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The Outdoors Show
Outdoors Show Hour 2

The Outdoors Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 48:23


We went down to Matagorda to talk to Charlie Paradowski. Mike Jeffcoat of Venice, Louisiana joined the show. James Plaag called in from Galveston during this split skirt alert. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stuff You Should Know
Selects: Why is Venice so wet?

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 43:21


Venice, Italy has a problem. It's sinking, and the water around it is rising. Thankfully, some engineers are working hard on the MOSE project - huge gates that keep high tide from happening. Learn all about Venice in this classic episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

How To Love Lit Podcast
Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Sonnets Of The Portuguese - Plus A Great Love Story!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 50:03


Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Sonnets Of The Portuguese - Plus A Great Love Story!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our second week in a two part series discussing one of English Language literature's most romantic couples- the poets Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Last week, we introduced Robert Browning and his notable dramatic monologue My Last Duchess which gives voice to a twisted psychopath.  We talked a little bit about Robert Browning's life, but not too much.  This week we'll return to his story as well as introduce his remarkable wife and her poetry, Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Christy, am I correct when I say that during their lifetimes, she was famous and he was the Mr. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, so to speak?  Also, am I also correct that the man who wrote about the most twisted love relationship in British poetry also arguably had one of the most famous personal love stories!      You are correct on both accounts- although, in his defense, in regard to the second fiddle Robert played to Elizabeth during her life, history has elevated him over the years.      And been less kind to her, am I right about that?      For a while-you're right- the world turned on  Elizabeth, or EBB, as she signed her things.      Wait= stop there- EBB for Elizabeth Barrett Browning?  She went by that?      Well, she had a family nickname BA, but in her professional life-Yes- she signed everything EBB but there is a story.  When she was single she was Elizabeth Barrett Barrett- so, she started that before she got married.  When she got married, she kept up the EBB- it avoided all the normal name confusion women deal with when they marry later in life and have the hassle of changing identities.  In her case, sticking with thethe initials  just made it easy.    That worked out.      I agree- Anyway- back to your point that history was RUDE to her.  There was a period of about 100 years where people really criticized put her down.  Virginia Wolfe, specifically, wrote what to me is a cruel essay about EBB's most accomplished piece of poetry, a long epic novel in poem form called Aurora Leigh.  Wolfe is very condescending for many reasons, but from my perspective, Wolfe just didn't like poetry very much, and Aurora leigh is an epic poem.   So, EBB, for about a 100 years drifted along on the coat tails of her husband, ironically, whose reputation gained ground over that same period of time.  It was this giant reversal after death.      Huh- I guess it's a good thing they were both gone- that could have brought some marital complications!      So true, but maybe they would have laughed.  When they were alive, Robert Browning once said that the only way he could get a publisher to look at his work was if he promised he'd get Elizabeth to print something with them.   Today, though, over two hundred years later, we can all be relieved to know, history has decided to let them rest together in peace. They are both viewed in high regard in their own rights.  The Wolfe crowd has settled down, and we can see EBB with a more balanced perspective, especially her work Aurora Leigh- something notable but more than we can really handle in one episode-  I did want to mention because it was EBB's masterpiece- and something that is quite original- if you like her stuff or if you like epic poetry, you should check it out.  No one has really done an epic poem about a female hero like her either before or since, at least that I know anything about. When it came out It was extremely popular, as well as quite scandalous. It's a plot driven story, and Marian Erle, a heroine in the stories, gets raped, has a child, refuses to hide the fact that it was a product of rape and does not take a proposal in marriage that would redeem her reputation as a fallen woman, so to speak.  It has been said that women read it secretly under their sheets so as not to be discovered, and EBB loved that.      Let me just tell you, that might scandalize readers even todayOh my, I'd say that's a very different hero than Odysseus or Gilgamesh, and I can see why Aurora Leigh was so popular so quickly not just in Britain but in America- in fact,. I read it hadsomewhere that they printed over 20 editions before the end of the 19th century.  But, let's back up and get a little of the back story on this scandalous Victorian celebrity.      Okay- boring stuff first.  EBB was born on March 6, 1806, the eldest of TWELVE children to very prominent people.  Her father's family, the Barrett's owned thousands of acres of sugar plantation in Jamaica plus all the slaves that went with that.  The Barrett's had gobs of money.  Her early years were happy, and for a while she lived in a fairy land.  Her father built this incredibly lavish estate, and she had free reign to roam at will, and that's exactly what she did.  In one sense, her family was progressive.  They encouraged and even supported her studying, and she did and loved it.  She had an excellent private tutor and she worked hard- even though at the time for a woman there wasn't much point in it.  She received a very good classical education becoming proficient in both Greek and Latin.  She read all of the time and anything she could get her hands on- which was a lot.  She also got into poetry writing pretty early on. She wrote for everyone and all the time.  Her father called her the Poet Laureate of Hope End (that was the name of their estate).  He even sponsored the publication of her first epic poem she was only 13.      Can you imagine a proud father publishing his teenage daughter's epic poem- that's definitely a rich kid thing to do.    Well, it certainly was and an indication that her life was all just dreamy…until it wasn't.  First, The Barrett's, as in the extended family, had some sort of squabble about the sugar plantation money and somehow, I'm not sure how, Elizabeth's dad, lost a big chunk of it.  They lost the big fancy estate and had to move into some sort of temporary housing.     Then, and this is even worse although, it seems what I'm about to describe happened to a lot of women during this time period, at age 15, she started getting really sick with no commensurate explanation.  To this day, her illness is undiagnosed, but she had all kinds of symptoms that left her weak to the point of literally being physically disabled.      What did they say it was at the time?  And as historians have looked back through the record is there an idea today about what made her sick?    Two good questions.  Well, of course, her family tried everything, including moving to live by the seaside- which we've seen in a lot of British literature- that came up even in Emma.  But in her case her health never really improved. By the time she was 25, her family was living in London,but that place wasn't really known at the time for its fresh air- think the chimney sweeper or Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.  What happened to poor Elizabeth is that she ended up spending all of her time confined in a bedroom in that famous address associated with her today- 50 Wimpole Street.       Well, I'm not sure about 50 Wimpole street, but isn't 57 Wimpole street the famous home of Paul McCartney- the place where he and John Lennon wrote “I want to Hold your Hand” and then later “Yesterday”.      Yes- that's a little bit after EBB's time there, though.  HA.  But actually, they did make a fairly famous movie called The Barretts at Wimpole Street about Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  So, there's that too.    Anyway, back to EBB's health-  Victorian London, in general,  was dirty and smoggy, and so Elizabeth ended up basically being locked up in her room theoretically for her own good.  There is a school of thought that suggests that Some of her problems were connected to an issue with her spine from an injury she got from falling off a horse.  We also know for a fact she  had a lot of trouble with her lungs.  I think the most trustworthy sources say she probably had spinal tuberculosis. Honestly, I really don't really know what was wrong with her except to say that by the time she was twenty-five, it seems she was pretty much disabled.  And, if that wasn't enough, she has another issue- again fairly common for the time period.   Her doctors- proscribed to her meds- and you can probably guess where I'm going with this- that were addictive- and like so many back then as well as today- she became an opium addict, of course, all under her doctor's care.  This seems a little horrifying to me, partly because we just finished watching the Netflix series The Pharmacist which was an expose on the opium problem in the United States connected to Oxycotin and the ensuing 400,000 overdoses directedly related to that drug.  But Garry, clearly, opium addiction is not a 21st century phenomenon, we talked about it a little bit with Frankenstein because it surfaced a little in that book, and even though this is a little tangential, it's interesting to me, so tell us about what opium addiction looked like in the 19th century and why would a little doted on homeschool girl wind up addicted to it?     Sure, wellFirst let's establish what it was she was taking.  It was a common drug called laudanum is what Elizabeth Barrett Browning was addicted to..  She wasn't popping pills or shooting up. anything.   Laudanum was an alcoholic herbal preparation thatand was 10% opium.  It was prescribed pretty much for everything: it was used as a pain reliever, a cough suppressant, it was used to control depression, heart palpitations.  It was given as a sleeping pill, menstrual cramps were treated with laudanum.  Just likeEven worse than oxycotin in the early days of the opioid epidemic today, itlaudanum was an entirely uncontrolled substance. Almost no one took the side effects of the drug seriously- and there were a lot of them- But another point to understand, and again this is just like opioids today- there was that associated euphoria people experienced from taking the drug that encouraged it's people to use it.  Why not, right?  It's not hurting anything, and it makes me feel good.       .  However, as we all know, thatdrug euphoria comes at a cost and the cost was depression, the slurred speech, the restlessness, poor concentration, and of course, theif you ever wanted to get off, terrible withdrawal symptoms.  Here's one crazy fun fact that might blow your mind- Itlaudanum was even spoon fed to infants, if you can believe that.      No way!    But before we judge too quickly with the arrogance of the present, we have to remember, that it wasn't until 1899 that aspirin was invented.  These were days when there were no antibiotics,  no mild tranquiliers;  not much of anything and people needed help- not just pain relief, but with all kinds of things, and this is what they had.      Do you think Barrett's prolonged disabilities could be connected with her drug use?    I'm sure it's possible, but I really don't know.  Laudanum has no curative properties. After they got married, Robert Browning did help her reduce her drug use significantly,  and in fact, she reduced her dosage to where she was finally able to get pregnant after two miscarriages related to laudanum.  After marrying him, her entire health condition improved actually.  She even got to where she could walk again, but I'm not sure what all the factors were that contributed to her general improved health.  She was definitely in a better climate and presumably happy.   I do want to be clear, there was no stigma at that time in using laudanum, so we don't need to see her as dark or even unconventional because she was a laudanum user.  Lots and lots of people used it for all kinds of things and lots were addicted- including names we recognize like Charles Dickens.      Okay-moving on to the love story- so Elizabeth was pretty much locked up in her room, disabled but otherwise living a fairly engaging intellectual life.  She was writing poetry, writing letters and basically building a literary career out of that bedroom, even in her disabled state.  In 1838, she published a book of poetry called The Seraphim and Other Poems and that one was met with a lot of critical success- oh and let me note- Elizabeth Barrett Browning published her work under her own name!!!  That wasn't what a lot of women writers were doing.  But, because her work was well received and NOT anonymous, this led to her corresponding via the mail and making friends with important literary figures of her day- some we've even heard of today- famous people like William Wordsworth and Edgar Allan Poe.  In 1844, she published another book of poetry, and it met even more success- and it was the publication of this book that changed her personal life completely.  In one of the poems in this collection,  the poem's name, btw, was  “Lady Geraldine's Courtship”, If you're interested, but in this poem she references the poetry of another  fairly obscure British poet,  a man by the name of Robert Browning.  Well, this obscure poet, Robert, was highly flattered to be noticed by someone who was now quite famous, and wrote her a letter thanking her for the shout out.  However, this was not your run of the mill thank you note.  In his thank you letter he very forwardly and now famously said this, “I love your verses with all my heart, Miss Barrett”…”, I do, as I say, love these books with all my heart- and I love you too.”      Ha!  That is forward.  Robert Browning was very much a very bold suitor- no doubt.  He pursued Elizabeth and all throughvia the mail. I was amazed to read there are over 573 letters between these two, and these letters pretty much document the story of two people falling in love.  Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan's email drama has nothing on these two!!  They wrote each other every day and seemingly pretty much about everything  in the world.  These were not check in texts.  These were not Joey Tribiani lines like “what's up!”- they were full on epistles.     So true, and these letters have been popular reading material ever since- for those of us who want to take stalking to the next level and stalk the love lives of the dead.  You really get an intimate look at two people falling in love.  Elizabeth said they were “talking upon paper”.   When you read the letters, you literally feel like you are injecting yourself into their private world.      Mostly because you are.      I guess that's true, but it is sweet.  Here's a clip for you to see what I mean.  “You've come to me as a dream comes, as the best of dreams comes.”  That's Elizabeth to Robert. And Robert Browning responds in the same sorts of ways, “I have loved you all my Life unawares- that is the idea of you.”         It's a very special back and forth that has been preserved, and they were clearly falling in love now before the eyes of the world and posterity- but we also see that Elizabeth was not totally sure marriage was the path for her.       No, she had a couple of serious hesitations.  Not the least of these was her father.  He absolutely did not believe in allowing his children to get married- especially Elizabeth, and by that I mean not ever.  They were a close family, and that put her in a terrible position.  To marry Robert would be to cut off her father.  Her relationship with her father otherwise was good- if you take out the tyrannical controlling thing- I know that kind of fails the say out loud test.       And of course we see in the letters that Robert, obviously was totally against this kind control over her.        That was one big problem, but she was also concerned about her disability and her age.  She was six years older.  Would this really work? By the time, they got married she was 40- today 40 is the new 20, but she didn't feel that way.   She felt past her prime.  These are some of the insecurities, we will see her write about in her love sonnets.  But, at the end of the day, Robert did love her.  He wanted the relationship to work.  And despite her father's objections, he visited her home 91 times unrelenting in wanting a relationship with Elizabeth.  Garry, do you have a theory as to what Mr. Barrett had against Robert or marriage in general?    Well, for one thing, he thought Robert might be trying to use Elizabeth's fame for his own career- and that would be understandable, I guess, although for a 40 year old, today that seems her problem not his.  But the bigger problem was sex in general.  From everything I've read he was a good father and loved his daughter.  Elizabeth, who they calledhis Ba- in many ways she his pride and joy.  He struggled with his daughter having her own sexual identity- he had idealized her.  It seems that as he got older, the sex piece was just more than he could handle.  This sort of thing happens even today.    Well, the locking the daughter up in the room plan failed.      I will say those plans usually do.    Robert and Elizabeth were in love, and on September 12 1846, with the help of her maid, Elizabeth sneaks out of the house and marries Robert.  One oddity is that after they get married, she had to sneak back into her father's house and live there secretly married for another week before they could work out their train tickets to Italy.  But they did ran away together and eventually settled in Florence and where they lived for the rest of Elizabeth's life.     One unfortunate fall out is that her father never got over the elopement.  He disowned her; cut her off financially and never spoke to her again.  He would die never to see his daughter again.  That's sad.     I suspect she knew that was a possibility, and the reason for her hesitation.  I'm also sure that really hurt, but she didn't seem to regret her decision.  Italy was her choice.  She'd loved it from her classical studies.  The doctors insisted it would significantly improve her health- which it did.   She also wanted Robert and a life with Robert, so Italy was the plan.  After three miscarriages, they had a son, she began walking again; she got involved with European politics, supported the the Unification of Italy, took stands on women's rights issues.  She was fully engaged in a life there.  In 1850, she would publish another collection of poetry- this one contained what she is most famous for- her “Sonnets from the Portuguese”.  Selections from this work is what we're going to read.  These were poems she had written to Robert during those days when she was living locked up in that room on Wimpole street.  She wrote 44 love sonnets to Robert,  but she didn't give them to Robert until after they were married.      What's the connection with the Portuguese?      Well, when they were dating, Elizabeth wrote a poem about a Portuguese girl named Catarina who was beloved.  Robert loved it and always connected Elizabeth to this fictional girl Catarina from the poem.  When Elizabeth published these love sonnets it was kind of an inside joke- the speaker is the Portuguese (her) and the poems are all love poems to her husband.  Sonnets from the Portuguese.    Also, you may remember from Robert's life- he had kind of a bad experience with writing personal confessional poems, so when it came to publishing truly personal poems, he wanted her to create some distance between the speaker of the poem.  So, they basically pretended she translated the sonnets. I like the idea- although, I will say, it's not super-well disguised.      So, why are these love sonnets so popular?    For one, there's just the idea that they are so so sweet.  And since their love life is so well documented with their letters, the personal story makes the sentiments in the sonnets charming.   Elizabeth was 39 years old.  