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Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher
Ep 761 | It Ended Up Where?

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 50:48


Deodorant recall… Syrup cartel / Big Syrup… Sure there's Omicron butttt Vulture Bees… Movie / theater updates… Jack stepping down… Social post explained… Airline crackdown from Attorney General… Breastfeeding during a flight… Landing gear arrival in Miami… Nancy moving? Matthew says no… USPS fixed? Package shipping story with Amber… Ghiz and Jessie Trials startin up…  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Work @ Home RockStar Podcast
WHR 3.43 : Kirk Cooper

Work @ Home RockStar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:12


SHOW NOTES Good Note : Started a side hustle as an amazon ecommerce seller while working as a teacher. Ended up growing that business to full time. Bad Note : Holding on to the security blanket of a job and ended up not putting in the full effort into his first venture and it never did take off. Assembling the Band : Found a group of Virtual Assistants though LinkedIn. Started by getting on a screenshare and just worked while the team watched. This allowed them to learn what he was doing and also creating content at the same time. Gathering Fans : When starting off, you can have a lower price point to build up a clientele and build testimonials. Keeping the Hat Full : Put time in and do things manually at first rather than spend the money on tools. THE STORY Kirk Cooper is the CEO and founder of Ecom Automation Gurus. Living in Aurora, Colorado, Kirk was a former high school teacher who got tired of the 9-5 life and decided to take a leap of faith and build his own company from the ground up. Now, EAG builds fully automated eCommerce stores for its users, supplying them with all of the manpower and tools to run their business, passively. Kirk is also the author of “Scratch and Claw: The Path To Entrepreneurial Greatness.”

Land-Grant Holy Land: for Ohio State Buckeyes fans
Hangout in the Holy Land: The Streak has Ended. Recapping the Beatdown in The Game. (11/28/21)

Land-Grant Holy Land: for Ohio State Buckeyes fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 72:41


Land-Grant Holy Land's flagship podcast ‘Hangout in the Holy Land' is back for a brand new season with brand new co-hosts! We will be now be coming at you twice a week to preview and recap each Ohio State game as well as any and all Buckeye news. Join LGHL's co-managing editor Gene Ross alongside his co-host Josh Dooley as they cover everything from football to basketball to recruiting and more! Well, it has finally happened. After a decade of Ohio State dominance, the Wolverines have emerged victorious in The Game for the first time under Jim Harbaugh. It wasn't the result of a bad call or a fluky outcome; Michigan was the better team on Saturday, dominating the Buckeyes in the trenches on both sides of the ball. Gene and Josh sort through to wreckage to figure out just what went wrong, both from a player and a coaching standpoint. They also discuss an important offseason for Ryan Day, as he must rebuild his entire defensive coaching staff from scratch with that unit costing his team a chance at a national title two years in a row. Connect with the Podcast: Twitter: @HolyLandPod Connect with Gene: Twitter: @Gene_Ross23 Connect with Josh: Twitter: @jdooleybuckeye Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WhatCulture Wrestling
10 WWE Superstars Who Ended Up With Surprising Jobs After Wrestling - Spike Dudley! Ken Shamrock! AJ Lee! Bret Hart In A Musical?!

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:41


Finding work for the former workers, which wrestlers found the best shoot jobs? Adam Wilbourn presents 10 WWE Superstars Who Ended Up With Surprising Jobs After Wrestling...ENJOY!Follow us on Twitter:@AdamWilbourn@WhatCultureWWEFor more awesome content, check out: whatculture.com/wwe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Byzantium & Friends
59. What exactly ended in Late Antiquity?, with Polymnia Athanassiadi

Byzantium & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 63:51


A conversation with Polymnia Athanassiadi (University of Athens) about the way of life that ended in late antiquity. Scholars of Byzantium and the Middle Ages may see this as a period of new beginnings, but Polymnia doesn't want us to forget the practices and urban values that came to an end during it. The conversation touches on issues raised throughout her papers collected in Mutations of Hellenism in Late Antiquity (Variorum Ashgate 2015), as well as the concept of "monodoxy" explored in Vers la pensée unique: La montée de l'intolerance dans l'Antiquité tardive (Les Belles Lettres 2010).

The Bert Show
Cassie Ended Up In Urgent Care Yesterday?! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 4:58


The last few days have been extremely challenging for Cassie. For starters, she ended up in urgent care after accidentally slicing her finger off! Then a semi-truck CRASHED into her new car!How did this happen? Cassie explains... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

RNZ: Morning Report
Greenpeace wants govt agribusiness partnership ended

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 4:52


Environmental campaigners want the government to pull the plug on a voluntary agribusiness industry partnership because it fails to reduce agricultural emissions. In 2019 the Government announced the sector would have to start paying for emissions from 2025, and the industry was given time to develop a way to measure and price them. It said that if no credible alternative was put forward - agriculture would be put into the Emissions Trading Scheme. He Waka Eke Noa - the Primary Sector Climate Action Partnership has now released two options, but critics say neither will cut emissions. Greenpeace Aotearoa campaigner Christine Rose spoke to Corin Dann.

The Corner Podcast
The 'Boxing on a Corner After a BIG Retirement that Ended a BUDing Career' Episode

The Corner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 68:05


Andreas and Kel talk about the behind the scenes aspects of Crawford-Porter, Big E and Rapsody's involvement, Shawn's retirement, Bud Crawford's free agency, and much more. Stephen Fulton joins the show to talk about his upcoming unified title fight and Shawn Porter's father stopping his fight against Terence Crawford. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Spiritual Dope
Milagros Phillips A New Perspective on Race Healing

