon * https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VBdAY8eA9w * Unedited (syncable) commentary: https://youtu.be/I4XK7YqwgFg * Tiktok food trends that are more about elaborate assembly than flavors. * https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vesYREe6_uk Microtopics: * A band from Sweden that just released a demo. * Album art with a big giant snake and a shirtless barbarian dude whipping a mace at a guy. * A punk band composed of mixed race middle school riot grrls. * Speaking to a rude 12 year old and running off to write a bitchin' punk song about it. * Observing someone's career arc via the podcasts they guest on. * Talking yourself out of being a scientist. * Helping people with early-stage dementia manage activities of daily living. * An acquired language problem. * Adapting to not being in an abusive workplace environment. * How a process improvement is received when you suggest it to your BevMo manager vs. when you suggest it to the head of your neuroscience lab. * How every retail store is as understaffed as possible by design. * Switching from a retail job to an office job and suddenly being trusted to decide when to go to the bathroom. * How the world might be different if the people in charge had to live in the world they created. * Thriving in Our Hypercapitalist Dystopia. * Trying to have a kid and learning a whole bunch about your own body in the process. * Giving kids facts instead of ideology or even advice. * Going to pregnancy club and wondering if there's an aspirational pregnancy club. * Taking your temperature when you emerge from slumber. * Peeing on sticks. (A medical process.) * Not trying, not preventing. * Cervical mucus. * A bad batch of kombucha can kill you, and other ways kombucha is like a pregnancy. * Being naturally blessed with high motility sperm. * Asking your doctor if you should run a bunch of tests and they're like "just chill" and you're like "take my blood, please" * The science of trying-adjacent. * Drinking too deeply of the colloidal silver. * A bookish nerd who is portrayed by one of the most attractive humans on the planet but they're wearing glasses. * The incomparable Finn Carter. * Trying to cast an actor to play an unattractive person but Steve Buscemi is busy and you can't find a single other ugly actor so you cast Scarlet Johansson and have the makeup department put her in uglyface. * Doing an image search for "ugly actors" and every single result is of a South Asian and freaking out until you find out that there's a Bollywood movie called "Ugly." * Putting "the frumpy one" from a movie in a room next to a bunch of normal people and realizing that you need to blow way past the conventionally-attractive bell curve to even be allowed into Los Angeles. * A music video that was shot on VHS and uploaded to 2006-era Youtube. * Goth clowns scowling and looking out from behind trees. * A troupe of grumpy goth clowns in leather daddy outfits discovering and exploring ancient ruins. * Cutting your frenulum so you can stick out your tongue as far as Gene Simmons and waking up choking on your tongue meat every night. * Grumpy goth clowns crouching in doorways. * Hearing a variety of different screams and growls. * Training to scream for several hours a day, every day, without ruining your screamy bits. * Doing the crabcore thing decades before crabcore. * Googling "candlemass bewitched" for a good time. * Watching TikTok on Reddit because you're old. * Extremely simple and compelling recipes that can't possibly work and will in fact cause a fire in your chicken. * Making bad content to make people mad. * Trying to redefine porn as anything you enjoy. * Making a series of recipe videos with your nonstandard measuring cups so people need to buy your weird measuring cups to follow along. * Elsagate. * J. Kenji Lopez-Alt. * Hard boiling a million eggs to scientifically determine that you're super sick of eating eggs. * Food Wishes. * That's Just You Cookin'. * A cool chef with a cool attitude. * A chef with a cadence of speaking that really annoys your dad. * Learning to improvise when faced with an unexpected situation. * How to get joy out of cooking. * The fugu preparation certification. * Watching somebody spend five minutes washing some extremely starchy rice. * Having two gimmicks. * A knife that you can also use as a spatula. * Using fresh stream water in your forest cooking videos.

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #146: “Pretty Fly White Guys (ft. Gracie Canaan)”

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 60:00


NEW FORMAT ALERT! This week, with special guest comedian Gracie Canaan, we roll out our new segments, and talk about Parisian mummies facing racism, Kal Penn coming out of the closet, and the allure of white men on dating apps despite the cultural hit they're taking. We end the episode with our new advice segment for patreon subscribers and help a Muslim girl in a Romeo-Juliet style love affair with a Hindu boy. Thanks so much for listening! Please write us a nice review here and subscribe to our YouTube, and def consider contributing to our patreon if you want bonus content and want to be featured in future episodes!

Tabadlab Presents...
Pakistonomy - Episode 84 - Major Power Rivalry in South Asia

Tabadlab Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 60:11


Uzair talks to Dr. Tanvi Madan about her research paper which looks at the role of major power rivalries in the broader South Asian region. The emerging US-China rivalry and growing tensions between India and China are already having an impact on the geopolitics of the region. As this rivalry sharpens, countries in the region will have to strategize and find ways to effectively balance against these major powers in a way that maximizes the benefits they can derive in line with their own national interests. We also talked about potential areas of cooperation in the region, including climate change. Dr. Tanvi Madan is a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy program, and director of The India Project at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Madan's work explores India's role in the world and its foreign policy, focusing in particular on India's relations with China and the United States. She also researches the U.S. and India's approaches in the Indo-Pacific, as well as the development of interest-based coalitions, especially the Australia-India-Japan-U.S. Quad. Her book Fateful Triangle: How China Shaped US-India Relations during the Cold War is a must-read along with her most recent paper for CFR: - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07N8DRSQC/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_3YRDM3S9FWQ92PTE366H - https://www.cfr.org/report/major-power-rivalry-south-asia Reading Recommendations: - The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America by Louis Menand - War and Peace in Modern India by S. Raghavan - Animosity at Bay: An Alternative History of the India-Pakistan Relationship, 1947-1952 by Pallavi Raghavan - The Price of Aid: The Economic Cold War in India by David Engerman

The Pakistan Experience
Patriarchy and Sexuality - A conversation with Nighat Said Khan - Founder WAF - TPE #138

The Pakistan Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 90:12


Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience Nighat Said Khan ‎ is a Pakistani feminist activist, researcher and author. She is the director and founder of the Applied Socio-Economic Research (ASR) Resource Centre and a founding member of the Women's Action Forum. Nighat joins us on the podcast to discuss the sexuality spectrum, how patriarchy seeks to control women's sexuality, using religion as a strategy in politics, the Aurat March, Zia's legacy and why The Left needs to unite as a collective. Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience And Please stay in touch: https://twitter.com/ThePakistanExp1 https://www.facebook.com/thepakistanexperience https://instagram.com/thepakistanexpeperience The podcast is hosted by comedian and writer, Shehzad Ghias Shaikh. Shehzad is a Fulbright scholar with a Masters in Theatre from Brooklyn College. He is also one of the foremost Stand-up comedians in Pakistan and frequently writes for numerous publications. He can be found on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Tinder. Instagram.com/shehzadghiasshaikh Facebook.com/Shehzadghias/ Twitter.com/shehzad89 Chapters: 0:00 Introduction 1:00 Intersectionality, LGBTQI Spectrum and the South Asian identity 12:00 Patriarchy and the control of sexuality 28:00 Capitalism co-opting Feminism 40:00 Using religion in politics5 7:00 Why can't The Left identity a collective enemy? 1:05:00 Indira Gandhi's assasination changed India 1:15:00 Zia is alive in his legacy 1:23:00 The economics of Mumtaz Qadri

The Divorce Club
Natasha Aujla

The Divorce Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 41:24


TW: Baby death/Miscarriage"I called and said I'm going to come back and he said, no you're not, this isn't your house anymore- I'm divorcing you"- Natasha AujlaWriter Natasha Aujla joins Samantha Baines to talk about dealing with the death of her newborn son and then being asked for a divorce eight days later. Natasha discusses her journey with forgiveness and how logical thinking aided her recovery. They both discuss going to weddings after a divorce and the emotional rollercoaster they went through. Natasha talks about the importance of her Sikh religion and how she felt growing up in a South Asian community and the cultural expectations that come with it.Natashas blog and Instagram: blusabar.com / @BlusabarFollow us on twitter and instagram: @divorcepod & @samanthabainesEmail: thedivorcesocial@gmail.comTranscripts can be found at www.thedivorcesocial.comSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thedivorceclub. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Whiskey Hue
Episode 70: South Asian Prominence in Business |

Whiskey Hue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:17


Atul drops gens and gives us a great view into the importance and prominence of South Asian Business leaders. In other words, Atul was the star of this episode and opened our eyes to a unique story centered on the immigrant story centered on will. We sip on Rampur Indian Single Malt Whiskey Double Cask a nice treat from the land of Costco.

