Podcasts about Kiwi

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  • 2,149PODCASTS
  • 6,457EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 8, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Kiwi

Show all podcasts related to kiwi

Latest podcast episodes about Kiwi

Legends Podcast
Legends Podcast #553; Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring (20th Anniversary)

Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 61:54


J.R.R. Tolkien's massively popular fantasy epic, The Lord of the Rings, was long thought to be unfilmable due to the size and scope of the story and the technology limitations of the times. Kiwi director Peter Jackson proved them all wrong by shooting all three movies back-to-back in sixteen months at 150 locations and soundstages across New Zealand to the tune of $280 million. The films collectively brought in almost three billion dollars worldwide, winning 17 Oscars, becoming one of the greatest film series ever made. In celebration of the twentieth anniversary of its release, we're joining the quest to return some jewelry with The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring!   For more geeky podcasts visit GonnaGeek.com   You can find us on iTunes under ''Legends Podcast''. Please subscribe and give us a positive review. You can also follow us on Twitter @LegendsPodcast or even better, send us an e-mail: LegendsPodcastS@gmail.com You can find all our contact information here on the Network page of GonnaGeek.com Our complete archive is always available at www.legendspodcast.com, www.legendspodcast.libsyn.com

RNZ: Checkpoint
Rhythm and Vines moves to Easter after hearing from local iwi

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 4:37


Rhythm and Vines festival director Kieran Spillane told Checkpoint they decided to postpone the event to Easter after talking with local iwi and listening to the concerns of the local community. With booking international acts he said they have to essentially start again. "But we have some plans in place. For some acts the Easter dates no longer work so we're a little bit back to the drawing board. But certainly the vast majority of our Kiwi talent is prepared to play at Easter so we'll juggle things around." They will have to use the MIQ lottery system again for international acts. Spillane said about 8 percent of those who had booked for Rhythm and Vines have cancelled their tickets as they do not want to be vaccinated. Refunds are being offered in a two-week window to those who cannot attend the rescheduled event.

Beef Boys
#36 - Big Fat Stupid Americans Try Kiwi Snacks for the First Time

Beef Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 97:19


Foreign snacks, Ronald Reagan's biggest hater, and the end to My Immortal

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
FKJ - Live at MELT Festival 2019 - FRENCH KIWI JUICE - Full Concert

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:00


The Guy and Harley Podcast
Episode 226: Groundhog Day

The Guy and Harley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 133:47


The boys are back after last week's blow up, what's the scoop? Guy's camera died mid-shoot, what did he do!? Harley is producing a short film being shot entirely in Mandarin and the men discuss Ridley Scott's new film The Last Duel. Everyone's favourite segment 'Jab Chat' returns and Harley has some things to say about The Metaverse.  There's also lots of other great stuff, tune in! Useful podcast links: https://linktr.ee/TheGuyandHarleyPodcast Watch Older here: https://bit.ly/WatchOlderTheMovie​ Watch Immi The Vegan here: https://linktr.ee/ImmiTheVegan Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/PigvillePatreon Watch No Caller ID here: https://bit.ly/NCID Invest with Stake: https://bit.ly/JoinStake Invest with Sharesies: http://bit.ly/SharesiesNZ ~ Guy and Harley

RNZ: Nine To Noon
What's inside Kiwi garages?

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 16:05


Author George Lockyer embarked on a mission around the country to find some of the more quirky uses Kiwis have for their garages. He found vintage cars, inventions, a military museum, a brewery - quite a successful one - a repair shop, sculpture studio and a radio shack. The result is his book Kiwi Garages - Inside New Zealanders' Happy Places. George joins Kathryn to talk about how the garage is often a refuge from the world, and a good place to de-stress. He's joined by dominatrix Red Fox, whose garage is featured in the book and hosts a different kind of place to de-stress.

Fitter Radio
Fitter Radio Episode 396 - Tamara Jewett

Fitter Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 108:41


BEN AND KELSEY HOFFMAN: (00:10:34) Kelsey interviews Ben about his training with FORM goggles. FITTER RADIO COFFEE CLUB COMPETITION (00:18:28) This week a free race entry competition to IRONMAN New Zealand! The world's longest-running IRONMAN with a proud and rich history deeply rooted in our hometown of Taupō. The race itself showcases the best of New Zealand's natural wonderland, and more than 2,000 volunteers and thousands of supporters line the streets to cheer you on. You will be welcomed with open arms and will leave enriched with the local's pure Kiwi spirit. COACHES CATCH-UP: (00:22:59) Bevan and Tim review the Norwegian Strava data. HOT PROPERTY INTERVIEW: TAMARA JEWETT (00:50:04) Canadian pro triathlete Tamara Jewett won her first IM703 at the Timberman in August 2021. She became the first woman in listed PTO stats to break 74 minutes in the run split of a 70.3 with a 73.08 at the Augusta 70.3 in September 2021. We chat to Tamara to find out a bit more about her. ONE STEP AHEAD: (01:32:08) Recovery. LINKS: More about MitoQ at https://www.mitoq.com/ Training Peaks discount at https://www.fitter.co.nz/about-radio 10% off INFINIT Nutrition at https://www.fitter.co.nz/about-radio More about Infinit Nutrition Australia at https://www.infinitnutrition.com.au/ More about FORM Goggles at https://www.formswim.com/ More about Tamara Jewett at https://tamarajewett.com/ CONTACT US: Learn more about us at http://www.fitter.co.nz        Mikki Williden can be found at https://mikkiwilliden.com/

Endurance Chat
Endurance Chat S6E18 - The Supercars Bathurst 1000 Preview

Endurance Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 117:01


The Race that stops the Nation is back once again - the Supercars Australia Bathurst 1000, the crown jewel of the Australian motorsports calendar. Join Michael and Chris as we recap what has been a truncated year of the Australian Supercars Championship, give you the low down on the teams, drivers and co-drivers, make our predictions, and there's a little Endurance Chat announcement in there too!   Timestamps 0:02 Supercars Season Review - The Van Gisbergen Show 0:14 Cars, Teams and Drivers; Team Sydney, Matt Stone Racing, Kelly Grove Racing, Blanchard Racing, Erebus Motorsport 0:58 Cars, Teams and Drivers; Brad Jones Racing, Tickford Racing, Walkinshaw Andretti United, Dick Johnson Racing, Triple 8 Race Engineering 1:46 Predictions - Can anyone beat the #97 1:48 Support Categories - The greatest hits of Australian Motorsports! 1:52 An Endurance Chat Announcement - A new show for Flood and Kiwi!

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Carmela Ramaglia from Happy Calories on her book Food is not a 4 Letter word, the fallacy of diets & exercise and lettuce burritos.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 55:58


An award-winning author and podcaster, Carmela Ramaglia teaches women how to ditch the diet drama and create a body AND life they love. She earned her PhD in personal transformation with an emphasis in body image, self-esteem and weight loss from the very prestigious School of Hard Knocks. Her signature Model of Alignment and “Happy Calories Don't Count” Method have helped women from all across the world find freedom from food and body shame while optimizing physical results. Carmela is also a classically trained Pilates instructor, actress and model. She has heard in more than one check-out line, “Didn't I see you on TV?” When not working, Carmela can be found rocking out 80s Hair Bands, loving on her fur babies and hanging out with her family. Find Carmela here: Websites: www.carmelaramaglia.com (Primary) - Free Master Class Opt-In, Free Love Notes Opt-In www.happycalories.com (Coaching) www.foodisnotafourletterword.com (Podcast) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/BodyBreakthroughAndBeyond/ - Private group offering support https://www.facebook.com/HappyCaloriesDontCount/ https://www.facebook.com/FoodIsNotAFourLetterWord/ (New page - specific to the book) IG: https://www.instagram.com/thecarmelaramaglia/ (Primary) https://www.instagram.com/happy.calories.dont.count/ https://www.instagram.com/food.is.not.a.four.letter.word/ (Specific to the book) YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/HappyCalories Podcast: Available on All Major Platforms, YouTube Channel and www.foodisnotafourletterword.com website ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Shian Chuan, Executive Coach on her book Power Your Purpose: A Leader's Guide to Creating a Better Life and a Better World and going from Me to We.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 48:13


Shian says: Shian Chuan, is a certified Executive Coach, Leadership Facilitator, and Mindfulness Expert helping people find fulfillment and clarity in their lives and careers. Known as the “Career Whisperer” by many Fortune 500 companies, she has helped thousands of people land their dream roles, bring their whole selves to work, and realize their potential. She specializes in helping mission-driven leaders create a life and legacy they are proud of and achieve social and environmental impact without burning out. As an intuitive and empathic facilitator, Shian blends Neuro-Linguistic Programming (neuroscience), positive psychology, and behavioral change with intuition, spirituality, and energy leadership into her work for effective and lasting change. She has appeared on KING 5 News and in The Seattle Times for her work during the pandemic. Find more information and inspiration at www.shianchuan.com. Find Shian here: Website: shianchuan.com Access New Book Info: https://www.subscribepage.com/poweryourpurpose Free guide: https://shianchuan.com/start-here/ Social Media Handles to tag me: IG: @Shian2Ignite LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shianchuan/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/ShianChuanLeadership/ ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Xena Warrior Business
S5E8 - DaphZee

Xena Warrior Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:34


In a classic "be careful what you wish for" hijinks episode, Xena finds herself in a situation that Chris and Ally really struggle with trying to describe. Ally gets dazzled by Renee O'Connor's fight scenes, Chris gets dazzled by some unknown female Kiwi wrestlers, and everyone is twins! We watch Season 5 Episode 8 of Xena Warrior Princess: Little Problems! Follow us on twitter: @XenaWarriorBiz This podcast is the spinoff/sister podcast of SAILOR BUSINESS. Art by @barelysushi. Podcast edited by @allyspock. Support us on patreon at www.patreon.com/sailorbusiness

Understanding Train Station
EP37: When Kiwi Culture Meets Germany feat. Antoinette Emily

Understanding Train Station

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 101:40


Try Lingoda with an exclusive discount of up to 40% off with my link: https://try.lingoda.com/Nov_UTS A A German and a Kiwi meet in a bar in New Zealand. Numbers are exchanged and 11 years later they're still together with three kids and are living in Germany. Although it may sound like the beginning of a joke, this is the story of this week's interview guest Antoinette from the YouTube channel “Antoinette Emily”. We were so happy to be able to collaborate with her, learn more about her story and compare our experiences with moving abroad. Since Antoinette has children, she brings an interesting perspective that we haven't had on the podcast yet. We hope you all enjoy our conversation as much as we did. And a Happy Thanksgiving to all! Check out Antoinette's channel: ▸https://www.youtube.com/c/MamasStudio Follow Antoinette on Instagram: @antoinette_nz ▸https://www.instagram.com/antoinette_nz --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/understandingtrainstation/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/understandingtrainstation/support

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Lynnaire Johnston, LinkedIn Guru from wordwizard.co.nz on her latest best seller, the importance of a company page, dressing up and clay hillsides.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:28


Lynnaire Johnston is a Dunedin-based LinkedIn expert, ranked No.1 in the country and the author of two books on the subject. She runs Word Wizard, a communications consultancy focusing on LinkedIn marketing. Lynnaire started out as a reporter, news reader and announcer for Radio Hauraki. She worked in radio both here and overseas in the early part of her career but went on to feature writing and editor roles in the beauty, not-for-profit, and - however unlikely - automotive industries. She's interviewed many famous, interesting and successful people but on balance prefers the stories of how everyday Kiwis and those in her LinkedIn network overcome the challenges in their lives. When not on LinkedIn, Lynnaire can be found in her steep hillside garden which she has created from scratch in just three years. ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Podcast
LOM King Kong 2005

Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 77:18


The original kaiju Kong has had many incarnations over the years. From RKO to Toho, the original King has had a sorted history. But many were excited when Peter Jackson, fresh off of the Lord of the Rings trilogy decided he was going to remake his favorite movie of all time. But did the Kiwi deliver? Join us with Kay Hoddy to find out!