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 61:51


Spirituality encompasses the light and the dark… with the darkness meaning your shadows… without exploration, you may never uncover your truth. ⁠ ⁠ Join me this weekend with Milagros Phillips as we have an open conversation regarding spirituality, race, and more.⁠ ⁠ Racism is one of the most divisive issues in America today. From Charlottesville, VA to Ferguson, MO, tensions about race relations are high. ⁠ ⁠ There are many people who feel that racism is too sensitive a topic to discuss, but if we don't have the conversation around racism, how do people know what is acceptable and what isn't? ⁠ ⁠ This is an issue that will not disappear on its own or through silence.⁠ Connect with Milagros here: https://www.milagrosphillips.com/ and here: https://www.instagram.com/theracehealer/ The below is a machine transcript from otter.ai and has not been edited: Unknown Speaker 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general appear so limited in this process? Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the questions you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you, this world, the people in it? And most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another head of spiritual dub with your host, Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:41 Hey, there's spiritual dope. I'm on here today with Milagros Phillips and she is affectionately known as the race healer. logros has been facilitating programs for over 35 years on race literacy, racial conditioning and healing from racism that inform transform and lead to inspired action. Programs are presented at educational institutions, fortune 100, companies, corporations and public courses seminars, a keynote speaker TEDx presenter, three times author or four times four time author, and certified coach for logros fourth book cracking the healers code, a prescription for healing racism and finding wholeness has been, it's been released recently, and we'll lagosians work comes from lived experience and is backed by historical and scientific research. It comes from walking through the shadow to find her light and in the process helping others find theirs. What she brings to this work is great compassion, a deep understanding of race and an awareness of people's individual and collective power. Waters. I'm gonna I'm gonna direct everybody else. So to your website to get the rest of your bio there. I think that should get us get us fired up there. Milagro Phillips 1:53 How are you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you. Thank you so much for inviting me to be here to have this conversation with you. Brandon Handley 2:00 Absolutely, definitely looking forward to it. So I usually like to start these off with the whole idea that you know, you and I are kind of vessels for Source Energy, right? Call it what you want. And the idea is that somebody tuning into this podcast today that's going to hear a message that made specifically for them, it's going to be delivered through you. And it can only be delivered through you at this time in this place. What is that message today? That we're one human family, and we have a history that has never been healed? has barely been told, that gets in the way of us being that one human family that one global village. I really like that concept. It's funny. My children had a course called I think they went to a school called like the global village. This last year they did at home. Courtney didn't go into school traditionally, right. So they did at home studies. And that was the the coursework that they did. And you know, it's a global village, right. I mean, how else? How else could we look at it? And I guess that that's a little bit about what we'll be talking about today. Right? I mean, I'd love to just kind of, you know, talk to you about some of the work that you you're doing. Let's talk about how you became to be known as the race healer, which we'll just start right there. Milagro Phillips 3:29 Sure. Yeah, I was having a conversation with a friend about my work. And he said to me, Oh, you're here to be hunted if you're here to be one of the human race healers. And so we joked about how you know, the acronym was HRH, and which of course, he was like, of course, you know, Her Royal Highness, that would be you. Right. So so we got rid of the human piece. We just left it as race healer. And he kept calling me that and I really resisted that, you know, that title for a very long time. And then I finally I actually went to, to New York to have some work done on my website. And one of the women that was working on the website said, Well seems to meet your race healer. And I was like, okay, message from spirit. You're hearing it more than once you probably pay attention. And so to that became my nickname the race healer. Brandon Handley 4:42 Yeah, I mean, what what was your resistance to it? Like, who Milagro Phillips 4:46 am I to have a title like that? You know, I mean, I There have been things in my life that I've resisted like, when it comes to this work. For instance, I got my calling when I was 13 years old, the day that Dr. King died And, and I talked about that in the book, I locked myself in the bathroom to cry and my father kept knocking on the door and going okay in there. And I, you know, I keep saying, Yeah, I'm fine, but it really wasn't. And at some point while I was in there, just sobbing my eyes out, actually heard a voice, I said, Your to continue the work. And I had no idea what that meant. Except that I knew there was no way in the world I was ever gonna do race work like that was just not I'm not doing it, you know? And eventually, you know, obviously, I said yes to the column. But what's really interesting is that in that saying, yes, which, by the way, took decades for me to actually say yes to my calling. What I realized was that I sort of look back on my life, I realized I came in wired to do that work. You know, the people who were my parents, the place where I was born, the things that, like, who has a history like this. So I'll give you an example. My mother's best friend, this is when I was a little girl in the Caribbean, and mother's best friend lived around the block from us, and their backyard abutted our backyard. And at night, my mother was she was going to go visit her friend, and she would take me with her, we would walk through the backyard, because obviously that was the shortcut, right. And I remember being terrified of my favorite tree, which was huge with this huge avocado tree in the backyard. It was a beautiful tree. And I love this tree. And during the day, this tree was like my best friend sit under it to read. I was like, I learned to cook under that tree and just absolutely love this tree. So at night, though, I was terrified of that tree. I always felt like if I opened my eyes in the dark, I would see people hanging from that tree. Now I'm just a little girl, okay, like, between the ages of we lived in a house till I was eight. So I must have been between five and six years old. And it was rumored that they had hung slaves on that tree. And so I you know, like, who has a history like that you don't me like it just sort of, you know, politics and people in the south where it's like, yeah, it wasn't just a rumor. You know, we actually saw people being wrong from these trees. But, you know, in things that my father would say, and my mother would say, I mean, you know, I look back and I realized, wow, I spent a lifetime preparing to do this work. Brandon Handley 7:44 And I think that that makes sense. Especially when you said you know, you you heard the calling. And at a young age, right. Which sounds to me like it was because it was delivered by spirit. I don't know what kind of your your spiritual upbringing was at that point. But I mean, you we all kind of resist that, that first calling? Well, not everybody you hear that call me like, not me. Not now. This isn't this isn't for me, I'm gonna go do these 90,000 Other things that I feel like I should be doing other than this. Because to your point, you said, Who am I? Right, who am I and to play such a large role. But I think it's Joseph Campbell kind of talks about in the hero's journey in the call, right? That call doesn't go away that call like it will still kind of follows you around like a lost puppy is like, Are you sure? Milagro Phillips 8:39 Until you say yes. Brandon Handley 8:40 Right. I mean, I think I mean, I really agree to that. I think that that's right. And and and to your point, like, you're building up to that you are the perfect person for that calling. And when you feel that calling you kind of open up and apparently right for books. Can you do all the work? Right, right. Right. So I mean, I I'm not too familiar with, and I'm curious as we're having this kind of racism talk. What was the Caribbean like, I mean, versus the state. So you're there to your eight and then you come to the States I imagine. What was that? Yeah, no actually came Milagro Phillips 9:19 when I was the dance. And, I mean, obviously it was, it was a huge difference, right? The first thing that happened was, I came the beginning of November. And I remember my sister picked me up at the airport with a big fur coat. And, and I was wearing my, my cabana hat and my you know, it was dressed for the Caribbean right? It's got what else would I have been dressed with these short bobby socks and the whole thing and and I put on the scope. We walk outside and we get into a taxi. And all of a sudden this white stuff starts to fall on the taxi is nighttime And I said to my sister, that she goes nearly no, in other words, you better get used to it. So that in and of itself was quite a shock, you know, and of course, the cold air because you're not used to that, you know, it's sort of Olson's is this big shock, like, you stepped into a refrigerator kind of thing, you know, so. So there's that. And then, of course, I didn't speak the language at the time, so I had to learn to speak English. And, and just, you know, in also going from living in a house that was, you know, it was one floor, and living on a fifth floor, fourth floor, in an apartment building, it was just, you know, and instead of a backyard, there was a park across the street. So we were lucky, because we had a park across the street, of our apartment in New York, but, but it was just, it was just completely different, completely different. I was talking with someone recently, and I said, you know, we don't stop to think that people are migrating today, for the same reason that they have always migrated for the same reason that the people in the Mayflower migrated from Europe to come to the continental USA, and to go to other parts of the world. And that's because of, you know, people normally migrate because of food insecurity, housing insecurity, they migrate because of natural disasters, famines, and in you know, things like that. And wars, obviously, you know, and skirmishes and things like that. And so, you know, we forget that. And I think it's important for people to remember to be more compassionate, and to realize that the people who are who are at the border, are coming here for the same reasons that the Europeans came here when they came in the 1600s, and the 1700s 1800s, early 1900s, and so on. And how a lot of them were not considered white, you know, the Irish were not considered white, when they first came to this country, neither were the Italians, you know, and people had to lose their accent to assimilate, they have to stop speaking their own language to assimilate. So there were things that you had to do in order to be able to fit in, the difference is, if you're a black or brown person, you never do fit in, because the structure is not set up, for you to fit in. And so, you know, becoming aware of the ways in which immigrating and leaving your land behind affects you, at the psychological, emotional, spiritual level, you know, people also left their country, because they didn't have spiritual freedom. You know, and that's a huge thing for people to be able to practice their religion and their spirituality in the way that they want to do it. And so, you know, just being aware of all of that is extremely important. And then understanding the historical context as to why people had to leave Europe when they did, you know, in the place was rife with diseases, there was no sanitation. And so there was a lot of sickness, and you had only three months to grow your food. So a lot of people were starving and malnutrition, you can't even think straight when you're malnutrition, you know, not to mention the fact that the Crime and Punishment, the way that it was set up was something you know, it was set up to, it was basically based on violence, to traumatize, to destabilize to control. And so when the Europeans traveled the world and began to colonize the rest of the world, they brought with them what they had, which was their own unresolved trauma, the violence that they had experienced, receiving perpetrated upon the people that they were coming across. And then they were the diseases and things like that, that they brought. But they did the same thing to others that have been done to them. They made sure that people couldn't practice their religion or their, their spirituality, they had to let go of their languages, you know, the few native tribes that did survive. And the Africans that survived the Middle Passage, were were they had to give up their language. They had to give up their spiritual practices. They had to, you know, they, they had to fit in in the way that they were being made to fit in to this system. And when you stop to think about the fact that, you know, people who grow in cold climates who only have about three months to grow their food, who look out into their world, nine months out of the year, and there isn't even a leaf on the tree, their consciousness is the consciousness of lack, where people who are in places where it's always green, it's always lush, if the papaya is not growing the mangoes growing or, you know, something is always growing. So you can always feed your family, you have, you know, anyone can build shelter, because shelter is four sticks, and some plantain leaves to keep you from the sun, you know, to shelter