She considers herself past her prime when they met.  She was disabled.  She expresses what to me seems like a disbelief someone she found to be as amazing as this man she admired really truly loved her.  On his part, it's kind of a female fantasy- it's sweet- against a lot of big obstacles,he made her believe he loved her because he did.  He really did.  He was equally enamoured with her.  He admired her.  He wondered how could a woman as brilliant as this woman love me?     And there we have something special- a mutual admiration- it is this mutual admiration that led to a real intellectual exchange.  In these letters we watch this intellectual exchange develop into a reciprocity of respect and from this respect we see trust and then intimacy. All of this, of course, is exactly the kind of thing Ibsen advocates for in A Doll's House.  The Browning's relationship is the exact opposite of the Helmer marriage.  The BrownsingsThe Brownings started  as intellectual equals but then emotionally connect.  After many months of back and forth, after many doubts, we finally land on those famous lines most of us recognize from grocery store valentine cards that young boys glue boxes of chocolates or put in the arms of teddy bears. “How do I love thee, let me count the ways?”      I really like Elizabeth; but I also like Robert.  He loved her for who she was.  He was bold; he took risks.  This is something young men aren't often encouraged to do. For whatever reason, Robert demonstrated leadership, and Elizabeth absolutely reciprocated this strength back to him.  Sonnets from the Portuguese take us on her journey. And because we know the true story of their real-life romance- the sonnets just seem sweet, romantic and precious.    You seem smitten, Christy, should I be concerned?  Or should I write sonnets?    Oh, you should definitely write sonnets, But let me say, there is more to appreciate about these love sonnets than just the love confession.  EBB was a rhetorician- and you know I love rhetoric- persuasion.  These poems don't just express emotion.  They are making an articulate argument- she's making a statement one I find interesting and relevant. Because Elizabeth was a product of the Victorian era, she had a very specific understanding of the view of the ideal woman of her day.  However, she was an intellectual, her father had done her the disservice of introducing her to Greek and Latin philosophy.  She was enamored with the female poet Sapphos- so as she sat in the confining room on Wimpole street, receiving letters from Robert- she found herself thinking- what does something like romantic love mean for someone like me?  I don't need a man for money?  I don't need a man for a career?  I don't even need a man for love- my father loves me.  What is romance?  What is love?  What is a relationship between a man and a roman?  She sat around her room a thought about those sort of things and she draws conclusions.     For one thing, she  defines female love in a different way- it doesn't have to be the same thing as masculine love- but it also doesn't have to be this frail Victorian helpless type she found typical of the age- she defines feminine love in a stronger way.  For EBB love comes from confidence and fills the lover with confidence. In the beginning we see a woman who was confident in her intelligence; confident in her work, confidenr in her family,  but not necessarily confident in any romantic sense.  And how many of us can relate to that?  This was exactly me as a high school and college student- if I'm being honest.       One thing that stands out to me is this idea the frail female.  This WAS the ideal female for a lot of men at this time period.  Of course, most men, even today, want to be strong for a significant lover or the love of women in general,  but this dramatic idea of the sickly and frail woman is very typical of the Victorian period.   I can see that a woman expressing powerful confidence was not something people expected from a female in a romantic relationship and certainly not in a female romantic figure.      Exactly, and EBB, who ironically was sickly, didn't want that to be the reason someone loved her.  She ran from that.  In fact, she even ran from being appreciated for being a woman in general.  When Wordsworth died, England needed a new poet Laureate, Elizabeth's name was recommended to succeed him.  The argument was that there should be a woman poet Laureate for the nation because there was a woman monarch.  Barrett took issue with this- she made the statement that she was not a poetess but a poet and she thought poetry should be judged by its merits not by the sex of its writers.    HA!!  19th century cross-sectional politics.    I know, right, but here's why I bring it up.  When it came to her poetry, she didn't want to be looked at as a woman-as in a hyphenated sub-group.  She saw this kind of thing as patronizing like how I heard boys talk about girl athletes when I was a kid- phrases like, “she's pretty fast- for a girl.” That was not Elizabeth's thing.  It's why didn't use a pseudonym like George Eliot or Emily Bronte who went by Ellis Bell.  Hiding your gender professionally  was totally acceptable.  But it seems to me that for EBB she wanted to say- I am a woman- know that-, I have the feelings and desires define me as a woman.   I will write about women and what women care about.  I will show how I as a woman see the world and I will stand confidently this.  This is an important thing to do.   Don't patronize me by qualifying me by gender; I define my femininity for myself.    But all of that only applies to outside relationships. n    So, how does it apply to personal relationships?     It seems crazy, and unljikely but somehow, she and Robert were on the same page in their understanding of how men and women should relate.  He was not intimated by her professional success at all, and he really should have been.  She was very well known; he was not.  Their personal relationship was all theirs.  She was a woman who wanted to be desired, to be cherished, to be loved and adored- and he wanted very much to do all those things for her.  That is a very traditional relationship, and maybe Victorian in nature- but I have to be honest, I love all those very same things.     As we read these poems, I see a powerful writer but also a dreamy love-struck woman.   “As the prisoners think of liberty, as the dying think of heaven so I think of you.”  That is another quote from one of her letters to Robert- but in this line we see a brave but smitten female voice.      So, you're saying, she's not writing as someone trying to be coy or silently waiting to be seduced.       Exactly, she does want to be seduced; she's just dropping the silent part.  Sonnets from the Portuguese are in sequence; they take us through her evolution of thinking and her emotions on this experience of falling in love.  In sonnets 1-2 we see the woman speaker as object of man- she is not the creator of her own poetic voice yet.  And this of course is what we think of when we think of traditional love poetry- man loves woman- man speaks- woman stays silent- just think about the convention of the sonnets in particular- especially Petrarchan sonnets.  That's what they were all about.    Now, we don't need to rehash our entire episode on Petrarch- although he's worth listening to if you haven't listened to that podcast- or at least not in a while- but, by way of reminder, Petrarch wrote sonnets to a woman named Laura who did not return his affection- the entire genre of the Petrarchan sonnet is about objectifying women.    In fact, I'm pretty sure Petrarch never really even refers to Laura as a whole human being- it's always her hair, or her breasts, her voice, her smile- even the name Laura- some people think just stands in for the word Laurel.      You're right.  Laura is distant- impersonal- an ideal.  The sonnets are mostly about Petrarch- the man- not the woman at all. Elizabeth is to not just going to reverse this- she's going to redefine the sonnet genre entirely.  She's going to say, I'm the object- yes- I want to be the object, but I'm also the speaker- I am not silent.  I am a recipient of a love that empowers, but I am also the giver of a love that emboldens.  The poetic relationship in these sonnets is reciprocal- His love calls for her poems- SHE writes them.  In a sense, he is a magic prince who kisses and restores her- she sees him like this- but she is not weak, she is not powerless- even in her physical fraility- even in her age- and she did see herself as kind of past her prime maybe physically but definitely not creatively or professionally.    SHE is the creator of the art here- she is creating this new idea that I can be a the muse for love and the creator of its art.      I also want to point out that their relationship, although it is intellectual,  it is not platonic.  It's very romantic and there is a lot that is physical here… and some of this is erotic to be honest… He was bold towards her, but now she reciprocates with boldness of her own….    Well, that could get interesting.      I think so, but we'll let you read those on your own, though.     Okay- so, we're going to read three of her sonnets?     Yes, I want to.   I think it's nice to try to see a little bit of the progression we've been talking about- how they kind of show her evolving into her own understanding of her relationship.  We won't overdo the analysis thing because there are three of them- and we'll just try to enjoy them more holistically.  We'll start with 14, move to 22 and then finish with the famous 43- the one most people know.        Sonnet 14    If thou must love me, let it be for nought  Except for love's sake only. Do not say,  "I love her for her smile—her look—her way  Of speaking gently,—for a trick of thought  That falls in well with mine, and certes brought  A sense of pleasant ease on such a day"—  For these things in themselves, Belovèd, may  Be changed, or change for thee—and love, so wrought,  May be unwrought so. Neither love me for  Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry:  A creature might forget to weep, who bore  Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!  But love me for love's sake, that evermore  Thou mayst love on, through love's eternity.      It seems very straightforward and easy to understand for me.      It really is.  Just to give a little introduction to the form, notice that it is in iambic pentamenter, that means there are five strong beats in every line- just like in most every other sonnet in the world. Also, just like Petrarch, there is a rhyme scheme abba abba cdcdcd. But, that's as far as she will follow Petrarch's model.  In fact, she's almost responding to Petrarch- don't love me like Petrarch loved Laura.   He loved her for stuff- for her smile, her look, her way… all that garbage… don't even love me for any cute thing I say, or even what you do for me and how it makes you feel to do stuff for me, like wipe tears from my cheeks- nonsense like that…I'm just not interested.  If we're going to do this love thing, we need to get past all that and figure out something much deeper …the smile and tears stuff isn't enough.    “Love me for love's sake, that evermore though mayst love, on, through love's eternity.”      Well, it's a very ornate style- and it's understandable in light of what we know about her own personal underconfidences that she would talk like this, but like I said before, I really enjoy seeing a mature woman experience a deep and intimate love- she's allowing herself to enjoy all the emotions of love like most people associate with you, but it's not immature love, it establishs reciprocal terms.       Another point I want to make before we read the next one, and this may be one of the reasons her poetry was so ill-received in the 20th century, EBB has no trouble exploring her doubts and underconfidences in her romantic relationship.  And we see that a little here, although the earlier ones had more of it.  She seems slightly concerned that if the love relies too much on the physical, it might be a bust.  Feminist critics of the 20th century didn't like that.  They said things like, she's lowering herself in the relationship when she should be promoting herself.  And there is a real sense that that is true- she clearly submits to Robert in these sonnets- on purpose- but here is the difference that I think has since redeemed her- it's a reciprocated submission- it's not something that Robert himself was not doing.  Today, as we read her poems, we aren't really offended by her vulnerability.  In fact, the honesty has been reinterpreted as confidence.  It takes quite a bit of sincerity and confidence to be openly underconfident and dependent- as paradoxical as it sounds.      Well, of course, I agree with that.  And I have to think, from a psychological point of view, that being in love and writing about how it makes you feel at age 39 as opposed to 19 is probably why she can be vulnerable about her self-doubts without coming across as weak and pitiful.  She's already been through the adolescent stuff as a totally separate issue, so as she tries to understand what about love is overwhelming her and making her feel so differently- she can separate what is unique about this particular love relationship from regular developmental issues of underconfidence or even the loving relationships she's already experienced from her family- which we have to remember- she'd been adored her entire life.      Let's read 22- we can see the tone has shifted.  There's been a progression from love me for love's sake to now WHEN we stand erect…the posture is very different.  Let's read it.        When our two souls stand up erect and strong,    Face to face, silent, drawing nigh and nigher,    Until the lengthening wings break into fire    At either curvèd point,—what bitter wrong    Can the earth do to us, that we should not long   Be here contented? Think. In mounting higher,    The angels would press on us and aspire    To drop some golden orb of perfect song    Into our deep, dear silence. Let us stay    Rather on earth, Belovèd,—where the unfit   Contrarious moods of men recoil away    And isolate pure spirits, and permit    A place to stand and love in for a day,    With darkness and the death-hour rounding it.    Again, we have the same iambic pentameter- five strong beats in every line.  We have the rhyme scheme Abba Abba cdcdcd.  But what we notice more than the rhyme change is the tone change.  Traditionally in the Petrarchean sonnet the first eight lines set up a question and then the second six lines answer it.  There's a turn.  In this one, the first eight lines or the octave are going to define the status of their love as it is now.  The last six will argue- quite untraditionally that they need to stop time and just stay in the present moment.      HA!!  Wouldn't that be nice to be able to do.      Yeah- but I guess it's a nice sentiment even if a bit unrealistic.  I guess that's why she can enjoy it.  I want to point out how much religious imagery she throws in here.  It's not two bodies- it's two souls- they are not constrained by physical restraints anymore- something she was all too familiar with.   I also want to point at how equal the two people in this poem are.  They are two souls- erect and strong- face to face- with wings breaking into fire- that's pretty cool imagery.- kind of like some mythical phoenix full of power and energy.    And yet, as cool as they would be, I would prefer to just stay here in this moment with you.  It's sweet.  Okay, ready for the last one…the famous sonnet 43, the second to last poem in the series- in many ways the concluding one.  In this one, she is going to summarize some of the arguments she's made throughout the other sonnets.  She is going to catalogue the eight ways of loving that she's been making for the last 42.  Let's read it and then we'll see how this famous love story ends.      How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.  I love thee to the depth and breadth and height  My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight  For the ends of being and ideal grace.  I love thee to the level of every day's  Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.  I love thee freely, as men strive for right.  I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.  I love thee with the passion put to use  In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.  I love thee with a love I seemed to lose  With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,  Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,  I shall but love thee better after death.    By the end of EBB's sonnet sequence she has reshaped her understanding of love.  She has allowed herself to express her initial insecurities, walked us through her doubts and developed before us a full and complete discovery of what her romantic relationship means.   Again, she is using the same iambic pentameter- and the same abba abba cdcdcd.  It's simple.  It's obvious.  It's confident. Where in the first one we read, there was a lot of insecurity, the second a very confident equality, here she is asserting her own leadership.  I think she's ready to elope!!!    HA!!  I guess she is.  Again there is a lot of religious and Christian imagery- it even alludes to the Bible.  The languages borrows from St. Paul in his letter to the Ephesians where he describes Christ's love for humanity.      Exactly, she's expressing a completeness here- in every line she's showing us this cycle.  There's spiritual love, every day love, free and society love, virtuous love, passionate love, permanent love and finally eternal love- after death.    Well, how does their story end.      It's nice.  First of all, I forgot to tell you, they nicknamed their son, Pen.  That's cute.  After the elopement and the move to Italy, they had 15 years before Elizabeth's health finally gave out.  The story goes that on the day Elizabeth died, Robert lifted her up towards him and she kissed him repeatedly, even kissing the air after he put her back on her bed.  Robert was heard saying, “Beautiful, beautiful.”  After she breathed her last breath, he looked at her and said, “How she looks now, how perfectly beautiful.”  This was on June 29, 1861.  That autumn, Robert and Pen left Florence never to return.  He prepared and published her last works that he titled, “Last Poems”.  He was unselfishly pleased that even after her death, sales of her work exceeded his.      Browning stayed in England, gradually establishing a place in London society.  He did propose again to a woman named Louisa, Lady Ashburton, a rich and attractive widow in 1869.  However, he blew the proposal so badly that she turned him down.     You know bad proposals are some of the things America's Funniest Home Videos really taught us all to enjoy.  But how was his so bad.  I mean, he was a poet.  You'd think he could turn a line.       Oh, he turned a line for sure, but this stands out- even in a long list of bad proposals.   He literally told her that his heart lay buried with his wife in Florence and he really just wanted to marry her for the advantages it would give Pen.      Well, at least he was honest.      Yes, he was that- just honest and single.  He continued to write and to publish all the way until his death.  And he died in the same country as his wife.  He and his sister were vacationing in Venice, Italy.  He had bought a house there for Pen.  While in Venice, he caught a cold and died on December 12, 1878 there.  Today, EBB is buried in Florence, but ironically they did not ship Robert Brownings down to Florence to be buried with her.  He actually got a very prestigious placement.  Today Robert Browning's body rests in Westminster Abbey.    Wow, that's impressive and an interesting ending to this very famous romance.    Unless  it doesn't end the romance…according to Elizabeth, she was going to love him better after death.    Ha!!!  Well, there you go, perhaps she's set those wings on fire!!    Oh my, we've read way too many sonnets this week.  Next week, we are changing gears entirely.  If you're listening to this in real time, it's October 2021, Halloween season and we are starting The Haunting of Hill House by the American Shirley Jackson.  It's not my favorite sub-genre, but here we go…into the scary stuff!!!    Thanks for listening, please know we appreciate you spending time with us each week.  We hope you are enjoying exploring the classics with us.  If so, please help us by tweeting an episode, posting a link on Facebook or LinkedIn or simply texting an episode to a friend.  And if you're a teacher, Visit our website for teaching support.    Peace Out.     