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Heidi Holvoet on her mission to help 100,000 women reach financial independence, nuclear physics and recording in a closet.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 22:23


Hi I'm Heidi, scientist by trade, business coach by nature, online entrepreneur by passion. I've been in business online for over 15 years and I enjoy few things more than helping fellow woman entrepreneurs to nail & achieve their big bold vision. I also continue nurturing my 'business baby' baby-sleep-advice.com where together with my Dream Team, I help parents and their babies sleep better in truly gentle and effective ways. I fiercely love my family & friends, my dog, wild nature and good food, and my mission to help 100,000 women achieve financial independence. I value honesty, kindness, and true equality and inclusion Find Heidi here: My Business Coaching website: https://www.heidiholvoet.com with Freebie: Pricing Spreadsheet from https://www.heidiholvoet.com/money-making-spreadsheet-1 Connect with me on fb: https://www.facebook.com/heidi.c.l.holvoet My Baby Sleep Advice website: https://www.baby-sleep-advice.com ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Ashley Fontaine from Flux AF on her book Unstuck: A Practical Guide To Radical Change For Non-Profit Leaders and the color teal.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:15


Ashley says: I am the founder and Chief Badassery Officer at Flux AF, where I help nonprofits in flux with strategic planning, facilitation, and leadership coaching. I bring a Master's in Social Work and a decade of experience in the mental health field to organizational and people challenges. As both a former nonprofit executive and a current board member, I have a unique understanding of how nonprofits work, the challenges they face, and how we can make change with less burnout. I'm here to help leaders establish their values, set strategic priorities, and hold boundaries that allow them to create meaningful change in the world, without lighting themselves on fire to keep others warm. Find Ashley here: Website: www.FluxAFconsulting.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fontainea/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/smashfontaine ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

It's A Drama: Parenting podcast.
Living in Taranaki, New Zealand. 8 (Brutally Honest) Pros & Cons

It's A Drama: Parenting podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 50:14


In 2017, Taranaki, New Zealand was voted by The Lonely Planet as being the 2nd best region in the world to visit. Wow. That's a pretty big label—a lot to live up to.  My family and I have lived in this region for twelve years and now consider ourselves Naki locals. As you can imagine,  New Zealand has a lot of pros and cons and Taranaki is no different. Join Brian and I talk as we talk about what Taranaki is REALLY like, Enjoy! Would You Like To Join Our Private New Zealand Community? Are you Considering Moving To New Zealand and are desperate to know what life in New Zealand is (really) like? Do You LOVE New Zealand & dream of moving here one day? Sign up HERE, and I will send you my FREE Moving to and Living in New Zealand Guide. A 5 Part Video Series! At the end of the series, you will be offered details of how to become part of our inspiring and growing community of New Zealand loving members! SIGN UP NOW!   Living in Taranaki, New Zealand  You may be thinking of moving to New Zealand and you are currently trying to decide which is best, the North Island or South Island. I'll always be a North island fan. But only one place on the North Island. Taranaki.  I love Taranaki so much that I dedicated an entire post to it. In that blog post, I give 16 reasons why we consider Taranaki to be the best place in New Zealand. But today we are here to talk about the downsides of living on the far western tip of New Zealand's North Island. The pros and the cons.  In this week's podcast episode, Brian and I talk about: Sun Rain Living remotely Tourism Sports Being too old to join in Festivals Being too mean to pay for them Black sand beaches Dangerous waters Café culture in Taranaki Moving to New Zealand? Here's More Content For You! WARNING!! Do NOT Say This in New Zealand!! Life in New Zealand Compared to the UK. From a Kiwi Who's Tried Both Leaving America to live in New Zealand 7 Things That Scared us About Moving To New Zealand Living in New Zealand. Why 30% Of Immigrants Go Back Home Moving to New Zealand. The How's, the Whys and the Hoops. Moving to New Zealand. 5 Rookie Mistakes to Avoid Making Americans in New Zealand. Will They Ever Feel at Home?   Interested in Life in New Zealand? Here's More Content For You! Is New Zealand NEGLECTING These Essential Life Skills? Lions and Tigers and Bears Oh My...Scary Things in New Zealand 7 Weird Things About New Zealand You Know You're in New Zealand When... Where To Live in New Zealand? North or South Island? Christmas Down Under? Wonderful or Weird?   Behind The Scenes Podcast Episodes (Where we share the things that are happening in our lives right now). Episode #1: Meeting Our Teenage Daughter. Life at 17. Episode #2: Our Son at 20. Homeschooled. No College. Three Jobs. Episode #3: We Met Online. The Māori Subscribers Who Changed Our Lives. Episode #4: The REAL Reason We Left the UK. Episode #5: Quitting School. Now What? Episode #6. Dealing With The Mistakes You Make Online   Can't Wait To Travel Again? Here's Some Inspiring Content For You! 7 Most Beautiful Places on Earth (And Why You Need To Visit Them SOON!  Japanese Culture. 7 Things You Should (Really) Know BEFORE You Go How to Travel The World For Free. Or at Least Very, Very Cheap. Italy Travel (Like You've Never Seen Before. In Your Life.)   Follow us on: YouTube Pinterest Facebook TikTok   Subscribe to us on Apple Subscribe on Android Subscribe on Spotify  

Podcast – The Children's Hour

This week on The Children's Hour we'll explore New Zealand through stories and songs, and in conversation with our friends, Kiwi musicians Lucy Hiku from Itty Bitty Beats, and Claudia Robin Gunn. One lives on the north island, and the other on the South Island! We'll learn about New Zealand's unique geography, climate, landscape, wildlife, and culture. Expect to hear all New Zealander music, in both English and Maori. This episode comes with a downloadable learning guide so you can learn along with us, and explore even more.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Priyanka Raha from Pop Smart Kids on mentoring not monitoring, inclusive creativity, asking about your child's online day and shopping when you're short.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 46:49


Priyanka is a strategist, technologist, entrepreneur, speaker, blogger and a mom to 2 boys. She is passionate about raising tech-ready citizens and creating opportunities with technology. She founded PopSmartKids with a bold mission of reimagining screentime to inspire the budding creators, writers and thinkers of tomorrow. Her company has launched PopSmartWrite, a story-writing app that empowers parents and educators to mentor the next generation of authors. She is a contributor to ThriveGlobal and is a frequent speaker on digital citizenship, early-education and entrepreneurship. She serves on the board of Dottie Rose Foundation, a non-profit that encourages girls in STEM. When not working, she enjoys biking and cooking with her children. Find Priyanka here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/priyanka.raha.9/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/priyanka.raha.9/ ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Fate of Isen: A Kiwi D&D Podcast
Chapter 6 Ep28 - Plans & Polar Bears

Fate of Isen: A Kiwi D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 54:20


In this episode, the Apple Squadeth enact a plan to ambush and defeat Krova's final general, Kovalcik. Will their planning be enough? Or will they perish at the hands of the cold, metallic demon?Visit www.fateofisen.com to learn moreA proud member of the Necropodicon Network, and one of the Feedspot top 60 D&D podcasts in the world! Check out Feedspot here.If you like the show, please feel free to join us on Discord or support us on Patreon!Intro, outro, and recap music by freesound user, Tyops★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Nicol Park
Episode 107: A Shaved Kiwi

Nicol Park

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:58


Bet you can't figure out what todays topic of choice is.... in addition to furless green fruit we get into the nuances of workplace bathroom etiquette, why there was a strange woman digging in Joshua's tree stump, and the proper spelling of excersise. Exercise? Exhersize? Thanks to our amazing sponsors, Arby's and Duck Doughnuts.  

RNZ: Nine To Noon
New research into football headers and memory decline - are Kiwi kids protected?

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:16


As more research continues to emerge into the effects of heading a football and cognitive decline, there's no move in New Zealand yet to introduce heading regulations for younger players. Children under 10 have been banned in the US from heading balls since 2015, and the UK moved last year to ban the under-12s from headers in training and introduce a limit of 10 at training at all levels. In the latest study, a group of former professional footballers in the UK were asked about the number of headers they'd taken through their career and then run through a memory test similar to those that screen for dementia. The research, published recently in the Journal of Neuropsychology, found strong evidence between the number of headers over their careers and the players' lower test scores. Dr Davide Bruno of Liverpool John Moores University joins Kathryn to talk about the research.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Jennifer Swaim on accessible personal training for any woman, LIFTing them up and going from a corporate closet to yoga pants.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:44


Jenn Swaim is a NASM-certified personal trainer, owner of LIFT - Life Integrated Fitness Training . After 20+ years in the occupational safety field, she left the corporate world to spend more time with her family and slow down life. She started her business as a way to lift women through fitness and nutrition. She designs personalized resistance and balance focused workouts to build strength, create energy and foster a desire for daily exercise. Clients who work with Jenn get a unique opportunity to give back through their commitment to their workouts. Every 6 month package creates an opportunity for 1 month of free personalized training for a woman in need or an organization who supports them. Find Jenn here: www.lifeintegratedlift.com @lifeintegratedlift on FB and IG ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.comShe would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Squiz Kids
Wednesday, November 17 - Missile in space emergency; Sesame Street's first Asian muppet; the misinformation fight goes global; and the Kiwi held hostage by a possum.

Squiz Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 8:49


Squiz Kids is an award-winning, free daily news podcast just for kids. Give us ten minutes, and we'll give you the world. A short weekday podcast, created here in Australia, that gives kids the lowdown on the big news stories of the day, delivered without opinion, and with positivity and humour. ‘Kid-friendly news that keeps them up to date without all the nasties' (A Squiz Parent) This Australian podcast for kids easily fits into the daily routine - helping curious kids stay informed about the world around them. LINKS Sesame Street: Ji-Young and the Best Friends Band: ​​https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8n_Mh3xhIYHow To Become A Squiz Kids Correspondenthttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1FH2HA28InnLU6UxE91wrLBAbCMT40Mua/viewSquiz Kids Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/squizkids/?hl=enGot a birthday coming up and you want a shout-out? Send us an email at squizkids@thesquiz.com.au See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Break Things On Purpose
Tomas Fedor