you from the heat of the sun, that, you know, you don't really need to cover your body because it's hot, as opposed to you know, cold weather we have to layer up and you know, and so, so the the, the ways in which people did culture had to do with where they lived in the world, where their tribes developed in the world. And the and you know, those ways those cultures work well in their own environment. You know, like, for people in cold climates, it's good for them to preserve food and to be good preservers, because they only have three months to grow their food and whatever they harvest has to last until they can grow and harvest again, right. Whereas if you try to preserve food in hot climates, the food's gonna go bad. So it's, you know that those cultures and things work well in their own environment. The problem is, when you take one culture, and you impose it on other people, and in places where it doesn't belong, and then you get people to stop telling their stories, so they no longer have access to their history, you make them stop speaking their language, so they can't connect to the previous generation, who doesn't speak the same language and campus on the wisdom and the information and so on and so forth. I mean, you start to see what a mess, right? Brandon Handley 16:41 Yeah, no honor. percent. I mean, I see that, that last part, I see that even in a generational divide, where we're separated from even our young and our parents, right, that the whole tribal elder thing kind of goes out there, especially, at least in the Western civilization, and an America where it's like, alright, well, you're. So now that you're not usable, basically, is what we're saying, can you just go finish out your years in this corner, but all that wisdom is going there too. And there's conversations that aren't being had, and there's a lot of wisdom that that's not being had there. And to your point, in regards of the language, there's only a certain way to convey that story. And that's with the authentic language, right? Because a lot of that stuff does not translate into you know, English, right, it loses its it loses its flavor, or as it were. So, I mean, lots of reasons to migrate, understand, like, you know, the racism, definitely, you know, I think that, you know, as a nation, we all forget that. A, we were all immigrants at one point, be, you know, we were not all accepted all the time, regardless of where we think we are right now. But when the question is, what brought your family to the states? And, you know, I know, we talked a little bit about kind of the culture shock and of itself, but one of the things that since we're covering the racism aspect of it, how, you know, what was it I'm not familiar with, how it wasn't a Caribbean for you, right? And then the culture and the acceptance or non acceptance and what it was like for you to fit in, in the States. Milagro Phillips 18:26 Yeah, so um, so it was definitely different. And I remember when I first started to go to school, and I was learning English. Um, I remember that I lived in in one of those neighborhoods that was changing was a mostly Jewish neighborhood. There were some African American families, some Cuban families, and a few Puerto Rican fan was very few Dominicans. This is it 64. And the end of 1964, beginning of 1965, was actually when I started school. And what was interesting was that the reason first of all that I came to this country was because the, my father realized that the US was about to go to war with the Dominican Republic. And he wanted to get the whole family out of there. And we had, you know, his sisters lived in the US and we had cousins here and so on. So he tried to get the entire family out before the end of 64. And sure enough, the United States attacked the Dominican Republic in 1965. And so So you see this this onslaught of Dominican families of a lot of people who were our neighbors in the in the Dr. Ended up being our neighbors in New York, you know, because they tuber escaping what had happened in the country at that time. So again, you know, little things that we don't talk about, because a lot of people don't know that the US went to war with the Dominican Republic, and it was like, you know, this tiny country To mean, and this big US Army and Navy and all of you know, and so, um, so that was the beginning of that. And then, um, then I had to, you know, I was in school, I had to learn the language. And it was really interesting for me, because I remember that the black children didn't play with me because I didn't speak English. The white children in play with me because I was black and Hispanic children and play with me because they didn't want anyone to know that people who look like me came from where they came from. Because what happens is, you know, and, and I explained this to several people. When you, when you go around the US, and, and you look at the Latin X community, people look a certain way, it's mostly lighter skin, or brown skin, people, lighter, brown skinned people who get to get out of those countries. And I was explaining to someone that you have to remember that, that for those of us coming into the US, you have to get a visa, you have to get your visa through the Council of general, the Council of general, usually white males, who bring with them the same racism that they experienced all their lives, which has to do with segregation, and everything else. And so the only people they let out of those countries are people who don't look like me. And we were at that time, we were kind of a novelty, because my, my parents folk, it, both my parents, my entire family was bilingual, except for me, I had at that time, five brothers and one sister, I was the only one who didn't speak any English, but everybody was bilingual. My grandmother never spoke Spanish. And my mother was an American citizen, because she was born in the Virgin Islands. And in 1936, when the Virgin Islands were bought by the US and became the US Virgin Islands, they were they were British Virgin Virgin Islands. When they bought them, they all the people who were on that island who had been born there up until that time, up until 1936, who become American citizens, that my mother could only give citizenship to any of her children who was born in 1936, which I wasn't even thought of back at that time, you know? And so, you know, so there are all these restrictions that are put on those immigrations, and we don't always consider that. And so the people, for the most part, who get to get out of those countries, and for whom it was certainly back in the 50s, and 60s and 70s, easier to get out of those countries are the more European you look, the better your chances of getting a visa to get out. Brandon Handley 22:56 Sure, I mean, that makes sense, given how we roll, right? Like I mean, that's just just kind of, you know, that's definitely a good history of it. Where would you say it is at this point in time? Just like kind of racism in general. You know, what can we do? What do you feel like we are now and some of the work that you're doing? What's the trajectory? Milagro Phillips 23:20 Yeah. So as of the murder of George Floyd, by Derek Shogun. People have awakened. However, however, it's been over a year now. And people are starting to fall asleep, again, is what I've noticed. And unless something happens, and it's on television, and even, you know, I've seen some pretty horrific stuff, be on the news in between the COVID stuff, right? People are not really paying attention like they were before. And I think that when it comes to the subject, people are prone to exhaustion. And the truth is that if we're going to change, we can't afford to stay exhausted, it's okay to be exhausted. And then, you know, take a nap if you need to, but don't fall fast asleep again. Because there's so much work to be done. And there's so much that we don't know that we need to really awaken to and in start changing. I think people don't realize that racism is institutional, systemic, internalized, and interpersonal. And we keep trying to solve it at the interpersonal perspective. Well, you said this, and I should say that and I actually have people say to me, if somebody says so and so what should I respond? And it's like, Are you kidding me? Really, if you can't respond from your heart, there's a problem, right? Like, maybe you should do some really work around it so that you can respond from your heart. And so so there's this whole thing. The reality is that Brandon Handley 24:57 look, you might just want to jump in there real quick, right? Like I mean, I think that There's the the idea. And this would be, you know, again, what do we call it like crusty old white guys, right? Like, you know, coming from come from like that side of the fence. It's like, it's like, alright, well, I want to be sensitive, but I don't even know I was supposed to be sensitive to at this point in time, like, you know? Yeah. Right, cuz I'm just playing devil's advocate. I don't know who that person was like, What am I supposed to say? Like, I just want to have a conversation, and I don't want to come out looking like a jerk. Yeah. And I think that, what do Milagro Phillips 25:30 we do with that is, so here's the thing. Healing takes courage. It just does. It's not for the faint hearted. It just is, doesn't matter what it is, right? Whether whether you're healing from a broken arm, or a broken spirit, it takes courage to be with whatever is in that moment. And then to ask ourselves, why is this still hurting? Why is this hurting so much, you know, that that a lot of it is about becoming self reflective, rather than having a quick response. So that you can be right or so that you can fit in or you can say the right thing or be politically correct. We can't afford to do that anymore. People need to be authentic. And then they also need to say, I don't know what I don't know. You know, and not expect to be taught either, you can say that. I don't know what I don't know. Without an expectation that someone has to teach you. You can begin to ask questions and search for things so that you can start to get your own answers. Because a white person's never going to know what it's like to be a black or brown person or black or brown versus not going to know what it's like to be white. But we have we have a common thread. And we we know now through epigenetics, that we're all related. There's only one human family and one global village. Right. And the fact that we have been misinformed, that is not anyone's fault. But it is our collective responsibility to begin to ask questions, and to sit in uncomfortable conversations. Because if we think that a conversation is uncomfortable, and we want to escape it, can you imagine what it's like to be a black and brown person be stopped by the police? Where there is no conversation? How comfortable? Yeah, look, Brandon Handley 27:28 I mean, look, look, I'm uncomfortable getting stopped by the police. I'm a white guy, right. So I can only imagine. Right? And and you know, and so no idea, like, like we talked about for what are some of the uncomfortable questions that you feel like we should be asking. Milagro Phillips 27:44 So what is the history? What is the real history? Because clearly, we've not been taught the real history. Yeah. And really starting to do our own research, looking into what traumatized our families, what brought our families here, because it was some kind of trauma. You can, you can pretty much bet. I mean, people didn't jump on the Mayflower because it was the Carnival Cruise, you know what I mean? That they were gonna fall off the face of the earth by getting those fish you know, they were willing to do it, they're willing to risk their lives because it was so horrific where they were. So what trauma brought your family here? And how does that still show up in your family? Because we know now through epigenetics, that trauma gets passed down from one generation to another, we also know that it's impossible for someone to to traumatize another person without themselves being compromised. So in other words, both the victim and the perpetrator get to pass on that trauma to their children, their grandchildren, their great grandchildren honor, not up to at least seven generations. And so what we need to do is we need to become race literate. We need to become literate about our history and to see, first of all to understand that there's no such thing as black history. It's American history, okay. The fact that it's been segregated, like everything else has been segregated doesn't change the fact that it's still American history, and what people call Black history is really white history in you see what I mean? Like there's this Brandon Handley 29:21 No, I got it, I get it. Like, I mean, so we've got this this again, this is a point of contention for me where like, there's there's a continuous continuous, like kind of forced segregation, right, where do we get to the point where we can integrate to your point as a human race? Yeah, right. Um, and and I mean, I definitely you know, for what it's worth, you know, my you know, my grandfather came over from Norway right had to you know, American Iron is Americanize his name and all the stuff that we're talking about too, but you know, of course, you know, being white and tall and blue eyed. You know, it probably didn't have the same challenges. But you know, nonetheless, there were challenges came over for a reason. So I think that that that that the trauma or that conversation that you're talking about can be had on both ends. And especially as we come at it, you know, you and I are having a mature conversation, right? Or a conversation at least just says, Hey, you know? Yeah, that's a lot of messed up things happen, right? So a lot of these things were outside of you and I are control, what can we do to facilitate, you know, something cohesive and compassionate going forward? Right, what does that what does that picture look like? Versus you when we're talking this evening, I've even seen the Latino community losing their mind over being called like, Latinx. Right below, we can't, like we can't even say Latinx. Right. And it's another thing that's kind of being forced that like, I saw something today, about what you're saying, like Black History Month, there's