Business Matters
British member of Parliament dies after stabbing

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 53:17


The British Conservative MP Sir David Amess has died after being stabbed multiple times at his constituency surgery in Essex, England. We get an update on the tragedy from Rob Watson, the World Service's political correspondent. Also in the programme, Italy has made it mandatory to prove Covid vaccination, or a negative test, to go to work. Thousands of workers at Trieste port have gone on strike over the mandate, and we get reaction to the new policy from Alessandro Borghese, who is a chef with two restaurants in Milan, and another opening soon in Venice. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis heads to the TED Countdown climate summit in Edinburgh, to find out about innovative approaches to tackling climate change. And Lucy Burton talks to Katherine O'Brien of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service about why women are deciding that it's not a good idea to have a baby in these uncertan times. Plus, we have a report from Arunoday Mukharji in India as the country's festival season gets under way. He hears that whilst there seems to be more enthusiasm on the streets compared to last year, it does not necessarily mean more business. Additionally, a report from Kai Ryssdal from our partner programme Marketplace; Kai has been speaking to the CEO of a flower deivery company to see how she's been affected by the last year. Lucy Burton is joined throughout the programme by Sinead Mangan of the ABC in Perth, Western Australia. (Picture: Conservative MP Sir David Amess. Credit: UK PARLIAMENT)

World Business Report
Italy port workers strike over Covid pass rules

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:22


Italy has made it mandatory to prove Covid vaccination, or a negative test, to go to work. Thousands of workers at Trieste port have gone on strike over the mandate, and we get reaction to the new policy from Alessandro Borghese, who is a chef with two restaurants in Milan, and another opening soon in Venice. And with a majority of Italians supporting the measure, we get wider context from Professor Guendalina Graffigna, who is an expert on consumer health psychology at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Piacenza. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis heads to the TED Countdown climate summit in Edinburgh, to find out about innovative approaches to tackling climate change. Plus, we have a report from India as the country's festival season gets under way, and hear that whilst there seems to be more enthusiasm on the streets compared to last year, it does not necessarily mean more business. Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Faarea Masud and Ivana Davidovic.

Protest Too Much
5.3 "Woman in Charge" Mary A

Protest Too Much

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:23


Mary Aalbue joins host Stephanie Crugnola on this week's episode to chat which of Shakespeare's women should rule the world! Mary argues for Portia (The Merchant of Venice) and has Stephanie argue for Lady Macbeth (Macbeth)! Vote for who you think should win on Facebook (/p2mpod), instagram, or Twitter (@p2mpod). Make sure to follow Mary's work on her website! Make sure to check out our Patreon for bonus materials and extra content - including my picks for each of the months' episodes, and some new audition monologue content! Special thanks to our new network: Serious Business for bringing us on board and giving us the space to discuss such an important element of Shakespearean Theatre. Check out their other two shows Adventure Incorporated (an actual play DnD 5e podcast) and Ask The Pokedexpert (a highly academic question and answer podcast/stream about Pokemon)!

About Buildings + Cities
88 — Carlo Scarpa — 2/3 — Querini Stampalia, A Modern Palazzo

About Buildings + Cities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:23


We talked about Carlo Scarpa's work at the Querini Stampalia foundation (1959-63), a palazzo-museum in Venice. Scarpa's interventions are focussed on the ground floor spaces, including a new entrance bridge, galleries and courtyard garden. There's a very distinctive mixture of restoration and fantasy, historical narration and occasional touches of grooviness. You can watch this episode, including relevant images, on our YouTube channel. Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts. Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show. Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us! Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook We're on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

KQED's The California Report
Alisal Fire Continues to Grow, Threatens Homes

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:47


The Alisal Fire has burned more than 13,000 acres in Santa Barbara County. That's prompted evacuation orders in rural areas and forced the shut down of parts of Highway 101. Reporter: Rachel Showalter, KCBX Los Angeles continues its push to dismantle large homeless encampments in the city and move people into temporary shelters. It's already happened in the city's Echo Park and Venice neighborhoods. Now, the unhoused who are living in a section of MacArthur Park west of downtown, will be required to move by the end of this week. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report In the Coachella Valley, desert cities are passing laws restricting or banning short-term rentals. And that's squeezing supply in the city of Palm Springs. Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW California's committee on reparations met again Tuesday to discuss housing and environmental inequities that have specifically disadvantaged African Americans. The committee looked at how reparations could be given in the form of direct payments and other methods to correct decades of racist policies and actions.  Reporter: Sarah Mizes-Tan, CapRadio Among the more than 700 bills Governor Gavin Newsom recently signed into law are several that aim to fix problems at the state's unemployment department. The changes come in the wake of a parade of problems that jeopardized much needed help for jobless Californians. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, The California Report

Quick Charge
Quick Charge Podcast: October 12, 2021

Quick Charge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:02


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from Electrek. Quick Charge is available now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn and our RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. New episodes of Quick Charge are recorded Monday through Thursday and again on Saturday. Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories we discuss in this episode (with links): Tesla is deploying the first Megacharger to charge its Tesla Semi electric truck Tesla unveils its new crash safety tech based on collecting real-world data Tesla (TSLA) breaks record in China, resulting in massive delivery expectation beat Tesla supplier CATL announces $5 billion battery recycling facility Rivian's first retail hub to open in Venice, CA, as ‘a space to gather' Lucid details DreamDrive ADAS platform, with ‘conditional automated driving in coming years' LG agrees to repay GM $1.9 billion over Chevy Bolt EV battery recall ELMS announces collaboration with Ample to bring battery swaps to its commercial EVs California bans gas-powered lawn equipment and other ‘small off-road engines' https://youtu.be/pozqyImLMtg Subscribe to the Electrek Daily Channel on Youtube so you never miss a day of news Follow Mikey: Twitter @Mikey_Electric Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify TuneIn Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at tips@electrek.co. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

The John Phillips Show
Fix California with Soledad Ursua

The John Phillips Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:00


RVs are taking over the streets of Venice and some of them are catching on fire See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talk Supes and CEOs
3.7 Who Gets to Be Gifted in America with Marc Smolowitz

Talk Supes and CEOs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:04


Doug has the opportunity to sit down with director and producer, Marc Smolowitz to discuss equity in education when it comes to gifted programs in America. This important yet rarely discussed aspect in education is the premise of Marc's upcoming documentary, THE G WORD. Marc is currently in post-production on THE G WORD -- a feature-length documentary that aims to be the most comprehensive film ever made on the topics of gifted, talented, and neurodiverse education across the United States. The film asks the urgent equity question -- In the 21st century, who gets to be Gifted in America and Why? and is scheduled to premiere in late 2022. Some links to check out: THE G WORD Short Film Vimeo Gallery: https://vimeo.com/showcase/5341657 GTN Awareness Week (Oct. 25-29): https://www.thegwordfilm.com/gtn-awareness-week Global Partnership Network: https://www.thegwordfilm.com/partnership-network Impact Manifesto: https://www.thegwordfilm.com/impact-manifesto #MyGiftedStory: https://www.thegwordfilm.com/my-gifted-story How to Donate: https://www.thegwordfilm.com/donate BIO: Marc Smolowitz is a multi-award-winning director, producer, and executive producer who has been significantly involved in 50+ independent films. The combined footprint of his works has touched 250+ film festivals & markets on 5 continents, yielding substantial worldwide sales to theatrical, television, and VOD outlets, notable box office receipts, and numerous awards and nominations. His credits include films that have screened at the world's top-tier festivals such as Sundance, Berlin, Venice, Tribeca, Chicago, Palm Springs, SF FILM, AFI Docs, IDFA, DOC NYC, CPH: DOX, Tokyo, Melbourne, Viennale, Jerusalem, among others. In 2009, Marc founded 13th Gen, a San Francisco-based boutique film and entertainment company (see: https://www.13thgenfilm.com/) that works with a dynamic range of independent film partners globally to oversee the financing, production, post-production, marketing, sales, and distribution efforts of a vibrant portfolio of films and filmmakers. The company has successfully advanced Marc's career-long focus on powerful social issue filmmaking across all genres. In 2016, he received one of the prestigious Gotham Media Fellowships to attend the Cannes Film Festival's Producers Network marking him as one of the USA's most influential independent film producers. In 2021,

Get Ready for Rome
On Returning from Rome

Get Ready for Rome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:36


I've just returned from a three-week trip to Italy, and I here begin a retrospective look at our travels, which were not much affected by COVID.

Keys To The Shop : Equipping the Coffee Retail Professional
308 : A Conversation w/ Italian Brewers Cup Champion, Alessandro Galtieri

Keys To The Shop : Equipping the Coffee Retail Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:12


Italian coffee has shaped how the world understands coffee and cafe culture. These days there is a movement to take the traditional Italian way of of getting a coffee and elevate the quality and the experience making it a truly specialty coffee experience. At the heart of that movement is Aroma Caffe todays guest, Alessandro Galtieri.  Alessandro has owned and operated Aroma Caffe since 1994 and has been a coffee professional since 1991. As he ran the cafe he began to shift it into a beacon of progressive specialty coffee amidst the traditional coffee culture landscape of his city of Bologna, Italy.  Alessandro is the 2018 and 2019 Italian Brews Cup Champion and 3rd place finisher in the 2019 World Brewers Cup. He has published several books/ manuals on professional barista work and training, is a certified SCA trainer, and is tirelessly working to serve his customers the best quality and to make them happy through coffee.  In today's conversation we will be covering his beginnings in coffee, becoming an owner, the challenge of shifting to specialty, and his vision for the future of Italian coffee culture. We cover: Learning under older traditional Italian baristas The road to owning his own bar Changing the business model to specialty coffee Training and educating both baristas and customers Experiencing resistance  to new ways from traditionalists What makes Italian coffee culture?  What is the future of Italian coffee culture The most important behaviors of a barista How loving our coffee helps its sustainability Constance and temperance  Links: Aroma Caffe on Instagram @aromacoffeelove Website: https://www.ilpiaceredelcaffe.it Alessandro's Brewers Cup Routine   Related episodes: 198 : The Evolution of the Coffee Shop w/ Prof. Jonathan Morris 205 : Inside Caffe Florian, the World's Oldest Coffee Shop ! | Venice, Italy 019 : 10 Reasons to Love the Customer w/ Chris Deferio 299 : 5 Rules for a Successful Coffee shop Blog: The Customer of Tomorrow Visit our amazing Sponsors! www.prima-coffee.com/keys www.pacficfoodservice.com www.coffeefest.com    

Quiz and Hers
S14 E1 - Route Canals

Quiz and Hers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:45


We're back for our the premiere of our fourteenth (!) season, and this week, Justin has written six trivia questions all about canals! We also sail into discussions of Irish music, video games, and one of the weirder events of the past couple of very weird years.3:03: Q1 (Times & Places): What famous canal was derisively referred to as “Clinton's Big Ditch” while it was being constructed, but saw 33,000 commercial shipments in 1855?9:21: Q2 (Music): In a song that has become an Irish standard, what titular object “went jingle-jangle, all along the banks of the Royal Canal”?16:44: Q3 (Sports & Games): The Panama Canal is one of the “wonders” that you can build in what series of turn-based strategy games, originally developed by Sid Meier?24:45: Q4 (Movies & TV): The canals of Venice, California, appear prominently in what 1984 horror movie, which featured Johnny Depp in his film debut, and introduced us to the murderous Freddy Krueger?33:58: Q5 (Arts & Literature): Canaletto's The Entrance to the Grand Canal is one prominent work from a later incarnation of what “School” of art, which is named for the city where you would find the Grand Canal?38:43: Q6 (Everything Else): What was the name of the ship that obstructed the Suez Canal earlier this year, single-handedly grinding global trade to a halt?Theme music: "Thinking it Over" by Lee Rosevere, licensed under CC BY 2.0E-Mail: quizandhers@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quizandhers/Twitter: https://twitter.com/quizandhersInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/quizandhers/History of the Atlantic World Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/history-of-the-atlantic-world/id1363411819Brain Ladle Podcast: http://www.brainladletrivia.com/Cormac on Twitter: @CormacsThoughts  

Dreams Not Memes Podcast
Episode 306: Composing for Film: A Conversation with Ana Ortiz

Dreams Not Memes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:47


Ana Ortiz Wienken is a Berklee College of Music alumni, graduated with a Magna Cum Laude in Film Scoring, Conducting and Music Production. Her career has been eventually intense as she began her musical training at the Russian Conservatory Katarina Gurska of Madrid, in where she obtained a Magna Cum Laude degree in classical piano performance and contemporary composition. Ana had the honor of assisting and working with award winning composers in relation with Warner Bros. Studios, Music & Motion Productions, Team Disney, Output, Velvet Green Music, Chroma Music for TV and Advertising and the Latin Grammy Scholarship Foundation. Her knowledge and experience in recording studios in Los Angeles, CA. Boston, MA. New York, NY. Madrid, Spain. Panamá, Venice, Italy, and Dublin, Ireland has taken her to found her company AOW Music Productions. In our conversation Ana speaks about her experiences with working in the film and composing industry and how she works for herself as an entrepreneurial composer. Learn more on Dreams Not Memes.