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:28


In this episode, we cover: 00:00:00 - Introduction 00:02:45 - Adopting the Cloud 00:08:15 - POC Process  00:12:40 - Infrastructure Team Building 00:17:45 - “Disaster Roleplay”/Communicating to the Non-Technical Side  00:20:20 - Leadership 00:22:45 - Tomas' Horror Story/Dashboard Organziation 00:29:20 - Outro Links: Productboard: https://www.productboard.com Scaling Teams: https://www.amazon.com/Scaling-Teams-Strategies-Successful-Organizations/dp/149195227X Seeking SRE: https://www.amazon.com/Seeking-SRE-Conversations-Running-Production/dp/1491978864/ TranscriptJason: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about failure and reliability. In this episode, we chat with Tomas Fedor, Head of Infrastructure at Productboard. He shares his approach to testing and implementing new technologies, and his experiences in leading and growing technical teams.Today, we've got with us Tomas Fedor, who's joining us all the way from the Czech Republic. Tomas, why don't you say hello and introduce yourself?Tomas: Hello, everyone. Nice to meet you all, and my name is Tomas, or call me Tom. And I've been working for a Productboard for past two-and-a-half year as infrastructure leader. And all the time, my experience was in the areas of DevOps, and recently, three and four years is about management within infrastructure teams. What I'm passionate about, my main technologies-wise in cloud, mostly Amazon Web Services, Kubernetes, Infrastructure as Code such as Terraform, and recently, I also jumped towards security compliances, such as SOC 2 Type 2.Jason: Interesting. So, a lot of passions there, things that we actually love chatting about on the podcast. We've had other guests from HashiCorp, so we've talked plenty about Terraform. And we've talked about Kubernetes with some folks who are involved with the CNCF. I'm curious, with your experience, how did you first dive into these cloud-native technologies and adopting the cloud? Is that something you went straight for, or is that something you transitioned into?Tomas: I actually slow transition to cloud technologies because my first career started at university when I was like, say, half developer and half Unix administrator. And I had experience with building very small data center. So, those times were amazing to understand all the hardware aspects of how it's going to be built. And then later on, I got opportunity to join a very famous startup at Czech Republic [unintelligible 00:02:34] called Kiwi.com [unintelligible 00:02:35]. And that time, I first experienced cloud technologies such as Amazon Web Services.Jason: So, as you adopted Amazon, coming from that background of a university and having physical servers that you had to deal with, what was your biggest surprise in adopting the cloud? Maybe something that you didn't expect?Tomas: So, that's great question, and what comes to my mind first, is switching to completely different [unintelligible 00:03:05] because during my university studies and career there, I mostly focused on networking [unintelligible 00:03:13], but later on, you start actually thinking about not how to build a service, but what service you need to use for your use case. And you don't have, like, one service or one use case, but you have plenty of services that can suit your needs and you need to choose wisely. So, that was very interesting, and it needed—and it take me some time to actually adopt towards new thinking, new mindset, et cetera.Jason: That's an excellent point. And I feel like it's only gotten worse with the, “How do you choose?” If I were to ask you to set up a web service and it needs some sort of data store, at this point you've got, what, a half dozen or more options on Amazon? [laugh].Tomas: Exactly.Jason: So, with so many services on providers like Amazon, how do you go about choosing?Tomas: After a while, we came up with a thing like RFCs. That's like ‘Request For Comments,' where we tried to sum up all the goals, and all the principles, and all the problems and challenges we try to tackle. And with that, we also tried to validate all the alternatives. And once you went through all these information, you tried to sum up all the possible solutions. You typically had either one or two options, and those options were validated with all your team members or the whole engineering organization, and you made the decision then you try to run POC, and you either are confirmed, yeah this is the technology, or this is service you need and we are going to implement it, or you revised your proposal.Jason: I really like that process of starting with the RFC and defining your requirements and really getting those set so that as you're evaluating, you have these really stable ideas of what you need and so you don't get swayed by all of the hype around a certain technology. I'm curious, who is usually involved in the RFC process? Is it a select group in the engineering org? Is it broader? How do you get the perspectives that you need?Tomas: I feel we have very great established process at Productboard about RFCs. It's transparent to the whole organization, that's what I love the most. The first week, there is one or two reporters that are mainly focused on writing and summing up the whole proposal to write down goals, and also non-goals because that is going to define your focus and also define focus of reader. And then you're going just to describe alternatives, possible options, or maybe to sum up, “Hey, okay, I'm still unsure about this specific decision, but I feel this is the right direction.” Maybe I have someone else in the organization who is already familiar with the technology or with my use case, and that person can help me.So, once—or we call it a draft state, and once you feel confident, you are going to change the status of RFC to open. The time is open to feedback to everyone, and they typically geared, like, two weeks or three weeks, so everyone can give a feedback. And you have also option to present it on engineering all-hands. So, many engineers, or everyone else joining the engineering all-hands is aware of this RFC so you can receive a lot of feedback. What else is important to mention there that you can iterate over RFCs.So, you mark it as resolved after through two or three weeks, but then you come up with a new proposal, or you would like to update it slightly with important change. So, you can reopen it and update version there. So, that also gives you a space to update your RFC, improve the proposal, or completely to change the context so it's still up-to-date with what you want to resolve.Jason: I like that idea of presenting at engineering all-hands because, at least in my experience, being at a startup, you're often super busy so you may know that the RFC is available, but you may not have time to actually read through it, spend the time to comment, so having that presentation where it's nicely summarized for you is always nice. Moving from that to the POC, when you've selected a few and you want to try them out, tell me more about that POC process. What does that look like?Tomas: So typically, in my infrastructure team, it's slightly different, I believe, as you have either product teams focus on POCs, or you have more platform teams focusing on those. So, in case of the infrastructure team, we would like to understand what code is actually going to be about because typically the infrastructure team has plenty of services to be responsible for, to be maintained, and we try to first choose, like, one specific use case and small use case that's going to suit the need.For instance, I can share about implementation of HashiCorp Vault, like our adoption. We leveraged firstly only key-value engine for storing secrets. And what was important to understand here, whether we want to spend hours of building the whole cluster, or we can leverage their cloud service and try to integrate it with one of our services. And we need to understand what service we are going to adopt with Vault.So, we picked cloud solution. It was very simple, the experience that were seamless for us, we understood what we needed to validate. So, is developer able to connect to Vault? Is application able to connect to Vault? What roles does it offer? Was the difference for cloud versus on-premise solution?And at the end, it's often the cost. So, in that case, POC, we spin up just cloud service integrated with our system, choose the easiest possible adaptable service, run POC, validate it with developers, and provide all the feedback, all the data, to the rest of the engineering. So, that was for us, some small POC with large service at the end.Jason: Along with validating that it does what you want it to do, do you ever include reliability testing in that POC?Tomas: It is, but it is in, like, let's say, it's in a later stage. For example, I can again mention HashiCorp Vault. Once we made a decision to try to spin up first on-premise cluster, we started just thinking, like, how many master nodes do we need to have? How many availability zones do we need to have? So, you are going to follow quorum?And we are thinking, “Okay, so what's actually the reliability of Amazon Web Services regions and their availability zones? What's the reliability of multi-cross-region? And what actually the expectations that is going to happen? And how often they happen? Or when in the past, it happened?”So, all those aspects were considered, and we ran out that decision. Okay, we are still happy with one region because AWS is pretty stable, and I believe it's going to be. And we are now successfully running with three availability zones, but before we jumped to the conclusion of having three availability zones, we run several tests. So, we make sure that in case one availability zone being down, we are still fully able to run HashiCorp Vault cluster without any issues.Jason: That's such an important test, especially with something like HashiCorp Vault because not being able to log into things because you don't have credentials or keys is definitely problematic.Tomas: Fully agree.Jason: You've adopted that during the POC process, or the extended POC process; do you continue that on with your regular infrastructure work continuing to test for reliability, or maybe any chaos engineering?Tomas: I actually measure something about what we are working on, like, what we have so far improved in terms of post-mortem process that's interesting. So, we started two-and-a-half year ago, and just two of us as infrastructure engineers. At the time, there was only one incident response on-call team, our first iteration within the infrastructure team was with migration from Heroku, where we ran all our services, to Amazon Web Services. And that time, we needed to also start thinking about, okay, the infrastructure team needs to be on call as well. So, that required to update in the process because until then, it works great; you have one team, people know each other, people know the whole stack. Suddenly, you are going to add new people, you're going to add new people a separate team, and that's going to change the way how on-call should be treated, and how the process should look like.You may ask why. You have understanding within the one team, you understand the expectations, but then you have suddenly different skill set of people, and they are going to be responsible for different part of the technical organization, so you need to align the expectation between two teams. And that was great because guys at Productboard are amazing, and they are always helpful. So, we sat down, we made first proposal of how new team is going to work like, what are going to be responsibilities. We took inspirations from the already existing on-call process, and we just updated it slightly.And we started to run with first test scenarios of being on call so we understand the process fully. Later on, it evolved to more complex process, but it's still very simple. What is more complex: we have more teams that's first thing being on call; we have better separation of all the alerts, so you're not going to route every alert to one team, but you are able to route it to every team that's responsible for its service; the team have also prepared a set of runbooks so anyone else can easily follow runbook and fix the incident pretty easily, and then we also added section about post-mortems, so what are our expectations of writing down post-mortem once incident is resolved.Jason: That's a great process of documenting, really—right—documenting the process so that everybody, whether they're on a different team and they're coming over or new hires, particularly, people that know nothing about your established practices can take that runbook and follow along, and achieve the same results that any other engineer would.Tomas: Yeah, I agree. And what was great to see that once my team grew—we are currently five and we started two—we saw excitement of the team members to update the process so everybody else we're going to join the on-call is going to be excited, is going to take it as an opportunity to learn more. So, we added disaster roleplay, and that section talks about you are new person joining on-call team, and we would like to make sure you are going to understand all the processes, all the necessary steps, and you are going to be aligned with all the expectations. But before you will actually going to have your first alerts of on-call, we would like to try to run roleplay. Imagine what a HashiCorp Vault cluster is going down; you should be the one resolving it. So, what are the first steps, et cetera?And that time you're going to realize whatever is being needs to be done, it's not only from a technical perspective, such as check our go to monitoring, check runbook, et cetera, but also communication-wise because you need to communicate not only with your shadowing buddy, but you also need to communicate internally, or to the customers. And that's going to change the perspective of how an incident should be handled.Jason: That disaster roleplay sounds really amazing. Can you chat a little bit more about the details of how that works? Particularly you mentioned engaging the non-technical side—right—of communication with various people. Does the disaster roleplay require coordinating with all those people, or is it just a mock, you would pretend to do, but you don't actually reach out to those people during this roleplay?Tomas: So, we would like to also combine the both aspects. We would like to make sure that person understands all the communication channels that are set within our organization, and what they are used for, and then we would like to make sure that that person understand how to involve other engineers within the organization. For instance, what was there the biggest difference is that you have plenty of options how to configure assigning or creating an alert. And so for those, you may have a different notification settings. And what happened is that some of the people have settings only for newly created alert, but when you made a change of assigned person of already existing alert, someone else, it might happen that that person didn't notice it because the notification setting was wrong. So, we encountered even these kind of issues and we were able to fix it, thanks to disaster roleplay. So, that was amazing to be found out.Jason: That's one of the favorite things that I like to do when we're using chaos engineering to do a similar thing to the disaster roleplay, is to really check those incident response processes, and validating those alerts is huge. There's so many times that I've found that we thought that someone would be alerted for some random thing, and turns out that nobody knew anything was going on. I love that you included that into your disaster roleplay process.Tomas: Yeah, it was also great experience for all the engineers involved. Unfortunately, we run it only within our team, but I hope we are going to have a chance to involve all other engineering on-call teams, so the onboarding experience to the engineering on-call teams is going to rise and is going to be amazing.Jason: So, one of the things that I'm really interested in is, you've gone from being a DevOps engineer, an SRE individual contributor role, and now you're leaving a small team. I think a lot of folks, as they look at their career, and I think more people are starting to become interested in this is, what does that progression look like? This is sort of a change of subject, but I'm interested in hearing your thoughts on what are the skills that you picked up and have used to become an effective technical leader within Productboard? What's some of that advice that our listeners, as individual contributors, can start to gain in order to advance where they're going with their own careers?Tomas: Firstly, it's important to understand what makes you passionate in your career, whether it's working with people, understanding their needs and their future, or you would like to be more on track as individual contributor and you would like to enlarge your scope of responsibilities towards leading more technical complex initiatives, that are going to take a long time to be implemented. In case all the infrastructure, or in case of the platform leaders, I would say the position of manager or technical leader also requires certain technical knowledge so you can be still in close touch with your team or with your most senior engineers, so you can set the goals and set the strategic clearly. But still, it's important to be, let's say, people person and be able to listen because in that case, people are going to be more open to you, and you can start helping them, and you can start making their dreams true and achievable.Jason: Making their dreams true. That's a great take on this idea because I feel like so many times, having done infrastructure work, that you start to get a mindset of maybe that people just are making demands of you, all the time. And it's sometimes hard to keep that perspective of working together as a team and really trying to excel to give them a platform that they can leverage to really get things done. We were talking about disaster roleplaying, and that naturally leads to a question that we like to ask of all of our guests and that's, do you have any horror stories from your career about an incident, some horror story or outage that you experienced and what you've learned from it?Tomas: I have one, and it actually happened at the beginning of my career of DevOps engineer. What is interesting here that it was one of the toughest incidents I experienced. It happened after midnight. So, the time I was still new to a company, and we have received an alert informing about too many 502, 504 errors written from API. At the time API process thousands of requests per second, and the incident had a huge impact on the services we were offering.And as I was shadowing my on-call buddy, I tried to check our main alerting channel, see what's happening, what's going on there, how can I help, and I started with checking monitoring system, reviewing all the reports from the engineers of being on-call, and I initiated the investigation on my own. I realized that something is wrong or something is not right, and I realized I was just confused and I want sleep, so it took me a while to get back on track. So, I made the side note, like, how can I start my brain to be working as during the day? And then I got back to the incident resolution process.So, it was really hard for me to start because I didn't know what [unintelligible 00:24:27] you knew about the channel, you knew about your engineers working on the resolution, but there were plenty of different communication funnels. Like, some of the engineers were deep-focused on their own investigation, and some of them were on call. And we needed to provide regular updates to the customers and internally as well. I had that inner feeling of let's share something, but I realized I just can't drop a random message because the message with all the information should have certain format and should have certain information. But I didn't know what kind of information should be there.So, I tried to ping someone, so, “Hey, can you share something?” And in the meantime, actually, more other people send me direct message. And I saw there are a lot of different tracks of people who tried to solve the incident, who tries to provide the status, but we were not aligned. So, this all showed me how important is to have proper communication funnel set. And we got the lucky to actually end up in one channel, we got lucky to resolve incident pretty quickly.And what else I learned that I would recommend to make sure you know where to work. I know it's pretty obvious sentence, but once your company has plenty of dashboards and you need to find one specific metric, sometime it looks like mission impossible.Jason: That's definitely a good lesson learned and feeds back to that disaster roleplays, practicing how you do those communications, understanding where things need to be communicated. You mentioned that it can be difficult to find a metric within a particular dashboard when you have so many. Do you have any advice for people on how to structure their dashboards, or name their dashboards, or organize them in a certain way to make that easier to find the metric or the information that you're looking for?Tomas: I will have a different approach, and that do have basic dashboard that provides you SLOs of all the services you have in the company. So, we understand firstly what service actually impacts the overall stability or reliability. So, that's my first advice. And then you should be able to either click on the specific service, and that should redirect you to it's dashboard, or you're going to have starred one of your favorite dashboards you have. So, I believe the most important is really have one main dashboard where you have all the services and their stability resourced, then you have option to look.Jason: Yeah, when you have one main dashboard, you're using that as basically the starting point, and from there, you can branch out and dive deeper, I guess, into each of the services.Tomas: Exactly, exactly true.Jason: I like that approach. And I think that a lot of modern dashboarding or monitoring systems now, the nice thing is that they have that ability, right, to go from one particular dashboard or graphic and have links out to the other information, or just click on the graph and it will show you the underlying host dashboard or node dashboard for that metric, which is really, really handy.Tomas: And I love the connection with other monitoring services, such as application monitoring. That gives you so much insight and when it's even connected with your work management tool is amazing so you can have all the important information in one place.Jason: Absolutely. So, oftentimes we talk about—what is it—the three pillars of observability, which I know some of our listeners may hate that, but the idea of having metrics and performance monitoring/APM and logs, and just how they all connect to each other can really help you solve a lot, or uncover a lot of information when you're in the middle of an incident. So Tomas, thanks for being on the show. I wanted to wrap up with one more question, and that's do you have any shoutouts, any plugs, anything that you want to share that our listeners should go take a look at?Tomas: Yeah, sure. So, as we are talking about management, I would like to promote one book that helped make my career, and that's Scaling Teams. It's written by Alexander Grosse and David Loftesness.And another one book is from Google, they have, like, three series, one of those is Seeking SRE, and I believe other parts are also useful to be read in case you would like to understand whether your organization needs SRE team and how to implement it within organization, and also, technically.Jason: Those are two great resources, and we'll have those linked in the show notes on the website. So, for anybody listening, you can find more information about those two books there. Tomas, thanks for joining us today. It's been a pleasure to have you.Tomas: Thanks. Bye.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

RAD Radio
11.15.21 RAD 03 The Pressure Cooker & Update On Kiwi the German Shepherd

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:33


The Pressure Cooker & Update On Kiwi the German ShepherdSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Looking Sideways Action Sports Podcast
Episode 167: Dani Kiwi Meier - Life Is What Happens

Looking Sideways Action Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 90:20


Full episode and Show Notes - www.wearelookingsideways.com Is experience a prerequisite for knowledge? How can you use the lessons of life to strive for equanimity? Is it possible to avoid taking life personally? Should we let our curiosity guide our decision-making? How can we put story-telling at the centre of what we do? Is life about taking or giving back? These are the questions we all grapple with at some point during our lives, however unwittingly. And, as I realised at the end of our conversation, they are the questions that formed the key themes of my fascinating and thought-provoking conversation with snowboarding legend Dani ‘Kiwi' Meier. Let's get the snowboarding part out of the way first. As you might have guessed from that nickname, Dani is from New Zealand, but it was as part of the nascent late 80s/early 90s European snowboarding scene that he made his name. On the snow, his surf-influenced, rootsy take on snowboarding saw him carve out a gloriously idiosyncratic career, riding for brands like Rad Air and Northwave, and helping to create the European pro scene as we still recognise it today. Off the snow, his work ethic, ability to see the bigger picture, and incessant curiosity marked him out as a genuine innovator. Take The Crystal Awards, snowboarding's original culture-driven contest comp that soon became one of the most copied formats ever. Or his work with his agency Mana Media, which saw him work with the biggest brands on the planet and succeed in taking his culturally sympathetic story-telling approach to the biggest canvasses of all. Now, in mid-life, Dani is taking stock of his life and career, and I'm so fortunate he was gracious enough to share his insights for this episode. It's the type of conversation that caused me to view my own life differently. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Enjoying the podcast? Want to keep it free and ad-free? Donate here: https://bit.ly/LSBuyPint Thanks to Matt Ward for the theme tune, and to my editor Fina Charleson.

The Long Leash with James Jacobson
Ed Jamison: When the Dog Catcher Rebrands Animal Control | The Long Leash #37

The Long Leash with James Jacobson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 51:03


You know that person at work who has a new idea every five minutes? Who says at least once a meeting, “I was thinking about it, and why don't we…?” That's Ed Jamison. But he's not some tech entrepreneur – he's an expert in animal welfare with decades of government experience, and now the Director of Operation Kindness in Carrollton, Texas. Ed joins us today to explain how he has used data to help governments revamp their animal control programs into animal welfare programs. He's got a huge catalog of dog stories dating back decades to his days as a newbie Animal Warden in Ohio, where he convinced his bemused supervisors to try new methods to old problems by staying on budget. Or his time as Chief Animal Control Officer in Cleveland, where he rebranded both the agency (to Animal Welfare and Control) and the negative reputation of the city's rescue pittie population to the very cool City Dogs. Whether taking dogs out for jogs to leverage their need for exercise into positive marketing for pittbulls, showing up at any dog-friendly business with super awesome rescues, lowering euthanasia rates in Dallas (where he served as Director of Dallas Animal Services), starting a pet food bank for people in need, to literally saving lives – dog AND human – by reducing loose dogs on the street, Ed has been searching for leverage in animal welfare. Stepping into the directorship of Operation Kindness makes Ed's work, for the first time, non-governmental. Now that he has private support and funding for his big ideas, he's able to help the already-pioneering 501c3 to help even more people. As the pandemic rages, he's got the animals in mind – because as he points out, behind every animal in need, there is a human in need, too. About Ed Jamison Ed Jamison became CEO of Operation Kindness in March of 2021. Previously, Ed was Chief Animal Control Officer for the City of Cleveland. He then served as the Director of Dallas Animal Services (DAS), where he led a staff of more than 200 employees, rebuilt the volunteer base, and instituted new, progressive programming. The “Dallas 90” campaign was designed to help create a community where all people and animals are safe, treated with respect, and have access to the resources needed to thrive. Ed's policies and programs have been copied all over the country. He is currently the President of Texas Unites, Vice President of the National Animal Care & Control Association, and Board Member for the Association of Animal Welfare Advancement and Shelter Animals Count. Ed's love for animals means that he also has many pets at home, including a few foster fails. His pets include his dogs (Gurble and Esme), cats (Bertram, Deliah, Riley, Weston, Nestor, Merwin, Scrappy, and Kiwi), goldfish (Iragoo), cows (Cookie, Sprout, and Oliver), and miniature donkeys (Fern and Evie). https://www.operationkindness.org/ https://twitter.com/opkindness https://www.instagram.com/operationkindness/ https://www.facebook.com/OperationKindness/ https://www.youtube.com/user/OpKindness https://www.linkedin.com/company/operation-kindness https://www.tiktok.com/@operationkindness About The Long Leash  Thank you for joining us. If you have enjoyed listening, please SUBSCRIBE so you'll never miss out! Check out Dog Podcast Network for other dog-adjacent shows.  Follow us in Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. 

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Epic Kiwi tramping tales told in new book Across the Pass

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:41


Shaun Barnett is an outdoors author, editor and photographer who began tramping as a teenager in the mountains of Hawke's Bay - and has tramped the length and breadth of the country since. He's co-authored multiple award-winning books, among them: Classic Tramping in New Zealand, Shelter from the Storm: The story of New Zealand's backcountry huts and Tramping, A New Zealand History. For his latest work, however, it's the words of others he's brought to the fore. Across the Pass: A Collection of New Zealand Tramping Writing features the work of a range of Kiwi writers - from Sir Edmund Hillary and adventurer Graeme Dingle to peace activist Elsie Locke and poet Sam Hunt. Shaun joins Susie, along with Wellington writer and tramping enthusiast Kathy Ombler, who shares her own tale of a cold night, lost on Tongariro with a group of school children.

Drinking Alone, With Friends!
#162 -Teeth Brushing Beers & The Cavity Scale w/ Kiwi!

Drinking Alone, With Friends!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 109:59


Hey Folks and welcome to an EXTRA LONG EPISODE of Drinking Alone, With Friends! With Kiwi! This week we are graced by the presence of a special guest, and we get into it on a variety of topics including beers that make you want to brush your teeth, Tud Dominance, can shortages, crashing through tables, buffalo X7, and many more.  Enjoy this tangent filled wild ride! Four Handles on Our Frosty Mug of Wisdom Mercari MOX Mario Party Monster Train Follow us: Instagram YouTube Facebook Discord  - Join to drink beer, spirits or wine with us!  Support our Beer Buying Habits on Patreon (don't forget to subscribe to drink with Chris while he drinks a Bud Light Chelada!) Chris' Twitch Stream! e(nvelope)-mail us! Click here to let Jordan know your breakfast choices Special Thanks to the following for being AWESOME! Jordan of the Wreck My Podcast! crew! Jake for being a great Friend, Twitch Mod and Trader of Beers! Sal for being the best letter writer/Tud challenger/beer sender ever! Larissa for being the ULTIMATE handle giver of the podcast! Shea for becoming a ROCKSTAR patron!

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Kiwi showcase! Stephanie Crawford from Business Headspace on turning bookkeepers into business owners, music, sailing and Covid in NZ

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:54


Show notes to come! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

RNZ: Morning Report
Kiwi-tracking kids witness baby boom on Kaitake maunga

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 3:27


A group of Taranaki school children enjoying a crash course in kiwi tracking in Te Papakura o Taranaki, Egmont National Park, have been let in on a secret. Five pairs of the national bird released onto Kaitake maunga in April are in the midst of a baby - or should that be chick - boom. Taranaki Whanganui reporter Robin Martin joined them at Pukeiti.

The Dick Show
Episode 283 - Dick on Fat Body Erasure

The Dick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 123:13


Right-clicking NFTs and other FUD, Tess Holiday fights fat body erasure by wearing the world's unluckiest bikini, my dog is sexually harassed at the park, Chris the Kiwi meets an autistic escort and gets reviewed, most college applicants lie about their race, inflation hits strip clubs, a citizen journalist is raided by the FBI, and the Lego "ox" collection; all that and more this week on The Dick show!

Aotearoa Rugby Pod
Why Ireland could beat the All Blacks, the Kiwi take on Autumn Nations Series, and is Jarvo 69 an inside job?

Aotearoa Rugby Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 56:17


The Aotearoa Rugby Pod panel of Ross Karl, Bryn Hall and James Parsons review the latest round of the Autumn Nations Series, preview this week's All Blacks test against Ireland, discuss World Rugby's eligibility laws and ask how Jarvo 69 keeps getting away with his stunts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Guy and Harley Podcast
Episode 223: Piggy & The Nevs

The Guy and Harley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 102:27


A great episode. The men argue about who is the more experienced Camera Operator and we open up our new favourite segment 'Jab Chat'. Guy talks about the upcoming new season of Stranger Things and Harley has some auditions and a poetry performance, so we talk acting and on-set etiquette.  All this, plus the rest. So kick back, relax and hit play.  Useful podcast links:  https://linktr.ee/TheGuyandHarleyPodcast Watch Older here: https://bit.ly/WatchOlderTheMovie​ Watch Immi The Vegan here: https://linktr.ee/ImmiTheVegan Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/PigvillePatreon Watch No Caller ID here: https://bit.ly/NCID Invest with Stake: https://bit.ly/JoinStake Invest with Sharesies: http://bit.ly/SharesiesNZ ~ Guy and Harley

Lunatic Fringe - Into the Void
Lunatic Fringe with Taihuka Smith

Lunatic Fringe - Into the Void

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 66:39


Back in the can for round two, this time with a lot less alcohol, Tai Smith shares how it's felt going  from a low time Otter pilot to a few thousand hours, low time jumps to hitting it with a wingsuit, and how hardcore COVID rules have put an real exclamation point on incredible experiences like our spectacular trip across the Mediterranean.  Join us on this edition of Lunatic Fringe for a few proper laughs and a couple of songs with a proper Kiwi jump pilot.

Resources Radio
COP26 Week 2: Progress to Date, with Suzi Kerr

Resources Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:01


In this week's episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Suzi Kerr, chief economist at Environmental Defense Fund. Kerr's areas of expertise include emissions pricing, climate change policy, land use, and—most relevant for this podcast episode—international climate cooperation. Kerr originally hails from New Zealand, where she helped found Motu, an economics and public policy research institution that serves the needs of Kiwi decisionmakers. Kerr is the second podcast guest in our three-part series on COP26. She shares her reflections on the action at COP26 to date—major agreements that already have been forged, deals that have been scuttled, and key issues still on the negotiating table—with a particular lens on developing-country interests. References and recommendations: “Tears of Rangi: Experiments Across Worlds” by Anne Salmond; https://aucklanduniversitypress.co.nz/tears-of-rangi/

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Dr. Elisebeth Vanderweil from Hand In The Dark Consulting on fear & leadership, Hopelink, her book Apocalyptic Best Practices and thrift stores.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 44:44


Elisebeth VanderWeil, Ph.D., is Principal Consultant for Hand in the Dark Consulting in Seattle, WA, and the author of the book, Apocalyptic Best Practices: A unique approach to fear and change. Dr. VanderWeil is a fear expert who specializes in program evaluation, learning design, and leadership coaching – which all tend to flow into each other. She provides organizations with interesting questions and the designs ways to answer them. Dr. VanderWeil has pursued her love of learning, evaluation, and leadership in a variety of roles since graduating with her doctorate in leadership from Gonzaga University in 2007. She has a deep commitment to be of service to her community - reveling in its diversity, evolution, and gaiety. Apocalyptic Best Practices is grounded in research and narrative to illustrate ways for people to navigate sudden, massive change and the fear that is inherent in the process. This book reframes fear as an ally rather than an enemy. Find Elisebeth here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elisebethvanderweil/ https://www.handinthedark.net/ https://www.elisebethvanderweil.com/ ------ About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.com She would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Fate of Isen: A Kiwi D&D Podcast
Chapter 6 Ep27 - Jungles & Generals

Fate of Isen: A Kiwi D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 60:53


In this episode, the Apple Squadeth gets acquainted with the welcoming people of the Lochry jungle. Trestlespoon and Arcus get very acquainted... the Marley makes a very bold move.Visit www.fateofisen.com to learn moreA proud member of the Necropodicon Network, and one of the Feedspot top 60 D&D podcasts in the world! Check out Feedspot here.If you like the show, please feel free to join us on Discord or support us on Patreon!Intro, outro, and recap music by freesound user, Tyops★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Haley Johnson from The Propegy on using LInkedIn to grow your business and generate leads, handmade jewelry and purple sparkly roller skates.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 33:16


Haley is the CEO and accidental LinkedIn expert leading Propegy, the strategic LinkedIn agency on a mission to change the way online service providers use LinkedIn. If you'd told Haley 5 years ago that she'd be a LinkedIn expert teaching online service providers how to use LinkedIn lead gen to grow their business – she'd have laughed in your face. Because like you, she used to *hate* LinkedIn. But when a freelance writing gig turned into a deep dive of LinkedIn's best practices, she realized she'd unlocked the internet's best-kept secret for lead gen, thought leadership, and *insane* business growth. Now Haley helps online service providers like you learn how to make LinkedIn work for your business *and* your lifestyle through her signature program Level Up with LinkedIn Lead Gen, and members-only community, Thought Leaders Collective. Find Haley here: instagram.com/propegy thepropegy.com/training https://www.linkedin.com/company/propegy ----------- About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.com She would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Marie Mills from Clear Solutions on being a foodie, caring for feral cats and documenting your business for contingencies so you can go kayaking.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 34:22


Marie is the founder and owner of Clear Solutions. She captures your standard operating procedures in plain language, for everyone on your team, so your business can run exactly how you want, with or without you. Have you ever worried about the impact to your business if a key employee were to suddenly leave, taking their expert knowledge with them? She works directly with you and your team to document the details in a framework so the information is easy to find, easy to use, and easy to maintain. Efficiency begins with clarity. Clearsolutionsbymarie.com When Marie is not running her business, she can be found hiking in the mountains, paddling on the sea, or in the kitchen, cooking up a storm. Find Marie here: Website: clearsolutionsbymarie.com FB: @ClearSolutionsConsulting LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariecmills/ -------- About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.com She would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

Pushing The Limits
Handling Pressured Situations and Making Career Transitions with Conrad Smith

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 63:55


In our fast-paced world, everyone feels pressured to be the best and to do their best. It's easy to succumb to worry and anxiety during this time. This week, a superstar athlete encourages us to reframe pressure as an opportunity. You may not be involved in the sports world, but you can still learn from it. For our guest, overcoming high-pressure situations boils down to two things: trusting in the preparation you've done and taking things one step at a time.  Retired All Blacks player Conrad Smith joins us in this episode to talk about his experiences in the sporting world. He gives us a glimpse into his childhood and how he transitioned in and out of professional rugby. It's easy to make sports your whole identity if you're not careful, and Conrad details how athletes can avoid this trap. He also shares how we can equip ourselves to handle high-pressure situations. If you want to hear about Conrad's tales with the All Blacks and know how to be better at dealing with being pressured, this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Gain insights on the dangers of being too immersed in a sports bubble.  Learn how you can deal with feeling pressured. Understand the importance of adaptability in our fast-changing world. Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! All Blacks  International Rugby Players    Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [02:59] Conrad's Childhood Conrad's family used to move around until they settled at New Plymouth when he was six. His family was very close, as his parents always made time for him and his siblings.  They were also supportive of both his academics and sports. Conrad spent most of his childhood playing sports and helping out on their family farm.  [09:03] Conrad as a Young Sportsman  Conrad wasn't initially an overachiever when it comes to sports.  During his time at school, rugby didn't take up a huge portion of his life. Conrad didn't feel pressured to play, unlike most kids involved in sports today.  He's very grateful that he was able to finish his law degree before he started playing professionally.  [11:44] The Dangers of the Sports System Nowadays, there's an obsession with finding talent and training them hard from a young age.  The rationale behind this is to give these kids the best chances of success. However, Conrad is sceptical about this approach. He believes that balancing life and sports is crucial, especially because sports is a short-term career. Many athletes end up going bankrupt or developing depression because they don't have a life outside of playing sports. [16:26] Staying Grounded When you're in a sports bubble, it's easy to lose touch with reality. If you're handling a high-paying sports career, you can forget how real people live. Athletes need to stay grounded and not tie their identity with their sports. This way, they can land on their feet after the bubble bursts.  The challenge is to find other things that you enjoy and avoid the trap of coaching after your playing career ends.  [29:39] On Career Transitions With the rapid changes in the world, we need to adapt to stay relevant.  It takes courage to change your career.  However, you can always find support when you open up to the people around you.   [33:06] Mental Health in Sports  All athletes feel pressured with their sports—what's important is how they deal with it.  When you look at being pressured differently, you can see it as an opportunity.   There's no quick fix for handling high-pressure situations. It's essential to find what works for you. [36:38] How to Deal with Feeling Pressured  Preparation is critical to help overcome feeling pressured.  If you have done the prep work, all that's left for you to do is execute.  Don't get overwhelmed by the bigger picture. Instead, focus on the minute details. You need to be at the top of your game if you're playing in the Rugby World Cup. Listen to the full episode to hear how Conrad overcomes being pressured! [45:21] Conrad's Experiences with the All Blacks Conrad was playing for the Wellingtons when he was picked to play for the All Blacks. His fellow players and coaches told him not to feel pressured and encouraged him to have fun.  For Conrad, being an All Black never lost its glow. He acknowledges what the team means for the country.  He believes that the All Blacks continues to perform well because the players uphold the team's legacy. In particular, their jersey means so much to Conrad. Find out why when you tune in to the full episode!  [52:51] The Future of Rugby Now working as a lawyer in the player association, Conrad speculates that women's rugby will see tremendous growth in the coming years.  The women's rugby players are more motivated by the sport. They want to reach more women and girls through it.  Since this women's rugby is still a relatively small industry, there's not much effort to commercialise yet.  This can be an advantage. It's similar to how small but nimble companies can overtake big industries. [59:56] Conrad's Advice to Parents and Children It is much more harmful to shelter your children from sports. As you get serious about sports, remember to stay grounded and balanced. Connect with the real world as much as you can.  Lastly, be open to opportunities and changes.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘I think it's fine to keep a balance, and to play other sports, and to experience, just live a normal life. I think you can still excel.' ‘You have a crazy number of bankruptcy, crazy number of rates of depression because they haven't learned to live outside of their sport.' ‘You have a lot of retired players that feel like they have to coach because they think it's all they know. The challenge, I suppose is, then of being careful not to fall into that trap.' ‘Whatever you decide that you want to be, you can become.' ‘The bigger the moments and the bigger the pressure, it's the funny thing, it's the more important that you focus on the smaller, minute detail.' ‘If you break it down into one more step, just one more, and then you just keep going and keep going. Then, invariably, that mindset or that thing that's in your head passes and then you're back in the game.' ‘If it's a conversation you're just having in your own mind, you will never get anywhere. You just need to open up about it.'   About Conrad Conrad Smith was a long-time player of New Zealand's All Blacks and helped lead the team to the 2011 and 2015 Rugby World Cups. He is widely known as “The Snake” for his ability to slip through tackles. At 38, he captained the Wellington-based Hurricanes in the Southern Hemisphere's Rugby league, then retired after the 2015 World Cup.  He now serves as legal counsel and project manager for International Rugby Players, the global representative body for the sport. He is also the high-performance manager for Pau, a French club that competes in the Top 14, the highest in the country's domestic league.  Find out more about Conrad and his work at International Rugby Players.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends, so they can learn what to do when they feel pressured.  Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa     Transcript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Lisa Tamati speaking. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits. This week, I have Conrad Smith, the famous, famous All Black, who many of you Kiwis at least will know, a superstar athlete. And we share information about his career, and what it's like to be in the World Cup, and lots of exciting stuff. Also, what it's like to be post-career now, retiring, some of the issues that he sees around young athletes. Really lovely and interesting conversation with the amazing Conrad Smith who's also a lawyer as well as an All Black. Talk about an overachiever.  Before we get on to the show, just want to remind you, we have our epigenetics flagship program that we're running constantly. So if anybody wants to find out what the genes are all about, and how to optimise your food, your exercise, your lifestyle, your chronobiology, your mood and behaviour, all these things to your specific genes, and get the blueprint and the user manual for your body, then please come and check out what we do. Head on over to lisatamati.com, hit the ‘Work with Us' button, and then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program. That will take you over to our site where you can find out all about that. Or you can always reach out to me, and I can send you a little bit of a video, and maybe jump on a call to explain how it all works. It's a really powerful and awesome program. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program, and it's really been life-changing for so many, including myself and my family. So if you're wanting to find out about that, just head on over to lisatamati.com and hit the work with us button.  Also, just wanted to let you know that I do a lot of motivational speaking, corporate speaking. I would love if anyone knows, or organising a conference, or team workshop, or anything like that, please reach out to me: lisa@lisatamati.com if you're interested in finding out about my speaking programs. Also, we do corporate wellness programs on that front as well. How can you upgrade your life and be the best version of you can be at work and at home? That's what we're all about. So thanks for that letting me do that little plug.  Now, we're going to be going over to Conrad Smith who's just been moved back to New Plymouth. I've had the privilege of meeting him a number of times and working on a couple of things. So I hope you enjoy this conversation. Now, over to Conrad.  Well, hi everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits this week with Lisa Tamati. I am really excited for today's conversation. I've teamed up with another amazing superstar, a top athlete for you guys to enjoy learning from today. I have Conrad Smith. Conrad, welcome to the show.  Conrad Smith: Thank you, Lisa. Thank you for the introduction.  Lisa: You hardly need an introduction especially to people living in New Zealand. A legendary All Black. You played for how many years? I think it's 2004? Conrad: 15 years. Lisa: 15 as an All Black, as a winger. You've been a captain of the Hurricanes. You've been, I don't know, Player of the Year and Sportsman of the Year in Wellington. Your accolades are such a huge list, Conrad. You're blushing already, I can see. But really, an incredible athletic career and you were also talented as a cricketer, I understand. Conrad: When I was a little fella, when I was little fella. I was too little for rugby so I played more cricket, but yeah.  Lisa: And then you grew. Conrad: I was a New Zealander. New Zealand kid back then. Yeah, then I grew up. That's right.  Lisa: Yeah. Then you grew up and you were big enough to take on the big boys. Say, Conrad, give us a little bit of a feel like where you grew up. And how much of an influence did your childhood have on what you ended up doing with your rugby career? Conrad: Yeah. So I was actually born down Hawera. My father was a policeman so we moved around with him a little bit in the early years, and then moved to New Plymouth when I was about six. We're a very, very close family. He gave a lot of time. My mom and dad would always make time for the kids: a couple older brothers, younger sister. Yeah, it was a great childhood. A lot of sport was played but we all did pretty well academically, which my parents laughed at because both of them never made it. They did poorly in school. Really, really supportive parents in terms of... It's funny, I probably took it for granted then, but I don't ever remember my parents either not being there or having to work.  Everything we did, we always were supported. And they were there, whether it was just drive us there, or coach our teams, or try and help us with our homework. I think that was what I've, like I said, took for granted but now, being older, I realise how important that was and why we're still such a close family, and my brothers are my best mates, and my sister is. We still meet. Yeah we still, obviously. We're all sort of have moved around the world but we're sort of pretty close together again. I suppose I try to be now with my own family like my dad was to me. Yeah, so those were the luckiest break in my head, I suppose. I always say people talk about luck, especially in sport but for me, it was just the family I was born into and the sport I had as a young fella.  Lisa: Yeah. Now, that's brilliant. And you had a couple of kids yourself?  Conrad: Yeah, yeah. Now, we've got two of them, just about to go off to school. Luca is my seven, and we had him in New Zealand, and then our daughter was actually born over in France while I was over there for four or five years. She's come back with us. Lisa: Growing up in the... You grew up in the 80s, I grew up in the 70s. Showing my age, yeah. But I think in the 80s, it was still very much like an outdoorsy lifestyle, like that good Kiwi kid upbringing, especially in Taranaki because we both come from here. Having that being outdoors in nature all day, as kids, we never came home before dark, sort of thing. Was it the same in your household?  Conrad: Yeah, for sure and like I say to all the brothers, they were pretty influential in what I did. I just sort of hung around, tail off them but very much, we were always out. I just think of my childhood, it was all about playing sport, finding areas to play sport. You'd sort of get pushed out, and as we try and play inside, then we'd get pushed out to the garden and we'd ruin the garden or ruin the lawn. We're just constantly finding places to do what guys do with a ball and you can do anything. Then, the wider family were farming so my dad was on the farm. He sort of got kicked off by his older brother, but that was a family farm.  So we would eat out that way and that's that Douglas from Stratford on the way there with my mom in there. That's been in the family for three or four generations and that would be where we're kids. We'd help with haymaking, we'd help with carving, we'd help all sorts. That was pretty much my favourite holiday, and the same as all of us kids would be to go spend some time there and help on the farm. That was just a childhood, yeah. You just know what friends to do and always outside, didn't matter if it was raining and cold as it often is at most parts. We just put a coat on and carry on.  Lisa: Oh, man that just takes me back to my childhood, and I often think, 'Man, I want to go back.' What happened to that simple life that we had when we were kids? You're very lucky to have such wonderful parents, obviously. It's such a cool family. You also went off into university and became a lawyer, as you do, as an All Black. A slight overachiever there, Conrad. Did you always want to be a lawyer apart from wanting to be an All Black?  Conrad: As I sort of said before, I wasn't a huge overachiever on the sport front. Well, I went to Francis Douglas; it's not a huge sporting school. We had sporting teams, but that wasn't very much. Part of it, you were there to study, you were there to get an education, and I enjoyed it. I enjoyed school. I think it is a great school, and a lot of my mates now are still from the mates I made in my school years, and yeah. So I didn't mind class and I never had a... I suppose leaving high school as it was when I was going to go to university, my brothers had both done that. That was sort of a thing to do.  Law was, yeah. It was something. I enjoyed English history. Those sort of subjects at school in Wellington wasn't too far. I sort of wanted to go down to meet my brothers down there and that was the scarfie life was. But he sort of talked me out of it just because he... I think he'd done about four years by that stage, and flying down, and getting himself back and forth was pretty tough. They sort of said, 'Well, if you have to, go closer to home.' and that was when I ended up in Wellington and I really enjoyed law and rugby.  Yeah like I say, sport was great, but it was two nights a week. It wasn't taking over my life as I know it does to a lot of kids nowadays. They make academies, and whatnot, and maybe talk about whether that's a good thing or a bad thing. But yeah, I was able to finish a full law degree and luckily, that sort of perfectly dovetailed into when I started playing professionally. Yeah, it was just sort of fortunate for me in terms of the way it all worked out and the timing. That's something I was very grateful for, obviously. Lisa: Yeah, yeah. Because right now, like your career, your playing career at least is over, you've got something to do. You've got a qualification. If we dive into that subject a little bit, so a lot of the young guys now are coming through and they're sort of getting picked out early along the way. What sort of dangers do you see with that system?  Conrad: Yeah, I do worry about it,  and I've spoken about it before. Because it's not just in rugby. It's in all sports. There's sort of a real obsession towards identifying talent young. Then the excuses, are you giving them the best chance of success? So we're gonna do all the work with them, and specialise them, and make them concentrate on the sport. But firstly, I don't know if that actually helps them with their sport a whole lot. I think it's fine to keep a balance, and to play other sports, and to experience, just live a normal life. I think you can still excel. But the other thing is that if it doesn't work out or even if it works out, sports are short term industry. You know, I know that that's not forever, and when you get to the back end of that, if you're purely invested in one sport when the time runs out, you got to rebuild a lot of the... Yeah and that's a real problem.  And you don't need to look far to find a lot of evidence about that. We've been afoot and looking at American sports because they've been professional a lot longer than we have. Some of the statistics is just shocking. And people would think that they paid so much money, the athletes in those sports in America that they should be able to live literally after... They could do whatever they want. Theoretically, they have enough money just to retire but the statistics are not that at all. You have a crazy number of bankruptcy, crazy number of rates of depression because they haven't learned to live outside of their sport. That's sort of been taken away from them because they're placed into their sport so young, and then just cut, and there's no real assistance around that.  So yeah, that's an extreme example and we're nowhere near at that stage here with the way the academies and that are set up. I know most of the people involved are very mindful of the things I've just talked about. Lisa: That's pretty...just open that conversation now. Conrad: Yeah. I just think there's a lot to be said around leading young people. I look at myself and from that period of development where maybe nowadays, I'd been in an academy, I was lead to play multiple... I played cricket, I played basketball, I ran, I did, God knows, all these things, and who's to say what lessons I learned from those other sports that I actually used in rugby? Because there's so much that you can pick up and also being able to study.  