What's On Your Mind?
STFS: Second Gen Desi with Pree

What's On Your Mind?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 23:11


Pree is a second generation desi (second gen desi) (IG: @secondgendesi) South Asian writer, scientist, runner, and currently an expat in Italy. She uses her blog (secondgendesi.com) and social media platforms to discuss topics and experiences related to these main themes of her life, especially the struggles, the triumphs, and the unfiltered truth of it all. Thank you for the theme music @briank_williams28 BK Williams! Become a monthly supporter of the show at janirad.com/podcast. STFS: Stories of survival, struggle, and everything in between. Jani Rad @janirad.me and Be Fearless You Foundation @befearlessyou (Corilynn Bailey) are co-hosting this minisode series of “WHAT'S ON YOUR MIND?” @whatsonyourmindpodcast to bring you a platform where we can all end the stigma around mental health and mental illness together. Conversation is powerful, and together through language and stories - we can Stop the F****** Stigma! As a disclaimer, the stories shared on this platform may include triggering content. Please take care of yourself when listening. We will not be providing advice, therapy, or counseling. That is not the intended purpose of this space. If you are seeking professional advice or need to talk to someone immediately, please connect with a mental health professional or call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 800-273-8255 (TALK). @psych_today @800273talk Additional resources to find BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) therapists: Asian Mental Health Collective @asianmentalhealthcollective Therapy in Color: The mental health directory for People of Color @therapyincolor_ National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network @nqttcn South Asian Therapists @southasiantherapists

Her Success Story
Meeting the Global Need of Cultural Heritage Education For Children

Her Success Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 21:37


Anu Sehgal is the Founder of The Culture Tree. She lives in New York with her husband and her two sons. She is a marketer by profession. She holds an MBA from Yale University and has worked in the corporate sector for almost 15 years. Anu grew up in India and is a native Hindi speaker. She is an active parent and believes an awareness of one's heritage, culture and language is key for children to become self-aware and confident individuals. Anu founded her company The Culture Tree five years ago, with a desire to fill a vacuum for quality and educational South Asian events and classes in the New York City area. Her company continues to grow and expand. As a cultural educator, she is always looking forward to providing children with authentic, immersive and inspiring experiences. In general her focus is at providing children and their families cross-cultural exposure that can help develop knowledgeable, open-minded and respectful individuals. Anu is a health enthusiast, she leads an active and healthy lifestyle. For exercise she swims and does yoga regularly. She is also into mindful eating and healthy cooking, she is constantly making delectable Indian dishes that are healthy and made with fresh and seasonal ingredients. She teaches cooking classes both to children and grownups and is an active volunteer at WITS (Wellness In The Schools). In this episode, we discuss: How Anu started The Culture Tree, and the evolution of its programming and vision The value that comes when children understand their heritage culture and its language Why the pandemic skyrocketed this as a global need How listening to the market and her customers helped Anu grow her business How Anu navigated the pandemic and the results of those actions The pillars of the Culture Tree, and some of its offered programs and classes What incredible impact is being made in growing empathy and respect in these children for themselves and each other Website:https://theculturetree.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/CultureTreeNY Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheCultureTreeNY/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theculturetree/

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #145: “Mangoes in Paris”

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 49:22


Usama zooms it in from France on this one where discuss French browns, comedy in Paris, alignment, and other good stuff. Thanks so much for all the love you've been sending in the DMs and on patreon—def write us a review and remember to subscribe across platforms including YouTube and patreon for hours of bonus content!

Conversations with Kenzie
Being South Asian and body positive with Brynta Ponn

Conversations with Kenzie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 42:57


Brynta is one of my favourite content creators and a wonderful friend of mine. On this episode we discuss body positivity (and a little bit of sex!) and how she navigates that with her South Asian family and culture. Follow Brynta here: https://www.instagram.com/bryntstagram/ Produced by Brett Kibbler

Is It Worth It? The Self-Worth Podcast
Self-Worth & Generational Healing w/ Natasha Khawja @PurposeandChai

Is It Worth It? The Self-Worth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 62:10


Welcome back to this lovely guest episode featuring Natasha Khawja from @PurposeandChai! In this episode, we shared: our experiences breaking generational cycles from South-Asian culture how our relationships have played a part in our healing journies how guilt & shame used in South-Asian culture held us back and how we've grown through those setbacks our stories of pursuing creative paths that are often looked down upon in South-Asian families Follow Natasha: Instagram: @purposeandchai Find Natasha's podcast, youtube channel, and email list here: https://www.purposeandchai.com/discover Follow Roshni / BetiGrewUp: Instagram: @BetiGrewUp TikTok: @BetiGrewUp Work with Roshni: https://betigrewup.com/work-with-me/ Learn more about Roshni's story: https://betigrewup.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/betigrewup/support

Democracy and Z
Episode 51: How Colorism Hurts

Democracy and Z

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 31:44


Straight-up racism is bad enough—but for many of us, colorism cuts even deeper. Maybe we were born with skin tones darker or lighter than those around us, making it hard to fit in, feel beautiful, or even to claim our own Blackness. Maybe we've seen how differently society treats people of color, based on skin tone… and how easy it is to turn those “preferences” on ourselves and our peers. It's not something anybody likes to talk about, but we'll never heal from colorism if we don't call it out. In this episode, we share some of our own experiences with shade-prejudice, within the Black community and beyond; consider where it all came from, and how we can grow past it. The podcasters: Cierra Britten (host), University of CincinnatiKylie Bridgeman, Walnut Hills H.S.Enock Sadiki, Aiken H.S.Tasnim Saad, Aiken H.S. Conversation recorded on Zoom Nov. 7, 2021 Learn more: Click here for a report on a recent Pew Research Center study of how colorism affects Latinx Americans. Click here for a look at colorism within the South Asian community. And here's an episode on colorism from the WGBH public affairs program Basic Black, recommended for anyone seeking a greater understanding around this topic.

Nobody Told Me!
Robert Jensen: ...how to deal with the worst the world can throw at us

Nobody Told Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 29:52


Think about any major disaster in the world over the past 30 years and our guest, Robert Jensen, was probably on the scene and personally involved for days, months or even years afterward. Robert is the chairman of Kenyon International Emergency Services, which provides crisis management response to hundreds of businesses and governments. Robert has spent most of his adult life responding to major disasters like the 9/11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina, the 2010 Haitian earthquake and the 2004 South Asian tsunami. He is the author of a gripping new book, "Personal Effects: What Recovering the Dead Teaches Me about Caring for the Living". ****** Thanks to our sponsors of this episode! --> Maxine's Heavenly Cookies: the most delicious plant-based, gluten-free, vegan, low sugar cookies! We love all of their flavors, especially Mint Chocolate Chunk and Chocolate Chocolate Chunk! Go to http://www.maxinesheavenly.com/nobody and use promo code 'nobody' to get 25% off your order. --> Lumineux: plant and mineral hygiene products like Lumineux's famous toothpaste and whitening products are changing the game. They taste just as good and we were wowed by the research into why using their strategy works so well. Just in time for the holidays: enjoy 15% off your first purchase by going to http://www.oralessentials.com and using promo code 'Nobody'. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Poured Over
Kal Penn on YOU CAN'T BE SERIOUS

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 35:01


“I wanted to tell my story in a way that made you feel like you were having a beer with me. And…even though I delve into things like identity and politics and family history and things that things that I'm really excited to share with everybody, I want it to be accessible to people who might disagree with me or might not have experience with the things that I have experiences with.” From the Hollywood to the White House, Kal Penn's careers have been anything but boring; he's just published a very funny and honest memoir called You Can't Be Serious, which covers the work and the people he loves and the lessons he's learned. He joins us on the show to talk about growing up South Asian, stereotyping and that accent, Jhumpa Lahiri's fiction and more. Featured books: You Can't Be Serious by Kal Penn and Interpreter of Maladies and The Namesake, both by Jhumpa Lahiri. Produced/hosted by Miwa Messer and engineered by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Redefining ABCD
Brown Art Network: Challenges of Building a Career in the Creative Space

Redefining ABCD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:50


In this segment of Brown Art Network, Keerthi and Sneha change things up and try something new. In this episode, they talk about their own relationship to creativity, art, and expression and dive into some of the challenges of planning for a career in the creative industry. They break down education and resources they wished they had, how the South Asian community responds to growth in the creative space, how their inner selves (with the way they were raised) affected the perspective of continuing on in creative positions, and the idea of making your passion your career. Finally, they give advice to everyone who is hesitant in pursuing their passion professionally. Reply below in our Q& A section with your thoughts after listening to the episode!

Arthritis Life
What's it like to be a Teenager with Juvenile Arthritis?

Arthritis Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 51:09


Natasha and Cheryl discuss her treatment journey, how her social life was affected by JIA, the importance of diet and stress management in her treatment plan, and why Natasha formed the nonprofit Take a Pain Check.Episode at a glance:Natasha's diagnosis story and early experiences with juvenile idiopathic arthritisDifferent treatments Natasha has tried, including steroid joint injections, methotrexate, biologic medications, nutrition and dietary changes, Ayurvedic medicine, meditation and other lifestyle changesHow Natasha's mother helped support and advocate for her when it felt like “nothing was working” in her treatment planHow Natasha navigates peer pressure to drinkWays Natasha manages stress while living with juvenile idiopathic arthritisThe importance of cultural representation and what it means for Natasha to see other South Asian people in the chronic illness communityThings that bring Natasha joy, including singingNatasha's inspiration for forming the nonprofit Take a Pain CheckThe importance of patient involvement in research and advocacyEpisode SponsorRheumatoid Arthritis Roadmap, a self-paced online course Cheryl created that teaches you how to confidently manage your physical, social and emotional life with rheumatoid arthritis. Episode links:Submit an “Ask me Anything” question to Cheryl in honor of the Arthritis Life Podcast reaching 25,000 downloads! Email at info -at- MyArthritisLife.Net or on the social media links below by Saturday, November 6th.Natasha and Take a Pain Check's channels:ALL RESOURCES AND PODCAST: https://instabio.cc/takeapaincheck  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/takeapaincheck_/Twitter: https://twitter.com/takeapaincheckYoutube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRF07SYaN-9fbatNCKhL08gWebsite: www.takeapaincheck.com   Other orgs mentionedCheryl on Take a Pain Check podcast Cassie & Friends: Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Support & ResourcesResearch projects - JIA option map at University of Ottowa (research)PACER - patients doing reserach on other patients Chronic EileenCheryl's Arthritis Life Pages:Arthritis Life website: https://arthritis.theenthusiasticlife.com/Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/arthritislifeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/arthritis_life_cheryl/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@arthritislifeFacebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/arthritisLIFETwitter: https://twitter.com/realccArthritis Life Podcast Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/arthritislifepodcastandsupportMedical disclaimer: All content found on Arthritis Life public channels was created for generalized informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.Transcript: go to MyArthritisLife.Net for full episode details and a transcript.