秘密星球 HPR Secret Planet
Episode 144: 谁偷走了你的能量

秘密星球 HPR Secret Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 14:39


你有遇到过这种情况嘛?跟某个人接触后,需要缓好几天才能恢复?这期就讲下能量吸血鬼的故事 微信公号:HPR秘密星球 Heather微博:熊乖一第下天 入神秘学大群申请:个人微信 HPRsecretplanet 课程活动福利通知https://shimo.im/forms/rDwqRKPKHJTRwKth/fill?channel=podcast Youtube HPR秘密星球 订阅地址: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG2PTJejDu6mOrZvrv38cIA Logo设计:小荻 xiaodilove2020@hotmail.com 配乐:Parisian and Night in Venice by Kevin MacLeod

Valley 101
The history of Phoenix's canal system

Valley 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:17


When you think of water canals, you might think of Venice, Italy, Amsterdam in the Netherlands or even Venice, California. You probably don't think about Phoenix.  But metro Phoenix actually has more miles of canals than all three of those places combined. The city's canal systems are operated by the Salt River Project and the Central Arizona Project for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. But Phoenix has had canals long before the Reclamation Act was signed in 1902. In this week's episode of Valley 101, a podcast from The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com, we find out the history of the canal system dating back to 400 A.D. and how it helps us live in the desert today.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, October 11, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 467All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint John XXIIIAlthough few people had as great an impact on the 20th century as Pope John XXIII, he avoided the limelight as much as possible. Indeed, one writer has noted that his “ordinariness” seems one of his most remarkable qualities. The firstborn son of a farming family in Sotto il Monte, near Bergamo in northern Italy, Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was always proud of his down-to-earth roots. In Bergamo's diocesan seminary, he joined the Secular Franciscan Order. After his ordination in 1904, Fr. Roncalli returned to Rome for canon law studies. He soon worked as his bishop's secretary, Church history teacher in the seminary, and as publisher of the diocesan paper. His service as a stretcher-bearer for the Italian army during World War I gave him a firsthand knowledge of war. In 1921, Fr. Roncalli was made national director in Italy of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith. He also found time to teach patristics at a seminary in the Eternal City. In 1925, he became a papal diplomat, serving first in Bulgaria, then in Turkey, and finally in France. During World War II, he became well acquainted with Orthodox Church leaders. With the help of Germany's ambassador to Turkey, Archbishop Roncalli helped save an estimated 24,000 Jewish people. Named a cardinal and appointed patriarch of Venice in 1953, he was finally a residential bishop. A month short of entering his 78th year, Cardinal Roncalli was elected pope, taking the name John after his father and the two patrons of Rome's cathedral, St. John Lateran. Pope John took his work very seriously but not himself. His wit soon became proverbial, and he began meeting with political and religious leaders from around the world. In 1962, he was deeply involved in efforts to resolve the Cuban missile crisis. His most famous encyclicals were Mother and Teacher (1961) and Peace on Earth (1963). Pope John XXIII enlarged the membership in the College of Cardinals and made it more international. At his address at the opening of the Second Vatican Council, he criticized the “prophets of doom” who “in these modern times see nothing but prevarication and ruin.” Pope John XXIII set a tone for the Council when he said, “The Church has always opposed… errors. Nowadays, however, the Spouse of Christ prefers to make use of the medicine of mercy rather than that of severity.” On his deathbed, Pope John said: “It is not that the gospel has changed; it is that we have begun to understand it better. Those who have lived as long as I have…were enabled to compare different cultures and traditions, and know that the moment has come to discern the signs of the times, to seize the opportunity and to look far ahead.” “Good Pope John” died on June 3, 1963. St. John Paul II beatified him in 2000, and Pope Francis canonized him in 2014. Reflection Throughout his life, Angelo Roncalli cooperated with God's grace, believing that the job at hand was worthy of his best efforts. His sense of God's providence made him the ideal person to promote a new dialogue with Protestant and Orthodox Christians, as well as with Jews and Muslims. In the sometimes noisy crypt of St. Peter's Basilica, many people become silent on seeing the simple tomb of Pope John XXIII, grateful for the gift of his life and holiness. After his beatification, his tomb was moved into the basilica itself. Click here for more on Pope John XXIII! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Daybreak
Daybreak for October 11, 2021

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:15


Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Optional Memorial of Pope St. John XXIII, 1881-1963; born of a farming family in northern Italy; named a cardinal and patriarch of Venice in 1953; a month short of entering his 78th year, he was elected pope; called the Second Vatican Council, and criticized the “prophets of […] All show notes at Daybreak for October 11, 2021 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Suncoast Culture Club
Welcome to Our Carnival-Presented by the SCF Bradenton Symphony Orchestra featuring trumpet soloist Brandon Ridenour

Suncoast Culture Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:59


Step right up and experience a different kind of carnival by the SCF Bradenton Symphony Orchestra on Thursday, October 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the SCF Neel Performing Arts Center. Featuring Hector Berlioz's “Roman Carnival Overture,” the famous trumpet solo the “Carnival of Venice” with guest soloist Brandon Ridenour, and Camille Saint-Saëns' “Carnival of theAnimals," featuring pianists Aza Torshkoeva and Maria Medina, as well as SCF Theatre major William Ashburn as narrator. Take a listen as trumpet soloist Brandon Ridenour tells us about this life's musical work after Juilliard, becoming the youngest member ever of the Canadian Brass, his very unique connection to Sarasota and Bradenton, and why this version of the Carnival of Venice is so special to him.This is one acoustic carnival you won't want to miss! Tickets are available by going to scf.edu/neel or can be purchased at the door 45 minutes prior to the performance.Come along and join the club!• Brandon Ridenour Website & Facebook & Instagram & YouTube• Aza Torshkoeva Website & Facebook & Instragram & YouTube & Spotify• State College of Florida Music Program Website & Facebook & Instagram• SCF Theatre Program Website & Facebook Page & InstagramSupport the show (https://scf-foundation.org/suncoastcultureclub/)

Wise Millennial
Unique Experiences, "More Of That" │ Eric Dybvig & Meredith Baker, Co-Founders

Wise Millennial

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 31:50


JOIN US IRL: www.instagram.com/wisemillennial Eric Dybvig & Meredith Baker, Co-Founders of "More Of That", unique and "bar-alternative" experiences to foster deeper meaningful connection, sits down IRL to discuss their origin story, their experiences living across the world and the psychology of tribalism, loneliness & social anxiety, how to prevent people from being "cliquey"?, alcohol and why many Millennials rely on substance-use for social connection, insights into their ideation process, differences between being single vs. in a relationship, and the what the future holds for More Of That....LEARN ABOUT MORE OF THAT: https://moreofthat.lifeINSTA: @more.of.thatINTERVIEW QUESTIONS:What is More of That? More of what?What's been your favorite event so far?What's your Origin Story?Why are people tribal? How do we break that pattern?Loneliness -Why does connection need structure in order to work?Alcohol - I'd be really curious to hear your thoughts on why alcohol, or drugs or substances in general, plays such a predominant role in social interactions. Does it go back to social anxiety? Or just looking cool? Why is it so hard to scale community businesses?What's your Ideation process. You're promoting unique, alternative events. How do you come up with these events? Do you feel pressure like you constantly have to “one up” each previous event in terms of creativity?I feel like when you're single you care more about meeting others, and then there's a clear divide. Once you start a family, you no longer actively seek out connection. Is that a fair statement?How can people get more involved and learn about more of that?

The Outdoors Show
The Outdoors Show Hour 2

The Outdoors Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 49:02


We headed east to Venice, Louisiana to catch up with Mike Jeffcoat. Our buddy James Plaag called in from Galveston.  We stayed in Galveston when we checked in with Sharky Marquez. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Robert Browning - The Last Duchess - Poetry Supplement