For me to have a degree, the benefits that gave me to deal with injuries, to deal with all the downsides of sport because I had a background and the education. It's really helpful. You relax a lot more. You get a perspective on the sorts of things that if you're just wrapped up in a sport and you get an injury, man that's tough. You can't do what you would like to do. Where do you turn? But I think if you've had a bit of an education, and it doesn't have to be a law degree, but if you've got some other life or other opportunities and options that you can turn to in those times, and it gives you perspective and a sense of reality, and you don't get so caught up in that, so yeah. I know it is appreciated. I just think it may be still underrated by a lot of the people that are setting up these academies and things for the young sportsmen.  Lisa: Yeah, and that's a good conversation to have and just be open about. Because you're one injury away from ending your career at any time. And then, to build... that's like building a sort of a house on a foundation of saying if you haven't got something else and you haven't got the life skills, if I just look at the opposite extreme with my sport where you have... When I started, just a bunch of weirdos doing crazy stuff, right? There's no structure, and there was no support. There was no knowledge, but it taught me that I had to go and market myself. I had to go and push everything that... Even when I represented New Zealand, I had to buy my own singlet to wear at the thing. Get a little... I'm getting here and do all of the things. So you had to market yourself, present yourself, become a speaker, do all of this sort of stuff in order to... So through that, you learn a lot of life skills anyway and then it was never a professional sport, in a sense. I managed to live off my sport for a number of years, but that was an exceptionally... That just because I found ways to do that but it wasn't a pathway that anybody could follow. But it taught me to fight. I remember having this conversation with my brother, Dawson, who I know was one of your heroes when you were a little feller. My brother, Dawson, was a Hurricanes player and Super Rugby in Taranaki and international as well. When I came back from Australia, and I came back to New Zealand, and I was raising money to go to Death Valley, which was a big race for me, he was like, 'Why are you in the media? Where you want to be? I used to hide from the damn media.' And I'm like, 'Yeah, but you got everything given to you, mate. You got all your clothes, all your gear, you got stuff gifted to you left, right, and centre. You've actually got no idea what another sport is.' That structure, that framework is not there. And that's good and it's bad.  When you have everything laid on for you, but you haven't had to fight in society for your things... Because I've talked to a lot of rugby clubs actually around the country to all the younger guys. Everything is laid out for them. They have to fight. They've got a lot of pressure as far as performance and all that sort of stuff goes, but the rest of life is sort of taken care of. So it's something to be wary of. I think you got young ones and going up through this system is to just think about, 'What is the fallback option here? What else are they going to do when their career is over?' Because it can be very short, and not everybody reaches the stardom that you did. Not everyone gets to play for the All Blacks' 94 games or... Conrad: We talked about the bubble. They use that term a lot within sports. So you come into this bubble. When you stay in that bubble, you lose touch with reality. You're actually... I know because I've seen it, and I'd use that same terminology and say, 'Come on and talk to the guys. I've got to get out of the bubble.' It was always a thing of because people would... And you'd see it with people that get drawn into a sporting career and if they're doing really well. And you're right. It's only in New Zealand that it's probably only really rugby. There are other sports now that get paid really well, but they have to head overseas so... You're thrown into a lifestyle where everything is laid on and you don't actually... You forget how the real people live and the real life is, and that the bubble bursts, and it all comes about, and this is what I'm saying: The more time you spend in that bubble, when it bursts, the harder it is. The fall can really take a lot of getting used to it and some people don't.  Unfortunately, even the guys I have played with, I've got as many stories of guys who are struggling, still struggling as the guys who fell on their feet. I don't think anyone does straight away, even myself. People will say ‘You handled it well.' I've been retired just over three years and I knew. Everyone seemed to me it's at least two years before you even... There's still things you struggle with it. And that was spot on. It just takes a lot of time to understand that you're never going to get up in the morning and have that same drive. You're very lucky that when you're as a sportsman or woman to have that drive. Just do the same thing. But you got to find something else, and it will never replace that and it's not meant to, but it's a challenge for everyone. Those life experiences during that sporting career are so important so that when the bubble bursts, when you come out of it, it's just a little bit easier to find your feet. Because otherwise, that is tough, and it's a bit of a worry.  Lisa: Yeah yeah exactly. Just on even from that identity of being this athlete and you had a singular purpose. Pretty much every day when you got up, it was to train and it was to be the best for the next game or the next whatever. And that gets taken away and then the complexity of life comes in. Yeah? I retired from doing ultramarathons at 48. It's a sport where you can go a lot longer, and I've got mates that are still in their 60s and 70s doing it. But what I do see often in the ultra running community is they don't know anything else so, 'I'm going to stick with what I know and I'm just going to beat the crap out of my body until it falls into the ground.' Rather than going, 'Hang on a minute. This is no longer conducive to what I really want for me.' And reassessing. With rugby, you're forced to because physically, at 48, you wouldn't be able to keep up with a 20-year-old.  There's that whole, have you struggled? I know I've struggled with that whole identity. Like, 'Who the hell am I if I'm not that hardass athlete and I'm not able to do what I used to do?' Because I still get it in the running scene, 'Oh, a marathon must be... you must do that before breakfast.' I'm like, 'Yeah, no. That's not...' Now, a 5K's quite long. You know what I mean? So your horizon comes back in. So I've spent decades pushing my horizon out to be able to go longer, longer, longer, bigger. Then, life happens. In my case it was mum and that was the end of the career. It was high time; it was overdue. But that whole, you just had the rug pulled out from under you, and your identity is tied up in that performance. Have you found that a struggle?  Conrad: Yeah. Yeah, I think. Like I say, everyone does. You're lying if you say people do it easy. Again, I think a lot of the work, hopefully, athletes that handle it better have thought about that work during their career and they don't... We were given some great support while I was playing, particularly, within the All Blacks, guys like Gilbert Enoka with the background. And the whole mental side of not just the game, but of life, in terms of keeping...being grounded, keeping perspective. Part of that was your identity and not letting rugby define you. We used to say that you're a person that plays rugby, you're not a rugby player. It has this other life. You're actually... I play rugby because I like playing. Maybe that's not who I am. That's what the public sees, and I think if you get a handle on that while you're playing, then you understand that when rugby is taken away but that's not part of... ‘That's what I used to do. Now, I'm not doing it anymore but I'm still the person I've been this whole way. Now, my journey carries on.'  Like I say, that's easier said than done. There's people that become the rugby player. That's all they are, and so that's the real challenge. For me, it was about just finding other challenges. And I think anyone in terms of rugby or any sport yourself, you find other challenges, it gives you... You realise your own identity and you find other things to do that give you fulfilment. I think aligned with that is the whole... When I think of rugby players, a lot of them who find the identity in rugby, they then just go on to coaching, and this is a real problem, and it might... I don't think that's just with the sport of rugby, but you have a lot of retired players that feel like they have to coach because they think it's all they know.  The challenge, I suppose is, then of being careful not to fall into that trap. It was easier for me. I studied. I used to be a lawyer. I'm sure I could go back and do that. Maybe not as a lawyer, but there are other skills that I have. That's a really hard message, but it's a really important message to give all sportsmen. To rugby players, I'm always telling them, 'You don't have to stay in rugby, you know. You played, you finished, you don't have to coach.' There's going to be hundreds and thousands of players finishing career and they think they have to coach. But their skills are transferable to hundreds of different professions and things that will pay them well. You can keep being yourself.  Even for me, I've stayed within rugby but it's not coaching. I'm working with the Players Association, International Players Association and that suits me. That's my skill set: a bit of the law, the analytical side of me that I've always had. And I think that was important. It's sort of my process of moving away from that identity as just 'Conrad Smith, the rugby player.' It's important to find other things that challenge me and that I enjoy. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do.There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us.  Lisa: That's awesome and thanks for sharing that because I think that's... Being able to openly have these conversations because there are a lot of athletes in lots of different sports struggling with this whole process of... Your career is so short, and you're not a has-been. I asked myself these conversations, and most especially in the beginning is, 'You're nothing now. You're a has-been now. You can't do it.' And being embarrassed about that, instead of going, 'Hang on a minute. I'm still pretty fricking epic and I do other stuff.' Now, that's freed up a huge piece of my brain and my daily power and energy to then go and attack other massive projects.  There's so many things in the world that you can take on. It's all up to you to develop a certain passion. And I think it's not even just in the sports realm. I see people who are in careers that got friends and careers, they don't want to be there anymore but they studied it, they became it, they did it. whatever it was. Now, they're like, 'Is that it?' It doesn't have to be it, no. We live in a day and age where we can actually go and retrain. In fact, we have to be adaptable and flexible in this day and age if we want to keep up because the world is changing so fast. So many jobs are going to be gone and whole industries.  As a jeweller in a previous life, that industry got destroyed, really. If you weren't in the big game with big brands and Chinese mass production and stuff like that and you're an artisan, a person who made one-off pieces, you're struggling now unless you really got the top massive diamonds and God knows what. Everyone else is struggling, so you have to go, 'Okay, that industry's change. I'm going to have to adapt, change, go with it, overcome it, improvise, and keep developing.' I think that's the message that we're getting here is you don't box yourself in. don't just be that one-trick pony. That's not, and Conrad is now an advocate, he's a father, he's a speaker.  Whatever you decide that you want to be, you can become. And you're not just Conrad, the All Black. I think that's a really important transition for everybody to go through. Even if you're a policeman or a teacher and you don't want to do that anymore or whatever the case is. Conrad: Yeah, and it takes a bit of courage. Like I said before, it's easier said than done a lot of the time. And that's what people just need that encouragement. Especially with finances and people suddenly are, 'I've got a mortgage on a house. I don't want to change career because there might be a layer where I'm not earning money.' But yeah, I just think that's... You come back to some questions about who you are, who you want to be, and you've got to be... You'll be happy doing what you're doing. So I just think all the help you can get from people around you, that's where you'll draw the energy, I think. If it's a conversation you're just having in your own mind, you will never get anywhere. You just need to open up about it, speak to people close to you, and I think that's generally where the answers come from.  Lisa: Yeah. I think that's gold. On that point, how big is mental health in your work? Do you do a lot around supporting mental health, and that sort of thing, and helping people transition, and all that sort of jazz?  Conrad: Yeah, absolutely. More and more, it's a complex field. When you talk about players in the game, in the sport of rugby, it's really difficult. We were starting to appreciate the pressures I think that sportsmen and women are under in these fields. It's a lot of… it draws that back on what we were talking about before. You're in a bubble and you do lose perspective and so not as the... The challenge is to help these young, these kids that are in these bubbles to speak different, and keep living, and look at sport as this amazing opportunity, and not feel the pressure. Well, maybe saying not feeling the pressure is the wrong way to put it because it's natural, but to feel the pressure and find a way to deal with that, a healthy way to deal with it. Again, I look back on my career and you're playing for the All Blacks, you're playing World Cups, it's easy to talk about pressure. There was never times that I didn't know how to deal with it, and that was from the sport I had, and maybe the background, and my upbringing. But it was easily... You just channel that and see and look at it differently and decide. Look at the opportunity that every time you feel pressure, you get it, it's as simple as just changing the perspective of things rather than the pressure of, ‘You have to win'. ‘I'm an All Black, I want to win because…' Whatever. ‘I've got a country behind me,' and suddenly, it's a burden that's lifted and yeah, you flipped it and you're puffing out your chest, and you want to do it. If it doesn't come off, it's a game. There's more important things, absolutely, around. But yeah, like I keep saying, it's not easy for everyone and there's people that understand that better. The challenge is getting through to people of different backgrounds, and different cultures, and different ages.  Lisa: Yeah with different problems.  Conrad: Yeah. I'm saying that because I know what works for me, but I know a 17-year-old young Samoan boy who's playing rugby, I don't know for the Highlanders, I might not be able to connect with him. The things that worked for me won't work for him. That's what I'm trying to say. Or the female swimmer who's doing, training for an Olympics. We're all different, and the challenge is finding a way for everyone to deal with that pressure and to be mentally healthy through a sports career. Lisa: I love that approach and just coming off the back of the Olympics. It was just wonderful to watch our amazing athletes doing amazing things. Lisa Carrington just blows me away. She's mentally just insane. But I love that thing of the challenge versus threat. I think this is a really important thing to do. When you're feeling overwhelmed and overburdened and like the whole world of pressure is on me, you going out and something the World Cup, were you able, even in those extreme pressure moments, to turn that into an opportunity and not a threat? Because that does change the physiology. Like when you're running on the paddock on those days, those couple of times in your life where it's just been horrifically big pressure, how did you physically and mentally cope there?  Conrad: Yeah, I think we've spent a lot of time, and everyone did, preparing for that World Cup. Again, as All Blacks, you have to spend a lot of time because you know the pressure that comes with and the expectation that comes with being an All Black in New Zealand. But even more so a World Cup, a home World Cup, when we hadn't won, I think 2011. A lot of our preparation time wasn't just being on the field with how we're going to play but was how to deal with that pressure. For me, it was just constantly turning it around so that it was never a moment I even... I can look back and think of times in the game where the team was under pressure and it would be perceived as... Even in that final hour, the team struggled a bit with the pressure, but if I'm being honest, our preparation never let us feel that way. We were dealing with that all the time.  We just were focused on doing our job. We talked so much about whatever comes our way, we were going to adapt and deal with it and that's what you just had to keep doing. You never sort of stop, and you'll notice yourself, you just don't let yourself stop and think about that. I think if you've got to that stage, it's too late. If you're having to go through a process of. 'How do I deal with this?' It's probably too late. You've already, hopefully, got a process in place where you're just, it's just instinctively, you're just channelling that, focusing on little details. Because you know whatever the pressure, that's not going to influence you unless you need it. You just focus on the small tasks and you get through 80 minutes of rugby like that, keep a smile on your face. Lisa: Pull your focus into the job at hand instead of the: 'Oh my god. Everyone's watching me. Everyone's pressuring. Hang on a minute I've just got to pass this ball right now.' You're breaking it down into little tiny... Conrad: We all have little trigger words and I know we've talked about this: ‘Be in the now.' Be in the now, which is like just what you're talking about. It's not thinking about the mistake you might have just made, the ball you drop, the tackle you missed, and it's not worrying, and you're not thinking about the World Cup, you're going to win at the end of this game. Because you can't do anything. Right now. ‘Right now. Right now, I'm going to catch this next ball.' Look up, keep looking, keep calling, whatever it is. It's as simple as a little thing like that that just keeps you in tune with the moment and not letting you get overwhelmed by the bigger picture. Yeah, massively important, obviously. The bigger the moments and the bigger the pressure, it's the funny thing, it's the more important that you focus on the smaller, minute detail.  Lisa: I love it. I said try to forget the consequences of what you're doing. You've done the preparation. You've done the work. You've done everything that you possibly can. You're standing on the start line, in my case, a race, then letting go of the outcome because you've done what you can do. And now, it's up to the whatever happens in the next few hours or days, in my case. So this was no longer just in your hands then. Because the gods have a thing to say about it as well. Sometimes, if you try and control the uncontrollable, then you'll drive yourself to madness, whereas if you can go, 'I've done the stuff that I was responsible for. I've put the work and I've done the preparation. I know my strategies. I know my pacing. I know whatever it is I'm doing. I got that right. Okay. I'm going to keep my eye on the ball here. But I'm going to let go of the outcome now.' Because when you let go of the outcome, then that pressure goes and you're in that...  Being in that now is a really powerful message to people. Because when you're in the past or the future, you're either worrying about the future, or you're regretting what's happened in the past, or it's a load for you to carry. In the moment, when you're under pressure, all you can cope with is that second right now. The next minute. That's it. When I was running long distances, I would break it down into: 'What's the next power pole? I just got to get to the next power pole. If I can't even get that far, I'm just gonna take one more step.' You can always take one more step, right? If you break it down into one more step, just one more, and then you just keep going and keep going. Then, invariably, that mindset or that thing that's in your head passes, and then you're back in the game.  Conrad: That's funny, you sound... because someone I remember that came and spoke to the team when we were outside joined the team in 2004, and we had Amish Carter came and spoke with the team. It was before the 2007 World Cup and obviously, that World Cup didn't end well, but some of what he said, I still remember it. He was talking about his Olympic performances, and he said, and I think one of the questions from the players was about we're talking: the nerves and the pressure. And I remember him saying that he wasn't nervous. He wasn't nervous when he got to the start line just for the reasons you said. He said: ‘Because then, I'd backed on my prep, I'd done everything I needed to do. Now, it was just a matter of going out and doing that. You can't do anymore.' It's funny that when I looked, especially towards into my career, the only times I would feel nervous normally, on the start of a week. So if we play the game on a Saturday, and that was because I'm nervous thinking of all the things I've got to do on the Monday, Tuesday. But by the Friday, I would have this real sense of calm. I'd have a smile and I'll be like, 'Right now, it's time to do it.' It's funny because people, it's the opposite. They're not thinking about a game on Monday, Tuesday, but they were getting nervous on before a game starts thinking, 'You must be even worse.' But yeah, that was the way I could explain it is that we're really... I was nervous thinking about the game but now, I've done all that. This is the path I've taken. This is the training I've done for this game. Now, I'm ready to... I'm going to go and do it and see if it works. Lisa: Yeah, this is the reward phase. This is actually what you've been preparing for all along, so this is the time when you actually should be enjoying it. It wasn't always that easy especially when you're doing a couple hundred K's somewhere because sometimes it's not that pleasant. But you've done the work to get to the start line and the times where I am being nervous is when I hadn't done the work.  Conrad: Exactly. I think of some... I don't like admitting it but normally, with All Blacks, you always have checked every box but there were games, I'd go back even the Hurricanes or Club Games and that's the ones where I'd be nervous because I'd be thinking... ‘I haven't really... now this week. I probably haven't done…' Then, you get nervous but actually the bigger the occasion, the preparation is normally good.  Lisa: You took it seriously and yeah, yeah. I've come stuck on some short races where I've had my ass handed to me because I went in with the... That's just the short race, and oh my god. Had my ass handed to me. So yeah, always respect every distance or every game. I think it's key. What's it actually like, Conrad, to be... The first time that you put on that All Blacks jersey? Because it's every little boy and now, little girl's dream too. What's it actually like to put on that sort of thing for the first time? Can you remember?  Conrad: Yeah for sure. It's pretty special. I do think I was really lucky the way it panned out for me in terms of... It happened really quickly. I'd play. I hadn't even played the Super Rugby game. I hadn't played for the Hurricanes. When it started, I had a really... I was playing for the Wellington Lions. We made the final, and then I was picked, fortunately. So the coaching staff that had come in wanted to pick some new younger players and I was one of those. That was very much sort of out of the blue. Then, I was starting the following week. So I played a final. The team was picked. We assembled the end of that following week. We flew to Italy, and then I was playing.  But that was great in hindsight because it didn't let me overthink that. It was sort of okay, and I just was like, 'Right.' Little bit like what I said before, 'I'm just going to enjoy it.' Admittedly there were people around me. Graham Henry, Ryan Smith, Steve Hansen, great coaches, and Gilbert Enoka that were giving me those messages. Just telling me, 'We're picking you in the first game. Just go and enjoy it. Just keep doing what you're doing. We love what you're doing.' So those messages for a young guy were perfect. I didn't actually question that. Yeah, I just took the jersey. I was still sort of pinching myself how quickly it happened. But yeah, then there I was playing and yeah, it was an amazing experience.  I'm glad to say it never really diminished. I was lucky to play for over a decade, and it was always special putting on the jersey. The team does a great job, I think, of respecting the jersey, acknowledging how important it is to their country, what we mean to everyone, and staying grounded, and all that good stuff about acknowledging the connection that you have with the young men and women who are dreaming to being All Black, wishing they were there, would give anything to be in your place. So you're always aware of that, and so it never loses its glow. Then I put my jersey on.  Brian Hoyer who was a big part of the team when I joined the team, he said ‘When you put the jersey on, you shouldn't be able to fit outside the doorway.' You grow that big. I'm not using the words and I always... For me, I was normally marking someone bigger than me or normally not the biggest in the room but I always felt that. That I have to turn sideways to get out the door but that was the sort of feeling and you hear that even today: The way you sort of, you grow in the jersey. Lisa: You're carrying the manner and the tradition of that, and the reputation of that, and the hopes of a nation, basically, on your shoulders, which can be either a load or it can be like, 'Wow, how lucky am I that I get to stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before?' Basically and like you said, 'Yeah, I can't fit through the door because I'm just filled with all that.'  Okay, just a very quick anecdote. I was running through in the Gobi Desert at one point and we were running through these slot canyons. These really crazy. It was hot. One guy died out there that day which was really terrible. I was running through there and I was chasing down this American woman who was in front of me and I was second. I'm like, 'I've got to plan something here if I want to beat this person in front of me that I was chasing down through these canyons.'  So I started singing the Maori Battalion song to myself and I started to... like my ancestors, and my tradition there, my heritage like, 'I'm going to bloody beat you, American. Yeah. I'm gonna chase you down, and I'm singing away to myself running along through this canyon.' I beat her, right. It was awesome. I just went dashing past her, and I beat her. But it was just like, 'Wow.' It's just like you're pulling out stuff that you... It's not just you. You're like your ancestors and your heritage, and they're powering you. So I imagine it's a bit the same with the All Blacks jersey.  Conrad: Yeah. It's powerful stuff. Like, and it's all about creating something bigger than you. There's no doubt the history of things or like you say, in individual sports. As soon as you can create that connection to a greater cause. Actually, in the All Blacks, it's actually easy. I say this when I talk to other sports teams around how they create the identity. But the All Blacks had it handed to them because they have 130 years of whatever it is of this amazing performance, of this history, this black jersey that this country that's mad obsessed with them, great air of success and also, this idea that we do unite. We're the flagship of New Zealand. Rightly or wrongly, that's the way we're saying and you got to embrace that.  The fact that every time an All Black teams practice, it's a culture we have in New Zealand. This great collection of men who are representing the country. You capture that in the right way, and it counts as something. The field is 00 but I always felt... Yeah, when we got it right, we're straight away. That's worth some points at least on the board. It's something special that the All Blacks do have, and to the credit of the team, the whole time, I was involved. I know that it's carrying on that the way they connect and acknowledge that, it's really well done. It's the reason that the team continues to perform well. Lisa: And it does it empower whole generations. Like I said to my brother Dawson, my dad wanted him to be an All Black, and he wanted him to meet all those milestones along the way. I remember like... We lost my dad last year, as people know, if they listened to my podcast. I said to my brother the other day, 'Dawson,' because he went to the game up at the park, at Pukekura Park and they had the 25-year anniversary for the Ranfurly Shield because he was on the Ranfurly Shield team. He was excited to go to the Ranfurly Shield thing, and I remember that being the proudest moment of my dad's life. Of all the things that my dad got to do and see, all of their kids, I said to Dawson, 'You gave him the highest point in his life was when you came home with that Ranfurly Shield, and you're a part of that Taranaki Team. That was, for him, the pinnacle.'  That's beautiful because that is just like... Especially when you've lost somebody... And Dawson's like, to be able to go and celebrate that Ranfurly Shield with his old mates and reminisce on those times. That stays with you to the end: those special moments that you get, and that camaraderie that comes with it, and all of that sort of stuff. He gave my dad a precious gift really by being a part of that team. Dad was just so proud.  Dawson said to me once, 'Lisa, you could run across every fricking desert in the world and it would still not mean as much as that Ranfurly Shield.' And I said, 'You're damn right, and that's okay.' Because he was right in that. It's okay because he loved rugby, and he loved rugby teams, and the rugby world. My dad played, what do you call that? Fifth-grade rugby until he was 45 and he only quit because people were telling him he was too old, and then he played touch for another 10 years. He was a legend. A legend.  You're carrying all that on your shoulders. There are five and six-year-old kids looking at you on screen like you did with Daws back then. Like, 'Oh, these big Taranaki players and stuff.' That's just beautiful. I had that just wanting to represent New Zealand in something because I couldn't be in All Blacks because back then, we didn't have women playing rugby, much to my dad's disappointment. Actually watching the girls at the sevens in the Olympics, oh, I just fell in love with that team. They were just epic. Ruby Tui is my new bloody hero. She's just amazing. I think she's just epic. But just to watch the camaraderie of those girls and the performance that they put on, I'm glad that women now have the chance to do that tough stuff too. Because that's pretty special as well: seeing girls going there and giving it everything, just going hard.  Conrad: You speak to the Black Ferns, the women's rugby, it's growing so much not just in New Zealand, but around the world and that's pretty exciting, especially for Fifteens and the opportunity it's giving so many young women. Yeah and so for myself, that's really refreshing now with international rugby and the Player Association and we deal with both men and women's. The joy I hear working in women's rugby, seriously, compared to men's, especially men's Fifteens, it's a lot of established... Careful with my words, but it's just so hard. To put it simply, it's so hard to get things done even if you agree there's so much.  Whereas in the women's game, it's so refreshing. There's just an openness and the enthusiasm. They just, 'Yep. Let's get that done and this.' You will see, women's rugby going to go great in the next few years, and it's because of... In the men's game, I don't like to say it, but it might not have anywhere near the same growth or evolution just because it's... Lisa: Stayed in the old ways. It obviously breaks everything, isn't it?  Conrad: The money, the money at that level is so big that there's so much at stake. That's just what grinds along, whereas the women's game, they're not... Obviously, they're trying to commercialise on the game, but it's crumbs compared to the men's for things at the moment. But they'll catch up at a huge rate because they're just open about... Like at the moment, they're motivated by having fun, being patient, at getting the product out, getting more and more women and girls playing the game.  Lisa: That's amazing and isn't that though that's a really good analogy for everything in the world? Like that the big old institutions or big bureaucracies are going to be struggling in the future, I think. Completely off-topic but from the governments, to the big corporations, to the big institutions are going to be struggling against these young, nimble, small, exponentially powered technology-based companies and the rate of change that's coming that these big state, old bureaucratic, not just talking about rugby here, but governments and things are actually going to be on the backfoot shortly.  I always think of that Kodak, the company Kodak that used to be the biggest player in the world and photography, right? They didn't go with digital evolution, then they went under. Because they were too busy trying to protect what they already had, they actually discovered digital photography. They started it, but they didn't pursue it because they thought, 'Oh, that's going to be a threat to our current existing business.' That mindset is when you get overtaken by the young upstarts that come along with enthusiasm and they can, on a company-wide level, they're smaller. They're nimble. They can make decisions quicker. They can move faster. I see this in all areas happening. Hopefully, in the right way it'll brush off as well, but the girls certainly are next level.  Conrad: They're great. And I've got to know a few of them, a few of the Black Ferns. Lisa: Can you help me out with Ruby? I want to get in with Ruby. Conrad: That is such great Kiwi so yeah, more than happy. She'd love to chat. Lisa: Woohoo. Okay. I know she's pretty busy right now. Everybody in the world wants to see her right now. And the other girls, they're just amazing. Conrad, as we wrap it up now in a minute because I know you got to go, but what is it that you want to get across? So if we highlighted a couple of points now, if you were talking to your children, you've got two kids, what do you want them to do in the future? Or what would you, if you were talking to some young kids out there that want to have a life in the sporting world? What's some last parting wisdom or for the parents of those kids?  Conrad: Yeah, I think if you're speaking to parents, the first thing is the value of sport, I think. I just worry a little bit. I know I'm working in rugby, and there's some crazy things being said about the potential harms of playing a contact sport. But honestly, I've had the benefit of seeing, digging a lot deeper into that and that is not at all as clear as it's conveyed because of the sensationalism of journalism. Kids are kids. They love playing. If I leave my boy and his next-door neighbour, they're gonna wrestle; they're gonna fight. There's no harm in playing.  But on the flip side, the harm of not playing sport, of sheltering them, of thinking, of sitting in a lounge with a Coke and a bag of lolly is better for a kid than going and playing rugby because he might knock his head. That's so far from the truth. That would be my wish for parents' young kids. Just play sport but... And then, I suppose, if it's to reflect on what we've talked about, when the kid means getting serious about a sport, it would be to keep you balanced, to not lose sight. If you're put in a bubble because it's a performance bubble, then that's all well and good but now, it's a bubble and you need to step out of that every chance you get and connect with the real world as much as you can.  Unfortunately, there are dangers and there are risks when you are totally invested into a sport. The crazy thing is sport is a great thing. It should be enjoyed and if you're even not enjoying it, it's not hard just to talk to someone and step outside your sport to reconnect with the people in the real world. Then, that should give you back your love of the game, and then you'll go well and be like Lisa and I and have a life where you've had a sport that you've loved, and it's given you amazing opportunities, and literally meet great people, and you still come out of it, and you're still happy, and still meet people but doing different things. Lisa: This is gold. Conrad, thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it. I'm looking forward to doing our speaking gig together shortly and that's going to be exciting. I'm just really glad to have made your acquaintance and I think that you have such a level approach, level-headed approach to this whole thing and gave us some great insights today on what it is to be an All Black, but also what it is to come out the other side and gave us some really good perspective. So thanks for your time today, Conrad. Conrad: Pleasure, Lisa.  That's it this week for Pushing the Limits. Be sure to rate, review, and share with your friends, and head over and visit Lisa and her team at lisatamati.com.   