this Latin Heritage Month, like, why is it have to be like this constant like segregation, you know, people, I think, should be proud of, of, or at least know their story. Right? Here's my story. This is, you know, not even like, you know, and to your point, like, you're coming from the Caribbean, right? And you've got all these other people like, No, you can't have people knowing about, you know, you like you're talking about the Latino crowd saying we can't, you know, be associated with you. And so there's, there's different stories, and I think that they all deserve to be told and heard. But how do we how do we celebrate the differences versus? Versus being afraid of them? Milagro Phillips 31:42 Yeah, I think that I think there's, there's room for an awareness of both. I think that if we are too much into the celebration, without acknowledging the pain, then the shadow eats us up. And if we're too much into the shadow without seeing the hope, then the shadow eats us up. Either way the shadow was right. And so it's unbalanced. It's it's being aware of the fact that we need healing, because what do we do when something hurts, we go to the doctor, right? They ask for a lineage, right? They need your history, right? So understanding the historical context of that pain is is incredibly important, being being courageous enough to walk through the shadow of that, and be able to and willing to admit to the violence of that shadow, being willing to, to really take in, and when I say take care, I mean, listen to another's pain, without judging them or thinking, Well, what's wrong? What did you do wrong, or that kind of thing. And really having a greater sense of compassion for all of us, ourselves and others. And one of the I do a two day intensive. And in that program, one of the the stages of healing and I talk about it in the book, is forgiveness. And that's a huge one to ask for people who are continuously being re traumatized, and experiencing violence toward them. And yet, it's part of the healing process. And, you know, getting to that place where you can actually not, not just give it word, right, but really internalize that forgiveness, and that compassion and the realization that traumatize people traumatize others, that we've all been traumatized in one form or another, that if we don't become aware of that we will continue to traumatize each other without even being aware that we're doing it. Except that we know that there's a discomfort in these conversations, or there is something you know, let me like those. Brandon Handley 34:05 Tommy it is it's I mean, I know that I was talking to one of our network diversity specialist sounds like and I told her, I said, you know, I don't, I'm probably gonna say the wrong thing. And I'm not doing it on purpose, like I just want to have I just want to be able to talk. Right, and without being a landmine. And again, I appreciate this, you know, to appreciate the sensitivity, right, the sensitivity and awareness needs to be there. But I don't have you know, we, it'd be great to kind of work around that fear of having an open conversation. I don't think that you should be afraid. Like, I'm not really afraid, right of having an open conversation and, and being honest about it, right. To your point, like when you said earlier, if we can have an honest, authentic conversation, there really shouldn't be fear involved with it if we're talking from the heart, right. So I think Milagro Phillips 34:55 some of the fear is we we sort of have hang our lives on specific things, right? And there's the threat that someone's going to tell us something that dislodge. Is that, right? So, so if, if we believe that certain people or certain way, and that's what we've learned and that kind of thing. And then somebody comes along and says, Oh, actually, it isn't like that, you know, that rails, your cage, and it causes cognitive dissonance and people are very uncomfortable with that. And very often, what happens when you want to have a conversation about race in a mixed environment is that you trigger people stress response is fight flight or paralysis, they either want to defend themselves or come up with some way of either they get angry with you, or they want to flee the conversation, or else they freeze, and don't know what to say and don't know what to do. And so just being aware, and having compassion around the fact that that actually does happen to people. And it also knowing that we first of all, we don't all have the whole story, and probably never will. We need to be open to hearing people's stories and listening to people, and being open to hearing what they have to say, regardless of the color of their skin, where they come from, or whatever, without scaring them into silence. And we do that a lot. When it comes to the issue of race, you put some research to say something right away, somebody will jump on them. And you can't say that or you know, or whatever. And so it makes it difficult to have authentic conversations when we're not free to say what's in our hearts, and to express it our way. And one of the things that I talk about in the book are the languages of the caste system, because we live under a caste system and explain all that. It's not like the Indian caste system, this particular world. I'm sorry, Brandon Handley 37:00 lagosians. Just a new book, The new new book, you're talking about? No. Yeah. Yeah. Okay, here's Caracas. Milagro Phillips 37:07 Yeah, um, that in that caste system, because we all live under the same umbrella. But we've internalized that differently. And as a result of that, what happens is that people speak different languages. And we're all speaking English, but we're speaking it from a completely different perspective. And what often happens is, let's say, a politician makes a comment. A white male politician makes a comment to be specific, right? And a person of color will say, Well, that was really racist what that person just said. And watch fight flight or paralysis, right? So the politician immediately defend themselves. And if they can't defend themselves, they'll get somebody else to defend them. It's usually another white male politician who speaks his language, right? And that person will say, of course, he's not a racist. Here's what he said wasn't racist, blah, blah, blah, right. And, and of course, to them, it doesn't sound racist, because they speak the same language, the language of supremacy. And at that level, they can hear each other and they say, what they say about and in front of people of color, and they understand each other people of color, hear it from their filters, that says, Okay, this could be a dangerous situation for me, I need to be conscious of the fact that this person just made a racist comment. I'm not sure that I'm safe with that person. So they'll say what you just said was racist, but to the person, it doesn't sound racist, it wasn't great, blah, blah, blah, you know, and so everybody speaking from behind their filters of the caste system, which means that you can't hear people properly. And I want to I'm so sorry, apologize. I have to plug my computer in, which I did not do earlier. So I don't want to lose you. I am so sorry about this. Brandon Handley 39:07 Sorry, why you're doing that? I mean, I think that what made disarm somebody or in that conversation, like, what's some of the language we can use? is racism, even the right word? Or do you just feel uncomfortable? Right, what you're saying to me is just making me feel uncomfortable triggers, you know, makes me feel unsafe, right, is by saying something like that. Do you feel like that might open the dialogue a little bit differently? And, you know, I get what you're saying too, like, I'm a big I'm a huge believer in filters like we've we've all we've all got our own set of filters and, you know, kind of our heritage wherever we were brought up from we're coming with our own, you know, package of, you know, filter packets or right we all come with it and Depending on where we're at, and you know, so we got, you know, a couple of white politicians, and they say some stuff and you know, somebody audience, they're like, Yeah, I've heard some stuff like this before. And that's not the right thing to say. And I'm definitely uncomfortable in that, you know, but call it out is racist. It's kind of like what's getting shouted out? Or are they really saying, that makes me feel uncomfortable? Milagro Phillips 40:19 Well, you know, so here's the thing. Racism, when when you really understand it, when you're able to unpack it, what you realize is that it's not a character judgment, it's conditioning. So what you're really saying is, you're revealing your racial conditioning, maybe a longer way of saying it, but it's basically the same thing. Okay. And, and, but what that does, is it then brings to mind that where that person may be functioning from, is that, you know, 600 years of racial conditioning, which doesn't go away. You know, what if people have been integrating since the 1960s, versus verses hundreds of years of this stuff, right, and I'm talking institutionalized, so they were turning to law systemics, they were systems to support those laws internalized because you internalize the environment, you live it, and then you act it out with the other people in your life. Right. And so, when, when we are looking, and that's why I wrote the book, it's like, you know, having a consciousness that, yes, people will say these things, and they need them. And they don't even think there's anything wrong with saying those things. If they're on one side of the spectrum, from the other side of the spectrum. It sounds really ugly, right? And so those people will call you on it. If no one calls you on it, you will continue to do it. Because you're doing better. Or you may just be functioning out of maliciousness. But some people really don't know any better. Right? So Brandon Handley 42:07 Well, I mean, I'll tell you, I'll tell you this real quick, if you don't mind me jumping in, like, you know, so I'm up here in the Northeast Philadelphia area, born in San Francisco, you know, hippie parents growing up, and all that jazz, went down from the Philadelphia area to North Carolina, right outside of Raleigh Durham. And, you know, went hung out with some of my neighbors, we're all hanging out, we're drinking, we're having a good time eating chicken wings and hanging out. And my neighbor starts telling, like these really racist jokes, and I had to pause. It's like, dumbfounded. First of all, I was like, I can't believe like, this does not serve as like, guys. I don't know about you. But like, where I come from, we really don't talk like this. Right. Like, and it was just, to me, I was blown away by the fact that it's still so prevalent. Right? And of course, of course, right? Because as we're talking here, like, I'm not, I'm on the other side of it, right? Like, you know, again, I don't feel to see the impacts. And, you know, it's impossible for me to but it's not possible for me, of course, to have these conversations right with somebody else's experienced it and come at it from a place of compassion. But I just thought I'd throw that in there. Because again, like, wherever you're at, right now, let's say you're from the Northeast from California, or someplace where it's not as institutionalized as you're talking about, right, as it has been. And, you know, they're still holding on to it. It's kind of it's kind of mind boggling. Yeah. So I mean, I'm just I mean, I've experienced, at least again, from, from the old white guy perspective, like, you know, still still experiencing it. And it's, it makes me uncomfortable. So I again, I can only imagine being in a position where one of my co workers as matter of fact, he had bought some property, and he and his mixed race couple, and in North Carolina still had people were still giving them issues. And this is very recently, right. Within the past couple years, they bought some property, and there were some people that wouldn't stop hunting on that property. And they would tell them, they'd be like, Hey, we're our family did we're gonna keep doing it. You can't tell us that. Like, they tried to hold on to it for as long as they could. But like it's in the end, it made them feel uncomfortable, where they just sold the property. And that, to me was a tragedy, right? Like, where are we today that, that this is still a thing. And we want to call ourselves a progressive society. Milagro Phillips 44:30 That's why it's important for people to become race literate. Because when people understand and even if they continue to behave the same way, they're doing it from a conscious place. And when you're when you've got information and you're conscious, you have responsibility. You can choose to ignore that responsibility, but that doesn't mean that responsibility of your awareness goes away. So helping people to become race literate is extremely empowering. and race, literary literacy is the knowledge and awareness of the history of race and awareness that we are, we're all raised in a racial caste system. By the time children are three years old, they can tell you what caste system they belong to. Who are the good people in the back in the caste system? Who are the bad people? Three years old? They've already been racialized, you know? And so, what are we going to do today to change tomorrow, you know, we cannot if we continue to behave, and to do the same way, and to act out of ignorance, and not change our behavior, we're gonna continue to see the same thing for yet another generation, another generation and another generation, like, we have a responsibility to become as aware, and as knowledgeable as we can. And you know, the spiritual path is a path of awareness. We, it's about becoming conscious. It's about feeling things in our bodies, and experiencing them in our emotions, and being open to what that means to us. How does that make us feel? You know, because if it made us feel well, we'd have conversations with everybody in anybody about race, the fact that people are so uncomfortable with the conversation, it tells you, that's where the juice is, that's where the healing needs to happen. That's where the consciousness needs to shift. And ultimately, everybody wants to solve racism, like I said, from the intrapersonal perspective, coming from their heads. But if we don't become aware that it needs to take that 12 inch drop into our hearts, and then another 12 inch into our guts, so we know it, and we are aware of it. And we we realize that part of it is learning to walk in somebody else's shoes long enough to understand why they're hurting. That's when we start to shift. Brandon Handley 46:59 No, I love that. Oh, that. What would you suggest for somebody that's beginning to, you know, to to gain some race literacy? Like what are some of the first steps into into that? What do you recommend? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 47:13 so again, asking questions, doing research, looking into one's personal history, you know, why did your parents come here? What, you know, why are you here now? Right? Understanding that, looking at some of the, the history of Europe, really, and what was going on there that made people want to leave? in droves? Right? What, what are our connections to one another, in terms of being this one human family living on one global village? And what does that mean? And how do we care for one another compassionately? How do we do what we really, I really believe human beings came here, to be connected, to love each other, to learn from one another, to become more conscious together. And a lot of this stuff is keeping us from doing that work, which is the deeper work that we need to do. And so, for me, becoming race literates is the first thing stop being afraid of our history. It's ugly, it's nasty, it is what it is. But if we don't look at it, we keep repeating it. And we are worthy of having the power to create something new, instead of recreating the past and thinking we're creating something new, right. And so having an awareness of our history, allowing our hearts to open to all people, realizing that everyone, everyone on the planet deserves to thrive, and have the opportunity to do that. And so for me, this, this is about becoming conscious, and in really living from the depth of our hearts, not in the love and like kind of, you know, ignoring life kind of way, but really, by being conscious, and bringing that love and that light into all that is happening on our planet today. So that we can create something new to that to leave behind for the next generation. Brandon Handley 49:23 I think that's fantastic. And that that part where you're talking about the love and light, you know, and skipping the shadow, right? Really, it's what I just saw somebody call it spiritual bypassing recently, right? You know, kind of like just like, I'm like, I'm gonna go ahead and if if I just kind of hold this space, but we need to address the shadow, like you're talking about in your biography. I'm assuming that you touched on that and in your book. And again, the most recent book is called Milagro Phillips 49:50 cracking the healers code, prescription for healing racism, and finding wholeness. Brandon Handley 49:57 Great and you can find, you know, yours Barnes and Nobles. Yeah, that kind of thing. Right looking looking for that. Yeah. So awesome. I love it. And, you know, look, we, we've got a lot of work to do. Milagro Phillips 50:09 We can do it. It's one human family. Brandon Handley 50:12 Right. Hey, would you say that we're getting better? Milagro Phillips 50:14 I think we are because part of getting better is becoming conscious. Because when we just we can make different choices. You know. Brandon Handley 50:24 So I think and I actually want to jump all the way back to an area that you talked about, about the exhaustion part. Right. And I think that, I wouldn't say that, you know, again, coming from the white guy view, but you know, COVID Plus, like this heightened, you know, view on on the racism? I think the whole package, everybody's just exhausted in general, but not to fall asleep at the wheel, how can we, you know, how can we do it in a way that energizes us, right, how do you see a way that we can do that? Or is that just a finding a balance that? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 51:05 no, I, I really believe that. We can do this in a way that energizes us. I see, since the death of George Floyd. Every week, I was doing seminars up until this march on race literacy, and just, you know, getting the community to come in and have these experiences, like come in, I mean, unzoom, and have these experiences on a weekly basis. I'm now doing it on a monthly basis. The first, first Monday of the month, I do this lunch and learn so people can, you know, bring their lunch at work to their computer and join this conversation and learn some things I will often share something about, about some historical piece, and then we have discussions about how that history fits into today. How are we repeating that history today, what it looks like and feels like, also exercises, we always end with a meditation to really bring people back into balance before they go back to work. And in, you know, I have a series of programs that I do, I have a two day seminar that I do that I've been doing since 2020, since 2001, so it's 20 years old this year. And it's so powerful, and people always say that they just never see race the same way again, it helps them to heal all kinds of things with their, their own family. Because we use I take people through a universal process of healing that allows them to be able to do that, which is you know, a lot of the stuff that's, that's in the book. So, um, you know, so people can join these conversations to stay awake and stay aware. I know that there are times that people don't want to attend these things, especially white nails, because they feel like they're going to be the bad boy in the room kind of thing. You know, the one that everybody's looking at is, you know, I don't do that in my seminars, because what I'm aware of, is the fact that we've all been misinformed, and those who are misinformed, they're bound to miss create, and it doesn't matter your gender, it doesn't matter your sexual orientation, it doesn't matter the color of your skin, we have all when it comes to race and racism, all of us have been misinformed. And we can't blame people for that. But we can hold them compassionately responsible for their own ability and choices to change. Brandon Handley 53:29 That was fantastic. Those zoom calls the Lunch and Learns is that open to everybody has something, Milagro Phillips 53:36 you can go on my website and get information on that on that program. And it's open to the entire community. And I will continue to do that as long as I can. Brandon Handley 53:49 That's fantastic. That's great that that's available. Thank you for that. So logros at this point of the conversation I kind of look at like anybody tuning into this I mean, obviously you great conversation on the racism and we touched on the spirituality I look at this as a spiritual speed dating, right? Somebody is looking to like get the next fish will connect on this conversation. So I'm going to ask you a question. Basler espiritual black Bachelorette, a number one who to do to do? Move, I think you've already established that kind of like we are all one would you agree that you know kind of we are all one in one shape. Milagro Phillips 54:30 I mean, you know, we're all cousins, some of us 35th cousins and mother's 50th cousins, but we're all related. And we know that through the study of epigenetics, so that's already been established. It's no longer one of these. Oh, you're my spiritual sibling. And yes, absolutely. But you're also my physical sibling. Yeah. And so being aware of that is really important. Brandon Handley 54:56 Now Perfect, perfect. Whoo doo doo doo doo. To, what would you say is our greatest distraction Milagro Phillips 55:09 when it comes to this topic, everything in anything, you know, anything we could throw in the fire, so that we are now focused on the fire and we take our eyes off the ball, right? When it comes to race, because people don't really want to deal with it. It is uncomfortable for most people. And yet, as I said before, can you imagine if it's uncomfortable in a conversation versus being uncomfortable, because, you know, you're you're being beaten to death in the streets or shot or your family member at you've lost them because of this, right? So there are levels of discomfort, right. And some people are more uncomfortable than others, because they are living the violence. And so for those of us who are not, it's important that we show up, even with our discomfort, because we're always going to feel uncomfortable until we start showing up and learning what this is really about. Brandon Handley 56:07 That's fine. No, it's true. Right? There's always a willingness to to not be, you know, uncomfortable as quickly as possible. Right. And, and I can't think of too many topics that are more uncomfortable than Yeah, that's right. Even Even amongst friends. And, you know, just trying to again, you know, because I think sometimes you just feel like the bad guy, like you said earlier, like, you know, I don't know that I go into a room feel like the bad guy, or, you know, the one that's been called out, but it definitely, again, you know, just just wanting to do the right thing, even though I don't know what the wrong thing is. Yeah. Milagro Phillips 56:44 You know, and that's, that's a huge piece. It's like it is the not knowing what the wrong thing is, or, or what is really wrong here. Like, I'm just uncomfortable with this. And in those, there's those who can escape it, right? Because it's sort of like, oh, you know, I don't have to deal with that, right. And there are those who can't. And yet, there's something, you know, um, it's Bradshaw, that wrote in his book, family secrets about how there are secrets and families that people keep and their secrets and families where it's sort of like, people just don't talk about certain things, right. And, and yet everybody acts, reacts and interact out of the family secret, whether they know the secret or not, right. And that's what happens to us as a human family when it comes to this history. Like, we all know, something's off, right? We don't know quite what it is. So I'll give you an example of that. For the most part, people call Haiti, the poorest country in the world, or at least one of the poorest countries in the world. But no one ever talks about the fact that Haiti has been paying reparations to Frances 1825, when they set themselves free in 1804. And from slavery, and the French kept trying to go back in there to re enslaved them. And finally, they use the Doctrine of Discovery to get back in there, and to have them pay reparations all these years. Now, if you are so poor, you can't afford to do anything, let alone pay reparations, right. And so, you know, just the realization that there's so many natural resources on that island that, you know, people are still finding natural resources on those islands. And, you know, when we only tell one piece of the story, what happens is that people get hung up on that one piece. And yet, there's something in our hearts that kind of knows that something's off, you know, people are constantly being told those and $19 a month to support a child in Haiti, when in reality, if friends gave back even one part of all that they siphoned out of there, that island would not be poor, okay, they just would not be poor. And that is not the only place it's all of these places that have been colonized to the so called poor countries, which most of them have happened to have dictators, which I think is quite a coincidence. Right. And those of us who are spiritual know that there are synchronicities, right. And so, you know, so just having an awareness like we need an expanded awareness of this stuff, and not just go with Okay, the going story is, Haiti is a poor country. So you know, Hades, not a poor country. Haiti is a country that has been stolen from Okay, that is very different, because you don't steal where there's poverty, because I know the seal, right? Brandon Handley 59:42 No, no, you're right, right. You don't exploit Milagro Phillips 59:44 people, because they're poor. You exploit them because they have natural resources as a human being. All right. So we need to get really clear about what it is that we're talking about. When we're talking about this stuff, which is why I wrote that book. It's like, people need to get clear Let's let's have an honest, authentic conversation that goes beyond the rhetoric. Oh, it's it's this right like, okay, so why is it that way? You know, it's nuts. Right? Right. You'll, Brandon Handley 1:00:13 we'll be on the first layer go beyond that first layer, right? This, this is what I heard. This is what I was told. You know, why would somebody tell you that? Yeah, I'm kind of getting beyond that, for sure. For sure. It makes sense. I never knew, right? I never knew that I'm, you know, still paying France back. Right. And I think that that's crazy, right? Even Even, even the whole idea of you know, the British selling the Virgin Islands to the state. So to me, it's just boggle your mind. So snowballs my so Ragosa thank you so much for the conversation. I enjoyed it. I think that you know, you're obviously doing some great work. Excited for you to release your fourth book. Understand that you're working on the fifth. And where can we send people to find out more about Sure. Yeah, Milagro Phillips 1:01:01 so you can visit my website Milagros phillips.com. So it's just my name.com. And there's a lot of information on there. And as soon as this podcast is open for posting it on the website, so Brandon Handley 1:01:13 fantastic. Thanks again for being Milagro Phillips 1:01:17 so much. I Unknown Speaker 1:01:20 really hope you enjoyed this episode of the spiritual dove podcast. Stay connected with us directly through spiritual dove. CO You can also join the discussion on Facebook spiritual though, and Instagram at spiritual underscore Joe. If you would like to speak with us, send us an email Brandon at spiritual Co Co. And as always, thank you for cultivating your mindset and creating a better reality. This includes the most thought provoking part of your day. Don't forget to like and subscribe to stay fully up to date. Until next time, be kind to yourself and trust your intuition.

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Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:27


Website: www.blackandwhitenetwork.com Get your MERCH here: https://teespring.com/stores/blackandwhitesports Follow Black and White Network on Odysee: Black and White Sports: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitesports Black and White News: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitenews Black and White Entertainment: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhiteentertainment Follow us on Rumble: Black and White Sports: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteSports Black and White News: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteNews Email: blackandwhitesports2019@gmail.com Check out the podcast site here for all of the live streams: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports Please support Black and White Sports for as low as .99 per month here: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports/support Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blackandwhitesports Join us and become a channel member today as we fight against Woke sports. Click the JOIN button or the link in the description and support us. Just starts at $4.99 per month and cancel anytime. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC73b_bf7j4fgTnBNRTqKKTA/join Check Out blackandwhitenetwork.com for More Exclusive Content from Us. Entertainment, Politics, Sports! 3 Membership levels Available As Well As Free Video Content & Articles!

Steve Allen - The Whole Show
I Ended Up With The Flugelhorn

Steve Allen - The Whole Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 136:56


No one is safe from this man's tongue - Steve Allen takes to the airwaves on LBC every Monday to Friday morning from 4am. Hear all of Steve's show with the news, travel and breaks taken out.

Left Reckoning
45 - Who Ended Apartheid & No Free Speech for Mine Workers ft William Shoki & Jacob from the Valley Labor Report

Left Reckoning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 91:35


support the show at patreon.com/leftreckoning and get our weekend bonus episodesWilliam Shoki (@Shokispeare) of Africa is a Country joins us first to discuss the death of FW de Klerk and who really deserves the credit for ending apartheid. Then, Jacob from The Valley Labor Reporters (@JacobM_AL) joins us for an update on the Warrior Met strike in Alabama.Also, Ben Shapiro prompts us to recommend the work of Stephen Jay Gould on IQ.

Weather Wise
E46: The Growing Season has Ended; Winter Forecast Released

Weather Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:37


Low temperatures across Delmarva dropped into the 20s for the first time since last April, meaning the growing season is over. Today's podcast is on the importance of paying attention to frost and freeze warnings so that you can properly protect your home and outdoor gardens. We also release more details about our exclusive 2021-2022 winter outlook!

Ken Webster Jr
Why the Cold War Never Ended Pt. 2

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 35:37


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Legal problems for Harris County Judge Latest from the Rittenhouse trial Beto is late-o Special guests Wesley Hunt and Holly Hansen 

Ken Webster Jr
Why the Cold War Never Ended Pt. 1

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 37:29


Today on Kenny Webster's Pursuit of Happiness: Legal problems for Harris County Judge Latest from the Rittenhouse trial Beto is late-o Special guests Wesley Hunt and Holly Hansen 

The Daily Break
Russian Anti-Satellite Missiles in a Cold War that Never Ended

The Daily Break

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:43


Former double agent Naveed Jamali addresses current headlines of the Russian anti-satellite missile test that put the lives of American astronauts in danger. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bowcast Podcast -  An archery and bowhunting podcast.
Jack Wallace - Repeating the Meaningful Shot

Bowcast Podcast - An archery and bowhunting podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 27:26


"Jack Wallace - Repeating the Meaningful Shot" Professional archery and dedicated hunter, Jack Wallace stops by to chat about hunting, shooting events and balancing it all. Timestamps: 1:30 Introduction to Jack, how he got into archery and how he met fellow professional archery Sharon Wallace. 9:30 favorite tournaments 11:00 Hunting vs Tournament Archery 13:00 Jack's favorite species to chase, how he stays in shape and tips for separating the two mentally. 21:00 Directional focus 22:00 the equipment he's shooting.

Girl-ish
Why We Ended The Podcast

Girl-ish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 59:30


GIRLISH IS BACK! New and improved with a brand new logo and format. Welcome back to the first episode in Season 3 of Girlish. In this episode, Gage and Olivia talk about what they've been up to over the past 6 months and the reasons why the podcast ended. They share in-depth ideas on what they want the future of the podcast to look like. Girlish is now a "trans AND pop culture podcast!" Find out what that means on this episode of Girlish! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/girlish/support

New Life Downtown
Circumstances, Leftovers & The Faithfulness of God

New Life Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 35:56


What have you happened upon? Stumbled into? Ended up? Is it possible that God is hiding in that circumstance? Pastor Jason Jackson continues our sermon series “The Outsider: Circumstances, Leftovers & The Faithfulness of God”. Could God be mysteriously present - waiting to be found?

The Ian Furness Show
Ian Rapoport - How OBJ ended up with the Rams / Jon Gruden suing the NFL / The return of Aaron Rodgers, and odd COVID rules

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 9:15


Don't miss Ian Rapoport's weekly visit with Furness as Rap catches us up on all the news around the league. Rap's visits are thanks to the fine folks at Porter and York. Rare meat, well done. Visit PorterandYork.com to get great meat delivered straight to your door!

The Jason Smith Show
Hour 2 - Our Long National Nightmare Has Ended

The Jason Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 43:21


Jason Smith and Mike Harmon discuss Odell Beckham Jr. heading to Los Angeles, and the guys explain why the Rams are adhering to a strategy that not nearly enough teams employ. Cam Newton is trying to find new life in an old uniform. Plus, maybe the worst game of the NFL season is finally over. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Change Lives Make Money: The Podcast For Online Trainers
#525- Maturing in Business is Realizing…

Change Lives Make Money: The Podcast For Online Trainers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 19:13


On today's episode, we're going to be talking about how maturing in business is realizing a few certain things. Before we begin I'd just like to give you guys a bit of a life update. So, I'm back home after my big fitness competition in Alberta on Sunday. Ended up placing third. Super grateful for the opportunity to compete. Super happy I got the chance to show up. I felt really, really good about the package that I brought.  After the fitness competition in Alberta we went out for all-you-can-eat sushi, and I sat there for two hours, no joke, and probably ate 3,000 calories worth of sushi. And then my friend made me this gluten-free, dairy-free cheesecake that was like the best thing I've ever put in my mouth. So, your boy was feeling pretty tired and lethargic on Sunday and Monday. Today is the first day that I feel like I've worked off the bloat and I've worked off the water retention. I hadn't eaten like that in a long time. And one thing I realized is that I don't like eating like that, because I felt like absolute ass. So, anyway I'm back and I'm ready to drop some major knowledge today! Today's episode was actually inspired by one of my clients, Mariah Fontana. She's doing this series on her TikTok called “Maturing in the Gym is Realizing....” (Listen to episode #525 and learn more!) I've Been There. I've Done That. Now Learn with Me. I know all the ins and outs of online fitness coaching. I've made mistakes and I've had successes. But I've never given up. That's how I was able to open my own gym and start an online coaching business that has not only brought me success, but also benefited over 600 other online fitness coaches. I love to share my knowledge. So, when you work with me, you learn with me. I'm ready to help you shed those 9-5 shackles and enjoy the freedom, satisfaction, and yes, money, you'll get from being an online fitness coach. If you got value from this podcast and would like to work closely with me and my team to scale your fitness business and learn how to go online, go to my Instagram account @bmarkfit and DM me with the words “Change Lives.” We can start a conversation about our amazing Online Trainer Escape Plan, that allows you to make $10,000 plus a month by helping people transform their lives through health and fitness. Follow Me. I'll Help You Succeed. While you're here, be sure to subscribe to my podcast Change Lives Make Money: The Podcast For Online Trainers. It's a great source for free advice and info. Rate and review too. It helps me know whether or not I'm giving you the kind of content you want and need. And don't forget to follow and subscribe to my social media accounts. TikTokInstagramFacebookYoutube My DM is always open. Let's keep talking! I want to hear from you! You can contact me any time through my social media accounts or email. Tell me about your latest successes. Ask me questions. Give me ideas for future podcasts. I've always felt a successful business is built on two pillars:  Persistence and Communication. If you're looking for a little bit of help with your online coaching business, click here to shoot me a message