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 47:23


Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I am Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This week and next we will have two poetry supplements.  After talking about one of the worst romances in literature- we will switch to one of literature's greatest love stories- the romance of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning- although you would never guess it after reading the poem we are doing today- My Last Duchess- a very twisted poem.  You know, Christy, now that I think about it, there's not really a lot of great love stories that we've read.  So many of them end poorly- Romeo and Juliet comes to mind- but even the real life stories aren't all that awesome.  I can't say I'm all that impressed with the love story of Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley.      No, I should think not.  I wouldn't think Petrarch or Lauuuura define true love either- although Petrarch sure got a lot of mileage out of their non-relationship.    No, Hester and Dimmesdale didn't end well.    Or William Butler Yeats and Maud Gonne    Now that you mention it, whether we're talking about characters or writers- there's quite a bit of tragedy involved.    You're right- but of course, doesn't great love tragedies produce great art- look no farther than the new hit song by Selena Gomez about her disasterous relationship with Justin Bieber.  “Lose You to Love Me” debuted at number 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 and stayed on the chart for 23 weeks- hittint it number one.      And it was number 1 on Itunes as well.  Of course, Justin Bieber has milked that relationship or should I say, all of their break ups over the years, as well.      Well, xometimes things do go right- there's hope for the Noras and Torvalds out there.  HA!  So, let's introduce at least one love story that went right…Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Except, if you want to know the love-story part, you'll have to stick around for one more episode.  We're going to start with this episode by discussing Robert Browning and his most nefarious villiian in “My Last Duchess” and then we'll look at Elizabeth and her infectious love sonnets- and that's when we'll get into their personal story.    Great, so Robert Browning, what I find unusual about Robert Browning is that there is nothing unusual about Robert Browning.  I'm so used to all of these British poets and their colorful lives, but he's kind of a non-scandalous person, well- if you don't count the part about his elopement with Elizabeth, of course.    Indeed, and that is just how he liked it- perhaps a man of his time.  Let me back us by introducing him as part of the Victorian Age- that glorious period of English history where Britain held the position of world leadership- I guess somewhat like we think of as belonging to the United States today.      Just for clarification- The Victorian period is considered somewhere around 1837-1900.    Oh yes- I should have said that.  Not talking about literature, Garry, what stands out about this period of time.      Well, there's a lot- it was an incredible period and Queen Victoria was incredibly popular.  When you say Victorian England, a lot comes to mind- both good and bad- but the first thing that comes to my mind, and please bear in mind that I'm American, so there's the disclaimer- we're always talking about impressions from this side of the Atlantic, but the first thing that comes to mind is just the incredible amount of material progress- there was unequaled production of goods- England was well on the front end of the Industrial Revolution.  There was a lot of innovation, a growing middle class- but then again on the flip side- with that there's all the social problems that go with material progress.  Things that we think of Charles Dickens writing novels about- street children, dirty pollution from coal- the sort of things we've talking about in other episodes like when we talked about where the Bronte sisters grew up or William Blake's Chimney Sweepers- and these problems are the things that lots of people but specifically a lot of writers were concerned about and commenting on.  John Ruskin famously said, “that the real test of a community is not how much wealth it is producing but what kind of people it is producing” and of course he's right about that.  It was something that would take years to sort out- finding the moral balance between production and exploitation- something every society wrestles with and always will.      Well, the Brownings, surprisingly, weren't really a part of that protest movement, to be honest- and the reason I say that is because for a big chunk of time, in fact, their entire married life, they lived in Italy.    Didn't Ibsen live in Italy, and Keats lived in Italy- Italy seems to be responsible for a lot of great English language writing.    Ironically, that's true.  Well, getting to the Brownings, Robert Browning grew up in Camberwell, at the time, a suburb of London. He was the only son of a fairly affluent family.  He was the product private tutoring, world travel, and a lot of what today we would call privilege.  None of this made him a famous poet though.      It wasn't for lack of trying.  I was impressed to see how supportive his family was to the point of paying for his work to get published.  I was also impressed by how bumpy his start was.  It seems his work was not well-received initially, and in fact was met with a bit  of mean-spirited extremely embarrassing criticism.  John Stuart Mill said that Browning was parading and I quote a “morbid state” of self-worship after he published his first poem named “Pauline” when he was 21.      Yeah- that seems meat to me, and maybe would have wiped me out too, but in his case, Browning reacted to those criticisms of his early work in a positive kind of way.  I find it clever, actually,  and this stylistic change altered the course of his career.  He swore off confessional writing- the kind that'spersonal-  and instead modified from the kind of writing he had done in the poem “Pauline” and turned to what today, he is has become famous for- the dramatic monologue.    Exactly- now Christy, I think we've mentioned these before, but what is a dramatic monologue and more importantly, why should we care?    Thank you for asking exactly the question I wanted to answer!    Ha!  It's like you didn't ask me to ask you.    Well, there is that- hahaha- anyway, let me start by saying that the reason most people don't like poetry in general is because they think it doesn't make a lot of sense.  It doesn't SAY anything. And I realize, we high school English teachers, likely share part of the blame for this dislike of the genre.  More than one teacher, myself included I'm sure, have droned on and on about things that are fairly boring.  I remember a few years ago, and this is a tangent, but it's stayed with me.  Anyway, it was a junior English class and I started the class by saying something like, “Today, students, we are going to explore some of the key features of American Romanticism and then some of the greatest hits”- to which a kid from the back row rapid fire responded- with “And that is why I got up and came to school this morning”.   It made me laugh because this particular boy, an athlete, could not think of an introduction to anything more boring than what I had just described…although, in fairness, American Romanticism is NOT boring…but I digress.    Ha!!  I'm sure you changed his mind about the writings of Edgar Allan Poe and Walt Whitman.         Well, of course I did.  HA!   But where I'm heading is that- when we think of poietry as being  boring.  We often are thinking about confessionals – people whining about their lives, their loves, getting in their feelings for the wrongs life has brought upon them- that sort of thing.      For most of us- that is not the purpose of reading.  We think of writing as a form of communicating information, and reading as a form of gathering information.  The problem with a poem is that it has no information.  And so the natural reaction to it is the very honest question- why am I reading this?  But we shouldn't read poetry like we would read an article on Snap Chap or a newspaper editorial.   Instead, we should judge it with a very intuitive criteria- did I learn something, did it make me laugh or cry, was it unexpected, did it change my mind?  That sort of thing?     But isn't learning or gathering information a large part of what writing is about?    Well, of course that's true- but it isn't a very good way to read poetry because if you do it that way you just can't enjoy it-  what makes great poetry is not the transmission of information at all.  What makes great poetry is the exact same thing as what makes great plays or great novels or great music- they voice ideas about the world- they spotlight things we experience, things we've seen but have not articulated, things we've noticed but have not thought.  Great poems are not about the poet at all- they are about us- the reader.  They are about our experiences in the world- they are about understanding the people and the emotions that populate our world. And then we are no longer alone in our world- even from 100 years ago, there was a guy who knows somebody like I know.   And Robert Browning did this sort of thing extremely well.  And I want to explain how all of this works.      Sounds good.      One thing we have to always keep in our minds about a poem is that the speaker is not the author.  In other words the poem may be in the first person, but that doesn't mean we are to understand that the speaker is writing about himself.  Example, a poem may say “I love chopped onions” and the poet actually hates them, but the speaker of the poem can say I love chopped onions because this speaker is his own separate character totally apart from the poet. And in this world that has been created, the speaker likes chopped onions.    This is, of course, true for plays as well, we know that Nora is not Ibsen , nor is Torvald.  But when we read poetry, we slip into the habit of thinking the poet is writing about his or her own life- that it's ocnfessional.  And although, that's sometimes true, and it was true for the poems we're going to read by Elizabeth next-  it's not necessarily true- in fact, I would argue- it's mostly not true.  So, that brings us to dramatic monologues.  In the dramatic monologue, especially Browning's,  it is extremely apparent that the speaker is NOT the poet.   Browning wants to make it very clear he is not using dramatic monologues as a masking technique to talk about himself.      Instead, he uses this poem, My Last Duchess,  to explore something really twisted in humanity- and although, I doubt many of us know a guy as twisted as this guy from this poem- he doesn't sound unrelatable.  As we read the monologue, Browning pushes forth a really aggressive commentary on how people treat each other, but he does it with a sort of ironic detachment.  He can entertain us as well as comment on how humans behave towards each other because he's not talking at all.  He will allow the twisted character to just talk and through this guy's, own confessions, he tell us information about himself, his view of the world, his behaviors and from there we are enabled to actually judge for ourselves how nuts this guy is, and then we can extrapolate people we may have met who are kind of like this, or maybe even really like this.      Well, I have to say, as a student of psychology, My Last Duschess, is one of the more psychologically twisted characters and fascinating characters I've read about since we've started this podcast.  The inordinate level of hubris Browning expresses through this duke makes most egomaniacs we know look small time.      True- but although none of us go to dinner parties expecting to see pictures of dead wives behind curtains, we may know someone we also find to have an absurd level of vanity disproportionate to their accomplishments or essence- that hints at this level of hubris. That to me is how this poem connects to A Doll's House, Torvald Helmer, but in his middle class suburban way expresses this  unusual degree of possessiveness that we see blown up in a Renaissance setting.  Torvald doesn't seem like the kind of guy who would murder his wife, but he most certainly has reduced her to a work of art, a treasure- something comparable to a portrait on a wall to be brought out and admired, but then put back on the shelf- that portrait better not exercise any sort of will of her own- and if she knows what's best- try to stay mostly quiet and unsmiling towards strangers.      So, in case, you are unfamiliar with the poem and I've confused you, let me introduce you to the speaker of Browning's poem.  The speaker in this poem is an Renaissance Italian Duke- a extremely wealthy man, who's pedigree includes a 900 year old name.      Garry, was the guy in the poem a real person or totally something Browning made up entirely in his head.      Interesting you should ask that because as you know, I've always thought that writers write from their experience or what they know- but in the case of this particular poem- if this is an actual person- I'm not really sure we can say that it is.  We do know that Browning was well traveled and in 1838 spent two months in Northern Italy studying Italian history and legends.  This poem seems to be set somewhere in that area- there's a lot of scholarship to say maybe the town of Ferrara which, for those of us less familiar with Northern Italy, think of it as North of Florence but South of Verona or Venice.  This may or may not be the right town or the right Duke, but it's an interesting hypothesis that the Duchess in the story could be Lucrezia, Cosimo de Medici's younger daughter who was married to Alfonso of the Este family.  She supposedly died of tuberculosis, but Alfonso showed no interest in her as a wife- to the point that he left three days after their wedding in Florence without his new bride for France.  He didn't even see Lucretia for the next two years.  When he did come back to Ferrara, he sent for his wife, she moved to Ferrara and a year later, barely 17 was found dead.  It could have been tuberculosis, it could have been poisoning, we all know the Renaissance is famous for a disproportionate share of people being poisoned to death including a few members of the DE Medici family, and of course, Catherine de Medici was famous herself for poisoning people.    I saw that in the tv series, Reign.  Well, getting back to our Duke, what about this Duke from Ferraro, Alfonso the Second,  what kind of guy he- does he match the profile of someone who might poison his wife?      That's a good question.  It seems he was something of a jerk.  Historians, and let me quote one, called him an “immoderately arrogant and conceited, and prided himself beyond measure upon his bravery, intelligence, and ancient descent.  With all that he was vengeful and ever ready to pursue a feud.”  So, there you have that commentary, it seems a possibility-  but of course, as we will see as we read the poem, Christy, are we even sure the Duke in the Last Duchess murders his wife?  Renaissance murderers were kind of mysterious like that- you just never knew.      I guess so, before we get out of the history part and start reading the poem, let me ask one more question.  In this poem, the Duke keeps a portrait of his murdered wife behind a curtain so he can admire her and show her off when he wants to, is there a portrait of Lucrecia that we know of today that might have inspired this poem?  Or is there a painter called Fra Pandolf- the name of the painter in the poem?  Do we know of any  emissaries that would have been representing the would be the next duchess- the one to follow the Last Duchess?  Is there any historical evidence based on the clues from the poem that any of the other characters were real people?    Well yes and no- the first hurdle in definitely declaring this poem to be about Lucretia de Medici- is that  There is no such painting that we know of, and there is no such famous painter as Frau Pandolf.  But, if we just assume that there might have been but it's just gone to history, and we work on the assumption that the Last Duchess is Lucrezia de medici, that means the second wife would have to be Barbara of Austria.  There's a long story there, their marriage only lasted 8 years before she died.  She was most famous for her work with destitute young girls and even founded a house for them.  After she died, Alfonso married a third time, this time to Margherita, the 15 year old  niece of  his wife Barbara of Austria.    Well, whether this is the guy or not, he does seem to be creepy enough to fit the bill.    I think so.  And honestly, it doesn't matter.  This stuff is just interesting stuff to discuss at Trivia night.    I agree, I've read enough Machiavelli to know that the Renaissance boys were not above poisoning people for most anything- and that isn't even the point.  Browning doesn't tell us who it is maybe because it's a composite of a couple of people, maybe it's because it's a totally made up person, but I think because in a more important sense, this is metaphorical- this Duke is a metaphor of a familiar ego- one a reader of Ibsen might latched on to, one we can all latch on to.  And yes, this is a poem about objectifying women again, and this is why we chose to feature it this week, but honestly, if you think about it= the metaphor of the ultimate egoist s person so stupid and delusional that he sees himself as the Neptune in his world is not far fetched.    Ah- no- I'd say- look no farther than a twitter feed.  Shall we read, Christy- as this is a dramatic monologue- to what degree should we bring a dramatic reading to the text.    I think we should bring a very dramatic reading to it.  Do you want to give it a go. Let's read break it up, and then we can put it all back together and see if we can understand it.      Sure, let me read it….      Okay, there's a lot to say, but I want to break everything down so that the poem can be fun- and it is fun.  The way to read poems, and I know I've said this before, and not just me, but everyone, is read them slowly.  It's about enjoying the details.  It's not about rushing to the end, so let's do that…    That's my last Duchess painted on the wall,  Looking as if she were alive.     Sentence one- we are to see that the duchess is painted on the wall- we'll understand in a minute that that's probably a fresco, but that doesn't necessarily matter.  She looks as if she were alive, implying she's dead.  We also know that the belonged to the Duke- it's his duchess and we know it's the last one whe had.  We should also be alarmed that the tone here is quite detached.  Garry, I hope if something bad happens to me, you don't talk about me like this.  There is no tenderness here- there's pride, perhaps, but no tenderness.      Let's keep going….    I call  That piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf's hands  Worked busily a day, and there she stands.  Will't please you sit and look at her?    Sentence 2- 3The piece is a wonder- not the woman- again-the PIECE is the wonder- be it the paitning or the woman- it's all very detached.  But we also are told that she was painted by Fra Pandolf- Garry, you said we don't know anything about this guy for sure, but is there any historical context that could give us some help in understanding subtext here.    Well,  Fra- is short for Friar- this is a catholic monk or priest.  That tells us that there is NO sexual hanky panky going on.  Friar's take vows of chastity, and although we know there were those that broke them, there were more that didn't and we should presume that here as well.  Also, he worked busily a day- may imply that this IS a fresco.  Fresco paintings had to be done in one day, like with Michelangelo and the Sistine chapel because when the plaster dries youre done.  But the nice thing about them is that once they do dry, they last forever.  If you wanted beauty to never die- a fresco would be the way to go.    And notice this rhetorical question- whoever the Duke is talking to is basically being told to sit and admire the last Duchess.  We will soon find out that this guy is the emissary for the new Duchess, so in a sense, it is not appropriate to sit and stare at the last Mrs. So, we have to wonder, why does he insist on this?  This next sentence is really very long and difficult to understand.        I said  “Fra Pandolf” by design, for never read  Strangers like you that pictured countenance,  The depth and passion of its earnest glance,  But to myself they turned (since none puts by  The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)  But to myself they turned (since none puts by  The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)  And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,  How such a glance came there; so, not the first  Are you to turn and ask thus.     This sentence takes a couple of rereads to just make sense of it- but let me put it in my words.  Basocially, he's saying that Fra Pandolf- on purpose- captured a very specific facial expression in the face of his ex-wife.  She had this certain deep and passionate smile- the way he's suggesting here- it's almost a sexy smile- and- according to this duke, he imagines that the guy he's talking to is like everyone else in the world and everyone else in the world- when they see this painting want to ask him, although they don't dare because this duke is just that intimidating- they want to ask him who she's looking at to give such a sexy glance.  And then he is just going to tell this guy- who did not ask that question or even ask to see this painting- who exactly his wife was looking at when she gave this sexy smile.  And notice that the way he phrases it almost suggests the last duchess was perhaps cheating on him.      Sir, 'twas not  Her husband's presence only, called that spot  Of joy into the Duchess' cheek; perhaps  Fra Pandolf chanced to say, “Her mantle laps  Over my lady's wrist too much,” or “Paint  Must never hope to reproduce the faint  Half-flush that dies along her throat.”    He says, it wasn't just my presence that gave her that sexy smile.  Maybe even Fra Pandolf happened to suggest that she reveal a little more skin- implying maybe she liked to show a little more skin- a little more wrist.  He goes on to say that paint couldn't possibly reproduce her half-flush.  All of this is pseudo sexual language that ends with death threat along the throat.      Let me interject something here that caught my eye- the way he talks to the guy he's talking to is very condescending.  He makes him sit down.  He uses the term “sir” and “you” instead of “thee or thou” that would have been more appropriate between men of equal station of the time period.  He is talking down to this guy for whatever reason.    Look at these next two sentences-     Such stuff  Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough  For calling up that spot of joy. She had  A heart—how shall I say?— too soon made glad,  Too easily impressed; she liked whate'er  She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.    He's going on and on about this sexy smile.  But here he again implies she's permiscuous.  He uses the word “stuff”- that is a very vague term which we use euphemistically for things we don't want to say outloud.  Then he says this, “she had a heart- how shall I say?- too soon made glad” that phrase- how shall I say is set off with dashes.  This duke is stopping as if he can't quite find the right word to describe the behavior for his wife- how shall I say- he's looking for that word and the words he comes up with are “too soon made glad”- or she gets happy to easily- again implying almost less subtly that she flirts inappropriately.  Just the very idea that he wants to pretend that he has to find the right word- he's been rattling on and on in perfect iambic pentameter for a good 22 lines with no need to even have any dash at all- much less a problem with coming up with the right words.  In fact, he has already told us he shows off this picture many times apparently to a bunch of people who look at that sexy smile and wonder who she's smiling at.      He will continue to imply that his wife was a slut with even more euphemisms.  Read the next two sentences.      Too easily impressed; she liked whate'er  She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.  Sir, 'twas all one!     That last sentence, is a telegraphic sentence- that means it's very short for the purpose of highlighting a very important idea.  She looked everywhere and with that same dang sexy smile.  It's clear by this point he hated that.       My favour at her breast,  The dropping of the daylight in the West,  The bough of cherries some officious fool  Broke in the orchard for her, the white mule  She rode with round the terrace—all and each  Would draw from her alike the approving speech,  Or blush, at least. She thanked men—good! but thanked  Somehow—I know not how—as if she ranked  My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name  With anybody's gift.      And now we are let on to the secret that this guy may be a psychopath.  Look at what he's jealous of- that duchess presumed to look at the sunset with her sexy smile.  A nice person gave her a cherry and she gave him a sexy smile.  She gave her mule that sexy smile.  Now we are led to question, is this really a sexy smile or is this just a kind smile?  It appears she had the audacity to thank people for things- clearly something he doesn't do.  And in fact, something she should not do- the only person she should ever be thanking is him.  He gave her the most p recious thing in the entire universe- his name- and if she thanked him other people with the same words as she used to thank him- or if she smiled at people with a kind smile- that was a direct assault him.  Who does she think she is?    Who'd stoop to blame  This sort of trifling? Even had you skill  In speech—which I have not—to make your will  Quite clear to such an one, and say, “Just this  Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,  Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let  Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set  Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—  E'en then would be some stooping; and I choose  Never to stoop.     Notice how the tone seems to shift here.  He's getting a little angrier.  He's also throwing out more of those dashes- this time to set off the phrase that he doesn't have skill in speech- of course he has skill in speech- that's the whole point.      It reminds me of when I've fussed at my children and said something like, “I guess I didn't make myself clear when I asked you to clean your room”- you're not really communicating you were not clear, you're communicating you WERE clear and you were ignored.      Exactly- and apparently he had told her that certain behaviors of hers like smiling and thanking people were disgusting to him and she blatantly ignored this.  She refused to be lessoned- and of course we have a pun here- because lessons are something that you learn- she refused to be taught- but she also refused to be lessened as in made smaller.  She didn't stoop – but here's what's worse. He didn't actually tell her anything.  He didn't actually ask her to do or not do anything.  For him to actually have to tell her to do these things- that in and of itself would be degrading to him.      I've been told that line before- perhaps you have to- I shouldn't have to tell you to do this- you should just know it- you should WANT to do this thing that I want you do to do.  And by you not knowing or not wanting the right things that I want you to want or to like- THAT is the infraction- the insult lies there.  How could you NOT want this thing that I want you to want or have this behavior that I want you to have.  The very idea that I would have to stoop to tell you is in itself an insult beyond scope.      And if you are not convinced that he's psycho- he's got more to say.  First to confirm that she did not cheat on him or even hate him.      Oh, sir, she smiled, no doubt,  Whene'er I passed her; but who passed without  Much the same smile?    She smiled at him.  It seems, as we are now to assume, that she did not have a sexy smile but that this smile was a kind smile- she smiled kindly at him.  And THIS was an insult because that smile, that we see on the wall- that sexy smile that is now a kind smile- she gave out to other people besides him.  Why would she do that!??  That was just too too much, so the poor person sitting down and listening to this is supposed to clearly understand that by this point he had no choice- she had to go.       This grew; I gave commands;  Then all smiles stopped together. There she stands  As if alive.    So, did he have her executed?    I know- it's ambiguous.  I read somewhere that someone directly asked Browning this question to which and one time he replied smugly, I didn't say he had her executed.  I said all smiles stopped, maybe he sent her to the convent.  But another time he said, yes, these were commands to be put to death..so we are left to make that determination for ourselves.  I will say, I think the person he's talking to thinks he had her killed.  As we read these lines, there's an indication that tried to bolt but the Duke won't let him. Let's read the ending.     Will't please you rise? We'll meet  The company below, then. I repeat,  The Count your master's known munificence  Is ample warrant that no just pretense  Of mine for dowry will be disallowed;  Though his fair daughter's self, as I avowed  At starting, is my object. Nay, we'll go  Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though,  Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,  Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!      How do you think that means the emissary is trying to bolt?    Well, first the Duke tells him to get up for them to go down together to meet the new duchess- but then he says, nay= nay means no- no to what- I think the guy was trying to get head of him because he says, “nay, we'll go together.”  He's not letting this guy out of his sight.  He's enjoying this.  He wanted to tell this story.  He wanted to brag on his omnipotence- it's not a coincidence that he's showing off another piece of art of his- this one a Roman God- Neptune.  And this is the final thought of the poem and worth us taking a minute to think about.  Again- this is why poetry is not informational.  The fun of poetry is not to get to the end and get all the information.  The fun of poetry is to slow down and think the thoughts the poet is feeding you.  Following the clues and hearing his voice.  Browning, from over 100 years ago wants to give us a few ideas about life and how to look at certain people that surface in every generation.      And the final image is this statue of the Roman god, Neptune.  When we see the statue, the first thing we think about is =huh, another piece of art.  Browning has created a frame for his poem- he started and ended his poem with art- these two pieces.  Then the next thought should be- huh- I wonder what Neptune is supposed to tell us.  Who is Neptune?  How does art piece number two connect with art piece number 1? Well, obviously, Neptune is the god of the sea- the Greeks called him Poseiden.  But what is he doing here- well- he's taming a sea horse- what does that mean?  This statue is not a static statue- it's not a bowl of fruit, it's not even a horse in a park.  It's a Roman god taming  a sea horse.  Neptune, in general is god of the sea – he commands and controls nature itself- the environment- there is a suggestion here of violence- by casting the sculpture in bronze the Duke has tamed and stopped the god taming the sea- he is the master of it all- he is in total control- Neptune has restrained the sea horse in exactly the same way as the Duke has restrained his wife- he controls the vitality- just as he has frozen the vitality in this statue- the vitality of his wife is also frozen.      Well, and what is ironic about all of it- is that in describing his ex-wife- he describes a woman totally in tune with life- she connected to nature, to others, to animals- she was the very expression of vitality- to the point that her vitality is expressed in a smile he tries to explain away as adulterous.  He is bragging because he had the power to get rid of that smile- to get rid of that vitality- she could be reduced to a work of art in death- something he could never accomplish in life.      And yet, there is more irony even in this…in order to destroy his wife- he preserved her for all eternity.  We all know that art outlasts a single lifespan.  By destroying her vitality- he preserved her vitality.     Oh my, that's confusing- are you trying to make us crazy.      Maybe- but I'm trying to point out how fun poetry can be if we let it.  Let's read it put back together.    That's my last Duchess painted on the wall,  Looking as if she were alive. I call  That piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf's hands  Worked busily a day, and there she stands.  Will't please you sit and look at her? I said  “Fra Pandolf” by design, for never read  Strangers like you that pictured countenance,  The depth and passion of its earnest glance,  But to myself they turned (since none puts by  The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)  And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,  How such a glance came there; so, not the first  Are you to turn and ask thus. Sir, 'twas not  Her husband's presence only, called that spot  Of joy into the Duchess' cheek; perhaps  Fra Pandolf chanced to say, “Her mantle laps  Over my lady's wrist too much,” or “Paint  Must never hope to reproduce the faint  Half-flush that dies along her throat.” Such stuff  Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough  For calling up that spot of joy. She had  A heart—how shall I say?— too soon made glad,  Too easily impressed; she liked whate'er  She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.  Sir, 'twas all one! My favour at her breast,  The dropping of the daylight in the West,  The bough of cherries some officious fool  Broke in the orchard for her, the white mule  She rode with round the terrace—all and each  Would draw from her alike the approving speech,  Or blush, at least. She thanked men—good! but thanked  Somehow—I know not how—as if she ranked  My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name  With anybody's gift. Who'd stoop to blame  This sort of trifling? Even had you skill  In speech—which I have not—to make your will  Quite clear to such an one, and say, “Just this  Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,  Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let  Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set  Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—  E'en then would be some stooping; and I choose  Never to stoop. Oh, sir, she smiled, no doubt,  Whene'er I passed her; but who passed without  Much the same smile? This grew; I gave commands;  Then all smiles stopped together. There she stands  As if alive. Will't please you rise? We'll meet  The company below, then. I repeat,  The Count your master's known munificence  Is ample warrant that no just pretense  Of mine for dowry will be disallowed;  Though his fair daughter's self, as I avowed  At starting, is my object. Nay, we'll go  Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though,  Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,  Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!        A great writer can make things simple- like the simplistic understanding that this is an excellent portrait of a psychopath- which it is- to a historical understanding- as an expose on the dark side of the Renaissance- a moralistic understanding- like beware of objectifying self-serving schucks- or what I will call an optimistic reading….freedom and vitality cannot be contained…life finds a way… (to quote that philosopher Michael Crichton) and that way may just be through a poem.. .  Thank you Robert Browning.    Yeah- well there you go- today's take away- stop reading for information- but read looking for the vitality!!!      Yeah!  Read for vitality!! It's there!      Next episode, we will tell you the famous love story of Robert Browning and his celebrity wife, Elizabeth Barrett, and we'll read some bona fide love poems.  Thank you for spending time with us today.  We don't take that for granted.  Support us, if you don't mind, by tweeting an episode on your twitter feed, your linked in feed, or your facebook or Instagram feed.  Text an episode to a friend and help us grow.    Thank you.    Peace out.     