Birth Stories in Color
128 | Mother the Mother - Megana Dwarakanath

Birth Stories in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 45:34


Megana knew that she wanted a family, and before meeting her husband, she had even considered taking on the role of parenting without a partner. But soon after moving to a new city, she met her husband; they fell in love and began discussing expanding their family. They both wanted to have two kids before Megana got a bit older and had planned to start trying to conceive after getting married. But their March 2020 wedding was canceled due to the beginnings of the COVID-19 pandemic, leading them to move forward with a small ceremony and begin trying to conceive in May.As a healthcare worker (pediatrician), Megana was aware of the studies around birthing folks in her field having two times the rate of infertility than others. Many of her friends in residency with her had shared their struggles with infertility. With that in mind, she was emotionally prepared to have some struggles of her own with conceiving but was grateful that she was pregnant within three months of trying. The beginning of her pregnancy was layered with many parts. They were going to be moving cross country; she had lost both her grandparents, dealing with the pandemic and also working through the pandemic and didn't fully have care established where they were moving; Megana describes that time as "surreal."Once settled in their new home in Pittsburgh, Megana found an OB practice she trusted. As she continued to work, she also decided to move forward with getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Which at that time, few pregnant people were choosing to move forward with it. Reading and listening to the emerging studies on the vaccine, she elected to get vaccinated at 32 and 36 weeks pregnant, hoping to not only protect herself through work but hopefully be able to pass antibodies off to her baby. Amongst her preparation in that way, she was journaling, reading, and listening to positive birth stories and remained active, running up to her 39th week of pregnancy. Her due date came and went, making Megana uneasy as she knew she was losing time from her maternity leave. Her jobs maternity leave policy would give her 12 weeks, and she had already begun using some time waiting on the arrival of her baby. Taking that into consideration, Megana elected to support her progress with an induction.Megana was induced with two doses of misoprostol, moving her quickly into intense labor. Reviewing all her options and managing the frequency and intensity of her contractions, which had started putting her baby in distress - Megana decided to have an epidural to provide them some rest and allow her body the space it needed to continue to progress. After about an hour and a half of pushing, her daughter was born. Megana did suffer from a 2nd/3rd-degree periclitoral and labial tear, which would impact her in ways she wasn't prepared for.Within her great support village, Megana's sister would be the guiding light in helping her navigate all the new transitions. The reality of how debilitating her tear was, combined with the level of rest she needed and what maternity leave entailed for caring and bonding with her daughter Megana was falling into a postpartum anxiety/depression cycle. With the support of her sister, they established some concrete strategies to guide her through this time. Megana began pelvic floor therapy and found a community of friends and cousins who had also had babies. Within this group, they had similar work schedules and could relate to their day-to-day experiences and their Indian culture.Megana's journey with an extremely short maternity leave due to the American Board of Pediatrics policies has led her to be a driving force for changing maternity leave policy. She  wrote an oped that has changed policies in her department and has a postpartum group for other South Asian women to discuss some of the cultural misogyny and expectations they contend with. Check these essential resources out below.Resources:New York Times Article | a medical career, at a cost: infertility

That's So Hindu
We've forgotten that Hindu teachings have given trans people a status equal to other genders | Anjali Rimi

That's So Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 44:15


In this episode Suhag Shukla speaks with Anjali Rimi, a South Asian, Hindu, Canadian-American woman of trans experience, based in the Bay Area. Anjali is the president and co-founder of Parivar Bay Area, America's only trans-led, trans-centering queer organization. Parivar Bay Area focuses on centering trans-equity and economic justice within the Indian and South Asian diaspora.Parivar Bay AreaParivar Bay Area on FacebookParivar Bay Area on Instagram

Meaningful Marketplace Podcast
#95 South East Asia Fusion in a Jar - Holly Ong & Patricia Lau, Sibeiho

Meaningful Marketplace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 53:39


You always miss the food from your home, no matter where you go. That's exactly what has been the driver for Holly Ong and Patricia Lau, founders of Sibeiho. The Singapore natives who have known each other over 17 years always loved to cook for family and friends. Patricia's husband is an Oregon native, and when they made the move to Oregon seven years ago, they still cooked the same amazing South East Asia dishes for family and new friends. And they love their new home in Oregon. They particularly adore going to the farmers' markets and finding fresh produce and the unusual foods. A trip to the Oregon coast introduced them to the local crab and gave them the idea to make their Singapore dish, chili crabs, using the crab from their newly adopted home. This led to starting a supper club, which blossomed as their reputation for delicious dishes grew. People kept asking for their special home dishes and wondering if they could produce the sauces, or Sambals as they were called back in Singapore, commercially. They kept producing what they could in their kitchen and selling it to their group of friends and soon word of mouth made them popular with the public. COVID stopped their supper club sales but their delivery business kept them afloat. However some customers kept asking if they could buy the Sambals in a store and that led to a conversation with our host, Sarah Masoni and her team at the Food Innovation Center, Oregon State University, about how to stabilize the product for commercialization. Holly and Pat attended a class at the center on food processing and production. They got into the science of giving a food product shelf life while not losing the flavor that made it popular in the first place; every food entrepreneurs' challenge. They worked in the Center's kitchen with Mike Adams who is incredibly experience in working out the magic formulas for any food item. And so birth was given to their growing business of selling the enticing flavors from China, Malay, India and Peranakan that their line of Sambals give to every dish you cook. Of course they offer their own incredible recipes to prepare authentic South Asian dishes on their website. Currently, the company sells online and out of their retail store. There's only one way to experience it: Try it! When you do, you'll understand the Chinese word, Sibeiho (See-Bay-Ho) which in English roughly means something very, very good. And their company also is very, very good indeed. "Masoni and Marshall the meaningful Marketplace" with your hosts Sarah Masoni and Sarah Marshall We record the "the Meaningful Marketplace" inside NedSpace in the Bigfoot Podcast Studio in beautiful downtown Portland. Audio engineer, mixer and podcast editor is Allon Beausoleil Show logo was designed by Anton Kimball of Kimball Design Website was designed by Cameron Grimes Production assistant is Chelsea Lancaster 10% of gross revenue at Startup Radio Network goes to support women entrepreneurs in developing countries thru kiva.org/lender/markgrimes

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Geopolitics in the Middle East

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Steven A. Cook, Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at CFR, leads a conversation on geopolitics in the Middle East.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you want to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Today's topic is geopolitics in the Middle East. Our speaker was supposed to be Sanam Vakil, but she had a family emergency. So we're delighted to have our very own Steven Cook here to discuss this important topic. Dr. Cook is the Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies, and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of several books, including False Dawn; The Struggle for Egypt, which won the 2012 Gold Medal from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; and Ruling But Not Governing. And he's working on yet another book entitled The End of Ambition: America's Past, Present, and Future in the Middle East. So keep an eye out for that in the next year or so. He's a columnist at Foreign Policy magazine and contributor and commentator on a bunch of other outlets. Prior to coming to CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. So, Dr. Cook, thank you for being with us. I thought you could just—I'm going to give you a soft question here, to talk about the geopolitical relations among state and nonstate actors in the Middle East. And you can take that in whatever direction you would like. COOK: Well, thanks so much, Irina. It's a great pleasure to be with you. Good afternoon to everybody who's out there who's on an afternoon time zone, good morning to those who may still be in the evening, and good evening to those who may be somewhere where it's the evening. It's very nice to be with you. As Irina mentioned, and as I'm sure it's plenty evident, I am not Sanam Vakil, but I'm happy to step in for her and offer my thoughts on the geopolitics of the Middle East. It's a small topic. That question that Irina asked was something that I certainly could handle effectively in fifteen to twenty minutes. But before I get into the details of what's going on in the region, I thought I would offer some just general comments about the United States in the Middle East. Because, as it turns out, I had the opportunity last night to join a very small group of analysts with a very senior U.S. government official to talk precisely about the United States in the Middle East. And it was a very, very interesting conversation, because despite the fact that there has been numerous news reporting and analytic pieces about how the United States is deemphasizing the Middle East, this official made it very, very clear that that was practically impossible at this time. And this was, I think, a reasonable position to take. There has been a lot recently, in the last recent years, about withdrawing from the region, from retrenchment from the region, reducing from the region, realignment from the region. All those things actually mean different things. But analysts have essentially used them to mean that the United States should deprioritize the Middle East. And it seems to me that the problem in the Middle East has not necessarily been the fact that we are there and that we have goals there. It's that the goals in the region and the resources Washington uses to achieve those goals need to be realigned to address things that are actually important to the United States. In one sense that sound eminently reasonable. We have goals, we have resources to meet those goals, and we should devote them to—and if we can't, we should reassess what our goals are or go out and find new resources. That sounds eminently reasonable. But that's not the way Washington has worked over the course of the last few decades when it comes to the Middle East. In many ways, the United States has been overly ambitious. And it has led to a number of significant failures in the region. In an era when everything and anything is a vital interest, then nothing really is. And this seems to be the source of our trouble. For example, when we get into trying to fix the politics of other countries, we're headed down the wrong road. And I don't think that there's been enough real debate in Washington or, quite frankly, in the country about what's important in the Middle East, and why we're there, and what we're trying to achieve in the Middle East. In part, this new book that I'm writing called the End of Ambition, which, as Irina pointed out, will be out hopefully in either late 2022 or early 2023, tries to answer some of these questions. There is a way for the United States to be constructive in the Middle East, but what we've done over the course of the last twenty years has made that task much, much harder. And it leads us, in part, to this kind of geostrategic picture or puzzle that I'm about to lay out for you. So let me get into some of the details. And I'm obviously not going to take you from Morocco all the way to Iran, although I could if I had much, much more time because there's a lot going on in a lot of places. But not all of those places are of critical importance to the United States. So I'll start and I'll pick and choose from that very, very large piece of geography. First point: There have been some efforts to deescalate in a region that was in the middle of or on the verge of multiple conflicts. There has been a dialogue between the Saudis and the Iranians, under the auspices of the Iraqis, of all people. According to the Saudis this hasn't yielded very much, but they are continuing the conversation. One of the ways to assess the success or failure of a meeting is the fact that there's going to be another meeting. And there are going to be other meetings between senior Iranian and Saudi officials. I think that that's good. Egyptians and Turks are talking. Some of you who don't follow these issues as closely may not remember that Turkey and Egypt came close to trading blows over Libya last summer. And they pulled back as a result of concerted diplomacy on the part of the European Union, as well as the Egyptian ability to actually surge a lot of force to its western border. Those two countries are also talking, in part under the auspices of the Iraqis. Emiratis and Iranians are talking. That channel opened up in 2019 after the Iranians attacked a very significant—two very significant oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, sort of scaring the Emiratis, especially since the Trump administration did not respond in ways that the Emiratis or the Saudis had been expecting. The Qataris and the Egyptians have repaired their relations. The Arab world, for better or for worse, is moving to reintegrate Syria into is ranks. Not long after King Abdullah of Jordan was in the United States, he and Bashar al-Assad shared a phone call to talk about the opening of the border between Jordan and Syria and to talk about, among other things, tourism to the two countries. The hope is that this de-escalation, or hope for de-escalation coming from this dialogue, will have a salutary effect on conflicts in Yemen, in Syria, in Libya, and Iraq. Thus far, it hasn't in Yemen, in particular. It hasn't in Syria. But in Libya and Iraq, there have been some improvements to the situation. All of this remains quite fragile. These talks can be—can break off at any time under any circumstances. Broader-scale violence can return to Libya at any time. And the Iraqi government still doesn't control its own territory. Its sovereignty is compromised, not just by Iran but also by Turkey. But the fact that a region that was wound so tight and that seemed poised to even deepen existing conflicts and new ones to break out, for all of these different parties to be talking—some at the behest of the United States, some entirely of their own volition—is, I think, a relatively positive sign. You can't find anyone who's more—let's put it this way, who's darker about developments in the Middle East than me. And I see some positive signs coming from this dialogue. Iran, the second big issue on the agenda. Just a few hours ago, the Iranians indicated that they're ready to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. This is sort of a typical Iranian negotiating tactic, to push issues to the brink and then to pull back and demonstrate some pragmatism so that people will thank for them for their pragmatism. This agreement to go back to the negotiating table keeps them on decent terms with the Europeans. It builds on goodwill that they have developed as a result of their talks with Saudi Arabia. And it puts Israel somewhat on the defensive, or at least in an awkward position with the Biden administration, which has very much wanted to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. What comes out of these negotiations is extremely hard to predict. This is a new government in Iran. It is certainly a harder line than its predecessor. Some analysts believe that precisely because it is a hardline government it can do the negotiation. But we'll just have to see. All the while this has been going on, the Iranians have been proceeding with their nuclear development, and Israel is continuing its shadow campaign against the Iranians in Syria, sometimes in Iraq, in Iran itself. Although, there's no definitive proof, yesterday Iranian gas stations, of all things, were taken offline. There's some suspicion that this was the Israelis showing the Iranians just how far and deep they are into Iranian computer systems. It remains unclear how the Iranians will retaliate. Previously they have directed their efforts to Israeli-linked shipping in and around the Gulf of Oman. Its conventional responses up until this point have been largely ineffective. The Israelis have been carrying on a fairly sophisticated air campaign against the Iranians in Syria, and the Iranians have not been able to mount any kind of effective response. Of course, this is all against the backdrop of the fact that the Iranians do have the ability to hold much of the Israeli population hostage via Hezbollah and its thousands of rockets and missiles. So you can see how this is quite worrying, and an ongoing concern for everybody in the region, as the Israelis and Iranians take part in this confrontation. Let me just continue along the line of the Israelis for a moment and talk about the Arab-Israeli conflict, something that has not been high on the agenda of the Biden administration, it hasn't been high on the agenda of many countries in the region. But since the signing of the Abraham Accords in September 2020, there have been some significant developments. The normalization as a result of the Abraham Accords continues apace. Recently in the Emirates there was a meeting of ministers from Israel, the UAE, Morocco, Bahrain, and Sudan. This is the first kind of face-to-face meeting of government officials from all of these countries. Now, certainly the Israelis and the Emiratis have been meeting quite regularly, and the Israelis and the Bahrainis have been meeting quite regularly. But these were broader meetings of Cabinet officials from all of the Abraham Accords countries coming together in the United Arab Emirates for talks. Rather extraordinary. Something that thirteen months—in August 2020 was unimaginable, and today is something that doesn't really make—it doesn't really make the headlines. The Saudis are actually supportive of the normalization process, but they're not yet willing to take that step. And they're not willing to take that step because of the Palestinian issue. And it remains a sticking point. On that issue, there was a lot of discussion after the formation of a new Israeli government last June under the leadership, first, of Naftali Bennett, who will then hand the prime ministership over to his partner, Yair Lapid, who are from different parties. That this was an Israeli government that could do some good when it comes to the Palestinian arena, that it was pragmatic, that it would do things that would improve the lives of Palestinians, whether in Gaza or the West Bank, and seek greater cooperation with both the United States and the Palestinian authority toward that end. And that may in fact turn out to be the case. This government has taken a number of steps in that direction, including family reunification, so that if a Palestinian on the West Bank who is married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel, the Palestinian in the West Bank can live with the family in Israel. And a number of other things. But it should also be clear to everybody that despite a kind of change in tone from the Israeli prime ministry, there's not that much of a change in terms of policy. In fact, in many ways Prime Minister Bennett is to the right of his predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu. And Yair Lapid, who comes from a centrist party, is really only centrist in terms of Israeli politics. He is—in any other circumstances would be a kind of right of center politician. And I'll just point out that in recent days the Israeli government has declared six Palestinian NGOs—long-time NGOs—terrorist organizations, approved three thousand new housing units in the West Bank, and worked very, very hard to prevent the United States from opening a consulate in East Jerusalem to serve the Palestinians. That consulate had been there for many, many, many years. And it was closed under the Trump administration when the U.S. Embassy was moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The Biden administration would like to reopen that consulate. And the Israeli government is adamantly opposed. In the end, undoubtably Arab governments are coming to terms with Israel, even beyond the Abraham Accords countries. Egypt's flag carrier, Egyptair, announced flights to Tel Aviv. This is the first time since 1979. You could—you could fly between Cairo and Tel Aviv, something that I've done many, many times. If you were in Egypt, you'd have to go and find an office that would sell you a ticket to something called Air Sinai, that did not have regular flights. Only had flights vaguely whenever, sometimes. It was an Egyptair plane, stripped of its livery, staffed by Egyptair pilots and staff, stripped of anything that said Egyptair. Now, suddenly Egyptair is flying direct flights to Tel Aviv. And El-Al, Israel's national airline, and possibly one other, will be flying directly to Cairo. And there is—and that there is talk of economic cooperation. Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi in Sharm al-Sheikh not long ago. That was the first meeting of Israeli leaders—first public meeting of Israeli leaders and Egyptian leaders in ten years. So there does seem to be an openness on the part of Arab governments to Israel. As far as populations in these countries, they don't yet seem to be ready for normalization, although there has been some traffic between Israel and the UAE, with Emiratis coming to see Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and so on and so forth. But there are very, very few Emiratis. And there are a lot of Egyptians. So as positive as that all is, this is—this has not been a kind of broad acceptance among the population in the Arab world for Israel's legitimate existence. And the kind of issue du jour, great-power competition. This is on everybody's lips in Washington, D.C.—great-power competition, great-power competition. And certainly, the Middle East is likely to be an arena of great-power competition. It has always been an arena of great-power competition. For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has competitors in the region. And let me start with Russia, because there's been so much discussion of China, but Russia is the one that has been actively engaged militarily in the region in a number of places. Vladimir Putin has parlayed his rescue of Hafez al-Assad into influence in the region, in an arc that stretches from NATO ally Turkey, all the way down through the Levant and through Damascus, then even stretching to Jerusalem where Israeli governments and the Russian government have cooperated and coordinated in Syria, into Cairo, and then into at least the eastern portion of Libya, where the Russians have supported a Qaddafist general named Khalifa Haftar, who used to be an employee of the CIA, in his bid for power in Libya. And he has done so by providing weaponry to Haftar, as well as mercenaries to fight and support him. That episode may very well be over, although there's every reason to believe that Haftar is trying to rearm himself and carry on the conflict should the process—should the political process in Libya break down. Russia has sold more weapons to Egypt in the last few years than at any other time since the early 1970s. They have a defense agreement with Saudi Arabia. It's not clear what that actually means, but that defense agreement was signed not that long after the United States' rather chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which clearly unnerved governments in the Middle East. So Russia is active, it's influential, its militarily engaged, and it is seeking to advance its interests throughout the region. I'll point out that its presence in North Africa is not necessarily so much about North Africa, but it's also about Europe. Its bid in Libya is important because its ally controls the eastern portion of Libya, where most of Libya's light, sweet crude oil is located. And that is the largest—the most significant reserves of oil in all of Africa. So it's important as an energy play for the Russians to control parts of North Africa, and right on Russia's—right on Europe's front doorstep. China. China's the largest investor and single largest trading partner with most of the region. And it's not just energy related. We know how dependent China is on oil from the Gulf, but it's made big investments in Algeria, in Egypt, the UAE, and in Iran. The agreement with Iran, a twenty-five-year agreement, coming at a time when the Iranians were under significant pressure from the United States, was regarded by many in Washington as an effort on the part of the Chinese to undercut the United States, and undercut U.S. policy in the region. I think it was, in part, that. I think it was also in part the fact that China is dependent in part on Iranian oil and did not want the regime there to collapse, posing a potential energy crisis for China and the rest of the world. It seems clear to me, at least, that the Chinese do not want to supplant the United States in the region. I don't think they look at the region in that way. And if they did, they probably learned the lesson of the United States of the last twenty-five years, which has gotten itself wrapped around the axle on a variety of issues that were unnecessary and sapped the power of the United States. So they don't want to get more deeply involved in the region. They don't want to take sides in conflicts. They don't want to take sides in the Arab-Israeli conflict. They don't take sides in the conflict between the United States and Iran, or the competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran. They want to benefit from the region, whether through investment or through extraction, and the security umbrella that the United States provides in the region. I'm not necessarily so sure that that security umbrella needs to be so expensive and so extensive for the United States to achieve its goals. But nevertheless, and for the time being at least, we will be providing that security umbrella in the region, from which the Chinese will benefit. I think, just to close on this issue of great-power competition. And because of time, I'm leaving out another big player, or emerging player in the region, which is India. I'm happy to talk about that in Q&A. But my last point is that, going back to the United States, countries in the region and leaders in the region are predisposed towards the United States. The problem is, is that they are very well-aware of the political polarization in this country. They're very well-aware of the political dysfunction in this country. They're very well-aware of the incompetence that came with the invasion of Iraq, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, or any number of disasters that have unfolded here in the United States. And it doesn't look, from where they sit in Abu Dhabi, in Cairo, in Riyadh, and in other places, that the United States has staying power, the will to lead, and the interest in remaining in the Middle East. And thus, they have turned to alternatives. Those alternatives are not the same as the United States, but they do provide something. I mean, particularly when it comes to the Chinese it is investment, it's economic advantages, without the kind of trouble that comes with the United States. Trouble from the perspective of leaders, so that they don't have to worry about human rights when they deal with the Chinese, because the Chinese aren't interested in human rights. But nevertheless, they remain disclosed toward the United States and want to work with the United States. They just don't know whether we're going to be there over the long term, given what is going on in the United States. I'll stop there. And I look forward to your questions and comments. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Steven, that was fantastic. Thank you very much. We're going to now to all of you for your questions. So the first raised hand comes from Jonas Truneh. And I don't think I pronounced that correctly, so you can correct me. Q: Yeah, no, that's right. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you, Dr. Cook, for your talk. I'm from UCL, University College London, in London. COOK: So it is—(off mic). Q: Indeed, it is. Yeah. That's right. COOK: Great. Q: So you touched on it there somewhat particularly with great-power competition, but so my question is related to the current energy logic in the Middle East. The Obama administration perhaps thought that the shale revolution allowed a de-prioritization, if I'm allowed to use that word, of the Middle East. And that was partly related to the pivot to Asia. So essentially does the U.S. still regard itself as the primary guarantor of energy security in the Persian Gulf? And if so, would the greatest beneficiary, as I think you indicated, would that not be China? And is that a case of perverse incentives? Is there much the U.S. can do about it? COOK: Well, it depends on who you ask, right? And it's a great question. I think that the—one of the things that—one of the ways in which the Obama administration sought to deprioritize and leave the region was through the shale revolution. I mean, the one piece of advice that he did take from one of his opponents in 2002—2008, which was to drill, baby, drill. And the United States did. I would not say that this is something that is specific to the Obama administration. If you go back to speeches of presidents way back—but I won't even go that far back. I'll go to George W. Bush in 2005 State of the Union addressed, talked all about energy independence from the Middle East. This may not actually be in much less the foreseeable future, but in really—in a longer-term perspective, it may be harder to do. But it is politically appealing. The reason why I say it depends on who you ask, I think that there are officials in the United States who say: Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. But when the Iranians attacked those two oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, that temporarily took off 50 percent of supply off the markets—good thing the Saudis have a lot stored away—the United States didn't really respond. The president of the United States said: I'm waiting for a call from Riyadh. That forty years of stated American policy was, like, it did not exist. The Carter doctrine and the Reagan corollary to the Carter doctrine suddenly didn't exist. And the entirety of the American foreign policy community shrugged their shoulders and said: We're not going to war on behalf of MBS. I don't think we would have been going to war on behalf of MBS. We would have been ensuring the free flow of energy supplies out of the region, which is something that we have been committed to doing since President Carter articulated the Carter doctrine, and then President Reagan added his corollary to it. I think that there are a number of quite perverse incentives associated with this. And I think that you're right. The question is whether the competition from China outweighs our—I'm talking about “our”—the United States' compelling interest in a healthy global economy. And to the extent that our partners in Asia, whether it's India, South Korea, Japan, and our important trading partner in China, are dependent upon energy resources from the Gulf, and we don't trust anybody to ensure the free flow of energy resources from the Gulf, it's going to be on us to do it. So we are kind of hammered between that desire to have a healthy global economy as being—and being very wary of the Chinese. And the Chinese, I think, are abundantly aware of it, and have sought to take advantage of it. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, which got an up-vote, from Charles Ammon, who is at Pennsylvania State University. And I think this goes to what you were building on with the great-power competition: What interests does India have in the Middle East? And how is it increasing its involvement in the region? COOK: So India is—imports 60 percent of its oil from the region. Fully 20 percent of it from Saudi Arabia, another 20 percent of it from Iran, and then the other 20 percent from other sources. So that's one thing. That's one reason why India is interested in the Middle East. Second, there are millions and millions of Indians who work in the Middle East. The Gulf region is a region that basically could not run without South Asian expatriate labor, most of which comes from India—on everything. Third, India has made considerable headway with countries like the United Arab Emirates, as well as Saudi Arabia, in counterextremism cooperation. This has come at the expense of Pakistan, but as relations between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and relations between Pakistan and the UAE soured in recent years, the Indians have been able to take advantage of that. And Indian leaders have hammered away at the common interest that India and leaders in the region have in terms of countering violent extremism. And then finally, India and Israel have quite an extraordinary relationship, both in the tech field as well as in the defense area. Israel is a supplier to India. And the two of them are part of a kind of global network of high-tech powerhouse that have either, you know, a wealth of startups or very significant investment from the major tech players in the world. Israel—Microsoft just announced a huge expansion in Israel. And Israeli engineers and Indian engineers collaborate on a variety of projects for these big tech companies. So there's a kind of multifaceted Indian interest in the region, and the region's interest in India. What India lacks that the Chinese have is a lot more capacity. They don't have the kind of wherewithal to bring investment and trade in the region in the other direction. But nevertheless, it's a much more important player than it was in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Curran Flynn, who has a raised hand. Q: How do you envision the future of Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia politics for the next thirty years? Ethiopia controls the Nile dam projects. And could this dispute lead to a war? And what is the progress with the U.S. in mediating the talks between the three countries? COOK: Thank you. FASKIANOS: And that is coming from the King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia. COOK: Fabulous. So that's more than the evening. It's actually nighttime there. I think that the question of the great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is really an important one, and it's something that has not gotten as much attention as it should. And for those of you who are not familiar, in short the Ethiopians have been building a massive dam on the Blue Nile, which is a tributary to the Nile. And that if—when competed, threatens the water supply to Egypt, a country of 110 million people that doesn't get a lot of rainfall. Ethiopia, of course, wants to dam the Nile in order to produce hydroelectric power for its own development, something that Egypt did when it dammed the Nile River to build the Aswan High Dam, and crated Lake Nasser behind it. The Egyptians are very, very concerned. This is an existential issue for them. And there have been on and off negotiations, but the negotiations aren't really about the issues. They're talks about talks about talks. And they haven't gotten—they haven't gotten very far. Now, the Egyptians have been supported by the Sudanese government, after the Sudanese government had been somewhat aligned with the Ethiopian government. The Trump administration put itself squarely behind the Egyptian government, but Ethiopia's also an important partner of the United States in the Horn of Africa. The Egyptians have gone about signing defense cooperation agreements with a variety of countries around Ethiopia's borders. And of course, Ethiopia is engaged in essentially what's a civil war. This is a very, very difficult and complicated situation. Thus far, there doesn't seem to be an easy solution the problem. Now, here's the rub, if you talk to engineers, if you talk to people who study water, if you talk to people who know about dams and the flow of water, the resolution to the problem is actually not that hard to get to. The problem is that the politics and nationalism have been engaged on both sides of the issue, making it much, much more difficult to negotiate an equitable solution to the problem. The Egyptians have said in the past that they don't really have an intention of using force, despite the fact of this being an existential issue. But there's been somewhat of a shift in their language on the issue. Which recently they've said if red lines were crossed, they may be forced to intervene. Intervene how? What are those red lines? They haven't been willing to define them, which should make everybody nervous. The good news is that Biden administration has appointed an envoy to deal with issues in the Horn of Africa, who has been working very hard to try to resolve the conflict. I think the problem here however is that Ethiopia, now distracted by a conflict in the Tigray region, nationalism is running high there, has been—I don't want to use the word impervious—but not as interested in finding a negotiated solution to the problem than it might have otherwise been in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Bob Pauly, who's a professor of international development at the University of Southern Mississippi. It got three up-votes. What would you identify as the most significant likely short and longer-term effects of Turkey's present domestic economic and political challenges on President Erdogan's strategy and policy approaches to the Middle East, and why? COOK: Oh, well, that is a very, very long answer to a very, very interesting question. Let's see what happens in 2023. President Erdogan is facing reelection. His goal all along has been to reelected on the one hundredth anniversary of the republic, and to demonstrate how much he has transformed Turkey in the image of the Justice and Development Party, and moved it away from the institutions of the republic. Erdogan may not make it to 2023. I don't want to pedal in conspiracy theories or anything like that, but he doesn't look well. There are large numbers of videos that have surfaced of him having difficulties, including one famous one from this past summer when he was offering a Ramadan greeting on Turkish television to supporters of the Justice and Development Party, and he seemed to fade out and slur his words. This is coupled with reports trickling out of Ankara about the lengths to which the inner circle has gone to shield real health concerns about Erdogan from the public. It's hard to really diagnose someone from more than six thousand miles away, but I think it's a scenario that policymakers in Washington need to think seriously about. What happens if Erdogan is incapacitated or dies before 2023? That's one piece. The second piece is, well, what if he makes it and he's reelected? And I think in any reasonable observer sitting around at the end of 2021 looking forward to 2023 would say two things: One, you really can't predict Turkish politics this far out, but if Turkish elections were held today and they were free and fair, the Justice and Development Party would get below 30 percent. Still more than everybody else. And Erdogan would have a real fight on his hands to get reelected, which he probably would be. His approaches to his domestic challenges and his approaches to the region are really based on what his current political calculations are at any given moment. So his needlessly aggressive posture in the Eastern Mediterranean was a function of the fact that he needed to shore up his nationalist base. Now that he finds himself quite isolated in the world, the Turks have made overtures to Israel, to the UAE, to Saudi Arabia. They're virtually chasing the Egyptians around the Eastern Mediterranean to repair their relationship. Because without repairing these relationships the kind of investment that is necessary to try to help revive the Turkish economy—which has been on the skids for a number of years—is going to be—is going to be more difficult. There's also another piece of this, which is the Middle East is a rather lucrative arms market. And during the AKP era, the Turks have had a significant amount of success further developing their defense industrial base, to the point that now their drones are coveted. Now one of the reasons for a Saudi-Turkish rapprochement is that the United States will not sell Saudi Arabia the drones it wants, for fear that they will use them in Yemen. And the Saudis are looking for drones elsewhere. That's either China or Turkey. And Turkey's seem to work really, really well, based on experience in Syria, Libya, and Nagorno-Karabakh. So what—Turkish foreign policy towards the region has become really dependent upon what Erdogan's particularly political needs are. There's no strategic approach to the region. There is a vision of Turkey as a leader of the region, of a great power in its own right, as a leader of the Muslim world, as a Mediterranean power as well. But that's nothing new. Turkish Islamists have been talking about these things for quite some time. I think it's important that there's been some de-escalation. I don't think that all of these countries now love each other, but they see the wisdom of pulling back from—pulling back from the brink. I don't see Turkey's position changing dramatically in terms of its kind of reintegration into the broader region before 2023, at the least. FASKIANOS: Great. Let's go next to, raised hand, to Caleb Sanner. And you need to unmute yourself. Q: Hello, my name is Caleb. I'm from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. So, Dr. Cook, you had mentioned in passing how China has been involved economically in North Africa. And my question would be, how is the U.S. taking that? And what are we doing, in a sense, to kind of counter that? I know it's not a military advancement in terms of that, but I've seen what it has been doing to their economies—North Africa's economies. And, yeah, what's the U.S. stance on that? COOK: Well, I think the United States is somewhat detached from this question of North Africa. North Africa's long been a—with the exception of Egypt, of course. And Egypt, you know, is not really North Africa. Egypt is something in and of itself. That China is investing heavily in Egypt. And the Egyptian position is: Please don't ask us to choose between you and the Chinese, because we're not going to make that choice. We think investment from all of these places is good for—is good for Egypt. And the other places where China is investing, and that's mostly in Algeria, the United States really doesn't have close ties to Algeria. There was a tightening of the relationship after the attacks on New York and Washington in 2001, recognizing that the Algerians—extremist groups in Algerian that had been waging war against the state there over the course of the 1990s were part and parcel of this new phenomenon of global jihad. And so there has been a security relationship there. There has been some kind of big infrastructure kind of investment in that country, with big companies that build big things, like GE and others, involved in Algeria. But the United States isn't helping to develop ports or industrial parks or critical infrastructure like bridges and airports in the same way that the Chinese have been doing throughout the region. And in Algeria, as well as in Egypt, the Chinese are building a fairly significant industrial center in the Suez Canal zone, of all places. And the United States simply doesn't have an answer to it, other than to tell our traditional partners in the region, don't do it. But unless we show up with something to offer them, I'm afraid that Chinese investment is going to be too attractive for countries that are in need of this kind of investment. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to a written question from Kenneth Mayers, who is at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. In your opinion, what would a strategic vision based on a far-sighted understanding of both resources and U.S. goals—with regard to peace and security, prosperity and development, and institutions and norms and values such as human rights—look like in the Middle East and North Africa? COOK: Well, it's a great question. And I'm tempted to say you're going to have to read the last third of my new book in order to get the—in order to get the answer. I think but let me start with something mentioned about norms and values. I think that one of the things that has plagued American foreign policy over the course of not just the last twenty years, but in the post-World War II era all the way up through the present day, you see it very, very clearly with President Biden, is that trying to incorporate American values and norms into our approach to the region has been extraordinarily difficult. And what we have a history of doing is the thing that is strategically tenable, but morally suspect. So what I would say is, I mean, just look at what's happened recently. The president of the United States studiously avoided placing a telephone call to the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The Egyptians, as many know, have a terrible record on human rights, particularly since President Sisi came to power. Arrests of tens of thousands of people in the country, the torture of many, many people, the killings of people. And the president during his campaign said that he was going to give no blank checks to dictators, including to Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And then what happened in May? What happened in May was that fighting broke out between Israel and Hamas and others in the Gaza Strip, a brutal eleven-day conflict. And Egypt stepped up and provided a way out of the conflict through its good offices. And that prompted the United States to—the president of the United States—to have two phone calls in those eleven days with the Egyptian leader. And now the United States is talking about Egypt as a constructive partner that's helping to stabilize the region. Sure, the administration suspended $130 million of Egypt's annual—$130 million Egypt's annual allotment of $1.3 billion. But that is not a lot. Egypt got most of—most of its military aid. As I said, strategically tenable, morally suspect. I'm not quite sure how we get out of that. But what I do know, and I'll give you a little bit of a preview of the last third of the book—but I really do want you to buy it when it's done—is that the traditional interests of the United States in the Middle East are changing. And I go through a kind of quasi, long, somewhat tortured—but very, very interesting—discussion of the origins of our interests, and how they are changing, and how we can tell they are changing. And that is to say that the free flow of energy resources may not be as important to the United States in the next twenty-five years as it was over the course of the previous fifty or sixty years. That helping to ensure Israeli security, which has been axiomatic for the United States, eh, I'd say since the 1960s, really, may not be as important as Israel develops its diplomatic relations with its neighbors, that has a GDP per capita that's on par with the U.K., and France, and other partners in Europe, a country that clearly can take care of itself, that is a driver of technology and innovation around the globe. And that may no longer require America's military dominance in the region. So what is that we want to be doing? How can we be constructive? And I think the answers are in things that we hadn't really thought of too systematically in the past. What are the things that we're willing to invest in an defend going forward? Things like climate change, things like migration, things like pandemic disease. These are things that we've talked about, but that we've never been willing to invest in the kind of the resources. Now there are parts of the Middle East that during the summer months are in-habitable. That's going to produce waves of people looking for places to live that are inhabitable. What do we do about that? Does that destabilize the Indian subcontinent? Does it destabilize Europe? Does it destabilize North Africa? These are all questions that we haven't yet answered. But to the extent that we want to invest in, defend and sacrifice for things like climate, and we want to address the issue—related issue of migration, and we want to deal with the issue of disease and other of these kind of functional global issues in the Middle East is better not just for us and Middle Easterners, but also in terms of our strategic—our great-power competition in the region. These are not things that the Chinese and the Russians are terribly interested in, despite the fact that the Chinese may tell you they are. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Ahmuan Williams, with a raised hand, at the University of Oklahoma. COOK: Oklahoma. Q: Hi. And thank you for being here. You kind of talked about the stabilization of northern Africa and the Middle East. And just a few days ago the Sudanese government—and they still haven't helped capture the parliamentarian there—have recycled back into a military—somewhat of military rule. And it's been since 2005 since the end of their last civil war, which claimed millions of innocent civilians through starvation and strife and, you know, the lack of being able to get humanitarian aid. There was also a huge refugee crisis there, a lot of people who evacuated Sudan. How's that going to impact the Middle East and the American take to Middle East and northern Africa policy, especially now that the Security Council is now considering this and is trying to determine what we should do? COOK: It's a great question. And I think that, first, let's be clear. There was a coup d'état in Sudan. The military overthrew a transitional government on the eve of having to hand over the government to civilians. And they didn't like it. There's been tension that's been brewing in Sudan for some time. Actually, an American envoy, our envoy to East Africa and Africa more generally, a guy named Jeff Feltman, was in Khartoum, trying to kind of calm the tension, to get the two sides together, and working to avert a coup. And the day after he left, the military moved. That's not—that doesn't reflect the fact that the United States gave a blessing for the military to overthrow this government. I think what it does, though, and it's something that I think we all need to keep in mind, it demonstrates the limits of American power in a variety of places around the world. That we don't have all the power in the world to prevent things from happening when people, like the leaders of the Sudanese military, believe that they have existential issues that are at stake. Now, what's worry about destabilization in Sudan is, as you point out, there was a civil war there, there was the creation of a new country there, potential for—if things got really out of hand—refugee flows into Egypt, from Egypt across the Sanai Peninsula into Israel. One of the things people are unaware of is the large number of Sudanese or Eritreans and other Africans who have sought refuge in Israel, which has created significant economic and social strains in that country. So it's a big deal. Thus far, it seems we don't—that the U.S. government doesn't know exactly what's happening there. There are protesters in the streets demanding democracy. It's very unclear what the military is going to do. And it's very unclear what our regional allies and how they view what's happening. What Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, what Saudi Arabia, what Israel—which Sudan is an Abraham Accords country now—what they are doing. How they view the coup as positive or negative will likely impact how effective the United States can be in trying to manage this situation. But I suspect that we're just going to have to accommodate ourselves to whatever outcome the Sudanese people and the Sudanese military come to, because I don't think we have a lot of—we don't have a lot of tools there to make everybody behave. FASKIANOS: OK. So I'm going to take the next question from Elena Murphy, who is a junior at Syracuse University's Maxwell School. And she's a diplomatic intern at the Kurdistan Regional Government's Representation in the United States. COOK: That's cool. FASKIANOS: That's very cool. So as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional hegemony has affected Erdogan's domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors policy? COOK: Great. Can I see that? Because that's a long question. FASKIANOS: Yeah, it's a long question. It's got an up-vote. Third one down. COOK: Third one down. Elena, as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism—I'm sorry, I'm going to have to read it again. How much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional has affected Erdogan's both domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors? OK. Great. So let us set aside the term “neo-Ottomanism” for now. Because neo-Ottomanism actually—it does mean something, but people have often used the term neo-Ottomanism to describe policies of the Turkish government under President Erdogan that they don't like. And so let's just talk about the way in which the Turkish government under President Erdogan views the region and views what Turkey's rightful place should be. And I think the Ottomanism piece is important, because the kind of intellectual framework which the Justice and Development Party, which is Erdogan's party, views the world, sees Turkey as—first of all, it sees the Turkish Republic as a not-so-legitimate heir to the Ottoman Empire. That from their perspective, the natural order of things would have been the continuation of the empire in some form or another. And as a result, they believe that Turkey's natural place is a place of leadership in the region for a long time. Even before the Justice and Development Party was founded in 2001, Turkey's earlier generation of Islamists used to savage the Turkish leadership for its desire to be part of the West, by saying that this was kind of unnatural, that they were just merely aping the West, and the West was never actually going to accept Turkey. Which is probably true. But I think that the Justice and Development Party, after a period of wanting to become closer to the West, has turned its attention towards the Middle East, North Africa, and the Muslim world more generally. And in that, it sees itself, the Turks see themselves as the natural leaders in the region. They believe they have a cultural affinity to the region as a result of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, and they very much can play this role of leader. They see themselves as one of the kind of few real countries in the region, along with Egypt and Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the rest are sort of ephemeral. Needless to say, big countries in the Arab world—like Egypt, like Saudi Arabia—don't welcome the idea of Turkey as a leader of the region. They recognize Turkey as a very big and important country, but not a leader of the region. And this is part of that friction that Turkey has experienced with its neighbors, after an earlier iteration of Turkish foreign policy, in which—one of the earliest iterations of Turkish foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party which was called no problems with neighbors. In which Turkey, regardless of the character of the regimes, wanted to have good relations with its neighbors. It could trade with those neighbors. And make everybody—in the process, Turkey could be a driver of economic development in the region, and everybody can be basically wealthy and happy. And it didn't really work out that way, for a variety of reasons that we don't have enough time for. Let's leave it at the fact that Turkey under Erdogan—and a view that is shared by many—that Turkey should be a leader of the region. And I suspect that if Erdogan were to die, if he were unable to stand for election, if the opposition were to win, that there would still be elements of this desire to be a regional leader in a new Turkish foreign policy. FASKIANOS: Steven, thank you very much. This was really terrific. We appreciate your stepping in at the eleventh hour, taking time away from your book. For all of you— COOK: I'm still not Sanam. FASKIANOS: (Laughs.) I know, but you were an awesome replacement. So you can follow Steven Cook on Twitter at @stevenacook. As I said at the beginning too, he is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine. So you can read his work there, as well as, of course, on CFR.org, all of the commentary, analysis, op-eds, congressional testimony are there for free. So I hope you will follow him and look after his next book. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday November 3, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. And stay well, stay safe, and thank you, again. COOK: Bye, everyone. FASKIANOS: Bye. (END)