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
The Friendship That Ended Slavery

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:20


Fox News' Brian Kilmeade has a new book out about the friendship between President Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, as the two men fought to end slavery. He calls in to talk to Boyd about what we can learn from it.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Women of Golf
WOG - Special Guest: Amanda Doherty, Symetra Tour Graduate/2022 LPGA Tour Member

Women of Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 51:00


Welcome to the Women of Golf Show! Tune in Tuesday 9:00 AM Eastern Cindy's off again this week, so I welcome another Symetra Tour Graduate, Amanda Doherty, as she prepares to head to the LPGA in 2022. More on Amanda: Amanda, is a native of Atlanta, Georgia. 2018 All-ACC selection for Florida State University. Captured medalist honors at the 2020 IJGA Guadalajara Collegiate Invitational. Competed at the inaugural Augusta National Women's Amateur (ANWA) in April 2019. Ended collegiate career with the fourth-lowest scoring average in Seminoles history (73.08). 2021 in a Nutshell: 19 events, 15 cuts made, $90,921. Recorded eight top-10 finishes including a runner-up result at the IOA Golf Classic. Finished seventh on the Race for the Card money list to earn LPGA Tour membership for the 2022 season Join LIVE Tuesdays 9:00 - 10:00AM Eastern http://www.blogtalkradio.com/womenofgolf Or listen on these platforms:  iTunes , Stitcher, Tunein, Castbox, TalkStreamLive & Spotify.

Overcome to Become
Learning to Pivot When a Season Has Ended with Sarah Wood

Overcome to Become

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:05


Are you wrestling with moving on from a season that is over?  Have you planted your feet even though you're feeling the nudge to pivot?  If we are all honest, change is hard, especially if where we are is comfortable, predictable, and safe.  My guest, Sarah Wood is with us today to chat about how she learned to lean into God's nudging and pivot out of a season that had ended, even though it was hard.  We also discussed: The difference between our assignment and our purposeBeing open-handed so God can grow us and replant usHow we cause our own hardPopular opinion vs God's agendaDiscipling the people right in front of usWe are 2,000 away from our goal of 10,000 downloads! We need your help to get this message of hope and encouragement out to those who need it most. Please share this podcast with friends and family via social media or word of mouth?  Complete a rate and review on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/overcome-to-become/id1523413873About Sarah:Sarah Wood is a follower of Jesus, wife and mom. She lives on the space coast of Florida and loves being involved with her community by leading local moms clubs and groups. She's the editor in Chief of Mom Mentor, an intern for Lisa Whittle and loves writing and speaking. On the weekends you'll find her at the beach, going for bike rides, or visiting fun foodie joints! Connect with Sarah:Instagram//Mom Mentor WebsiteConnect with Latasha:Website// Instagram//EmailOTB Email Tribe: Click here for updates and encouragement in your inbox!Mentioned in this episode:Psalm 18:19Brandon Lake- Feels Like Heavenhttp://www.calledcreatives.comGrab a copy of the Hard Good Here: https://www.amazon.com/Hard-Good-Showing-Work-When-ebook/dp/B08NHY3JVS

GOT IT FROM MY MAMA
EP 130: How I ended up with three mothers

GOT IT FROM MY MAMA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:25


We had on comedian Ankara Savone, to discuss dating, marriage and the show YOU. Everything from how to hook a guy or how they can sniff out eagerness. Why single girls should date multiple people at once. How to believe a guys actions rather than their words. Why Scott Speedman, from YOU says he is the worst boyfriend. Who is facing criminal charges in the Alex Baldwin scandal? And if you're watching Impeachment: American Crime Story, we tell you where Linda Tripp (the person who outed Monica Lewinsky) is today! OrCam Read (Code: Mama)  Leave a 5 Star Review on iTunes Full Youtube Episodes Follow us on @ToriPiskin @lulupiskin @Gotitfrommymamapodcast

The Wildcast
The Wildcast, Episode 358: Looking back on Arizona's 20-game losing streak — and how the Wildcats ended it

The Wildcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 22:33


Arizona finally ends the 20-game, two-year losing streak after beating Cal 10-3 in Tucson; now what? The Star's Justin Spears, Michael Lev and Alec White reflect on the UA's skid, Will Plummer's heroic efforts and Don Brown's defense standing out. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mavs Outsiders Podcast
The Outsiders recap a week that saw the return of KP and ended with a Luka buzzer beater + Eternals talk

Mavs Outsiders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 88:32


The Mavericks come out of another winning week and now sit at 6-3 on the season which is good for 3rd place in the West. However, we saw two close wins against teams that have played poorly so far this season and another double-digit loss to the only good team we played this week. We'll take the W's but who is this team? We also saw the return of Kristaps Porzingis and his back looked very loose. The Outsiders discuss all of this in this week's episode. This week we introduced another new segment with our Question of the Week in which we asked the timeline for their best Mavs-related question and answered the best 1 (actually 2) on the podcast. We also, of course, hit Reese's Unsung Hero and Bibs' Weekly Forecast. There were some technical issues with the weekly forecast so the one you're hearing is not the one that was done live. 00:00:00 - 00:05:00 Intros 00:05:15 - 00:27:15 Game recaps 00:31:23 - 00:50:41 Question of the Week / Reese's Unsung Hero / Bibs' Weekly Forecast / Closing Mavs talk 00:51:24 - 01:24:59 Eternals / Movie talk 01:25:45 - End Outtakes Enjoy! As always you can find Bibs on Twitter @Bibscorner and Reese on Twitter and Instagram @MindofReese. Also, subscribe to MindofReese on YouTube. Finally, make sure you're following the show on Twitter @MavsOutsiders and on Instagram @MavsOutsidersPod. Use code TBPN on Draftkings.com or hit the sign-up link here: (https://tinyurl.com/DKNOVEMBER) for a chance to win BIG! Help support the show and The Basketball Podcast Network. You can also help the show by leaving a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate every listen and, of course, every review.

The Morning Mix
Elizabeth went to Costco for ONE thing and ended up with THIS instead!

The Morning Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 3:35


You know this has happened to you!! (photo credit Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Revive Church Podcast
The Acts Never Ended - Weekly Message

Revive Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 41:40


Matt teaches on how The Book of Acts never ended and that what we do is a continuation and that we should be spreading the Gospel with such reverence and keeping on Guard.

Starlight Reunion Radio
EP 81 - BK Love - Live@Disco BloodBath - Starlight Thursdays Episode 81

Starlight Reunion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 48:57


Starlight Thursdays Episode 81 we return to BK Love for another live mix recorded at Disco BloodBath in the Valhalla Lounge. A few words from BK Love This was my first time playing at DBB. I haven't played a Halloween set in ages and am not the kinda DJ to play remixes of thriller and the monster mash, so I put my ears to the test and looked for tracks with a certain haunted vibe, eerie synths and lyrics that fit the theme. Ended it with a Halloween classic. Happy Halloween, Hope you enjoy! -BK Love-

WEEI at Night
Mut at Night: Gilmore isn't happy with how things ended in New England and took some shots at Belichick.

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 47:17


Hour 2: Mut is joined by Andy Hart and they react to Stephon Gilmore's comments on today's conference call and how unhappy he was with how it ended here. It has been revealed Aaron Rodgers wasn't vaccinated, so was he breaking the NFL covid rules earlier in the season? OBJ could be getting cut soon and any chance the Patriots would open up cap space for him? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Hot Mess Comedy Hour
Gordon Baker Bone Had a Routine Operation That Almost Ended in Cremation

The Hot Mess Comedy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 86:03


*** Join our Patreon at the $5 level and up in the month of November and you'll be entered to win a gift basket with $200 worth of sponsored products and goodies! The basket will include an Olive and June Mani Kit, Dad Grass CBD Joints, Prose Hair Supplements, fresh Hot Mess Merch, and MORE! Join now and you'll also have advance access to the first episode of Andrea's upcoming podcast "Dog Pig" featuring the infamous Claws. Visit Patreon.com/HotMess ***Follow Gordon @bakerbone on InstagramFollow Emily @lubination on InstagramFollow Andrea @andreacomedy69 on InstagramFollow Hot Mess:Insta @HotMessComedyHourFor MORE fire content including the first 300 episodes of Hot Mess, bonus shows, and video, visit Patreon.com/hotmess

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News
ENS Airdrop!! Has The Stablecoin FUD Just Ended?

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:04


Ethereum Name Service (ENS) announced an airdrop which is coming out very soon! Besides, we talk about stablecoins! Has the FUD just ended? And by the way: happy new ETH all-time high!  This and much more in today's episode!  COSMOVERSE 2021  NEWSLETTER: https://www.cosmoverse.org/pages/newsletter ATTEND AS A SPEAKER: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScg6GBPRp3iAU5y0KdBCkcMFfEY994_XaXpIDuShrnD1yFFkA/viewform TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ccclisbon?s=11 TELEGRAM: https://t.me/joinchat/MZRLJjZngShlZGQ6 DEFITIMES

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Charissa Fong Torossian, Lyle Southwell: 07 Why Hasn't Injustice Ended?