Retire There with Gil & Gene
Retiring in Venice, Florida with Stopovers in the British Virgin Islands and on Mega Yachts

Retire There with Gil & Gene

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 55:51


Have you ever dreamt about chucking everything and escaping to a far-away island? Cynthia and Winston Hovey made it happen! They left their ocean-view apartment and corporate lifestyle in San Diego to live in a grass hut and manage a pirate bar on a tiny island (population 5) in the British Virgin Islands. After hurricanes devastated the island, they captained and ran luxury sailing and motor yachts for 20 years. Find out what led this fearless couple to retire in Venice, Florida, on episode 53 of Retire There with Gil & Gene.Cynthia and Winston Hovey's adventurous and entertaining book is There's a Yacht More to Life: Loving, Working and Playing in Paradise. 

Work Hard Play Hard
387. Fri-Date: Be Open to the LESSONS the Universe Is TRYING to Tell You

Work Hard Play Hard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:51


One of the most exciting parts of moving to Italy for us was not only living in Florence, but all of the other incredible locations that were just a train ride or a short flight away. At a restaurant in Venice, we spoke to the son of a restaurant owner and he had a Scottish accent when he spoke English. It turns out he went to school there. Why? Because “You can't be in the restaurant business and have interesting conversations with people if you don't know the world.” This episode is all over the place… except it isn't. We're going to talk about the power of having deep conversations with interesting people, allowing kismet to happen, and listening to the lessons the universe is throwing in your face. In This Conversation We Cover:  [02:41] Exploring the world to become an interesting person [08:05] Being a citizen of the world [10:41] Knowing when there's magic happening [13:10] Finding the teachers all around us Resources: Text "Dream Life" to 310- 388-9724 to get our FREE dream life course Mastermind: https://workhardplayhardpodcast.com/mastermind/ (workhardplayhardpodcast.com/mastermind) Connect with Rob on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robmurgatroyd/ (@robmurgatroyd) Connect with Kim on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kimmurgatroyd/ (@kimmurgatroyd) To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: https://workhardplayhardpodcast.com/ (workhardplayhardpodcast.com) Work Hard Play Hard is a production of http://crate.media (Crate Media)

The Week in Art
Jasper Johns: the retrospective in depth. Plus, Venice's tourism problem and Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:23


This week: Jasper Johns. Carlos Basualdo of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Scott Rothkopf of the Whitney Museum of American Art talk to Ben Luke about their simultaneous shows of the 91-year-old artist, and taking a radical approach to a retrospective of a radical artist. Also this week: Venice's tourist problem. Are Venetian authorities subjecting tourists in Venice to unprecedented surveillance? We talk to Anna Somers Cocks, founder of The Art Newspaper and former chair of Venice in Peril. And in our Work of the Week, Aimee Dawson asks Marja Sakari, director of the Ateneum in Helsinki, about the Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen's Dream Play: Fleeting Virginity (1984), a key work in her retrospective at the Ateneum. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Come Thru
Pull Up On Me #96

Come Thru

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 60:36


Cashley went viral over the weekend after she dropped her latest skate video. fLex says she is still intimidated by the Venice skate champs but is down for the rink. Lexie gives us the 411 on the new SoFi Stadium in Inglewood after attending her first game there. Football season is back and in full force! Sending love to the nephew of the pod, Cole dislocated his shoulder at football practice over the weekend. Don't let Ash and Lex get caught up on food alley cuz then the show will be real long! Dave Chapelle releases his self proclaimed “last” stand up on Netflix called The Closer and naturally turns it up. The ladies discuss the effects of the War on Drugs and the current aftermath that we're STILL dealing with. Fentynol is finding its way into everything, even weed so that means no more hood shops!Shoutouts to the 85 South show for hosting the BET Awards and putting on for the podcast industry!You can find Hood Feminism by Mikki Kendall hard copy on Amazon, Target, and the eBook on Kindle.Stay safe, wear a mask + remember… No Justice, No Peace until ALL BLACK LIVES MATTER! Stay connected: @ComeThruPod @FlexxLutherr @Ashlijaayy BUSINESS HIGHLIGHT:Check out @kellyskreations on IG and YouTube for quick and easy recipes or even full course signature meals from her home country of Grenada in the Caribbean. TV/FILM: Instant Hotel on NetflixPower Book II: Raising Kanan on STARZ Wu Tang: An American Saga on HuluMaid on NetflixMAMBA MOMENT: Trae The Truth: Howdy Homemade Ice Cream, franchise. Specifically creates jobs for people with disabilities. HEAT SEEKERS:This Week's Heat added to the Heat Seekers Playlist:Icewear Vezzo: 5 MiliFemme it Forward feat. Ambre: What You DeserveVibe to the Heat Seekers and follow the playlists: Apple Music/ iTunes: https://music.apple.com/us/playlist/heat-seekers/pl.u-55D6ZylugW2MDM Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1BxWfYK7rJSPZhH4fBMJEt?si=9lFATMeBTDO1mvRMhbaxLQ Tidal: https://tidal.com/playlist/4eb24890-f738-4615-b98a-f68064149c27 *** Come Thru Media LLC does not own the rights to the music played during heatseekers.