BC&B
"The jelly in between your sandwich of hotness…"

BC&B

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 63:42


Sohail aka Starfleet Boy has been having casual and informal conversations about his beloved, Star Trek in his cozy little corner of YouTube for nearly 5 years but he has been exploring the themes and stories since he was a child. Star Trek is at the core of his life's philosophy and his being. His hope is to continue to be a contributing member of the Star Trek fandom and community for the rest of his life. ** Bae would like to amend his thoughts on The Notch™ - "also if you want to put in a footnote about my tirade being for not as i now don't think the notch is a big deal feel free lol..." “Underground hip-hop sensation TOTTy!!” The Kiwi in Canada is a passionate Trek fan, and hidden musical talent! "Hello and welcome to TREK on the TUBE! This is a channel about Star Trek mainly for people who know nothing or very little about the franchise and want to learn about the rich and immense universe. But don't worry, if you're an established Trekkie you're also welcome to stay." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/digresscast/message

Rusty's Garage
Andy McElrea (Part 1)

Rusty's Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 58:49


The larrikin racer turned team owner who stole rival team apparel, took part in crazy late night pitstop practise in a caravan park, and went on to win the prestigious Jim Clark Trophy. Andy McElrea's journey is packed with laughs, some missed opportunities and the Kiwi 'can-do' approach to motor racing that took him all over the world. Join host and broadcaster Greg Rust as they relive the early years. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fantasy Rugby Yanks Podcast
Season 4- Episode 9- Built For What Exactly? (Premiership Round 7)

The Fantasy Rugby Yanks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 53:44


It's your favorite American rugby knuckleheads, ready to have a jabber for your listening enjoyment. On this episode we get into the international scene once again, as we cover the Kiwi's first stops in their visits to the U.K. including the action both at Sandy Park and at the Principality. We also have a look at what the heck happened to the Eagles on Monday night, down to a few key positions unfortunately in our opinions. Yes, we then dive into the action from the Prem for the weekend including the big ones at the Gardens and the Stoop. Kick back, crack one and have a chuckle, on us! *Apologies to those that listened to our little blip last night* Patreon is here for TFRY https://www.patreon.com/TheFantasyRugbyYanks , subscribe and start getting a leg up on your friends. Ask us questions via Twitter: Jarrod- jdyke8man & Ben- admrablsnackbar, and #AskTFRY. Send us your thoughts for the show and questions for upcoming shows via e-mail fantasyrugbypodcast@gmail.com. Of course we welcome feedback via e-mail, twitter or by rating/reviewing the pod on Apple Podcast.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.
Amee Quiriconi from Activity Girl on her book A Fearless Woman's Guide to Starting a Business, addressing trauma, Joan Jett and waterproof Converse.

Erin Keam's Conversations about Closets with my Closest 1000 friends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:51


Ameé Quiriconi is a business & leadership coach and consultant. She is also the author of the best-selling book, "The Fearless Woman's Guide to Starting a Business: What Every Woman Needs to Know to Be a Courageous, Authentic, and Unstoppable Entrepreneur." ​As an entrepreneur herself since 2002 when she founded her first company in Seattle, Ameé has been through it all. She has built scalable companies from an idea at the kitchen table to entire operations. After overcoming her own personal and professional struggles, including CPTSD from childhood trauma, Ameé became an outspoken advocate for mental health awareness. She hosts a weekly podcast called One Broken Mom, which tackles mental health and understanding the impacts of trauma & dysfunction on our lives today. Through her work with clients across many industries - from companies with 100 or more employees to mompreneurs - Ameé knows firsthand the importance of balancing professional growth with personal development. Her innovative approach helps clients bridge the gap between their "business self" and their "authentic self." Ameé is also a frequent speaker on entrepreneurship, women in business, and trauma-informed leadership practices for individuals and organizations. Find Aimee here: https://www.ameequiriconi.com/ Link for Free Gift: https://www.ameequiriconi.com/lead-landing-page-lifestyle-levels -an ebook with exercises to help figure out what you should be earning based on your own dreams & aspirations IG: @amee_quiriconi Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ameequiriconi.writer.speaker LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ameequiriconi/ My podcast: One Broken Mom, https://podcast.ameequiriconi.com/ also available on everyone's favorite podcast app ---------- About Erin Keam Erin Keam is a Kiwi living in Seattle who works with women solopreneurs to create their ideal life and achieve their vision. She combines her 23 years' experience mentoring and being mentored in the recovery field with her career in marketing, film, media, TV, advertising, real estate and customer service (and a passion for fashion) to be a trusted source for solutions to what is getting between you and the life you want. She offers two paths to progress. One is her unique LifeStyle Statement sessions, in which women uncover their personal themes which are distilled into a one-of-a-kind Statement which can then be taken to every area of their life from wardrobe to relationships to their business to their career and their home. The other are her “pressure relief” mini-intensives where the focus is on moving closer to your vision through exploring and tackling personal and marketing issues which are keeping you stuck, whether clarifying your website's message to your clients, looking at how you spend your time and money, decluttering (mental and physical), dressing as who you want to be, assessing the first impression your media and home office make on your ideal clients and creating action plans to get you the life you want. When she's not doing this, she's interviewing women entrepreneurs on her podcast Conversations About Closets With My Closet 1000 Friends, about what they do, why and what they love about it, with one or two questions in there about clothing (there's that passion for fashion!). Female-identifying (or non-binary) and want to be a guest? Book here! You can find out more on her website erinkeam.com She would love to connect with you on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook. Hey, Koa Club members! Something getting between you and your goals? Often, all we need is someone to hold space while we talk through what's keeping us stuck and the solution presents itself. Book a Talk it Out Call here with Erin. If you want an action step, she'll suggest one. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erin-keam/support

POD LEDOM
Cycle 13, Episode 12: The Host Who Once Ate a Kiwi Whole

POD LEDOM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 92:53


The Hosts discuss Cycle 13, Episode 12 of ANTM! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/podledom/support

Swish Edition
Here, Kiwi, Kiwi

Swish Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 48:28


Hosts Dale & Scott are wrapping up the Halloween season with a discussion about what's PC to dress up as and what isn't in ultra-woke 2021; local governments are stopping unvaxxed from eating hamburgers; sugary sweet Christmas movies are all the rage; skimpflation is running rampant everywhere; super-rich “Judy Justice” moves to streaming; Blue Origin wants to build an office park in space; borrowing towels from nice hotels; liquor coming back to United; and much more pop culture craziness.

Open the Pod Bay Doors
OTPBD News Special - 2nd November 2021

Open the Pod Bay Doors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:20


Welcome to another edition of the OTPBD News Special, our series which analyses the news that matters for Australian and Kiwi startups. This week, we're focusing on news stories centred around climate tech and renewable energy.Meet this week's panel…Mick Liubinskas, Climate SaladAli Cluines-Ross, ArtesianTopics we discuss: Australia's goal of net zero emissions by 2050, The 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, Grok Ventures becoming Australia's first $1b VC fund to invest in climate tech, Loam Bio raising a $40m Series A with backing from Marc Benioff (TIME Ventures) and Mike Cannon-Brookes (Grok Ventures), Australian energy company Woodside partnering with US-based solar startup Heliogen, Square Peg backing waste reduction startup Zero Co in $6m raise, Bitcoin mining coming to Byron Bay with a data centre powered by renewable energy, and Atlassan's new 40-storey HQ which will operate on renewable energy.Additional information can be found below:https://www.climatesalad.com/https://events.humanitix.com/climate-salad-showcase-2021https://www.globalclimatelandscape.org/

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
563: Luke Hollomon, SPT: How to Keep up with Research While Staying Sane

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 32:23


In this episode, Founder of PT Crab, Luke Hollomon, talks about the importance of reading, dissecting, and understanding research. Today, Luke talks about how PT Crab can help PTs, the most common research-reading pain points, why reading the abstract isn't enough, and how to make the whole research process easier. What does it mean to keep up with the research? Hear about how to find exactly what you're looking for, how to understand what the research says, and how to apply the research to your clinical population, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Research has shown that, in our specific field, over 90% of the abstracts are at least misleading, if not inaccurate, relative to the paper.” “It's important, when you're reading a paper, to read it a little bit critically.” “A lot of times, research is written for researchers. It's really important for researchers to write for physical therapists.” “If you have a paper that doesn't specifically address your patient population, you can translate that to your population with good communication.” “Try to make [your] favourite journal one that you have access to.” “Get focused in on something a little bit earlier.”   More about Luke Hollomon Luke Hollomon is a writer, teacher, and student from Richmond, Virginia with a special interest in sharing complex information with those who need it. Using his background in physiology and education, he started PT Crab, a newsletter that brings physical therapy clinical research, awesomely brief to the inboxes of thousands of physical therapists every week. His true passion is helping people understand and use scientific information. When not writing The Crab, he writes science and technology articles as a freelancer and is currently finishing his degree in physical therapy from Virginia Commonwealth University. Afterward, he plans to pursue a PhD in exercise physiology and study the limits of human endurance. When not doing all of that, he's a bikepacker, rock climber, and trainer of his deaf adventure dog, Kiwi. If you're ever in Richmond, look for her in her trailer behind Luke's bicycle as they explore the city together.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, PT Crab, Physiotherapy, Research, Papers, Reading, Keywords, Critical Thinking, Science, Knowledge,   Resources: https://www.researchgate.net   To learn more, follow Luke at: Website:          PTCrab.org Facebook:       PT Crab Twitter:            @lukehollomon   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927