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 54:28


Budgetrek
Episode 92: Taylor Duncan - Chief Operating Officer at NxT Level

Budgetrek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 42:38


Taylor Duncan was born and raised in Chicago. He went to University of Wisconsin to play Football and Track & Field. Transferred to University of IL and graduated with a degree in Finance. He had a taste of entrepreneurship in college in a house painting leadership program. Ended up buying the IL division when he graduated and eventually ran the national company with ~1000 sales people annually. Sold his shares in 2020 and moved to Nashville to enjoy an open state with his amazing wife and 5 kids. And in 2021 joined forces with his former mentee in the Tech recruiting space and are growing Nxt Level in Nashville. They have hired a dozen people in Nash in the last 6 months and plan on doubling that in the next year. During that they have launched Founders Live in Nashville as an event based entrepreneurial pitch competition, but really it is just a big party with founders pitching their respective start ups in mid-TN. In his free time he is active at church, try to work out and volunteer in the local youth sports programs. Brady Morgan's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bradymorgan_/ John Trusty's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/johntrusty/ Our Website - https://www.vastaffing.agency/

(URR NYC) Underground Railroad Radio NYC
X22 Report 2.0 - "...FINALLY An ERA ENDED"

(URR NYC) Underground Railroad Radio NYC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


https://www.X22Report.com

Sober Yoga Girl
Plot Twist! How I ended up in Bali...

Sober Yoga Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 21:32


Plot twist...Alex moved to Bali! In this episode Alex tells the story of her seemingly spontaneous sudden move to Bali...which has actually been in the works and in her dreams for the past five years! Alex has relocated to Bali for November & December to try things out and see how they go! In this episode, listen to all the things leading up to her decision and what her plans are next. The great thing about the MLPC is that Alex can run it anywhere...so you can still join her live on Zoom for yoga daily! Catch Alex for yoga, meditation, coaching and other programs at: www.themindfullifepractice.com. If you want to become a podcast member to support the show, you can join at www.themindfullifepractice.com/podcast . Send Alex a message on Instagram @alexmcrobs if you have any questions about the upcoming fall programs. We can't wait to flow with you!Are you a fan of Sober Yoga Girl Podcast? The podcast remains completely free, and free from advertisements, however, it has monthly production costs. If you are able to, please subscribe to become a monthly podcast member to support our show. As a member you get invited to a once a month mocktails night and hangout with Alex on Zoom (rotating times to accommodate our many timezones!) Please subscribe here to support us! www.themindfullifepractice.com/podcast. 

Sustainable Dish Podcast
Jocelyn Zuckerman, author of Planet Palm: How Palm Oil Ended Up in Everything - and Endangered the World

Sustainable Dish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:22


Take a look at the list of ingredients on the back of almost any ultra-processed packaged food and you are likely to find palm oil or its derivatives as an ingredient. Its presence is just as ubiquitous in cosmetics and personal care products.  The consequences of the excessive use of palm oil are far-reaching and impact more than just our health. In this episode, my co-host James Connolly is talking with Jocelyn Zuckerman, author of Planet Palm:  How Palm Oil Ended Up in Everything - and Endangered the World. Jocelyn and James dive deep into the history of the palm oil industry and how it came to be in everything, exploring the devastation of natural habitats, corporate corruption, and how many of these practices continue today. Join them in this enlightening conversation as they discuss: -Jocelyn's connection to Nina Teicholz and her inspiration for the book -The effect of land grabs in Africa in the aftermath of the 2008 economic crisis -How Liberia was founded and the palm oil industry there -The brief summary of Unilever's violent past from Sunlight Soap to enslaving native populations  -How the palm oil trade replaced the slave trade after it was outlawed in 1807 -How growing palm oil trees started as a way to alleviate poverty -The processing oil palm and stats on palm oil usage -Major brands that use a lot of palm oil -The perspective of poachers -The connection between what's happening in the palm oil industry with other commodity industries -Tragic stories of modern-day slavery in the agriculture industry -The current practice of using prisoners as farmworkers and the effect it has on prison sentences  While topics like this can seem overwhelming and discouraging, I encourage my listeners to see the links below for ways you can find out more and take action. Resources: Books & Articles: The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet by Nina Teicholz Selections of Jocelyn's articles in Gourmet Magazine here, here, & here Selections of Jocelyn's articles in On Earth Magazine here, here, & here Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts: Colonial Exploitation in the Congo by Jules Marchal The World for Sale by Javier Blas & Jack Farchy Merchants of Grain by Dan Morgan The Secret Life of Groceries: The Darkside of the American Supermarket by Benjamin Lorr The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together by Heather McGee Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi The Warmth of Other Suns and Caste by Isabel Wilkerson How Beautiful We Were by Imbolo Mbue Black Boy and The Man Who Lived Underground by Richard Wright Articles on prisoners used as farm labor here and here Websites for Info & Action: National Resources Defence Council Chain Reaction Research Mighty Earth   Rainforest Action Network No White Saviors   Other Resources: Natural Habitats Palm Oil James's podcast with Benjamin Lorr: Sustainable Dish Episode 127 Behind the Bastards Podcast   Connect with [Guest]: Website: Jocelyn Zuckerman Instagram: @jocelynzuck LinkedIn: Jocelyn Zuckerman Twitter: @jocelynzuck *** Episode Credits: Thank you to all who've made this show possible. Our hosts are Diana Rodgers, Lauren Manning, and James Connelly. Our producer is Meg Chatham, and our editor is Emily Soape. And of course, we are grateful for our sponsors, Patreon supporters, and listeners.

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Aditi Kinkhabwala on Browns/Steelers: The way last season ended is absolutely on the Steelers mind

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 17:45


NFL Network's Aditi Kinkhabwala talks Browns-Steelers. Why every AFC North game is critical for each team? Mindset of the Steelers as they prepare to face the Browns for the first time since last season's AFC Wild Card game. Is there a market for OBJ? Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy App!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

My Nuclear Life
How the Norwegians & British ended the Nazi atomic bomb program with Neal Bascomb

My Nuclear Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 57:06


In this episode, host Shelly Lesher is joined by Neal Bascomb, author of The Winter Fortress, which tells the story of the plan to sabotage Hitler's atomic bomb. Listen as Neal tells about the several different missions set out to destroy the Nazi atomic bomb program and how they affected the course of the World War II. Visit us at: mynuclearlife.com Patreon: www.patreon.com/mynuclearlife email us

First Take
Hour 1: Has The Chiefs Reign Ended?

First Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 43:37


Stephen A, Michael Irvin, and Dan Orlovsky debate if the Chiefs are done, and if they are sold on the Packers. Ryan Clark joins to discuss who he trusts more: Lamar Jackson or Joe Burrow. Then Dan returns to tell us if the Patriots can make a playoff run.

TalkItOut Podcast
Why Capitalists Ended Segregation

TalkItOut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 25:21


Topics discussed: ⁃ Capitalists ended segregation for their economic benefit. ⁃ How did the reconstruction era end in jim crow laws? - Was it better for white southeners to accept integration for economic growth? ---------- Help support the community fridge: moneyyy.me/$BUILDINGOURPOWER Merch: www.teepublic.com/user/buildi... ---------- Mutual Aid: mutualaid.nyc/ usacovidmutualaid.org/ www.afsc.org/blogs/news-and-c... --------------- Follow us www.linktr.ee/buildingourpwr www.twitter.com/kt_doesart www.instagram.com/gabbeatsmusic www.twitter.com/gabbeatsmusic --------------- Work Cited Booker T Washington & his respectability politics: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Future_of_the_American_Negro How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America by Manning Marable https://drive.google.com/file/d/16sX62MK3If9zmFxOvxMvfUgxfBnoxABU/view?usp=sharing Reconstruction Era Black-owned Businesses history (1865-1877): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-owned_businesses Jim Crow Era Timeline(1877-1954): https://www.ferris.edu/htmls/news/jimcrow/timeline/jimcrow.htm Civil Rights Era (1954-1965): https://www.history.com/topics/civil-rights-movement/civil-rights-movement-timeline Brown Vs Board of Education: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_v._Board_of_Education Civil Rights Act (1964, 1968): https://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/c.php?g=592919&p=4172702

The Bert Show
Cassie Ended Up In Urgent Care Yesterday?! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 4:57


The last few days have been extremely challenging for Cassie. For starters, she ended up in urgent care after accidentally slicing her finger off! Then a semi-truck CRASHED into her new car!How did this happen? Cassie explains...  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Good Risings
22.2. The Rising Sign: Jupiter Retrograde Has Ended!

Good Risings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 6:02


Good Risings is a mindset. Join Colin Bedell for a daily dose of Astrology. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.    Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Executive Producers: Colin Bedell, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Bert Show
Bert's Mom & Aunt Coincidentally Ended Up In The Same Facility + Kristin's Taking Her First Trip Since Becoming A Mom! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:23


For the last six months, Kristin's spent her time balancing her work life and being a mom. But finally, she's ready to go on her first girls trip. She'll tell us all about her excitement, but first, we need to talk to Bert.Bert just found out that his aunt is suffering from Alzheimer's, just like his mom. It was shocking news, but what was more shocking is that she ended up in the same facility as his mom.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

The Joe Pags Show
President slammed for way he ended remarks about supply chain crisis as prices soar, shelves left empty

The Joe Pags Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 113:43


It's Humpday!!! Pags Parody? Plus, Dinesh D'Souza on Columbus, Southwest and more! Plus, a scientist on vaccines, natural immunity and more! Let's GO! Pags is ON!