Orange Slices
Gianluca Busio

Orange Slices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 59:41


On the eve of their World Cup Qualifying match against Jamaica, we caught up with one of the youngest guys in camp, Gianluca Busio. The guys may have been battling jet lag - 7 hours is no joke - but they still had a great conversation about this camp, Venezia and life outside of soccer. The guys give you a behind the scenes look on this current camp, general vibe, training sessions, how it compares to the Gold Cup and how they stay mentally ready on match day. Plus, Gianluca opens up about his time in Venice: how he feels playing against players he played with on FIFA, new training gear, and who he's swapping a jersey (or shorts) with next. Check out our Spotify Playlist Follow us on Instagram “Orange Slices” connects the past, present, and future generations of U.S. internationals around our collective soccer story. Hosted by emerging U.S. international Mark McKenzie and former U.S. international Heath Pearce, this cross-generational show is an unfiltered celebration of our national team and soccer Americana.

Indagare Global Conversations
Gay Gassmann, Art Historian and Architectural Digest Contributing Writer: An American in Paris

Indagare Global Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:17


What's it really like to be an American in Paris? Melissa Biggs Bradley talks with Gay Gassmann about seeing the world (and the City of Light) through an expat's lens and how travel, her career, (and her combined passions) have intertwined at the nexus of art and collecting, design and fashion. Plus, her favorite parts of the city and the best design cities beyond Paris—including Tokyo, Kyoto, Antwerp, Marrakech, Venice and more.

Technical Difficulties Gaming Podcast
Night's Black Agents - The Vampire of Venice Part 1

Technical Difficulties Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 96:26


February, Venice, 2019. Carnival.A shipping CEO hires a trio of operators. His son has been murdered, and he wants the killer found. The son lived a hard, fast life, and was found dead after he went missing for a few days. His body was posed post mortem and drained of blood, so there is more to this story. Will the trio be able to unravel this mystery?Ben - GMDan - Varoutte (He/Him), FrenchEthan - Morgan (He/Him), AmericanLaura - Evelyn Greene (She/Her), American

Art Slice - A Palatable Serving of Art History
16: El Greco loco - Mannerism Mayhem! 'The Annunciation' From 1597

Art Slice - A Palatable Serving of Art History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 52:50


Oh jeez - this is a wild one...... Stephanie and Russell are back with another serving and boy, is it a _ROMP_. This week, join them as they head further back into Art History than ever before – to the 16th century to introduce El Greco, a catalyst of Modern Art. Looking to make it big, El Greco left the island life of Crete for the bustling Italian cities of Venice and Rome. There, he picked up traits from Renaissance and Mannerism styles and added some hometown Post-Byzantine spice – resulting in a bizarre yet stunning combination of colors and dynamic compositions never before seen in art history. He also made some friends - and enemies - along the way. Despite the Counter Reformation's harsh grip on Europe, EG was still able to thrive utilizing his strange style (that echoed his eccentric personality) to continually score commissions while managing to stand out amongst his contemporaries. After his death, he was mostly forgotten about until his rediscovery in the 19th century. Modern artists of the 20th century claimed him since he laid the groundwork for breaking visual tradition. And it was famous works like The Annunciation (1597) that caught the eye of Remedios Varo and Pablo Picasso among other art giants like Paul Cezanne. Stephanie and Russell discuss the first iterations of abstraction present in The Annunciation (1597) in which a teenage Mary is receiving heavenly news from towering angels and a turbulent celestial cloud column with floating cherub heads. Topics include: the rebranding of the Catholic Church (RC²), a lotta olives, trash talking Michelangelo (not us), long babies, miniature galleries for rats, time travel, and a plushie Remedios Varo mascot. There is no Art Pantry this week because Bean is missing. The song featured in this episode was “A Forest for me and You” by Komiku from the album A Tale is Never Forgotten which can be found here. Consider supporting their work! https://chezmonplaisir.bandcamp.com/album/a-tale-is-never-forgotten Reviewing, subscribing, liking, and sharing really helps support the show: Follow us on twitter, tiktok, youtube, and instagram. Be sure to listen to all the cuts that didn't make it into the episode on our Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/artslicepod Grab a sticker or a Three Witches t-shirt artslicepod.com/shop Check out some great books related to our episodes here (and support independent bookstores in the process): https://bookshop.org/shop/artslicepod

Flourish In The Foreign
Corporate Life in London & Repatriation with Wendy C .Williams

Flourish In The Foreign

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 66:24


In this episode of Flourish in the Foreign, Wendy shares her story of moving abroad to London for her career in tech, becoming a digital nomad, dating abroad, and dealing with the shock of repatriation.    This Episode Covers Experiencing a Corporate Move to London Being a Black Woman in London Becoming a Digital Nomad Living in Venice, Italy Dating Abroad How to Manage Repatriation Check out these resources: How She Built That: Podcasting Workshop with Danielle Desir & Christine Job  Join the Flourish in the Foreign Community Membership waitlist Flourish in the Foreign Book Club Guest Blog Submission Guidelines WOC Podcasters Insiders Membership*   Moving Abroad with Intention Guide 1-on-1 Moving Abroad with Intention Consultation Moving Abroad with Intention Course   Build a Business Abroad Guide Build a Business Abroad Group Coaching   *Affiliate links are used to support this podcast and website at no extra cost to you! Thank you for your support!   Episode Credits: Christine Job-Creator & Host Zachary Higgs-Theme Music   Like this episode? Love the podcast? Buy me a coffee SUPPORT THE PODCAST Become a Patreon Supporter Tip the podcast via CashApp Flourish in the Foreign Amazon Wishlist

Záznamy z klubovny
BoardGame Club #27

Záznamy z klubovny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 267:48


(3:20) Destinies (18:00) Alenčina zahrádka (29:30) Kaskádie (46:30) Churchill (1:04:50) Míra Štrobl – překladatel pro Fox in the Box (1:16:50) Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood of Venice (1:31:45) Kinghill (1:43:25) U-Boot (1:57:50) Jízdenky, prosím! Asie (2:09:00) Rollcate (2:11:30) Railroad Ink (2:26:50) Mini Express (2:38:50) Railroad Tycoon (2:49:30) Steam (2:55:30) Chicago Express (3:01:25) Téma 18xx – 18Chesapeake (3:41:40) 18Lilliput (3:51:15) Dual Gauge (3:58:10) 1846 (4:12:00) 18CZ

Travels Through Time
Michael Pye: The City at the Hub of the World (1549)

Travels Through Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 48:50


In the sixteenth-century there was nowhere quite like Antwerp. Tolerant, energetic, independent, vibrant; Antwerp sat at the heart of a busy and growing trading network. After the Portuguese moved the spice trade to Antwerp it became a fierce rival to Venice. It was a place that many came to call. 'the city at the hub of the world.' Today's guest is the historian, columnist and broadcaster Michael Pye. For many years Pye has been investigating Antwerp's distinctive culture and unique place in European history. In this episode he guides us back into the rowdy streets of Europe's busiest port. Antwerp was, he points out, a haven for Jews and hard-line Protestants, and a playground for just about everyone else. As ever, much, much more about this episode is to be found at our website tttpodcast.com. Click here to order Michael Pye's book from our friends at John Sandoe's who, we are delighted to say, are supplying books for the podcast. Show notes Scene One: September, Charles V's ceremonial entry into Antwerp with his son Philip. Scene Two: The King of Sweden sends Jacob Binck to Antwerp to check on the progress of a tomb he had commissioned. Scene Three: Italian merchant and conman Simone Turchi's luck begins to run out as his past catches up with him, ending with his public execution. Memento: A baboon People/Social Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Michael Pye Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Unseen Histories Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Or on Facebook See where 1549 fits on our Timeline 

Acquired Tastings
Cheers to cocktails from Italy

Acquired Tastings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:25


In their ramp up to Dad leaving for Italy, they mix up some cocktail. Josh stirs up the Venetian special Bellini. Josh made the peach nectar to go with the Italian Procecco. This cocktail was made famous by Harry's bar in Venice.  Dad, being true to form, pours the scotch based cocktail called The Godfather.  Marion Brando as Vito Carleone  enjoyed the Godfather cocktail.  They both have a good time sipping these drinks and talking about Italy. Josh tells his favorite Amaretto story.Cheers!

Orange Slices
Tanner Tessmann

Orange Slices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 77:24


Our guy Tanner Tessmann may just be the most chill guest we have had on the pod, just don't come at the FC Dallas Academy around him. Tanner stopped by for a great conversation with the guys about his new life in Venice, the food scene, navigating Serie A with a fellow American on the squad, breaking into the team and so much boat talk. Tanner also dives into his USMNT career, his first taste of Concacaf in Olympic qualifying and his future in red, white and blue. Finally, Tanner and Mark may have began a new feud over the best academy in MLS. This dude has a bright future. Check out Tanner's podcast “Chum Chat” Check out our Spotify Playlist Follow us on Instagram “Orange Slices” connects the past, present, and future generations of U.S. internationals around our collective soccer story. Hosted by emerging U.S. international Mark McKenzie and former U.S. international Heath Pearce, this cross-generational show is an unfiltered celebration of our national team and soccer Americana.

Oscar Wild
A Fall Festival Recap and September Release Round-up (Malignant, Blue Bayou, Cry Macho, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, and Dear Evan Hansen)

Oscar Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 76:42


Summer may have come and passed but there's no need to wake Nick and Sophia up as September ends because they've been diligently watching movies and are ready to discuss five releases from the past month. Firstly, find out which movies are solidifying themselves in the Oscar race due to positive reviews from recent film festivals, including Venice, Telluride, Toronto, and New York, and which new trailers of some of their most anticipated films they're most excited about (1:21).Then, onto Malignant, James Wan's latest spooky adventure (27:32), Blue Bayou (31:36), Clint Eastwood's new flick, Cry Macho (38:46), The Eyes of Tammy Faye (49:53) which showcases Jessica Chastain's televangelist transformation, and the Toby-winning stage-to-screen adaptation, Dear Evan Hansen (1:03:37). Tune in to find out about Oscar potential for these movies and come back in October to hear about some other new releases!Michael's Telluride Film Blog:https://michaelstelluridefilm.blogspot.com/2021/09/the-composite-telluride-belfast-wins-in.htmlFollow us on Twitter and Instagram @oscarwildpodMusic: “The Greatest Adventure” by Jonathan Adamich

秘密星球 HPR Secret Planet
Episode 143: 10月卢恩符文十二星座运势占卜

秘密星球 HPR Secret Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 24:44


00:11白羊 02:04金牛 03:39 双子 05:58巨蟹 08:10 狮子 10:10处女 12:44天平 14:33天蝎 16:09射手 18:37摩羯 21:22水瓶 22:40双鱼 微信公号:HPR秘密星球 Heather微博:熊乖一第下天 入神秘学大群申请:个人微信 HPRsecretplanet 课程活动福利通知https://shimo.im/forms/rDwqRKPKHJTRwKth/fill?channel=podcast Youtube HPR秘密星球 订阅地址: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG2PTJejDu6mOrZvrv38cIA Logo设计:小荻 xiaodilove2020@hotmail.com 配乐:Parisian and Night in Venice by Kevin MacLeod

ArtCurious Podcast
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #17: The Casino of the Spirits

ArtCurious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 33:56


Venice-- it's the most serene and beautiful city in Italy, and possibly the whole world. But Venice at night-- all darkened and quiet-- takes up the most space in my imagination. I seriously love the depictions of Venice as enigmatic, shadowy, and even dangerous. All of this lends Venice this air of inscrutability and mystery. And over time, locals and visitors alike have reveled in this sensation as fodder for myth-making and storytelling. Some stories really stick, lasting for centuries and becoming embedded into the city itself, through its buildings, monuments, and specific locations. And there's one building that has had plenty of legends built around it. This particular elegant structure had an illustrious past, having once been a meeting place where Italian Renaissance artists discussed their craft, caroused, and gambled. But it's also the location where relationships soured, crimes were committed, and death inevitably followed. Today, some people won't even enter this particular building because it is feared to be haunted, cursed… or both. Today we're calling back to an episode of the first season of ArtCurious to talk about another potentially cursed locale in Venice, Italy: the so-called Casino of the Spirits. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts and FOLLOW on Spotify Twitter / Instagram / Facebook / Fireside Don't forget to show your support for our show by purchasing ArtCurious swag from TeePublic! Want to advertise on ArtCurious? We work exclusively with AdvertiseCast to manage all our ads. Join us today! SPONSORS: The Zebra: Compare home and auto insurance on one independent marketplace, for free Indeed: Listeners get a free $75 credit to upgrade your job post BetterHelp: Listeners enjoy 10% off your first month of counseling Feals: Become a member and get 40% automatically taken off your first three months of premium CBD with free shipping Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Second Chances
Julia Verdin's Second Chance

Second Chances

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 57:36


Veteran filmmaker Julia Verdin is a multi hyphenate – she is known as accomplished producer, award-winning Director and has written a number of screenplays. She is also the founder of Artists for Change, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with a mission to create high impact film, television, and multimedia projects to inspire individuals, organizations, and communities to bring about positive social change. Having been in the film business for 30 years, Julia has established herself as one of Hollywood's leading independent producers, with over 33 critically acclaimed feature films produced to date.  She founded and has been running Rough Diamond Productions since 1995. Currently in post-production is THE UNWILLING starring Dina Meyer, Lance Henriksen and Jake Thomas, and 7 SECONDS directed By Jeffrey Obrow, starring Dwight Yoakam and Christopher Lloyd. Julia's films have been selected for many major film festivals including Sundance, Toronto, Venice, AFI, Raindance, Vancouver International and London. Julia is also known as a leading educator in film: her book SUCCESS IN FILMS, a guide to developing, funding, producing, and marketing indie films is on many college syllabuses around the world and has helped many filmmakers.  Julia is passionate about raising awareness on key social issues through the powerful medium of film and encourages filmmakers to think about making content that contributes to a better world.