new york japan europe russian university china chinese american mexico america future oklahoma indian south asian world war ii representation gdp west european france turkey iran council donald trump syria iraq united states vladimir putin russia washington gulf cia africa turkish pakistan african afghanistan needless egyptian indians middle east sudan barack obama struggle bush morocco cook muslims european union palestinians mediterranean tel aviv steven cook ethiopia arab ge trouble security council gold medal outreach assad joe biden nile saudi cabinet arab israeli horn pennsylvania state university jerusalem university college london foreign policy south korea foreign affairs ngos algeria united arab emirates saudi arabia foreign relations cfr ottoman empire turks academic hezbollah libya nato abu dhabi ethiopian syracuse university ambition state of the union southern mississippi fully webinars iraqi ucl oman embassy algerian intervene north africa mena bahrain gaza israelis saudis uae brookings institution sisi yemen east africa west bank iranians geopolitics arrests eastern mediterranean ramadan sudanese ankara george w bush levant benjamin netanyahu yair lapid suez canal riyadh khartoum washington institute near east policy damascus tigray hamas emiratis abdel fattah bashar akp hafez islamists broader mbs nile river eritreans east jerusalem emirates persian gulf recep tayyip erdogan turkish republic maxwell school algerians haftar blue nile false dawn egyptair sharm king abdullah nagorno karabakh gaza strip middle easterners cook it khalifa haftar national program qataris sheikhs sanam wisconsin whitewater kurdistan regional government development party naftali bennett egyptian president abdel fattah ottomanism abraham accords
Transform Your Wedding
South Asian Wedding Décor

Transform Your Wedding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 19:29


Today we're chatting all about South Asian #weddings. From traditions to décor to color palettes, you won't want to miss this information-packed overview. We chat with Shushil Patel, founder and owner of Utopian Events (@utopian_events), an event planning company specializing in Indian weddings. Not only is this a great primer for anyone planning a South Asian wedding, but it's also full of ideas for weddings of any #culture -- so many beautiful décor ideas to borrow! #mandap #indianwedding #southasianwedding

But What will People Say
What Are You? Bi-Racial Upbringings and Identity

But What will People Say

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 53:30


My guest this week is biracial, she is the product of a South Asian father and English mother. We discuss growing up being racially ambiguous, finding your place in the world, gender identity, and more!ANON Submission Form DishaMazepa.com ***Sign Up for Happy Mail (my newsletter!) at Patreon.com/BWWPS ***SHOP: Disha Mazepa Designs on EtsyBe sure to SUBSCRIBE & LEAVE US A REVIEW if you enjoyed the show. Follow me on Instagram @Disha.MazepaLike the show on FB here. Contact me at BWWPSPodcast@gmail.com Music by: Crexwell Episodes available on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Overcast.Support the show (http://Patreon.com/BWWPS)

The Current
Former PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi on the challenges women face in the workplace

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 26:50


Indra Nooyi became the first South Asian woman to lead a Fortune 500 company when she was named CEO of PepsiCo in 2006. She tells us about that journey, her new memoir My Life in Full: Work, Family, and Our Future and the challenges women continue to face in the workplace.

Grand Tamasha
Inside the Secret World of South Asia's Spies

Grand Tamasha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 38:02


Spy Stories: Inside the Secret World of the RAW and the ISI  is the brand new book by investigative journalists Adrian Levy and Cathy Scott-Clark. Spy Stories relies on unprecedented access to top military and intelligence officials in both India and Pakistan to shed light on some of the most consequential crises in recent South Asian history—from the 2001 attack on the Indian Parliament, to the 2011 killing of Osama bin Laden, and the suicide bombing in Pulwama on the eve of India's 2019 general election.This week on the show, Milan sits down with Levy to discuss the secret world of South Asia's top spies. The two discuss the different trajectories of the ISI and RAW, the defining character of India's current National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, the roots of turmoil in Kashmir, and the long shadow of the IC 814 hijacking. Plus, Milan asks Adrian about the terror outlook for India in the wake of America's Afghanistan exit. “What the Taliban Takeover Means for India,” Grand Tamasha, September 14, 2021.Adrian Levy and Cathy Scott-Clark, The Siege: The Attack on the Taj (Penguin, 2013).Aqil Shah, “How Will the Taliban Deal With Other Islamic Extremist Groups?” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, August 31, 2021.

United Colors with India.
125: Mystikal Organic, Ethnic Afro House, Dancehall Fusion, Indian Pop, Hindi

United Colors with India.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 60:00


This week I'm taking you on a journey with mystical, ethnic and organic afro house. World sounds of Tulum, Burning Man, Mykonos, all induced with South Asian. Thereafter, we're travelling to the Caribbean to hear a few new South Asian dancehall records. I'm also playing new Urban Desi from Ezu and Karan Aujla, new Justin Bieber, new J Balvin, Conkarah, Roach Killa, plus some incredible remixes from Kahani from the US. Mon 10pm PST, Tue 7pm GMT, Tue 2pm EST, and Tue 11.30pm for listeners in India. Hosted by DJ and music producer: @viktoreus

Grateful Living
#80: Coming out as Queer in a Conservative South Asian Community: Alex Sangha

Grateful Living

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 64:14


Alex is a nationally recognized award-winning social worker and documentary film producer, most recently of Emergence: Out of the Shadows. The film documents the tough journeys of 3 queer brown people as they come out with their sexuality within their conservative South Asian families. In this interview, Alex talks about: - Feeling internalized homophobia in high school and feeling suicidal as a result - His advice to other South Asians on coming out to family and friends - How he got into making documentaries and his advice for others on the process Emergence out of the Shadows Website: https://emergencefilm.net/social-media-images/ Alex's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alexsangha/ Grateful Living Info: My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aroy81547/?... To Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3Hn4ttt... To Listen on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Bo... Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gratefulliving4 Approximate Time Stamps: Approximate Time Stamps: 0:00 Intro 0:48 Childhood 2:21 First Feelings of Being Gay, Internalized homophobia, suicidal thoughts 5:08 Advice to someone feeling Internalized homophobia 6:02 When did things get better for you? 8:17 Did joining LGBTQ+ groups help you? 10:00 How is being brown affected your coming out process? 15:32 Arranged marriage aspect 19:54 When did you start telling friends and family? 21:42 How did you grapple with your father initially not being supportive? 24:30 Advice on seeing your parents getting divorced 30:38 A friend's suicide due to homophobia 34:53 Advice to someone feeling suicidal for being gay? 41:14 What's it like to be a social worker? 44:30 Starting non-profit SHER as a LQGBTQ community support group 46:30 How did you get into making documentaries? 49:46 Advice to someone wanting to start a documentary 51:24 Coming up with the idea of the film Emergence: Out of the Shadows 52:24 Working with your mom in the documentary 53:27 Alex's belief in God 58:10 Managing doing multiple things 1:01:20 Supporting Alex

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #143: “Problem Children”

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 30:36


Pranav and Usama talk the new couch and the formation of their identities as problem children while as navigating the pressures of immigrant expectations. 

Chuski Pop
Episode 108 (Season 7) Pappu went to Italy

Chuski Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 101:50


This week on Season 7 Episode 108, we chat about Pappu's magical vacation to Italy and how it completely transformed her! We then move on to discussing the latest news, from Lakme Fashion week to the arrival of 7-11 convenience stores to India. And finally, we wrap up with a yummy dose of Filmi Chakkar where we discuss the new film "Dune" and of course, the Netflix show that's taken the world by storm "Squid Game" . - // Starring Sweety & Pappu // Visit ChuskiPop.com for more info // Subscribe to us on patreon.com/chuskipop for only $1 a month // Listen To Us On Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher or your favourite podcast app! // Follow Us on twitter.com/chuskipop and instagram.com/chuskipop  

Blind Abilities
Qudsiya Naqui – Lawyer, Advocate and Podcaster. A Conversation about Transitioning From Sighted to Blind and From College to the Workplace, Running, Biking and Getting Down to the Struts.

Blind Abilities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 36:41


Qudsiya Naqui has experienced losing sight, transitioning from reading to listening to audio, learning about the White Cane and advocating all along the way. Qudsiya is aa Lawyer and reflects back about her journey, her advocates, her way of choosing a college and how Tandem Biking and Running has opened up communities where she is thriving. Qudsiya has a lot to say about her experience transitioning into Blindness and the experiences Qudsiya shares are lessons we can all take from.  Qudsiya produces a podcast called, “Down to the Struts” , and here is the description from the web site, DownToTheStruts.com Qudsiya Naqui is a lawyer and activist living in Washington DC. She identifies as a blind, South Asian woman, and is dedicated to making spaces and systems more inclusive of disabled people through public education, storytelling, and amplifying the voices of disabled people. Here is a snippet from Qudsiya's article in Vox: The best $34.32 I ever spent: My white cane As a blind person, it was a conscious investment in my own independence. …As I settled into my hotel room that night, I thought about the object that made this whole trip possible: my white cane. Wielding the cane in the airport, at the restaurant, and in the hotel made me feel powerful and in control, but I recalled a time when that was not the case. I remembered when pulling out the white cane filled me with shame. It was the symbol of my failure to be sighted. Read the entire article on Vox Contact Your State Services If you reside in Minnesota, and you would like to know more about Transition Services from State Services contact Transition Coordinator Sheila Koenig by email or contact her via phone at 651-539-2361. Contact: You can follow us on Twitter @BlindAbilities On the web at www.BlindAbilities.com Send us an email Get the Free Blind Abilities App on the App Storeand Google Play Store. Give us a call and leave us some feedback at 612-367-9063 we would love to hear from you! Check out the Blind Abilities Communityon Facebook, the Blind Abilities Page, and the Career Resources for the Blind and Visually Impaired group

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE
"Transforming Schools with Restorative Justice" (Neha Sobti)

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 90:24


In this episode, I had the honor of interviewing Transformative Justice practioner and educator Neha Sobti. In our conversation, Neha shares about her personal journey in education, the need to decolonize restorative justice practice in our schools, life as a queer South Asian woman while engage in antiracist education work, and so much more! To learn more about Neha's work, you can follow her on Instagram and Twitter (@nehajoya). BIO: Neha Sobti is a Transformative Justice practitioner, anti-racist school leader, scholar and poet. She supports educators in creating school communities grounded in relationships, healing, care, and culturally sustaining practices. She dreams and leads conversations about dismantling systems of racism in schools while supporting you on your journey to adopt anti-racist and transformative practices. Neha is currently a Doctoral Student at New York University in the Department of Administration, Leadership and Technology. She writes on topics of school discipline and transformative/restorative justice in education. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/identitytalk4educators/support

Black Girls Texting
Deepica Mutyala is a Brown Girl Doing Sh*t !

Black Girls Texting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 73:01


On this week's episode we're still debating the whole "spoiled woman" thing (if you adore her, Dior her); Sade is embracing that "Cater to You" life (but only slightly); Glynn is having too much sex (is that a thing?); and Chelsea has a brand new glow (courtesy of Dr. Eva Kerby).  Then, Sade and Glynn chat with Deepica Mutyala. Deepica is South-Asian beauty entrepreneur, businesswoman, and founder and CEO of Live Tinted, a multicultural community about beauty and culture. Mutyala launched Live Tinted, in 2018 as an inclusive digital community that explores diverse beauty for every shade in between. Live Tinted focuses on underrepresented people in beauty, and their personal journeys with culture and identity. Make sure to cop and support her amazing line of beauty products specifically crafted for melanated skin at https://www.livetinted.com/.  ****************** Make sure you're following your girls on IG @blackgirlstexting, and on Twitter @blackgirlstext1.  As always, please rate, comment and subscribe to Black Girls Texting on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts, it's really important to us as we continue to grow!   And if you want to see our lovely faces and WATCH this episode, head to our Youtube run up those views, and please like, comment, subscribe!  Want even more?! Go to Blackgirlstexting.com to subscribe to our newsletter and cop some merch! AND  Become a Patron at Patreon.com/blackgirlstexting for weekly bonus episodes, access to live events, exclusive merch and more of the group chat!!

Redefining ABCD
Larger Than Us: Queen Bee Syndrome

Redefining ABCD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 39:46


In this episode of Larger Than Us, Keerthi and Sneha discuss everything about Queen Bee Syndrome - what it is, how it affects people, and where they have seen it in the workplace, social relationships, and the South Asian community. While they discuss instances of queen bee syndrome, they talk about non-traditional experiences (outside of the workplace) particularly within the Indian community and people focused on competition. Just like other stereotypes/labels though, they also discuss when people try to label women in power as "Queen Bee" and how you need to identify real behaviors vs superficial labeling. They wrap the episode with the advice they would give for people who encounter such individuals and how we can foster more inclusive environments to prevent such traits in people. Check out Pixar's Spark Short Purl which explains why "Queen Bee" occurs and how we can change it: https://youtu.be/B6uuIHpFkuo.

Gals Chat by Engineering Gals
Ep47: Uplifting South Asians & Navigating Toxic Work Cultures in Industrial Engineering with Adya Roy

Gals Chat by Engineering Gals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 61:03


Adya Roy is an incoming microinfluencer on Instagram who always felt underrepresented in society as a South Asian Bonafide-Nerd! She has been growing her platform for over two years, and enjoys being an older sister/ mentor figure and coach to many South Asian (and other) women in STEM who want to see life through a focused career-viewpoint! Her journey through college was far from typical or easy but getting two job offers and switching jobs mid-pandemic as an international student was the wake-up moment she needed to realize that she wanted to help others with the mentorship she missed growing up! *This episode is sponsored by Steel Chic Shoes who offer women's fashionable Steel Toe Shoes. Use promo code EngineeringGals to get Free shipping and a Free water bottle when you purchase a pair of shoes: https://shopsteelchic.com/pages/engineering-gals Connect with us on social media: Adya: @thedesicareerwoman Amy Kaur: @amydeepkaur Engineering Gals: @engineeringgals MUSIC by: Not The King - Faded - Royalty Free Vlog Music @coreygagn --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/engineeringgals/support

Brown Girls Read
Author Interview: Soniah Kamal (Unmarriageable)

Brown Girls Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 28:13


In this episode, we are in conversation with Soniah Kamal, a Pakistani-American writer who is the author of two novels: An Isolated Incident and Unmarriageable. We talk about Jane Austen's classic, the South Asian culture, and the many parallels between the book and real-life, writing life, and much more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/browngirlsread/message

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #142: “Pak Attack! Feat. Gibran and Farooq

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 49:58


This week we have on our two favorite Pakistani comics, Gibran Saleem and Farooq Hussain and it's honestly just pure chaos and a mistake we'll prob make again in the future—we talk biases and South Asian rivalries but really this whole ep has big nuclear standoff energy! Follow us across platforms and subscribe to our patreon! We love you like our mother.

Not Too Deep with Grace Helbig
Nik Dodani - Dear Evan Hansen (Ep 321)

Not Too Deep with Grace Helbig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 44:16


Recorded: September 22, 2021   This week I'm joined by the incredible Nik Dodani! We talk about what he learned through playing Zahid in “Atypical,” what it was like auditioning for “Dear Evan Hansen” during the pandemic, and The Salon, the group he co-founded that provides a space for South Asian artists and executives in the industry!    Follow Nik:   www.instagram.com/nikdodani Check out our website: www.nottoodeep.com  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.