A Quest for Well-Being
Self-Fulfilment Is Life Moving Through You

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 46:33


— When we are beyond desire, we open to what is with no judgment. Which allows Being to flow into all our actions. Life simply moves through us. Valeria Teles interviews Fu-Ding Cheng — the author of “Map of Desire: Blueprint for Self-Fulfillment.” Fu-Ding Cheng––visionary filmmaker and shamanic artist––began his career as a practicing architect, but has since focused his attention on books, spirituality, and filmmaking. In 1990, he founded Liquid Light Productions devoted to help change the “dream of the planet” through shamanic workshops, art, books and media. His multi-faceted career includes a prize-winning series of films, Zen-Tales for the Urban Explorer presented as a special retrospective at the Hammer Museum, music videos (Starship's We Built This City on Rock and Roll, nominated “Best Video of the Year”), illustrated album covers (Heart's Dog and Butterfly), and wrote and illustrated a children's book, Dream-House. While teaching film directing at the North Carolina School of the Arts, he created a groundbreaking new curriculum, "Shamanic Tools for the Filmmaker." However, first priority over all vocational activities has been his life-long devotion to spiritual awakening. Since break-through life-changing experiences in 1995 as apprentice to Toltec shaman Don Miguel Ruiz (The Four Agreements), Fu-Ding has been impassioned to help spread the deepest wisdom to the widest number of people. For the last twenty years, he has been leading spiritual/shamanic workshops distilled from his life-long quest involving Eastern meditation in the Himalayas, Chinese Kung-Fu, spiritual psychology, and Meso-American wisdom traditions. Based in Venice, California, he is now launching his latest book, Map of Desire, a Blueprint for Self-fulfillment. To learn more about Fu-Ding Cheng and his work, please visit: fudingcheng.com & www.facebook/fdcheng     — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well.   

The Outdoors Show
Outdoors Show Hour 2

The Outdoors Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 48:54


We started the second hour in Venice, Louisiana with our good friend Mike Jeffcoat. James Plaag joined us from Galveston. We stayed in Galveston with our friend Sharky Marquez. We headed out west to Corpus and Cliff Webb. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast
September 24, 2021 - Tim Sika Movie Reviews

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 31:22


This week's reviews include THE CARD COUNTER--a revenge thriller about an ex-military interrogator (Oscar Isaac) turned gambler haunted by the ghosts of his past. -----THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BOY IN THE WORLD--documentary about actor Björn Andrésen and the effects of fame thrust upon him when he appeared in Luchino Visconti's 1971 film, "Death in Venice." -----THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE--More about Tammy Faye Baker than the PTL fraud scandal of the late 1980s but watchable as hell. Jessica Chastain and Andrew Garfield play Tammy and Jim Baker, respectively. -----ATTACK, DECAY, RELEASE--Please make sure to ask me about this--made by one of the best Bay Area filmmakers and I really want to plug it! And MOHAMMAD ALI and WIND RIVER, too. www.celluloiddreams.net   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Gabby Petito's Death Determined To Be A Homicide As Dive Crews Search For Fiancé

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 11:55


Gabby Petito's remains were recovered in northwestern Wyoming near Grand Teton National Park Sunday and a coroner has determined her death was a homicide. Meanwhile, there is mounting pressure on authorities to locate Petito's fiancé as crews search for him in a swampy Florida preserve. FOX's John Saucier speaks to FOX's Phil Keating, in Venice, Florida, about the latest in the case that has captivated the attention of so many.

Mommy Matters The Wine down
Texas Abortion Ban

Mommy Matters The Wine down

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 62:25


We're touching on this weeks trending topics:Fentanyl Overdoses (Micheal K Willams & 3 Comedians in Venice,CA *Fuquan Johson)Texas Abortion LawWe have a guest joining us today to give us the legalities on Texas Abortion ban- Attorney Keli Webb Esq.Get in touch with Attorney Keli Webb Esq- https://www.thewebblawgroup.com keli@thewebblawgroup.comSubscribe on Youtube- https://youtu.be/fAHfG_0TIqEYou can also tune into todays episode on Apple Podcast or Spotifyhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talk-space-co-the-podcast/id1271495363Check out our Website https://www.Momspaceco.com

Seeking Excellence
Ep 96 | Why You Need More Mary In Your Life w/ Joshua Mazrin

Seeking Excellence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 50:40


Joshua Mazrin is a graduate of Franciscan University of Steubenville with a Bachelors and Masters in Theology. He also serves as Director of Evangelization for the Catholic Diocese of Venice in Florida. Joshua has been involved with recording talks for Augustine Institute presents Lighthouse Catholic Media, writing theology curriculum for the Diocese of Brooklyn in New York, and out giving talks at conferences. He has spoken at Diocesan-level conferences including Evangelization, Men's conferences, Apologetics, and Scripture, as well as material for Catholic programs on iHeart Radio. Joshua and Nathan have a great conversation around the importance of developing a strong relationship with Mary and the Holy Spirit. Follow Josh @jmazzy17 to learn more!

Unknown Friends
S2E30: The Merchant of Venice, by William Shakespeare

Unknown Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 33:39


Anti-Semitism is the chief accusation lodged against Shakespeare's difficult comedy The Merchant of Venice, but religious prejudice may be less of an issue in the play than is commonly thought. Truly, the drama's thematic core is a complex endeavor to reconcile law and liberality. Pro tip! If you want to experience The Merchant of Venice for yourself, try listening to an unabridged audio dramatization of the play, like Naxos Audiobooks' production: https://naxosaudiobooks.com/merchant-of-venice-the-unabridged/. Other audio performances are available as well, but I've listened to the Naxos edition and can personally recommend it. I'm Rachelle Ferguson of Kittywham Productions, and Unknown Friends is my weekly book review podcast. Visit the Unknown Friends homepage at www.kittywhamproductions.com/podcast. To learn more about me and my work as a Christian playwright, explore my website at www.kittywhamproductions.com. Help support the podcast and get access to bonus content: www.patreon.com/unknownfriends Get in touch with me on Instagram: www.instagram.com/rachelle.ferguson Connect with me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/kittywhamproductions Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the podcast, leave a quick review, and share with your book-loving friends!

Inside a Sinister Mind
Season 3: Ep.6 High Times (Bonus Episode)

Inside a Sinister Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 17:50


We bring you a bonus Episode called Hight times, the very first time Conejo was introduced to Marijuana in Venice beach after robbing a ditching party. Inside a Sinister Mind is a Prime Film Production Subscribe to Patreon for Bonus Content Patreon.com/insideasinistermind For merch or Patreon Information Visit Insideasinistermind.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/insideasinistermindpod/support

Locals Know Best
27: The Natural Wonders of Western Los Angeles, California

Locals Know Best

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 38:06


Today, I'll be speaking with Laura Grier about all of her favorite outdoor adventures throughout Western Los Angeles. We'll primarily focus on the span along the coast between Marina del Rey and Malibu, including stops in Venice, Santa Monica, Culver City, and Topanga. And then, before wrapping it all up, we'll also be taking a quick second-day trip over to Catalina Island! Join Laura and me as we paddle, bike, jeep, hike, wine taste, and even take an extra day island adventuring all in West LA! About Laura Grier Laura has lived in Venice Beach and Los Angeles for 20 years. Living abroad from a young age and working for the CIA at age 18, Laura turned her life of travel, adventure, and exploration into a profession as a photojournalist. She has been to all 7 continents through her work, shot weddings in over 15 countries, and has even been called the Indiana Jones of Adventure Travel Photography. Laura was also featured on Discovery Channel UK's “20 Richest People in the World List,” – highlighting people rich in life experiences. Passionate about mentoring, women's education, photography, and travel, Laura leads travel workshops and expeditions and serves as an ambassador for sustainable travel brands like Lokal and Impact Travel Alliance.  The most satisfying work so far in Laura's career has been during the last 8 years with Novica, National Geographic's global artisan catalog that represents artisans from around the world who are practicing “Vanishing Arts.”  With NOVICA, Laura has especially fallen in love with the culture and people of Peru.  Currently, Laura has joined forces with Pats Krysiak to create Andeana Hats, a sustainable fashion company that sources alpaca wool hats hand-made by Quechua women in the Sacred Valley of Peru. The mission of Andeana Hats is to invest in women's skills, empowering them to continue their vanishing crafts by connecting them to global marketplaces and supporting their leadership to increase their income and transform their communities. Learn more about Laura Grier (and see more of her beautiful photography) at LauraGrier.com and learn more about Andeana Hats at AndeanaHats.com. What We Cover in This Episode What leads young people living in Los Angeles to move to the beach. What gives the westside more of a “little villages” feeling. What makes the westside of Los Angeles optimal for outdoors lovers. An urban bike path with art that should not be missed. How to get to the best 360-degree view of all of Los Angeles – from downtown to the beach! The best and worst times of year to visit west LA. The must-stay hotels. A new crowd favorite hotel with the most happening rooftop bar and marina views. Which neighborhoods on the west side allow Airbnbs, and which don't. The best spots for breakfast in west LA. Laura's favorite activities to do in the morning around the beach. The best area to do a little shopping and grab a bite for lunch in west LA. A hidden hike, 15 minutes from the beach, with incredible rock formations and caves. A spot where you can taste wine and see a wild zebra, all in one visit! Two excellent westside dinner options. A second-day adventure to Catalina Island! Including how to get there and what outdoors lovers can do once they get there, for all budgets. A brief tangent all about Mackinac Island, MI – and the activity missed most often on that island! A few best Instagram spots in the area from a professional photographer! The most overrated tourist spots in western Los Angeles. Quotables And then, as you get older, like 30 plus, usually people sort of migrate west to the beach, which is just a little bit more relaxed, like flip-flop lifestyle. Laura Grier And then the entire hike is just all the way up this red rock road to the top of the mountain with incredible views. And it's just, it looks like you're on a different planet, like parts of it. And it doesn't look like Los Angeles at all, and it's all wooded and rocky formations, and it's such a beautiful hike. Laura Grier The greatest part about living on the westside is that we have the best outdoor activity that people come from all over for, which is the beach. And I take it for granted at times because I live literally on the beach. Like I can walk out barefoot and be on the sand and, you can hear people like cheering at sunset for the sunset. Like it's actually an event that people want to sit and watch. Laura Grier What I love about Los Angeles is that there's all these hills and canyons. And there's all these windy mountain roads that are stunning. And there's hidden forests and canyons and like overlooks and waterfall hikes and all kinds of things that are literally 15 minutes out of the city. So I think that's the part that people don't realize. They like want to jam in all the city stuff, and I think you definitely need more time to see the natural wonders. Laura Grier Links to Places Mentioned in this Episode Where to Stay in the West Los Angeles, CA Area: Santa Monica Proper Hotel Hotel Erwin Residence Inn by Marriott Marina Del Rey West Los Angeles, CA Area Outdoor Activities Mentioned in the Episode: Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook Venice Fishing Pier Red Rock Canyon Park Saddle Peak Santa Catalina Island Catalina Express Tuna Canyon Venice Canals Muscle Beach Dockweiler Beach Venice Public Art Walls Abbot Kinney Boulevard Two Harbors Trans Catalina Trail Hermit Gulch Campground Wrigley Memorial and Botanic Garden West Los Angeles, CA Area Restaurants & Wineries Mentioned in this Episode: The Cow's End Cafe Zinqué Gjusta Great White Gran Blanco Mercedes Bar & Grille Cabo Cantina Baja Cantina Malibu Wine Safaris Malibu Wine Hikes Moonshadows Malibu Geoffrey's Wabi on Rose Descanso Beach Club Cafe Intelligentsia The Butcher's Daughter Gjelina Thanks for Listening! We love our listeners! If you enjoyed this episode, please leave me a comment below and let me know about your favorite part! If you've been enjoying the show, please also consider leaving me a review in Apple Podcasts. It's super easy; click here and go to “ratings and reviews.” I read and appreciate every single one! Each review helps new listeners find the podcast. Thank you!! Follow Cinders Travels on Facebook or Locals Knows Best Podcast on Instagram for Locals Know Best updates.

Comments by Celebs
Ep 256: The Met Gala, Bennifer in Venice, Megan & Kourtney, Britney's Engagement, & More.

Comments by Celebs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 60:11


Emma and Julie are starting this week out strong breaking down the 2021 Met Gala: the theme, guest list, fashion moments, and social media from night. Plus, Kim's controversial outfit and Kylie pulling out at the last minute. Kardashians Kolloquium post: https://url.emailprotection.link/?bOBlK03OFRZ1-lvC8KC_psw3MrDgv0DcynOD5OqsYXiixtfVjW7SnI7XgcVElle1YuHeU9a6TCVljDKRLchgTY7EkUL8Du9e8-TlyDL_EPYZ504kTkO6IdtC-KqEqCu5V Lexie Jayy TikTok: https://url.emailprotection.link/?bv2xPsBhnm3RvRs-UKbYccOfqq2VGnJ90na2ibZlr5vhoSC0xT0wShiWSkFlWyqQsEKWDqkrtyxQg0P8YfYpgtQ~~ Next, they get into Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez's stunning red carpet debut in Venice (& their confrontation with a fan.) Also breaking news that Britney Spears and Sam Asghari are engaged, and Kourtney/Travis/Megan/MGK being sexual on Instagram at the VMAs. Ben & Jlo in Venice confrontation: https://url.emailprotection.link/?bv2xPsBhnm3RvRs-UKbYccN6-y-LL-zo0w6O6c_pm6lzgFHN5hz0d50S4_rPi2y68K1O-NArWw8GlSETuH0eanQ~~ Megan Fox/MGK/Kourtney/Travis bathroom pic:  https://url.emailprotection.link/?bOBlK03OFRZ1-lvC8KC_psw3MrDgv0DcynOD5OqsYXig97aXrhVuil1gxnVhMSRIxcqtXbpgo_vJXo9aXMIqPL8xht-6uUgkUb_h8DcbDwSJYTpUejUkx7e1P-0yB7lkJ Highlighted Black-Owned Business: Coral Oral https://url.emailprotection.link/?bHLymfk7RSqYy77FcSkHYvfa56mYFLnIXxvgcTdH8s-A6DHPNaK-MECjRToBanweI1wAiE1h-fDBHS-18NiujSQ~~ https://url.emailprotection.link/?b733-uZ0c8v-BbgGCHB5uc4yoq6cqNG_pl2ejAQ6HqOz-uZp-FfFyRcJvZpElSlcKF6inQSC7xhcbhbFdqVMiqQ~~ Shop our merch: https://url.emailprotection.link/?bQWqRk5gWFxtotBL-igcAjabyHWx74Cg66tdqm8_Sxxa_1Ayum9mY9YiM3NNrUZiCv91HSL0-3ziSKqyRlmMl7Q~~ Codes: BetterHelp - BetterHelp.com/celebs for 10% off your first month Sakara - Sakara.com/CBC for 20% off your first order Peloton - onepeloton.com for 30 days of free classes Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices