Podcasts about us marines

Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

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Latest podcast episodes about us marines

The Michael Berry Show
Tim Williams Tells The Story Of His Hero And Mentor US Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel Ralph 'C' (Rocky) Rosacker.

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 8:31


The Czar talks to Tim Williams. Tim is the Director of the documentary, The Colonel's Playbook

Transformation Talk Radio
Transcending Fear & Suffering Through Empathy With Akshay Nanavati

Transformation Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 55:19


Is it possible to suffer well? Can we transcend fear, stress and anxiety to enhance our internal motivation and reach our own human potential? Veteran, Explorer Author Akshay Nanavati would wholeheartedly say: Yes! He's overcome drug addiction, PTSD from fighting in Iraq with the US Marines (where one of his jobs was to walk in front of vehicles to find bombs), depression and alcoholism that pushed him to the brink of suicide. Combining his life experience with years of research in science and spirituality, he wrote the book Fearvana," which the Dalai Lama wrote the foreword for. In addition, he's is currently training for a 110 day, 1700-mile, solo, never-before-accomplished expedition in Antarctica next year. Tune in as Austin and Akshay have a heart-to-heart discussion about the power of empathy and the human spirit and learn:▸ how to overcome fear, stress, anxiety, pain and suffering in order to create a life of greater meaning, joy and fulfillment ▸ how trusting in self can build immense internal wisdom and shape your perception and experience of the world around you ▸ Love is the base for who we are and the key to unlocking the divine creator aspect within Be inspired to embrace and transcend your own suffering in service of something greater using empathy for self and others as a tool to harness your greatest potential!

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast
Taimur Baig - Don't Let the Upsides Distract You From the Downsides

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 40:30


BIO: Taimur Baig heads global economics and macro strategy for interest rate, credit, and currency at DBS Group Research. STORY: Taimur invested in his friend's hedge fund that was dealing with Iraqi stocks. He lost 50% of his investment after the country entered a war three years later. LEARNING: Don't get swayed by the upside and forget about the downside. Always analyze the risks, especially when the deal seems too good.   “Don't get swayed by greed and the potential upside, and forget about the downsides.”Taimur Baig  Guest profilehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/taimur-baig-7644335/ (Taimur Baig) heads global economics as well as macro strategy for interest rate, credit, and currency at DBS Group Research. He is a Director Fellow at the Asian Financial Think Tank and a council member of the Economic Society of Singapore. Before joining DBS in 2017, Taimur was a Principal Economist at the Economic Policy Group, Monetary Authority of Singapore. Earlier, he spent nine years at Deutsche Bank, where his last position was Managing Director and Chief Economist, Asia. During 1999-2007, Taimur was based in Washington, DC, at the headquarters of the International Monetary Fund, where his last position was Senior Economist. He is the host of the https://omny.fm/shows/econstrategy/playlists/kopi-time-e21-ifc-s-vivek-pathak-on-investing-in-e (Kopi Time Podcast). Worst investment everIn 2012, Taimur's friend—a Wall Street success story—who ran a hedge fund was pivoting to geopolitical bets. The idea was to invest in stocks in countries just recovering from war. Taimur was impressed by his success in the 2000s and had a lot of respect for him. So he started following the setting up of this fund. The fund's first investment idea was Iraq. The country had had 10 years of massive conflict. But after a decade of death and destruction, the country was coming together, and there was some peace in place. There was huge potential for the US Iraqi stock market to make an earnings growth of about 40% a year. This was the mother of all bull markets to latch on to. Taimur had little understanding of the institutional nature of the Iraqi capital market. Still, he trusted his friend, who had made trips around Baghdad with US Marines and talked to entrepreneurs and the people who were to set up and run the new Iraqi stock exchange. It all seemed very good. The fund launched in 2012, and Taimur invested in it. By the end of 2013, things were going really well, and the value of the investment was growing steadily. Then the insurgency began, and the following years got terrible in terms of security, as well as deep disappointment in the Iraqi government's ability to channel oil resources to support Iraq's economic rejuvenation. In 2016, Taimur's friend called him from New York and informed him that he would shut the fund down. He said he'd pay Taimur 50% of his investment in that fund. Lessons learnedDon't get swayed by greed and the potential upside, and forget about the downsides. Be careful when investing with friends. You don't have to reach for the stars and be super greedy when investing. Andrew's takeawaysJust because something sounds cool doesn't mean it's gonna be cool. No matter how exciting an investment opportunity is, don't get too excited and forget to analyze the risks. Actionable adviceGetting into an illiquid investment is a bad idea for the average investor. Investing in liquid things is far more preferable. No.1 goal for the next 12 monthsTaimur's number one goal for the next 12 months is to be a faster runner. He also wants to solve the six sides of the Rubik's Cube a little faster. Parting words  “Just keep listening to My Worst Investment Ever. It's an awesome podcast.” Taimur Baig   [spp-transcript]   Connect with Taimur Baig https://www.linkedin.com/in/taimur-baig-7644335/ (LinkedIn) https://twitter.com/taimurbaigdbs (Twitter)...

Conservative Daily Podcast
Live with Cordie Williams: The Megaphone Marine Discusses COVID Genocide, FBI and DOJ Corruption

Conservative Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 77:09


Dr. Cordie Williams is a US Marine and has built a successful chiropractic business in San Diego County with his wife Dr. Tania Williams. At the beginning of the COVID pandemic in 2020, Dr. Cordie felt the state of California was violating his rights and the rights of other Americans. As a father, veteran, and business owner, he knew he had to be the man to stand up. Dr. Cordie picked up a megaphone and began speaking up at protests all across California, gaining him the name #megaphonemarine. Find Cordie at https://www.cordie4senate.com/about/ If you want to support the show, you can donate here: http://bit.ly/cd-donate ​​The late Dr. Zelenko left quite a legacy for Americans fighting the COVID agenda. The Z-Stack Protocol is one of them! Your immune system can be weakened by over 300 immunodeficiency disorders, poor diet, lack of sleep, and adverse reactions to various vaccines. Get your Z-Stack right now and stay healthy amid the attack on our bodies at http://zstacklife.com/cdp 10% of Z-Stack profits go to the https://www.zfreedomfoundation.com/ This episode of Conservative Daily is brought to you by DCF Guns. We all see what is happening in America right now. It has never been more important for you to arm yourself, and most importantly, learn how to use your arms safely and effectively. Check out DCF Guns at: https://dcfguns.com/ Become a Conservative Daily member right now for massive savings on Faxblasts, discounts at Joe's Depot, and more perks like backstage time with the hosts of Conservative Daily! Use the link and sign up today! https://conservative-daily.com/forms/Step1b Make sure you Like, Comment, and Share! Text FREEDOM to 89517 to get added to our text list to receive notifications when we go Live! Please make sure you join our newsletter to receive our action alerts: https://bit.ly/joinconservativedaily Get you and your family prepared at the Brighteon Store right now and stock up on high quality storable food, survival gear, and the cleanest supplements on the planet! https://bit.ly/3PezXDd Liberty Cigars is a Patriot owned business with an extensive line of historically themed individual cigars and cigar collections including the Commander Series, Founders Series, and the Presidents Series. All packaging is proudly made in the USA by American workers. A truly unique gift for both cigar and history lovers. All orders over $76 will receive a free Patrick Henry cigar, the perfect gift for anyone who says, "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" this holiday season. Use code REPUBLIC at www.libertycigars.com Go to IPVANISH.com/daily and use promotional code DAILY - and claim your 70% savings. That's I-P-V-A-N-I-S-H.com/daily. If you want to support Mike Lindell and our show, use promo code CD21 to get up to 66% off at https://www.mypillow.com/radiospecials or by placing your order over the phone at 800-872-0627. When you use promo code CD21, a Queen Sized MyPillow is just $29, the cheapest it has ever been! Conservative Daily is on Rumble! https://rumble.com/user/ConservativeDaily We are now also going to be streaming on dlive! Check us out here: https://dlive.tv/ConservativeDaily Click here to donate: http://bit.ly/cd-donate Subscribe to our daily podcast at Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/ConservativeDailyPodcast on Google Podcasts (for Android users): https://bit.ly/CDPodcastGoogle We are also available on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/2wD8YleiBM8bu0l3ahBLDN And on Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/conservative-daily-podcast/PC:37034 And on iHeart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-conservative-daily-podcast-53710765/ on TuneIn: https://tunein.com/radio/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-p1350272/ And on Podbean: https://conservative.podbean.com/ And now also on Audible! https://www.audible.com/pd/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-Podcast/B08JJQQ4M Support Joe Oltmann in his legal battle against Eric Coomer: https://givesendgo.com/defendjoeoltmann

Pathfinder
A Pure-Play Space Infrastructure Player, featuring Redwire CEO/Chairman Peter Cannito and CTO Al Tadros

Pathfinder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 49:22


Bonjour, and welcome to the Pathfinder in Paris experience, powered by Payload. We've got a surprise in store for you today – a twofer! That's right, two guests for the price of one, and packaged up into one standard length podcast. In this week's episode, and our second dispatch from back-to-back space conferences in Paris, Ryan sits down with Redwire CEO and Chairman Peter Cannito, followed by an interview with Al Tadros, Redwire's chief technology officer. Redwire is a full-stack space infrastructure company based in Jacksonville, Florida, and publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange ($RDW). The first half of the podcast features our conversation with Peter, who is also an operating partner at AE Industrial Partners. The space-focused private equity player has more than $3 billion in assets under management and hatched Redwire in late 2020 by merging Adcole Space and Deep Space Systems, and has also backed Firefly, Sierra, and other big space names. With Peter, we discuss Redwire's M&A strategy, business roadmap, growth markets, investing in space, AE's central role in the space ecosystem, and the geopolitics of space. Peter has spent 25+ years in the defense, tech, and government contracting sectors, and was formerly the CEO of Polaris Alpha. He holds a bachelor's from U Delaware, an MBA from Maryland, and served as an officer in the US Marines. The second half of today's episode features our conversation with Al, who makes strategic investments that support Redwire's customer base, advance technology development, and further commercialization. Al has nearly three decades of experience as an aerospace executive and has straddled both business and technical leadership functions, which makes his perspective particularly unique and valuable. Prior to being named as CTO of Redwire earlier this year, Al was the company's chief growth officer and executive vice president of space infrastructure. Before Redwire, Al was VP of space infrastructure and and civil space at Maxar Technologies. Al holds a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering and a master's in mechanical engineering from MIT. Today's episode of Pathfinder is brought to you by SpiderOak Mission Systems, an industry leader in cybersecurity. Check out SpiderOak's space cyber whitepaper at spacecyber.com -- TIMESTAMPS 0:00 - Intro 2:30 - Show begins with Peter 4:49 - International expansion 7:08 - Square footage...correlated with company success? 9:07 - Operator + investor experience in space 14:30 - Space macro discussion 17:44 - Taking Redwire public via SPAC, and why not all space SPACs are created equal 22:02 - Peter's take on geopolitical trends shaping space, and a modern-day space race with China 26:27 - Al joins + tells us about the Redwire CTO role 27:10 - His journey at Redwire and rising up the ranks 33:00 - Redwire's technology portfolio 35:07 - Robotics in space 38:47 - Flight-proven hardware, structures on the ISS, etc. 42:01 - Where is the European space sector headed? 45:00 - The space industry always has room for more fresh talent, including folks in non-technical roles -- Pathfinder is brought to you by Payload, a modern space media brand. While we have designs on becoming the biggest space content company in the galaxy, for now, we publish Payload, our flagship newsletter, from Monday to Friday; Pathfinder, and Parallax. Parallax is our brand-spanking new weekly science newsletter for the space industry. Subscribe now so you can say you were early by signing up at parallax.beehiiv.com You can subscribe to our daily newsletter and find out more about Payload at payloadspace.com

Daring Dissent
E18: Lili'uokalani - 1st & Last Queen of Hawaii

Daring Dissent

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 51:31


In January 1893, Queen Lili'uokalani looks out the 2nd floor window of her Honolulu palace and sees 160 US Marines marching down her street. They are there to illegally overthrow her and help nonnative White people seize power over the kingdom. Does she give into the demands of these invaders? Would she risk violence erupting across the islands in order to protect their independence? Listen in to hear how the first sovereign Queen of Hawaii became its last. In the process, you'll learn about American attempts to destroy Hawaiian culture/identity and the long fight from Hawaiians to preserve it. Donate to support the show at ko-fi.com/daringdissent Follow on IG @daringdissent Aloha ‘Oe courtesy of US Library of Congress "He Mele Lahui" by Mailani Theme song by Skilsel on pixabay.com Album Art by chnkyraptr Source list for all episodes found here --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Detective Monday- Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Adam Kegg Matter (11-11-1950)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:28


The first several seasons imagined protagonist Johnny Dollar as a private investigator drama, with Charles Russell, Edmond O'Brien and John Lund portraying Dollar in succession over the years. In 1955 after a yearlong hiatus, the series came back in its best-known incarnation with Bob Bailey starring in "the transcribed adventures of the man with the action-packed expense account – America's fabulous freelance insurance investigator." There were 809 episodes (plus two not-for-broadcast auditions) in the 12-year run, and more than 710 still exist today. Jim Cox's book American Radio Networks: A History cites "886 total performances" which includes repeat performances. Format. The format best remembered was instituted by writer-director Jack Johnstone. Each case usually started with a phone call from an insurance adjuster, calling on Johnny to investigate an unusual claim: a suspicious death, an attempted fraud, a missing person, or other mysterious circumstances. Each story required Johnny to travel to some distant locale, usually within the United States but sometimes abroad, where he was almost always threatened with personal danger in the course of his investigations. He would compare notes with the police officials who had first investigated each strange occurrence, and followed every clue until he figured out what actually happened. Johnny's file on each case was usually referenced as a "matter," as in "The Silver Blue Matter" or "The Forbes Matter". Later episodes were more fanciful, with titles like "The Wayward Trout Matter" and "The Price of Fame Matter" (the latter featuring a rare guest-star appearance by Vincent Price as himself; here Price and Dollar team up to retrieve a painting stolen by Price's insurance agent). Johnny usually stuck to business, but would sometimes engage in romantic dalliances with women he encountered in his travels; later episodes gave Johnny a steady girlfriend, Betty Lewis. Johnny's precious recreational time was usually spent fishing, and it was not uncommon for Johnny's clients to exploit this favorite pastime in convincing him to take on a job near good fishing locations. His past was rarely mentioned, but Dollar in “The Bennett Matter” described himself as a four-year US Marine veteran who then worked as a police officer for a decade before changing careers to insurance investigation. In "The Blackburn Case" Dollar also refers to his time as a Pinkerton Detective. Each story was recounted in flashback, and every few minutes the action would be interrupted by Johnny listing a line item from his expense account, which served as an effective scene transition. Most of the expense account related to transportation, lodging, and meals, but no incidental expense was too small for Johnny to itemize, as in "Item nine, 10 cents. Aspirin. I needed them." The monetary amounts weren't always literal: the smallest line item Johnny ever recorded was "two cents: what I felt like" after a professional setback; the largest was "one million dollars" (the way he felt after finding a missing woman and her daughter in a snowbound cabin). The episodes generally finished with Johnny tallying up his expense account and traveling back to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was based. Sometimes Johnny would add a sardonic postscript under "Remarks," detailing the aftermath of the case. ("The Todd Matter," which especially disgusted Johnny, ended abruptly with "Remarks – nil!") In later seasons the program sometimes referred to itself, with other characters recognizing Dollar's voice from the radio; in the episode “The Salkoff Sequel Matter” Johnny's radio show becomes an important plot point.

Former Action Guys Podcast Clips
"We Issued Three Body Bags A Squad" | US Marine talks Marjah

Former Action Guys Podcast Clips

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 15:53


Ryan Rogers is a Marine Infantryman that served with Kilo Company 3rd Battalion 6th Marines during Operation Moshtarak in Marjah, Afghanistan. The realities of combat hit home quickly in this clip taken from Ep 151. Check out the entire interview now on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, Spotify and more!Support the show: patreon.com/formeractionguys

Outlook
I was the voice of Bambi – and kept it secret for years

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 29:21 Very Popular


Donnie Dunagan was a Disney child star in the 1930s before becoming a US Marine. He was born in 1934 and grew up in Memphis, Tennessee, in the midst of the Great Depression. After winning a talent show aged four he was scouted and whisked to Hollywood where he starred in several movies – including a role as the voice of Walt Disney's iconic animated deer Bambi in 1942. But the Second World War would put a halt to his movie career, and Donnie eventually became a US Marine – never telling anyone about his Hollywood history until he was publicly unmasked in 2004. On the 80th anniversary of Bambi's release, he shares his story. Presenter: Mobeen Azhar Producer: Zoe Gelber

Jose L Cherrez
Conversando con el Gunnery Sgt David Mantilla de los US Marines

Jose L Cherrez

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 47:58


EPS Jose L Cherrez conversa con sus seguidores y un gran invitado especial.Gunnery Sgt. David Mantilla.Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/david_mantilla_18/Ver Video: https://youtu.be/yc_kl5Plqzg Para programar citas por videoconferencias con Jose L Cherrez:https://joselcherrez.youcanbook.me/ NRA Tienda:Código del 15% de descuento CHERREZNRASitio Web: https://nrastore.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/officialnrastore/ Membresía o Renovación de la NRA con descuento incluido:(Apoyando la segunda Enmienda)https://membership.nra.org/recruiters/join/XI029558T-Shirts, Hoodies, stickers y otros productos de Jose L Cherrez:https://teespring.com/stores/joselcherrez Para cursos en línea a distancia entra a nuestro sitio web:https://gepacademy.com  Para Membresía VIP en Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYAxtqzIo9gRTZPBil-zKHw/join  BROWNELLSTodo tipo de Pistolas, Rifles, accesorios, piezas y repuesto, y muchas de marcas reconocidas, las cosas mas que uso en mi trabajo y diario vivir lo pueden conseguir en el siguiente enlace. También si eres amante de la caza.Código del 10% de descuento: JOSELCH10Sitio web: https://brownells.dts2xn.net/qnvV7n  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brownellsinc/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BrownellsIncTwitter: https://twitter.com/BrownellsIncYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/brownellsinc5.11 TACTICALSitio web: https://www.511tactical.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/511tactical/ La información de la tienda en Miami (10% de descuento: Jose L Cherrez):Eddie CambóGeneral Manager / Instructor3887 NW 107 Avenue, Suite 107 Doral, Florida 33178Email: Eddie@511Miami.com Telefono: +1-786-485-4589Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/511miami/ Información en Broward (10% de descuento: Jose L Cherrez):Andrew CamachoGeneral Manager2164 S University Dr, Davie, FL 33324Telefono: +1-954-519-3808Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/511broward/SAFE LIFE DEFENSE Los chalecos de diferentes niveles que yo uso.Código del 10% de descuento: JOSELCHERREZSitio Web: https://safelifedefense.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/safelifedefense/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SafeLifeDefense/ GRIND HARD AMMO (solo USA)La munición que uso para defensa y prácticas.Código del 10% de descuento: JOSELCHERREZSitio web: https://grindhardammo.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/grindhardammo/?hl=enSitios de GEP Academy  y Jose L Cherrez:https://www.joselcherrez.com https://gepacademy.com  Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/joselcherrez/   https://www.instagram.com/gepacademy/ Grupo de chat del Telegram:https://t.me/joselcherrez1 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/joselcherrez/  https://www.facebook.com/Gepacademy/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/joselcherrez Podcasts de Jose L Cherrez: https://www.JoseLCherrezPodcast.com  Ropa táctica y accesorios tácticos los pueden buscar en el siguiente enlace de Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/shop/JoseLCherrezDonaciones para ayudar y participar en el programa:https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=YDC8Z7PMVFUDY&source=url#Podcast #JoseLCherrez #HablandoconlosEPSupport the show

One Minute Governance
125. Sound-Up Governance Episode 1 featuring Tiziana Casciaro

One Minute Governance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 15:55


Today's episode of OMG is actually a crossover with a new podcast, Sound-Up Governance, which is part of the new Ground-Up Governance platform. Episode 1 features an interview with Tiziana Casciaro, author of Power, for All: How it Really Works, and Why it's Everyone's Business. If you like what you hear, please consider heading over to groundupgovernance.com and subscribing.   SCRIPT The next three episodes of OMG are gonna be REALLY different. Well, actually, they're not episodes of OMG at all, but episodes of a brand new podcast called Sound-Up Governance, which is part of my new Ground-Up Governance platform. Sound-Up Governance features interviews with experts who don't necessarily come from the regular pool of corporate governance “gurus” so to speak. Instead, they are experts in stuff that's really important to doing corporate governance well, and can help us to understand what's really going on in our organizations. First up is Professor Tiziana Casciaro, who literally wrote the book on power and authority. If you like what you hear, head over to groundupgovernance.com to learn more and consider subscribing.   Matt  Welcome to Sound-Up Governance, part of the ground up governance network. My name is Matt Fullbrook. And in today's episode I speak with my friend Tiziana Casciaro, Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. We launched the Ground-Up Governance newsletter this week with the most fundamental concepts in corporate governance: authority and power. I mean, what could be more essential to corporate governance then trying to understand who's allowed to do what and what it takes for one person to influence another person? Luckily for us, Professor Casciaro, recently co authored a book with Harvard's Julie Battilana called Power for All: How it Really Works, and Why it's Everyone's Business. And just so I don't mess anything up, why don't we let her tell us a bit more?   Tiziana  It's a book intended for all in this world, not only in Canada, not only the US, but really, truly everywhere, who have contended with power, have struggled with it been frustrated by it, while understanding that it's important for them to have it, and know how to use it. And we have tried to give tools and understandings that allow people to grow in their influence, but also learn how to deploy it for good.   Matt  It never much occurred to me to think very hard about what power really is, or how, if at all, it's different from authority, or why, for example, people in really visible or influential positions sometimes fail to make a difference, am I missing somethingZ   Tiziana  Power is often very much confused with authority, or or I should say, authority is often confused with power. They are different, however. Authority is the formal right to issue orders and directives and make decisions. And it comes from the position you occupy in a formal structure. So your role puts you in a place where you get to make certain decisions. Power is different, however. Power is the ability to influence the behavior of other people. And you can influence them sometimes through your formal authority. If I have the right to decide whether you're going to be promoted or not, that gives me power over you. It's not just authority, but it's actual power. Why? Because you want something from me: a promotion. I have control over your access to this thing you want because I have the right to decide whether you will be promoted or not. And therefore I exercise influence over you. That's what power is made of. It's made of controlling your access to something you desire.  But you see, already in the definition of power, that I may control, access to something you want without having formal authority.   Matt   So can a person create power? Does that even make sense?   Tiziana  Absolutely makes sense. A person can increase their power, if they understand this simple principle of where power comes from. If I know that power comes from controlling access to resources you want, all I need to accrue more power is understand what is it that you want. And that's where people become very confused between the notion of formal authority and the power broadly conceived, formal authority has to do with something very specific. I have certain decision rights in a certain context over certain things. But that covers only a small part of what you might want, you might not just want a promotion, you might want for instance, to be managed by somebody who understands you, that understands your gifts, your talents, your complexity as a human being, values it and makes you feel good by giving you a platform where you can be your best self every day at work. Those are much more psychological resources, that are not written down in any formal organizational structure. They are much more subtle, and yet they are extremely important to people, they drive who they want to associate themselves with, whether they I want to be led by you or not, whether I will trust the decision you make. And even if you make a decision through your formal authority, and the decision comes at me, your actual underlying power - so,  your ability to influence my behavior - will come down to how willing am I to execute on that decision?   Matt   Okay, now we're really getting somewhere. No wonder some people have authority, but still can't get anyone to do anything. Power isn't only about controlling access to tangible resources, in some cases is way more important to just make someone feel good, feel valued and motivated. Since Ground-Up Governance is ultimately about corporations, how does all this apply in a typical corporate structure with a board, a CEO...in other words, a model that's got a well defined, built in leadership hierarchy. Once again, here's Professor Tiziana Casciaro.   Tiziana   The problem of the hierarchical structure you're describing is that it tends to concentrate power in the hands of very few people. And what we know from research in all kinds of disciplines is that power concentration tends to be bad in the long run, not only for the majority of people who don't have power, and therefore are just on the receiving end of the decisions of the few. But it can also be detrimental to the few in power, to the extent that having that much control can lead them to abuse their power. They lose sight of their unilateral capacity to shape the life of others and the other people who are receiving these decisions. Sometimes they become resentful of this asymmetry. And for good reason, if they're not unreasonable in becoming resentful. And when you have resentful people that you're leading, it's not good. Because they might push back, they do push back, the moment they have a little bit of room to show you that you're abusing your power. And I don't like it.   Matt  Uh oh So, concentrating power at the top of an organization sounds risky. What about a board of directors? How do power and authority work there?   Tiziana  So, you are a director on a board. And and because of that role, you will have certain rights to issue directives for the company and its leadership, and jointly with the other board members, you can come up with certain decisions that then presumably get implemented. So imagine one of these board members that in addition to the formal authority that accrues to them, by virtue of occupying that position on the board, they have something else going on for them. Maybe they have extra good connections to a stakeholder that the management of the company cares about, or that the board cares about. And they have to go through me to get to those guys in that stakeholder groups. In that case, I will end up having more influence over the decisions of the board and the behavior of the executives that leave the company, because I've got something that they want. And I control it in the sense that there aren't many alternative ways for them to get to those stakeholders, they kind of have to go through me.   Matt   It almost seems like part of the problem is the way that boards are structured, I asked Professor Casciaro if we should be trying to build boards so that every director somehow has an equal amount of power. I mean, maybe that would be the ideal condition for making good decisions and balancing everyone's interests.   Tiziana  The reality is that resources are unequally distributed across each and every one of us. And it's unavoidable that you will not have the quality you're describing on the board. But what you can do is to create decision making processes that make it harder for people to go off and establish relationships of influence that are disconnected from the goal that the board is presumably pursuing. So you can have decision making structures where it's one board member, one vote, that you have a way to express your preferences that does not allow easily for you to be swayed by others, which could protect you from their influence when it stems from things that have nothing to do with a decision at hand.   Matt  All right, so maybe it isn't possible to distribute power equally, but we can just use processes that balance things out a little. That's what we should be working on right?    Tiziana   But then you lose something when you do that. When you create a structure in which the decision is made almost independently by each board member, what you lose is the learning and the ability to engage with ideas other than your own that can actually and actually do oftentimes improve decision making. I can come in with my own independent judgment, which is all fine and dandy because it becomes not subject to your undue influence as my fellow board member. But I don't get to hear your argument, I don't get to really make my own decision better, because I don't get your input. So that's what what you're the tension, you're juggling here, you're navigating this pull toward independence, but also want to secure the beauty of multiple minds, struggling with a complex decision, where each and every one of us individually, cannot really understand every component.   Matt   We've learned how authority and power are different, and that people can in fact, take steps to generate power. We've all heard about the potential corrupting effects of power socially - morally, even - can we take steps to, you know, use our power for good?   Tiziana Ultimately, you're going to have to contend with what you have done with your life. What have you impacted? What are you leaving behind? And this is a level of insight into yourself that sometimes escapes us when we are in the middle of the action. We are the CEO of a company, complex stuff coming at us from every which way, and we kind of forget that actually, we want to accomplish something here. In addition to being rich and famous. We want to accomplish something other than that. So it's very important for people to understand that there are many goals you can accomplish. And power is essential to accomplishing all of them. You cannot get anything done without power. It's a form of energy in many ways that allows you to change the world around you, and move it in a direction you think is worthwhile. So you have to empower, for lack of a better word, people to acquire the power they need to pursue those objectives. And sometimes the people that have formal authority are not the right people. They're not pursuing the right objectives anymore. Maybe they started out with dreams and ambitions that were perfectly good and constructive, but along the way they lost sight of them. So the book tries to give everybody an opportunity to understand how power works so that they can acquire it, and then set up their power - and this is something that boards actually are very important contributors to - set up their power so that they don't get lost along the way. Because power does go to our head. It does. It does contaminate our purpose. It does distract us from our limitations and our need for other people to help us along the way. It makes us hubristic, it makes us self focused. So you need to not only give people tools to acquire power, but also give them tools to keep it in check.   Matt   Thank you for listening to episode number one of Sound-Up Governance. The fact that you're listening means you're a Ground-Up Governance subscriber. So thank you sincerely for your support and engagement. Next week, I'll speak with Lieutenant Colonel Jamahl Evans, Sr. of the US Marines as we work through our next batch of words: accountability, delegate and duty. If you want to reach out with a question or insight or an interesting story, send an email or voice memo to soundup@groundupgovernance.com. And we may feature you in a future episode. Thank you for tuning in. See you next week.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast
S6E74: Trauma That Our First Responders Are Exposed To. The Effects and Life After. Special Episode.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 43:01


Trauma That Our First Responders Are Exposed To. The Effects and Life After. Special Episode. There is social media and then there was social audio. Now the Breakout app combines the best of both. Best of all the Breakout app is free, with versions for iPhone and Android devices. You can download the app for free at the App Store and Google Play. Or you can download for free at www.LetBreak.com.  Jessie Holton is our guest. He is a U.S. Marine Corps combat veteran, he was a law enforcement officer in the Brevard County Florida Sheriff's Office for many years, before joining the Bozeman Montana Police  Department as a Police Officer. Jessie talks about the short and long term effects of repeated stress and violent trauma and how this motivates him to help others. If you enjoy the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast, please tell a friend or two, or three about it. Be sure to Like and Follow us on Facebook.  Interested in being a guest, sponsorship or advertising opportunities send an email to the host and producer of the show jay@lawenforcementtoday.com.  Background song Hurricane is used with permission from the band Dark Horse Flyer. Follow us on MeWe, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook.  Never miss out on an episode of the Law Enforcement Today Podcast subscribe to our free email newsletter, never more than 2 issues a week sent out. Click here and scroll down about halfway. Check out the Clubhouse: Drop In Audio Chat App for free. It is social audio, think of truly interactive talk radio. Be sure to become a member of our club for free, LET Radio and Podcast.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Point of the Spear | Military History
Author, USMC Lt. Colonel Stuart Scheller, Crisis of Command

Point of the Spear | Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 20:54


Join Robert Child for a conversation with author and former Lt. Colonel Stuart Scheller. Stuart gained notoriety last year as a US Marine speaking out and asking for accountability for the US's disastrous military withdrawal from Afghanistan. His new book is called Crisis of Command: How We Lost Trust and Confidence in America's Generals and Politicians. Watch our military history documentary, Weather and Warfare, FREE on Tubi the streaming service from Fox. LINK https://tubitv.com/movies/680635/weather-and-warfare-millennia-to-modern-time Sign up for our twice monthly email Newsletter SOCIAL: YouTube Twitter Facebook Website --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/robert-child/support

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line
Life In The IRA By Former Marine John Crawley

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 13:46


PJ talks to John Crawley who joined the IRA after his discharge from the US Marines and whose book "The Yank" has surprising insights into the men he came across as a result from Martin McGuinness to James ‘Whitey' Bulger. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Kerry Today
I Was an IRA Gunrunner – September 14th, 2022

Kerry Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


Jerry interviews John Crawley, author of The Yank: My Life as a former US Marine in the IRA tells how he and other Republicans used Boston mobster and murderer James ‘Whitey’ Bulger to help source and transport weapons to Ireland in 1984. The arms left the US on a trawler called the Valhalla and were then transferred to another vessel, the Marita Ann. The Marita Ann was intercepted by Irish authorities off the Kerry coast.

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line
2022-09-14 Minimum wage increase, a Yank in the IRA, Matty Kielys on the telly & more

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 123:15


The minimum wage is going up - will it make any difference given the cost of living?.. The US Marine who became an IRA man and believes the Good Friday Agreement was a cop out.. Matty Kielys fish & chips are going to be on TV & lots more Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Mogul Marathon Real Estate Podcast
EP #5: Leveraging Partnership To Scale To $50M In Real Estate With Brian Briscoe

The Mogul Marathon Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 52:05


In the business of real estate, if you want to scale faster, you have to learn how to leverage partnership. Especially in the world of real estate syndication where there is a lot of moving parts. Brian Briscoe shares his journey on how he was able to strategically leverage partnership to retire from the military and into multifamily syndication. Brian Briscoe is a full-time apartment investor with ownership interests in over $50 million in assets. He is also the director of the multifamily educational community The Tribe of Titans and the host of the “Diary of an Apartment Investor” podcast. He recently retired from the US Marines after 20 years of service. In this episode, we discuss: How to hire the right property manager in multifamily real estate Why asset management is so overlooked, but yet, so important How to leverage Linkedin to attract investors Pivoting quickly in times of turbulence in your business Brian's Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brian-briscoe-445658a/ Brian's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brian_briscoe/?hl=en Brian's Website: https://www.streamlinecapitalgroup.com/ Interested in investing in commercial real estate opportunities? Join our investor group here Check out our FREE multifamily due diligence checklist to avoid costly mistakes. Click here to download the checklist.

Kingdom Cross  Roads Podcast
Faith and Business - Edwin Carrion pt 2

Kingdom Cross Roads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 29:08


Faith and Business Edwin Carrion pt 2 https://edwincarrion.com/ ()In today's economy, many people find themselves thinking about becoming their own boss. They are contemplating starting their own business and becoming independently wealthy, not relying on anyone but themselves and God for success. Although that is a very attainable goal, it is not as easy as it sounds. In order to be successful, you need someone who has “been there, done that and has also overcome the pitfalls that go with it.” Our guest today has done just that… Edwin Carrion served from 1998-2002 an active duty in the United States Marine Corps. When he left military service, he had dreams just like everyone else.  The difference, he worked to attain those dreams… Edwin is now a respected entrepreneur, businessman and deal maker with more than 20 years of successful experience in multiple industries. During his career, he served as Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, President and Vice President of several significant, privately owned companies. Edwin's expertise in all aspects of managing operations of startups, from development, design, organization, legal, financial, marketing, capital financing and strategic negotiations with client and vendor partners, has made him the key player in growing four of his most notable companies from start up - to annual revenues exceeding $15 ,000,000.  Praise God! Edwin founded “E&D Development, Inc.” in 2002 after his military career with the United States Marines Corp. Edwin built, developed and sold over $30,000,000 in real estate. After the real estate meltdown, Edwin founded “Countrywide Gold Buyers” (CGB) in Rhode Island. Within a few months CGB became a national company, with which he created a Franchise concept, growing “Countrywide Gold Buyers” to revenues in excess of $15,000,000. After selling CGB in 2014, Edwin Co-founded “Eco Modern Custom Homes,” a high end real estate development company which grew its portfolio assets of projects to over $10,000,000 in just one year. Edwin sold “Eco Modern Custom Homes” in 2017, and purchased “MDC Transport Company” in 2017. He grew the company from $2,000,000 in revenue to over $12,000,000 in just 2 years. Today, Edwin enjoys working with beginner to intermediate real estate developers, teaching them things like, “real world negotiations; one on one mentoring with real estate developers; tax savings strategies and how to find valuable real estate development properties in their local communities. Right on the first page of his website, he lists his titles as “US Marine, Loyal Husband, Loving father of 2 beautiful children, Entrepreneur, Self-Made Millionaire, Real Estate Developer, Investor and Mentor, but the first thing it says is, “Man of God.”  Praise God! Today is part two of a great, two part interview! I briefly listed your businesses in the opening. Can you tell us a bit more about what all of your businesses are? Do you really need a lot of money already in the bank in order to start a business? Can you give some secrets to a successful life & business and how to balance the “faith-life-work” balance? Do you have a favorite bible verse that keeps your faith centered on God as you go through your day and business activities? I have a busy time handling the three facets of this business/ministry. How are you able to manage so many business at one time? In the overall scheme of things, what do you look for to determine the difference between a good deal and a bad deal? You are also a podcaster!  Tell us about your podcast, https://edwincarrion.com/podcast/ (“My First Investment Property Podcast?”) Edwin, this is all so fascinating. If someone listening to us right now would like to reach out to you, to ask a question, receive more information, etc., how can they do that? How can someone get in touch with you? Folks, Edwin is the “real deal.” I love interviewing patriots...

Kingdom Cross  Roads Podcast
Faith and Business - Edwin Carrion pt 1

Kingdom Cross Roads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 26:54


Faith and Business Edwin Carrion pt 1 https://edwincarrion.com/ ()In today's economy, many people find themselves thinking about becoming their own boss. They are contemplating starting their own business and becoming independently wealthy, not relying on anyone but themselves and God for success. Although that is a very attainable goal, it is not as easy as it sounds. In order to be successful, you need someone who has “been there, done that and has also overcome the pitfalls that go with it.” Our guest today has done just that… Edwin Carrion served from 1998-2002 an active duty in the United States Marine Corps. When he left military service, he had dreams just like everyone else.  The difference, he worked to attain those dreams… Edwin is now a respected entrepreneur, businessman and deal maker with more than 20 years of successful experience in multiple industries. During his career, he served as Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, President and Vice President of several significant, privately owned companies. Edwin's expertise in all aspects of managing operations of startups, from development, design, organization, legal, financial, marketing, capital financing and strategic negotiations with client and vendor partners, has made him the key player in growing four of his most notable companies from start up - to annual revenues exceeding $15 ,000,000.  Praise God! Edwin founded “E&D Development, Inc.” in 2002 after his military career with the United States Marines Corp. Edwin built, developed and sold over $30,000,000 in real estate. After the real estate meltdown, Edwin founded “Countrywide Gold Buyers” (CGB) in Rhode Island. Within a few months CGB became a national company, with which he created a Franchise concept, growing “Countrywide Gold Buyers” to revenues in excess of $15,000,000. After selling CGB in 2014, Edwin Co-founded “Eco Modern Custom Homes,” a high end real estate development company which grew its portfolio assets of projects to over $10,000,000 in just one year. Edwin sold “Eco Modern Custom Homes” in 2017, and purchased “MDC Transport Company” in 2017. He grew the company from $2,000,000 in revenue to over $12,000,000 in just 2 years. Today, Edwin enjoys working with beginner to intermediate real estate developers, teaching them things like, “real world negotiations; one on one mentoring with real estate developers; tax savings strategies and how to find valuable real estate development properties in their local communities. Right on the first page of his website, he lists his titles as “US Marine, Loyal Husband, Loving father of 2 beautiful children, Entrepreneur, Self-Made Millionaire, Real Estate Developer, Investor and Mentor, but the first thing it says is, “Man of God.”  Praise God! First question I always start with is this… Other than that brief information I just shared, can you tell us in your own word, “Who is Edwin Carrion?” You've gone through some tough times as well as the blessed times.  I guess we could start with boot camp in the Marines as not being a picnic in the park, amen! What made you decide to enter real estate after your stint on active duty? That was in the 2002-2003 time frame. And we all remember what happened about 2008. How did the real estate crash affect you and what did you do during and after? How important is it to create multiple streams of income so you are not totally reliant on just that one source? What investment strategy have you had the most success with? What are some of the bigger mistakes you made when you were just starting out? I briefly listed your businesses in the opening. Can you tell us a bit more about what all of your businesses are? I love interviewing patriots who have served this nation with honor and distinction and then used the discipline and self-drive to become successful in private life and be a blessing to others at the same time. Edwin Carrion

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Detective Monday- Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Joan Sebastian Matter (10-21-1950)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 29:39


Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar is a radio drama that aired on CBS Radio from February 18, 1949 to September 30, 1962. The first several seasons imagined protagonist Johnny Dollar as a private investigator drama, with Charles Russell, Edmond O'Brien and John Lund portraying Dollar in succession over the years. In 1955 after a yearlong hiatus, the series came back in its best-known incarnation with Bob Bailey starring in "the transcribed adventures of the man with the action-packed expense account – America's fabulous freelance insurance investigator." There were 809 episodes (plus two not-for-broadcast auditions) in the 12-year run, and more than 710 still exist today. Jim Cox's book American Radio Networks: A History cites "886 total performances" which includes repeat performances. Format. The format best remembered was instituted by writer-director Jack Johnstone. Each case usually started with a phone call from an insurance adjuster, calling on Johnny to investigate an unusual claim: a suspicious death, an attempted fraud, a missing person, or other mysterious circumstances. Each story required Johnny to travel to some distant locale, usually within the United States but sometimes abroad, where he was almost always threatened with personal danger in the course of his investigations. He would compare notes with the police officials who had first investigated each strange occurrence, and followed every clue until he figured out what actually happened. Johnny's file on each case was usually referenced as a "matter," as in "The Silver Blue Matter" or "The Forbes Matter". Later episodes were more fanciful, with titles like "The Wayward Trout Matter" and "The Price of Fame Matter" (the latter featuring a rare guest-star appearance by Vincent Price as himself; here Price and Dollar team up to retrieve a painting stolen by Price's insurance agent). Johnny usually stuck to business, but would sometimes engage in romantic dalliances with women he encountered in his travels; later episodes gave Johnny a steady girlfriend, Betty Lewis. Johnny's precious recreational time was usually spent fishing, and it was not uncommon for Johnny's clients to exploit this favorite pastime in convincing him to take on a job near good fishing locations. His past was rarely mentioned, but Dollar in “The Bennett Matter” described himself as a four-year US Marine veteran who then worked as a police officer for a decade before changing careers to insurance investigation. In "The Blackburn Case" Dollar also refers to his time as a Pinkerton Detective. Each story was recounted in flashback, and every few minutes the action would be interrupted by Johnny listing a line item from his expense account, which served as an effective scene transition. Most of the expense account related to transportation, lodging, and meals, but no incidental expense was too small for Johnny to itemize, as in "Item nine, 10 cents. Aspirin. I needed them." The monetary amounts weren't always literal: the smallest line item Johnny ever recorded was "two cents: what I felt like" after a professional setback; the largest was "one million dollars" (the way he felt after finding a missing woman and her daughter in a snowbound cabin). The episodes generally finished with Johnny tallying up his expense account and traveling back to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was based. Sometimes Johnny would add a sardonic postscript under "Remarks," detailing the aftermath of the case. ("The Todd Matter," which especially disgusted Johnny, ended abruptly with "Remarks – nil!") In later seasons the program sometimes referred to itself, with other characters recognizing Dollar's voice from the radio; in the episode “The Salkoff Sequel Matter” Johnny's radio show becomes an important plot point.

The Jedburgh Podcast
#075: Boston Firefighters Union Local 718 - President Sam Dillon & Tower Ladder 10

The Jedburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 88:30


For over 344 years the Boston fire department has led America and set the example for excellence, standards and service to others. Boston's firefighters are supported and empowered by Local 718, the Boston firefighter's union. For this 9/11 special edition episode, Fran Racioppi goes home to Boston to sit down with a group who know no other mission than to preserve and protect life.Fran spends part one of the episode with newly elected President of Local 718 Sam Dillon discussing his service in the US Marines, why his three pillars of Solidarity, Advocacy, and Respect are essential to the next generation of firefighter and the mental health of first responders. In the post 9/11 world, the Boston Fire Department maintains one of the strongest Veteran communities in the country. In part two Fran and Sam are joined by fellow Veterans turned Boston firefighters Greg Kelly, Tony McDonagh and Josh Stuart-Shor on what it means to serve their country and their city, no matter the challenge. Learn more about the Local 718 and the Boston Fire Department www.bostonfirelocal718.org and follow them on social media @bostonfirefighters.Read the full episode transcription here and learn more on The Jedburgh Podcast Website. Check out the full video version on YouTube.Highlights: -0:00 Welcome to Egleston Square Firehouse-6:44 Local 718 advocates for the firefighters of Boston -7:45 Sam answers the call to run for Local 718 Union President -9:35 History of Boston Fire Department-12:51 The mission and standards of a Boston Firefighter-21:30 The leadership of the fire department has been passed to the post 9/11 generation-23:39 Sam's career in the Marine Corps & being awarded the Purple Heart-28:47 First responder mental health and transition -30:11 The impact of COVID on the Boston Fire Department-34:40 Sam's Three pillars of Solidarity, Advocacy & Respect-38:41 A tribute to first responders-47:00 Crisis leadership in Boston-51:58 Greg, Tony and Josh join to discuss a lifetime of service and the impact 9/11 had on each of them-1:10:10 The camaraderie of the fire departmentQuotes: -”Firefighters are this city's lifeline; and this union…it's the lifeline for firefighters and their families.” (6:49)-”When I came on this job I was just happy to be a Boston firefighter…my life long ambition.” (7:47)-”You don't always get to pick your time. Sometimes your time picks you.” (9:11)-”Boston was at the forefront of America; and Boston firefighters are at the forefront of firefighting.” (11:39)-“Mission, team, self…in that order.” (16:34)-”We are willing to lose our lives for each other. We are willing to lose our lives for the city of Boston.” (17:59)-”You cannot sit idly by when your country and your way of life is attacked.” (25:34)-”If you spend the rest of your life trying to erase them, those things are eventually just gonna erase you.” (29:41)-”I don't pray for fires, but if there's a fire I want them to call me.” (1:18:46)This episode is brought to you by Jersey Mike's, 18A Fitness, and Analytix Solutions

The Pacific War Channel Podcast
Pacific War Podcast

The Pacific War Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 123:34


In this Podcast, Dave Holland from Guadalcanal Walking a Battlefield goes over many of the Medals of Honor earned during the Guadalcanal campaign. We talk about: Merritt Edson, Kenneth Bailey, Douglas Munro, John Basilone, Mitchell Paige, Anthony Casamento, Charles Davis, William Fournier and Lewis Hall.    Dave Holland is a former US Marine and has worked on Guadalcanal for a few years giving tours of the battlefields. He has found countless artifacts from the battalion and has pin pointed many locations where Medals of Honor were earned.  Please check out his Youtube Channel: Guadalcanal Walking a Battlefield to see some exciting videos on him walking the very grounds where some of the most brutal fighting of the Pacific War occurred! 

Failed Hips and Harmful Drugs
19: Camp Lejeune Marine Base Toxic Water Act of 2022

Failed Hips and Harmful Drugs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 16:11


A remarkable new law has just been passed that will open a channel to financial compensation for people exposed to toxic water at the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps base in Jacksonville, North Carolina. Those exposed to the toxic water developed serious health problems, including many cancers. Before going to law school, attorney Clay Hodges was an English instructor at Coastal Carolina Community College in Jacksonville. He spent several years teaching US Marines, their spouses, children, and other dependents. He also taught classes directly on the Marine Corps base at Camp Lejeune, so he is very familiar with Camp Lejeune and the Jacksonville area. In August 2022, President Joe Biden signed the new bill that created a federal cause of action related to toxic water at Camp Lejeune between 1953 and 1987. In today's podcast, attorney Hodges reviews certain parts of the bill, unpacks the language, and dives into the details of the exciting new legislation called the Camp Lejune Justice Act of 2022.  Stay tuned to hear the details of the recently legislated Camp Lejune water act. Show highlights The period between 1953 and 1987 is the most important detail of the Camp Lejeune bill. Attorney Hodges explains who might have a valid case.  What do we know about the contamination of the water at Camp Lejeune? Some of the toxic chemicals found in the water supply at Camp Lejeune. The chemicals found in the drinking water at Camp Lejeune are extremely harmful to human life. Extended exposure to the chemicals in the Camp Lejeune drinking water has been linked to birth defects, various cancers, and other major health problems. As far as we know, the water at Camp Lejeune is now safe to drink. You have only two years in which to submit an administrative petition or file a lawsuit against the federal government if you think you have a claim under the new legislation. Under the new legislation, the exclusive jurisdiction for these cases will be the Federal Court in the Eastern District of North Carolina. Family members of deceased people who qualify under the new law can claim compensation for the wrongful death of the deceased person. Attorney Hodges explains why the new law is so extraordinary. Links and resources: If you think you may have a case, call Clay at 919-546-8788 to discuss further. Check out Clay Hodges's website   

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast
Call from Chad in Chula Vista

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 7:21


While discussing Ben's attempt at stolen valor to go golfing in Hawai'i next week, the guys take a call from former US Marine, Chad in Chula Vista.

The Love of Cinema
Breaking (2022): New Movie Discussion

The Love of Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 57:54


This week on the pod John, Jeff & Dave discuss Breaking, the new film, based on a true story, starring John Boyega as a US Marine veteran who demands the VA pay him his disability checks, which have been held up by bureaucratic crap that the US military doesn't want to confront ever, ever. Therefore, Boyega's Brian Brown-Easley makes a bold decision to make his situation known at the risk of his own life. We discussed the incredibly important content of the film as compared to the final product, which was directed by relative new-comer to feature film directing, Abi Damaris Corbin, who co-wrote the script with Kwame Kwei-Armah. Boyega also co-exec produced, and the supporting cast is led by Michael K. Williams in one of his final performances. RIP! Composed by frequent Jordan Peele collaborator Michael Abels, the film was also co-produced by Euphoria's Sam Levinson. Additional Cast/Creatives: Connie Britton, Selenis Leyva, Nicole Beharie, Olivia Washington, London Covington, Jeffrey Donovan, Doug Emmett. Find all of our Socials at: https://linktr.ee/theloveofcinema Hosts: Dave Green, Jeff Ostermueller, John Say. Edited and produced by Dave Green. Music: soundcloud.com/dasein-artist Beer: @cbarrozo.beer

All Talk with Jordan and Dietz
Rocky Raczkowski ~ All Talk with Jordan and Dietz

All Talk with Jordan and Dietz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 8:36


September 6, 2022 ~ Rocky Raczkowski talks with Kevin and Tom about the Iran nuclear deal would lift sanctions on killers of US Marines in Lebanon.

The Engineer-ish
A Day in the Life (ft. Larry Griffin)

The Engineer-ish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 51:46


On today's episode of The Engineer-ish, the Martins welcome a dear fan and friend of the podcast Larry Griffin. If his name sounds familiar it is probably because he was one of their recent “picks of the week”. If you are considering becoming an independent contractor to work on a multitude of projects with no full-time employee ties, find out how Larry has paved his way as a project engineer doing just that. Tune in to find out what A Day in the Life with Larry Griffin, Petrochemical Engineer and former US Marine looks like. #Sidebar — Have you ever worked on a project that you had little to no experience and happened to be pleasantly surprised by the end-result? Recall it and drop us a line via email about it. Write us: theengineer.ish@gmail.com Follow & tweet us with our tags: @theengineer_ish Guest email: gatorgriffin08@yahoo.com Guest socials: https://www.linkedin.com/in/larry-griffin-491792174/

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Detective Monday- Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Jack Madigan Matter (10-21-1950)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 30:30


Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar is a radio drama that aired on CBS Radio from February 18, 1949 to September 30, 1962. The first several seasons imagined protagonist Johnny Dollar as a private investigator drama , with Charles Russell, Edmond O'Brien and John Lund portraying Dollar in succession over the years. In 1955 after a yearlong hiatus, the series came back in its best-known incarnation with Bob Bailey starring in "the transcribed adventures of the man with the action-packed expense account – America's fabulous freelance insurance investigator." There were 809 episodes (plus two not-for-broadcast auditions) in the 12-year run, and more than 710 still exist today. Jim Cox's book American Radio Networks: A History cites "886 total performances" which includes repeat performances. Format. The format best remembered was instituted by writer-director Jack Johnstone. Each case usually started with a phone call from an insurance adjuster, calling on Johnny to investigate an unusual claim: a suspicious death, an attempted fraud, a missing person, or other mysterious circumstances. Each story required Johnny to travel to some distant locale, usually within the United States but sometimes abroad, where he was almost always threatened with personal danger in the course of his investigations. He would compare notes with the police officials who had first investigated each strange occurrence, and followed every clue until he figured out what actually happened. Johnny's file on each case was usually referenced as a "matter," as in "The Silver Blue Matter" or "The Forbes Matter". Later episodes were more fanciful, with titles like "The Wayward Trout Matter" and "The Price of Fame Matter" (the latter featuring a rare guest-star appearance by Vincent Price as himself; here Price and Dollar team up to retrieve a painting stolen by Price's insurance agent). Johnny usually stuck to business, but would sometimes engage in romantic dalliances with women he encountered in his travels; later episodes gave Johnny a steady girlfriend, Betty Lewis. Johnny's precious recreational time was usually spent fishing, and it was not uncommon for Johnny's clients to exploit this favorite pastime in convincing him to take on a job near good fishing locations. His past was rarely mentioned, but Dollar in “The Bennett Matter” described himself as a four-year US Marine veteran who then worked as a police officer for a decade before changing careers to insurance investigation. In "The Blackburn Case" Dollar also refers to his time as a Pinkerton Detective. Each story was recounted in flashback, and every few minutes the action would be interrupted by Johnny listing a line item from his expense account, which served as an effective scene transition. Most of the expense account related to transportation, lodging, and meals, but no incidental expense was too small for Johnny to itemize, as in "Item nine, 10 cents. Aspirin. I needed them." The monetary amounts weren't always literal: the smallest line item Johnny ever recorded was "two cents: what I felt like" after a professional setback; the largest was "one million dollars" (the way he felt after finding a missing woman and her daughter in a snowbound cabin). The episodes generally finished with Johnny tallying up his expense account and traveling back to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was based. Sometimes Johnny would add a sardonic postscript under "Remarks," detailing the aftermath of the case. ("The Todd Matter," which especially disgusted Johnny, ended abruptly with "Remarks – nil!") In later seasons the program sometimes referred to itself, with other characters recognizing Dollar's voice from the radio; in the episode “The Salkoff Sequel Matter” Johnny's radio show becomes an important plot point.

The Brett Winterble Show
Lord: Speech "Decidedly WRONG Thing to Do"

The Brett Winterble Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 7:00


Today on this Friday edition of the Brett Winterble Show author Jeffery Lord rejoins the program to react to last night's speech by President Biden. Lord explains why he feels this was a massive mistake by Biden, comparing its contents to that of similar speeches given by other Presidents + why the presence of US Marines at the speech raises important questions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BofC Live
Air Force (and Space Force) considering cannabis using applicants

BofC Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 4:32


Three new stories from the "Cannabis Daily" podcast team too see you into the weekend!***URGENT - Early bird tickets end at midnight tonight - get your ticket at $100 off the price NOW.https://www.cannabisnewyork.live/ticketsBefore we get into the stories - time for another job ad!Cannabis At Work are looking for a Sales Executive in North America. You can check out the full listing and apply through here - Seeking a Cannabis Sales Executive , New York City - Business of CannabisHere are today's stories:The US Marine and Space Force may begin to allow applicants who use cannabis  - Air Force TimesBC job strike pauses to allow shipments to retailers - MJBizDailyThe pharmaceutical industry takes huge financial hit after cannabis legalization - Marijuana MomentTweet us and let us know your thoughts on today's episode, here.Email us about our stories, here.Missed the previous episode? You can catch up with it here.  About Cannabis Daily.Cannabis Daily is a cannabis news and interview program from Business of Cannabis. We highlight the companies, brands, people and trends driving the cannabis industry.Business of Cannabis is a cannabis industry platform marrying cannabis news, video and podcast content, newsletters and online and real-world cannabis events.Visit Business of Cannabis online:http://businessofcannabis.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/bofc_mediaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/businessofcannabisInstagram: https://instagram.com/businessofcannabisFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/bofcmediaSpotify: http://bofc.me/spotifyApple: http://bofc.me/applepodPodcasts Online: https://bofc.me/bofclive

The Commute with Carlson
September 2, 2022 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 115:17


Hour 1 -- Pres. Biden campaigned on uniting America but provides another televised example of partisan division, Biden repeats the phrase "MAGA Republicans" during Philadelphia speech in attempt to frame the 2022 mid-term election, Carlson explains why Biden's strategy won't work, Biden and Democrats keep complaining about political extremism but fail to see the extremism amongst the Progressive Left (i.e. The Squad), the fire marshall says spontaneous combustion of soil in a planter box caused a Lake Stevens house fire this week, Parkland (WA) homeowner pepper sprayed by two suspects attempting a home break-in then shoots back: 1 suspect still on the run & one hospitalized, new testing data shows have far math and reading scores have fallen for 4th graders due to COVID school lock downs and distance learning, unethical of Pres. Biden to have US Marines in the background of the cameras televising his Philadelphia speech last night, Hour 2 -- Pres. Biden goes full-Hillary Clinton in Philadelphia speech last night, Team Biden's new focus on "extremism" flies in the face of his public approval rating, things that politicians say when they are hopelessly out of touch, Biden's two-tiered approach to make Donald Trump the focus of the 2022 election (because they can't campaign on their Congressional record), a King County official rejects a basic interview request from independent Seattle journalist Jonathan Choe, GUEST: economist Steve Moore, calls Biden's "despicable" speech condemning half the country for a guy who said he'd unite the country, Democrats can't talk about the issues (gas prices, national debt, inflation, crime, public safety, the border) so they must attack Republicans, Moore points out that Democrats impeached Trump on the bogus Steele Dossier and simultaneously complain that MAGA Republicans are a threat to democracy, a Colorado power utility takes control of 22,000 customers' s in-home thermostats and reduces their air conditioning during a heat wave, Idaho's giving state taxpayers a solid rebate but WA Gov. Jay Inslee refuses to do anything of the sort with an even bigger state surplus. Hour 3 -- RIP to Seattle business trailblazer Art Oberto, KVI caller shares his insight about Seattle lawlessness problems amid the 40 reporter unprovoked attacks on city firefighters recently, why Pres. Biden and Donald Trump are both obsessive and most Americans have moved on from past elections to focus on their lives and families amid crime concerns and inflation today, a new California sushi restaurant with a high profile chef only serves 30 customers a night and already has a nearly 4 year waiting list, an explanation of who wins with student loan debt transfer/bailout to federal taxpayers.

FYI FLI - For Your Information Financial Literacy & Investing
Ep.71 - Making Moolah w/ US Marine, Jaylen Feliciano

FYI FLI - For Your Information Financial Literacy & Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 39:02


Over 50% of businesses fail due to lack of funding…after this episode, you will NOT fall into that statistic! Check us out for Season 3 - Episode 19 with US Marine, motivational speaker, and CEO of Creating Generational Wealth: Jaylen Feliciano! In this episode, Hassan & Jaylen talk about: - ACTION steps to starting a business and getting MAX funding - TIPS on setting up and separating your business bank account from your personal account - The LESSONS Jaylen learned from the marine's - that've translated to his business success If you're looking to be motivated, educated, and entertained…this podcast is for you! --- • Connect with Jaylen: https://instagram.com/jaylenfeliciano?igshid=NmNmNjAwNzg= • Subscribe to our website for FYI FLI app updates: https://fyifli.com/ • Purchase the playbook to increasing your drive, destiny, & dollars: https://fyifli.com/fromcollegetocovid/

Loving Liberty Radio Network
08-29-2022 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 109:40


Hour 1 * Guest: Dr. Scott Bradley – To Preserve The Nation – FreedomsRisingSun.com * Facebook Comment, Freyadis Virtanen: Which god? * Dr. Scott and Sam Discuss the Religious Nature of The Greatest Country on Earth, The United States of America! * Alexis de Tocqueville, Colloquially known as Tocqueville – French historian and political writer. * The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: “We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men [people] the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.” * Do you just know about God, or Do You Really Know Your Heavenly Father?! * Wise Men Still Seek Him! * Dietrick Bonhoffer: Should the leader succumb to the visions of those he leads, who will always seek to turn him into an idol, then the image of the leader will become the image of the misleader. This is the leader who makes an idol of himself and his office and who thus mocks God. Hour 2 * Guest: Lowell Nelson – CampaignForLiberty.org – RonPaulInstitute.org * More Billions to Ukraine as America Falls Apart – Ron Paul. * Roughly 200,000 illegals crossed the border in the US in July – We throw money at Ukraine to help them protect their borders, yet we do not secure our own. The $775M that went to Ukraine last week was the 18th weapons package to Ukraine in six months. * Defend the Guard. Uphold the Constitution. * President George Washington was unambiguous, “It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliance with any portion of the foreign world.” * President Jefferson was equally explicit, “Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none.” * President Monroe formalized that policy. The Monroe Doctrine's first point stated the US wouln't interfere in the internal affairs or wars of other nations. * CDC Changes Course on COVID Strategies – TheTruthAboutVaccines.com * For the past two years, people who refused the mRNA gene therapy clot shots have been maligned and mistreated. They have been turned away from gyms, restaurants, theaters, and sports arenas. They couldn't visit their loved ones in nursing homes. And some were fired from their jobs for refusing the jab. * Now, the CDC has changed its tune. In a report issued earlier this month, the CDC was careful not to openly admit they were wrong, but tacitly (reading between the lines) they did. * CDC: “As SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, continues to circulate globally, high levels of vaccine- and infection-induced immunity and the availability of effective treatments and prevention tools have substantially reduced the risk for medically significant COVID-19 illness (severe acute illness and post–COVID-19 conditions) and associated hospitalization and death.” * “A California appeals court recently ruled that all mandates forcing churches to close are unconstitutional, while a federal judge in Ohio blocked the military's vaccine mandate nationwide for Air Force, Space Force, and Air National Guard members who had requested religious exemptions. – A federal judge in Florida ordered class action relief and granted a classwide preliminary injunction against the federal government's COVID shot mandate for all US Marines – whether they are active or in reserve service. * The CDC has also removed the recommendation that people quarantine based on contact with someone who is or might be infected. They've also completely abandoned the 6-foot social distancing rule. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!
1619 Project, How To Argue Against!

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 119:59


Today on "Catholic Drive Time": Debunking the 1619 Project, exposing the plan to divide America with Dr. Mary Grabar. AND Sounding the Alarm on Anti-Catholic Violence ALSO – What do the New Cardinals, Nuns, and UFOs all have in common? - Tito Edwards – BigPulpit.com - Heavily armed Antifa militants 'stand guard' outside Texas 'kid friendly' drag show at the Anderson Distillery and Grill in Roanoke, Texas. 20 New Cardinals pay a visit to the Pope... then Benedict, joined by Francis, bless them and sung the Salve Regina! A staffer at the Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C., told an undercover activist caller that the hospital subjects children 16 years old and younger to “gender-affirming hysterectomies. Federal judge upholds US Marines' right to refuse COVID vaccines for religious reasons Join Email list! GRNonline.com/CDT GRN to 42828 What's Concerning Us – Sounding the Alarm on Anti-Catholic Violence? Guest Seg. Debunking the 1619 Project with Dr. Mary Grabar. Who is Howard Zin and why does he matter? What is the 1619 project and what are they teaching? CTR & Racism - why teach this? Slave-Occracy - Marxist Debunking the myths American Rev. To preserve slavery? Africans STILL being enslaved? Revisionist History Christopher Columbus – greedy capitalist? Also... hated Recyling? 2nd Guest Seg. Tito Edwards – BigPulpit.com Cardinal Stats and Charts, Summer 2022 New Cardinals Nuns and UFO's? Joe Social Media IG: @TheCatholicHack Twitter: @Catholic_Hack Facebook: Joe McClane YouTube: Joe McClane Adrian Social Media IG: @ffonze Twitter: @AdrianFonze Facebook: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Catholic Conversations Rudy Social Media IG: @ydursolrac Youtube: Glad Trad Podcast Visit our website to learn more about us, find a local GRN radio station, a schedule of our programming and so much more. http://grnonline.com/

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Detective Monday- Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Yankee Pride Matte (10-14-1950)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 30:38


Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar is a radio drama that aired on CBS Radio from February 18, 1949 to September 30, 1962. The first several seasons imagined protagonist Johnny Dollar as a private investigator drama , with Charles Russell, Edmond O'Brien and John Lund portraying Dollar in succession over the years. In 1955 after a yearlong hiatus, the series came back in its best-known incarnation with Bob Bailey starring in "the transcribed adventures of the man with the action-packed expense account – America's fabulous freelance insurance investigator." There were 809 episodes (plus two not-for-broadcast auditions) in the 12-year run, and more than 710 still exist today. Jim Cox's book American Radio Networks: A History cites "886 total performances" which includes repeat performances. Format. The format best remembered was instituted by writer-director Jack Johnstone. Each case usually started with a phone call from an insurance adjuster, calling on Johnny to investigate an unusual claim: a suspicious death, an attempted fraud, a missing person, or other mysterious circumstances. Each story required Johnny to travel to some distant locale, usually within the United States but sometimes abroad, where he was almost always threatened with personal danger in the course of his investigations. He would compare notes with the police officials who had first investigated each strange occurrence, and followed every clue until he figured out what actually happened. Johnny's file on each case was usually referenced as a "matter," as in "The Silver Blue Matter" or "The Forbes Matter". Later episodes were more fanciful, with titles like "The Wayward Trout Matter" and "The Price of Fame Matter" (the latter featuring a rare guest-star appearance by Vincent Price as himself; here Price and Dollar team up to retrieve a painting stolen by Price's insurance agent). Johnny usually stuck to business, but would sometimes engage in romantic dalliances with women he encountered in his travels; later episodes gave Johnny a steady girlfriend, Betty Lewis. Johnny's precious recreational time was usually spent fishing, and it was not uncommon for Johnny's clients to exploit this favorite pastime in convincing him to take on a job near good fishing locations. His past was rarely mentioned, but Dollar in “The Bennett Matter” described himself as a four-year US Marine veteran who then worked as a police officer for a decade before changing careers to insurance investigation. In "The Blackburn Case" Dollar also refers to his time as a Pinkerton Detective. Each story was recounted in flashback, and every few minutes the action would be interrupted by Johnny listing a line item from his expense account, which served as an effective scene transition. Most of the expense account related to transportation, lodging, and meals, but no incidental expense was too small for Johnny to itemize, as in "Item nine, 10 cents. Aspirin. I needed them." The monetary amounts weren't always literal: the smallest line item Johnny ever recorded was "two cents: what I felt like" after a professional setback; the largest was "one million dollars" (the way he felt after finding a missing woman and her daughter in a snowbound cabin). The episodes generally finished with Johnny tallying up his expense account and traveling back to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was based. Sometimes Johnny would add a sardonic postscript under "Remarks," detailing the aftermath of the case. ("The Todd Matter," which especially disgusted Johnny, ended abruptly with "Remarks – nil!") In later seasons the program sometimes referred to itself, with other characters recognizing Dollar's voice from the radio; in the episode “The Salkoff Sequel Matter” Johnny's radio show becomes an important plot point.

Liberty Roundtable Podcast
Radio Show Hour 2 – 08/29/2022

Liberty Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 54:50


* Guest: Lowell Nelson - CampaignForLiberty.org - RonPaulInstitute.org * More Billions to Ukraine as America Falls Apart - Ron Paul. * Roughly 200,000 illegals crossed the border in the US in July - We throw money at Ukraine to help them protect their borders, yet we do not secure our own. The $775M that went to Ukraine last week was the 18th weapons package to Ukraine in six months. * Defend the Guard. Uphold the Constitution. * President George Washington was unambiguous, "It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliance with any portion of the foreign world." * President Jefferson was equally explicit, "Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none." * President Monroe formalized that policy. The Monroe Doctrine's first point stated the US wouln't interfere in the internal affairs or wars of other nations. * CDC Changes Course on COVID Strategies - TheTruthAboutVaccines.com * For the past two years, people who refused the mRNA gene therapy clot shots have been maligned and mistreated. They have been turned away from gyms, restaurants, theaters, and sports arenas. They couldn't visit their loved ones in nursing homes. And some were fired from their jobs for refusing the jab. * Now, the CDC has changed its tune. In a report issued earlier this month, the CDC was careful not to openly admit they were wrong, but tacitly (reading between the lines) they did. * CDC: “As SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, continues to circulate globally, high levels of vaccine- and infection-induced immunity and the availability of effective treatments and prevention tools have substantially reduced the risk for medically significant COVID-19 illness (severe acute illness and post–COVID-19 conditions) and associated hospitalization and death.” * "A California appeals court recently ruled that all mandates forcing churches to close are unconstitutional, while a federal judge in Ohio blocked the military's vaccine mandate nationwide for Air Force, Space Force, and Air National Guard members who had requested religious exemptions. - A federal judge in Florida ordered class action relief and granted a classwide preliminary injunction against the federal government's COVID shot mandate for all US Marines – whether they are active or in reserve service. * The CDC has also removed the recommendation that people quarantine based on contact with someone who is or might be infected. They've also completely abandoned the 6-foot social distancing rule. * Remember that most of what we heard in the past two and a half years was propaganda--a propaganda machine working as a precursor to compulsory vaccination mandates around the world. Fear was manufactured, opposition silenced, and ordinary people so polarized that civil discussion is muted. * "It's essential that we stop believing the lies. It's essential that we refuse to comply. It's essential that we speak out the truth, no matter the risks." * Missouri AG Condemns FBI's Illegal Attempts to Harvest Concealed Carry Permit Information * “The FBI has absolutely no business poking around in the private information of those who have obtained a concealed carry permit in Missouri,” said Attorney General Schmitt. - “The Second Amendment rights of Missourians will absolutely not be infringed on my watch. I will use the full power of my Office to stop the FBI, which has become relentlessly politicized and has virtually no credibility, from illegally prying around in the personal information of Missouri gun owners.” * Parents Overwhelm AZ DoE Website To Apply For ESA Credit Up To $7K. * Better would be nonrefundable) tuition tax credit for parents and grandparents and businesses--anyone or any business that pays for the education of students in your state.

KONCRETE Podcast
#150 - African Terror Groups Are Hunting This US Marine | Ryan Tate

KONCRETE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 150:07 Very Popular


Ryan Tate is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and co-founder of Veterans Empowered to Protect African Wildlife (VETPAW). https://vetpaw.org JOIN OUR KULT: https://bit.ly/koncretepatreon Danny https://www.instagram.com/jonesdanny https://twitter.com/jonesdanny Koncrete http://twitter.com/koncrete http://instagram.com/koncrete

The Lunar Society
37: Steve Hsu - Intelligence, Embryo Selection, & The Future of Humanity

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 141:27


Steve Hsu is a Professor of Theoretical Physics at Michigan State University and cofounder of the company Genomic Prediction.We go deep into the weeds on how embryo selection can make babies healthier and smarter. Steve also explains the advice Richard Feynman gave him to pick up girls, the genetics of aging and intelligence, & the psychometric differences between shape rotators and wordcels.Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform.Subscribe to find out about future episodes!Read the full transcript here.Follow Steve on Twitter. Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.Please share if you enjoyed this episode! Helps out a ton!Timestamps(0:00:14) - Feynman’s advice on picking up women(0:11:46) - Embryo selection(0:24:19) - Why hasn't natural selection already optimized humans?(0:34:13) - Aging(0:43:18) - First Mover Advantage(0:53:49) - Genomics in dating(1:00:31) - Ancestral populations(1:07:58) - Is this eugenics?(1:15:59) - Tradeoffs to intelligence(1:25:01) - Consumer preferences(1:30:14) - Gwern(1:34:35) - Will parents matter?(1:45:25) - Word cells and shape rotators(1:57:29) - Bezos and brilliant physicists(2:10:23) - Elite educationTranscriptDwarkesh Patel  0:00  Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Steve Hsu. Steve, thanks for coming on the podcast. I'm excited about this.Steve Hsu  0:04  Hey, it's my pleasure! I'm excited too and I just want to say I've listened to some of your earlier interviews and thought you were very insightful, which is why I was excited to have a conversation with you.Dwarkesh Patel 0:14That means a lot for me to hear you say because I'm a big fan of your podcast.Feynman’s advice on picking up womenDwarkesh Patel  0:17  So my first question is: “What advice did Richard Feynman give you about picking up girls?”Steve Hsu  0:24   Haha, wow! So one day in the spring of my senior year, I was walking across campus and saw Feynman coming toward me. We knew each other from various things—it's a small campus, I was a physics major and he was my hero–– so I'd known him since my first year. He sees me, and he's got this Long Island or New York borough accent and says, "Hey, Hsu!"  I'm like, "Hi, Professor Feynman." We start talking. And he says to me, "Wow, you're a big guy." Of course, I was much bigger back then because I was a linebacker on the Caltech football team. So I was about 200 pounds and slightly over 6 feet tall. I was a gym rat at the time and I was much bigger than him. He said, "Steve, I got to ask you something." Feynman was born in 1918, so he's not from the modern era. He was going through graduate school when the Second World War started. So, he couldn't understand the concept of a health club or a gym. This was the 80s and was when Gold's Gym was becoming a world national franchise. There were gyms all over the place like 24-Hour Fitness. But, Feynman didn't know what it was. He's a fascinating guy. He says to me, "What do you guys do there? Is it just a thing to meet girls? Or is it really for training? Do you guys go there to get buff?" So, I started explaining to him that people are there to get big, but people are also checking out the girls. A lot of stuff is happening at the health club or the weight room. Feynman grills me on this for a long time. And one of the famous things about Feynman is that he has a laser focus. So if there's something he doesn't understand and wants to get to the bottom of it, he will focus on you and start questioning you and get to the bottom of it. That's the way his brain worked. So he did that to me for a while because he didn't understand lifting weights and everything. In the end, he says to me, "Wow, Steve, I appreciate that. Let me give you some good advice."Then, he starts telling me how to pick up girls—which he's an expert on. He says to me, "I don't know how much girls like guys that are as big as you." He thought it might be a turn-off. "But you know what, you have a nice smile." So that was the one compliment he gave me. Then, he starts to tell me that it's a numbers game. You have to be rational about it. You're at an airport lounge, or you're at a bar. It's Saturday night in Pasadena or Westwood, and you're talking to some girl. He says, "You're never going to see her again. This is your five-minute interaction. Do what you have to do. If she doesn't like you, go to the next one." He also shares some colorful details. But, the point is that you should not care what they think of you. You're trying to do your thing. He did have a reputation at Caltech as a womanizer, and I could go into that too but I heard all this from the secretaries.Dwarkesh Patel  4:30  With the students or only the secretaries? Steve Hsu  4:35  Secretaries! Well mostly secretaries. They were almost all female at that time. He had thought about this a lot, and thought of it as a numbers game. The PUA guys (pick-up artists) will say, “Follow the algorithm, and whatever happens, it's not a reflection on your self-esteem. It's just what happened. And you go on to the next one.” That was the advice he was giving me, and he said other things that were pretty standard: Be funny, be confident—just basic stuff. Steve Hu: But the main thing I remember was the operationalization of it as an algorithm. You shouldn’t internalize whatever happens if you get rejected, because that hurts. When we had to go across the bar to talk to that girl (maybe it doesn’t happen in your generation), it was terrifying. We had to go across the bar and talk to some lady! It’s loud and you’ve got a few minutes to make your case. Nothing is scarier than walking up to the girl and her friends. Feynman was telling me to train yourself out of that. You're never going to see them again, the face space of humanity is so big that you'll probably never re-encounter them again. It doesn't matter. So, do your best. Dwarkesh Patel  6:06  Yeah, that's interesting because.. I wonder whether he was doing this in the 40’–– like when he was at that age, was he doing this? I don't know what the cultural conventions were at the time. Were there bars in the 40s where you could just go ahead and hit on girls or? Steve Hsu  6:19  Oh yeah absolutely. If you read literature from that time, or even a little bit earlier like Hemingway or John O'Hara, they talk about how men and women interacted in bars and stuff in New York City. So, that was much more of a thing back than when compared to your generation. That's what I can’t figure out with my kids! What is going on? How do boys and girls meet these days? Back in the day, the guy had to do all the work. It was the most terrifying thing you could do, and you had  to train yourself out of that.Dwarkesh Patel  6:57  By the way, for the context for the audience, when Feynman says you were a big guy, you were a football player at Caltech, right? There's a picture of you on your website, maybe after college or something, but you look pretty ripped. Today, it seems more common because of the gym culture. But I don’t know about back then. I don't know how common that body physique was.Steve Hsu  7:24  It’s amazing that you asked this question. I'll tell you a funny story. One of the reasons Feynman found this so weird was because of the way body-building entered the United States.  They  were regarded as freaks and homosexuals at first. I remember swimming and football in high school (swimming is different because it's international) and in swimming, I picked up a lot of advanced training techniques from the Russians and East Germans. But football was more American and not very international. So our football coach used to tell us not to lift weights when we were in junior high school because it made you slow. “You’re no good if you’re bulky.” “You gotta be fast in football.” Then, something changed around the time I was in high school–the coaches figured it out. I began lifting weights since I was an age group swimmer, like maybe age 12 or 14. Then, the football coaches got into it mainly because the University of Nebraska had a famous strength program that popularized it.At the time, there just weren't a lot of big guys. The people who knew how to train were using what would be considered “advanced knowledge” back in the 80s. For example, they’d know how to do a split routine or squat on one day and do upper body on the next day–– that was considered advanced knowledge at that time. I remember once.. I had an injury, and I was in the trainer's room at the Caltech athletic facility. The lady was looking at my quadriceps. I’d pulled a muscle, and she was looking at the quadriceps right above your kneecap. If you have well-developed quads, you'd have a bulge, a bump right above your cap. And she was looking at it from this angle where she was in front of me, and she was looking at my leg from the front. She's like, “Wow, it's swollen.” And I was like, “That's not the injury. That's my quadricep!” And she was a trainer! So, at that time, I could probably squat 400 pounds. So I was pretty strong and had big legs. The fact that the trainer didn't really understand what well-developed anatomy was supposed to look like blew my mind!So anyway, we've come a long way. This isn't one of these things where you have to be old to have any understanding of how this stuff evolved over the last 30-40 years.Dwarkesh Patel  10:13  But, I wonder if that was a phenomenon of that particular time or if people were not that muscular throughout human history. You hear stories of  Roman soldiers who are carrying 80 pounds for 10 or 20 miles a day. I mean, there's a lot of sculptures in the ancient world, or not that ancient, but the people look like they have a well-developed musculature.Steve Hsu  10:34  So the Greeks were very special because they were the first to think about the word gymnasium. It was a thing called the Palaestra, where they were trained in wrestling and boxing. They were the first people who were seriously into physical culture specific training for athletic competition.Even in the 70s, when I was a little kid, I look back at the guys from old photos and they were skinny. So skinny! The guys who went off and fought World War Two, whether they were on the German side, or the American side, were like 5’8-5’9 weighing around 130 pounds - 140 pounds. They were much different from what modern US Marines would look like. So yeah, physical culture was a new thing. Of course, the Romans and the Greeks had it to some degree, but it was lost for a long time. And, it was just coming back to the US when I was growing up. So if you were reasonably lean (around 200 pounds) and you could bench over 300.. that was pretty rare back in those days.Embryo selectionDwarkesh Patel  11:46  Okay, so let's talk about your company Genomic Prediction. Do you want to talk about this company and give an intro about what it is?Steve Hsu  11:55  Yeah. So there are two ways to introduce it. One is the scientific view. The other is the IVF view. I can do a little of both. So scientifically, the issue is that we have more and more genomic data. If you give me the genomes of a bunch of people and then give me some information about each person, ex. Do they have diabetes? How tall are they? What's their IQ score?  It’s a natural AI machine learning problem to figure out which features in the DNA variation between people are predictive of whatever variable you're trying to predict.This is the ancient scientific question of how you relate the genotype of the organism (the specific DNA pattern), to the phenotype (the expressed characteristics of the organism). If you think about it, this is what biology is! We had the molecular revolution and figured out that it’s people's DNA that stores the information which is passed along. Evolution selects on the basis of the variation in the DNA that’s expressed as phenotype, as that phenotype affects fitness/reproductive success. That's the whole ballgame for biology. As a physicist who's trained in mathematics and computation, I'm lucky that I arrived on the scene at a time when we're going to solve this basic fundamental problem of biology through brute force, AI, and machine learning. So that's how I got into this. Now you ask as an entrepreneur, “Okay, fine Steve, you're doing this in your office with your postdocs and collaborators on your computers. What use is it?” The most direct application of this is in the following setting: Every year around the world, millions of families go through IVF—typically because they're having some fertility issues, and also mainly because the mother is in her 30s or maybe 40s. In the process of IVF, they use hormone stimulation to produce more eggs. Instead of one per cycle, depending on the age of the woman, they might produce anywhere between five to twenty, or even sixty to a hundred eggs for young women who are hormonally stimulated (egg donors).From there, it’s trivial because men produce sperm all the time. You can fertilize eggs pretty easily in a little dish, and get a bunch of embryos that grow. They start growing once they're fertilized. The problem is that if you're a family and produce more embryos than you’re going to use, you have the embryo choice problem. You have to figure out which embryo to choose out of  say, 20 viable embryos. The most direct application of the science that I described is that we can now genotype those embryos from a small biopsy. I can tell you things about the embryos. I could tell you things like your fourth embryo being an outlier. For breast cancer risk, I would think carefully about using number four. Number ten is an outlier for cardiovascular disease risk. You might want to think about not using that one. The other ones are okay. So, that’s what genomic prediction does. We work with 200 or 300 different IVF clinics in six continents.Dwarkesh Patel  15:46  Yeah, so the super fascinating thing about this is that the diseases you talked about—or at least their risk profiles—are polygenic. You can have thousands of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) determining whether you will get a disease. So, I'm curious to learn how you were able to transition to this space and how your knowledge of mathematics and physics was able to help you figure out how to make sense of all this data.Steve Hsu  16:16  Yeah, that's a great question. So again, I was stressing the fundamental scientific importance of all this stuff. If you go into a slightly higher level of detail—which you were getting at with the individual SNPs, or polymorphisms—there are individual locations in the genome, where I might differ from you, and you might differ from another person. Typically, each pair of individuals will differ at a few million places in the genome—and that controls why I look a little different than youA lot of times, theoretical physicists have a little spare energy and they get tired of thinking about quarks or something. They want to maybe dabble in biology, or they want to dabble in computer science, or some other field. As theoretical physicists, we always feel, “Oh, I have a lot of horsepower, I can figure a lot out.” (For example, Feynman helped design the first parallel processors for thinking machines.) I have to figure out which problems I can make an impact on because I can waste a lot of time. Some people spend their whole lives studying one problem, one molecule or something, or one biological system. I don't have time for that, I'm just going to jump in and jump out. I'm a physicist. That's a typical attitude among theoretical physicists. So, I had to confront sequencing costs about ten years ago because I knew the rate at which they were going down. I could anticipate that we’d get to the day (today) when millions of genomes with good phenotype data became available for analysis. A typical training run might involve almost a million genomes, or half a million genomes. The mathematical question then was: What is the most effective algorithm given a set of genomes and phenotype information to build the best predictor?  This can be  boiled down to a very well-defined machine learning problem. It turns out, for some subset of algorithms, there are theorems— performance guarantees that give you a bound on how much data you need to capture almost all of the variation in the features. I spent a fair amount of time, probably a year or two, studying these very famous results, some of which were proved by a guy named Terence Tao, a Fields medalist. These are results on something called compressed sensing: a penalized form of high dimensional regression that tries to build sparse predictors. Machine learning people might notice L1-penalized optimization. The very first paper we wrote on this was to prove that using accurate genomic data and these very abstract theorems in combination could predict how much data you need to “solve” individual human traits. We showed that you would need at least a few hundred thousand individuals and their genomes and their heights to solve for height as a phenotype. We proved that in a paper using all this fancy math in 2012. Then around 2017, when we got a hold of half a million genomes, we were able to implement it in practical terms and show that our mathematical result from some years ago was correct. The transition from the low performance of the predictor to high performance (which is what we call a “phase transition boundary” between those two domains) occurred just where we said it was going to occur. Some of these technical details are not understood even by practitioners in computational genomics who are not quite mathematical. They don't understand these results in our earlier papers and don't know why we can do stuff that other people can't, or why we can predict how much data we'll need to do stuff. It's not well-appreciated, even in the field. But when the big AI in our future in the singularity looks back and says, “Hey, who gets the most credit for this genomics revolution that happened in the early 21st century?”, they're going to find these papers on the archive where we proved this was possible, and how five years later, we actually did it. Right now it's under-appreciated, but the future AI––that Roko's Basilisk AI–will look back and will give me a little credit for it. Dwarkesh Patel  21:03  Yeah, I was a little interested in this a few years ago. At that time, I looked into how these polygenic risk scores were calculated. Basically, you find the correlation between the phenotype and the alleles that correlate with it. You add up how many copies of these alleles you have, what the correlations are, and you do a weighted sum of that. So that seemed very simple, especially in an era where we have all this machine learning, but it seems like they're getting good predictive results out of this concept. So, what is the delta between how good you can go with all this fancy mathematics versus a simple sum of correlations?Steve Hsu  21:43  You're right that the ultimate models that are used when you've done all the training, and when the dust settles, are straightforward. They’re pretty simple and have an additive structure. Basically, I either assign a nonzero weight to this particular region in the genome, or I don't. Then, I need to know what the weighting is, but then the function is a linear function or additive function of the state of your genome at some subset of positions. The ultimate model that you get is straightforward. Now, if you go back ten years, when we were doing this, there were lots of claims that it was going to be super nonlinear—that it wasn't going to be additive the way I just described it. There were going to be lots of interaction terms between regions. Some biologists are still convinced that's true, even though we already know we have predictors that don't have interactions.The other question, which is more technical, is whether in any small region of your genome, the state of the individual variants is highly correlated because you inherit them in chunks. You need to figure out which one you want to use. You don't want to activate all of them because you might be overcounting. So that's where these L-1 penalization sparse methods force the predictor to be sparse. That is a key step. Otherwise, you might overcount. If you do some simple regression math, you might have 10-10 different variants close by that have roughly the same statistical significance.But, you don't know which one of those tends to be used, and you might be overcounting effects or undercounting effects. So, you end up doing a high-dimensional optimization, where you grudgingly activate a SNP when the signal is strong enough. Once you activate that one, the algorithm has to be smart enough to penalize the other ones nearby and not activate them because you're over counting effects if you do that. There's a little bit of subtlety in it. But, the main point you made is that the ultimate predictors, which are very simple and addictive—sum over effect sizes and time states—work well. That’s related to a deep statement about the additive structure of the genetic architecture of individual differences. In other words, it's weird that the ways that I differ from you are merely just because I have more of something or you have less of something. It’s not like these things are interacting in some incredibly understandable way. That's a deep thing—which is not appreciated that much by biologists yet. But over time, they'll figure out something interesting here.Why hasn’t natural selection already optimized humans?Dwarkesh Patel  24:19  Right. I thought that was super fascinating, and I commented on that on Twitter. What is interesting about that is two things. One is that you have this fascinating evolutionary argument about why that would be the case that you might want to explain. The second is that it makes you wonder if becoming more intelligent is just a matter of turning on certain SNPs. It's not a matter of all this incredible optimization being like solving a sudoku puzzle or anything. If that's the case, then why hasn't the human population already been selected to be maxed out on all these traits if it's just a matter of a bit flip?Steve Hsu  25:00  Okay, so the first issue is why is this genetic architecture so surprisingly simple? Again, we didn't know it would be simple ten years ago. So when I was checking to see whether this was a field that I should go into depending on our capabilities to make progress, we had to study the more general problem of the nonlinear possibilities. But eventually, we realized that most of the variance would probably be captured in an additive way. So, we could narrow down the problem quite a bit. There are evolutionary reasons for this. There’s a famous theorem by Fisher, the father of population genetics (aka. frequentist statistics). Fisher proved something called Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, which says that if you impose some selection pressure on a population, the rate at which that population responds to the selection pressure (lets say it’s the bigger rats that out-compete the smaller rats) then at what rate does the rat population start getting bigger? He showed that it's the additive variants that dominate the rate of evolution. It's easy to understand why if it's a nonlinear mechanism, you need to make the rat bigger. When you sexually reproduce, and that gets chopped apart, you might break the mechanism. Whereas, if each short allele has its own independent effect, you can inherit them without worrying about breaking the mechanisms. It was well known among a tiny theoretical population of biologists that adding variants was the dominant way that populations would respond to selection. That was already known. The other thing is that humans have been through a pretty tight bottleneck, and we're not that different from each other. It's very plausible that if I wanted to edit a human embryo, and make it into a frog, then there are all kinds of subtle nonlinear things I’d have to do. But all those identical nonlinear complicated subsystems are fixed in humans. You have the same system as I do. You have the not human, not frog or ape, version of that region of DNA, and so do I. But the small ways we differ are mostly little additive switches. That's this deep scientific discovery from over the last 5-10 years of work in this area. Now, you were asking about why evolution hasn't completely “optimized” all traits in humans already. I don't know if you’ve ever done deep learning or high-dimensional optimization, but in that high-dimensional space, you're often moving on a slightly-tilted surface. So, you're getting gains, but it's also flat. Even though you scale up your compute or data size by order of magnitude, you don't move that much farther. You get some gains, but you're never really at the global max of anything in these high dimensional spaces. I don't know if that makes sense to you. But it's pretty plausible to me that two things are important here. One is that evolution has not had that much time to optimize humans. The environment that humans live in changed radically in the last 10,000 years. For a while, we didn't have agriculture, and now we have agriculture. Now, we have a swipe left if you want to have sex tonight. The environment didn't stay fixed. So, when you say fully optimized for the environment, what do you mean? The ability to diagonalize matrices might not have been very adaptive 10,000 years ago. It might not even be adaptive now. But anyway, it's a complicated question that one can't reason naively about. “If God wanted us to be 10 feet tall, we'd be 10 feet tall.” Or “if it's better to be smart, my brain would be *this* big or something.” You can't reason naively about stuff like that.Dwarkesh Patel  29:04  I see. Yeah.. Okay. So I guess it would make sense then that for example, with certain health risks, the thing that makes you more likely to get diabetes or heart disease today might be… I don't know what the pleiotropic effect of that could be. But maybe that's not that important one year from now.Steve Hsu  29:17  Let me point out that most of the diseases we care about now—not the rare ones, but the common ones—manifest when you're 50-60 years old. So there was never any evolutionary advantage of being super long-lived. There's even a debate about whether the grandparents being around to help raise the kids lifts the fitness of the family unit.But, most of the time in our evolutionary past, humans just died fairly early. So, many of these diseases would never have been optimized against evolution. But, we see them now because we live under such good conditions, we can regulate people over 80 or 90 years.Dwarkesh Patel  29:57  Regarding the linearity and additivity point, I was going to make the analogy that– and I'm curious if this is valid– but when you're programming, one thing that's good practice is to have all the implementation details in separate function calls or separate programs or something, and then have your main loop of operation just be called different functions like, “Do this, do that”, so that you can easily comment stuff away or change arguments. This seemed very similar to that where by turning these names on and off, you can change what the next offering will be. And, you don't have to worry about actually implementing whatever the underlying mechanism is. Steve Hsu  30:41  Well, what you said is related to what Fisher proved in his theorems. Which is that, if suddenly, it becomes advantageous to have X, (like white fur instead of black fur) or something, it would be best if there were little levers that you could move somebody from black fur to white fur continuously by modifying those switches in an additive way. It turns out that for sexually reproducing species where the DNA gets scrambled up in every generation, it's better to have switches of that kind. The other point related to your software analogy is that there seem to be modular, fairly modular things going on in the genome. When we looked at it, we were the first group to have, initially, 20 primary disease conditions we had decent predictors for. We started looking carefully at just something as trivial as the overlap of my sparsely trained predictor. It turns on and uses *these* features for diabetes, but it uses *these* features for schizophrenia. It’s the stupidest metric, it’s literally just how much overlap or variance accounted for overlap is there between pairs of disease conditions. It's very modest. It's the opposite of what naive biologists would say when they talk about pleiotropy.They're just disjoint! Disjoint regions of your genome that govern certain things. And why not? You have 3 billion base pairs—there's a lot you can do in there. There's a lot of information there. If you need 1000 to control diabetes risk, I estimated you could easily have 1000 roughly independent traits that are just disjoint in their genetic dependencies. So, if you think about D&D,  your strength, decks, wisdom, intelligence, and charisma—those are all disjoint. They're all just independent variables. So it's like a seven-dimensional space that your character lives in. Well, there's enough information in the few million differences between you and me. There's enough for 1000-dimensional space of variation.“Oh, how considerable is your spleen?” My spleen is a little bit smaller, yours is a little bit bigger - that can vary independently of your IQ. Oh, it's a big surprise. The size of your spleen can vary independently of the size of your big toe. If you do information theory, there are about 1000 different parameters, and I can vary independently with the number of variants I have between you and me. Because you understand some information theory, it’s trivial to explain, but try explaining to a biologist, you won't get very far.Dwarkesh Patel  33:27  Yeah, yeah, do the log two of the number of.. is that basically how you do it? Yeah.Steve Hsu  33:33  Okay. That's all it is. I mean, it's in our paper. We look at how many variants typically account for most of the variation for any of these major traits, and then imagine that they're mostly disjoint. Then it’s just all about: how many variants you need to independently vary 1000 traits? Well, a few million differences between you and me are enough. It's very trivial math. Once you understand the base and how to reason about information theory, then it's very trivial. But, it ain’t trivial for theoretical biologists, as far as I can tell.AgingDwarkesh Patel  34:13  But the result is so interesting because I remember reading in The Selfish Gene that, as he (Dawkins) hypothesizes that the reason we could be aging is an antagonistic clash. There's something that makes you healthier when you're young and fertile that makes you unhealthy when you're old. Evolution would have selected for such a trade-off because when you're young and fertile, evolution and your genes care about you. But, if there's enough space in the genome —where these trade-offs are not necessarily necessary—then this could be a bad explanation for aging, or do you think I'm straining the analogy?Steve Hsu  34:49  I love your interviews because the point you're making here is really good. So Dawkins, who is an evolutionary theorist from the old school when they had almost no data—you can imagine how much data they had compared to today—he would tell you a story about a particular gene that maybe has a positive effect when you're young, but it makes you age faster. So, there's a trade-off. We know about things like sickle cell anemia. We know stories about that. No doubt, some stories are true about specific variants in your genome. But that's not the general story. The general story you only discovered in the last five years is that thousands of variants control almost every trait and those variants tend to be disjoint from the ones that control the other trait. They weren't wrong, but they didn't have the big picture.Dwarkesh Patel  35:44  Yeah, I see. So, you had this paper, it had polygenic, health index, general health, and disease risk.. You showed that with ten embryos, you could increase disability-adjusted life years by four, which is a massive increase if you think about it. Like what if you could live four years longer and in a healthy state? Steve Hsu  36:05  Yeah, what's the value of that? What would you pay to buy that for your kid?Dwarkesh Patel  36:08  Yeah. But, going back to the earlier question about the trade-offs and why this hasn't already been selected for,  if you're right and there's no trade-off to do this, just living four years older (even if that's beyond your fertility) just being a grandpa or something seems like an unmitigated good. So why hasn’t this kind of assurance hasn't already been selected for? Steve Hsu  36:35  I’m glad you're asking about these questions because these are things that people are very confused about, even in the field. First of all, let me say that when you have a trait that's controlled by  10,000 variants (eg. height is controlled by order 10,000 variants and probably cognitive ability a little bit more), the square root of 10,000 is 100.  So, if I could come to this little embryo, and I want to give it one extra standard deviation of height, I only need to edit 100. I only need to flip 100 minus variance to plus variance. These are very rough numbers. But, one standard deviation is the square root of “n”. If I flip a coin “n” times, I want a better outcome in terms of the number of ratio heads to tails. I want to increase it by one standard deviation. I only need to flip the square root of “n” heads because if you flip a lot, you will get a narrow distribution that peaks around half, and the width of that distribution is the square root of “n”. Once I tell you, “Hey, your height is controlled by 10,000 variants, and I only need to flip 100 genetic variants to make you one standard deviation for a male,” (that would be three inches tall, two and a half or three inches taller), you suddenly realize, “Wait a minute, there are a lot of variants up for grabs there. If I could flip 500 variants in your genome, I would make you five standard deviations taller, you'd be seven feet tall.”  I didn't even have to do that much work, and there's a lot more variation where that came from. I could have flipped even more because I only flipped 500 out of 10,000, right? So, there's this  quasi-infinite well of variation that evolution or genetic engineers could act on. Again, the early population geneticists who bred corn and animals know this. This is something they explicitly know about because they've done calculations. Interestingly, the human geneticists who are mainly concerned with diseases and stuff, are often unfamiliar with the math that the animal breeders already know. You might be interested to know that the milk you drink comes from heavily genetically-optimized cows bred artificially using almost exactly the same technologies that we use at genomic prediction. But, they're doing it to optimize milk production and stuff like this. So there is a big well of variance. It's a consequence of the trait's poly genicity. On the longevity side of things, it does look like people could “be engineered” to live much longer by flipping the variants that make the risk for diseases that shorten your life. The question is then “Why didn't evolution give us life spans of thousands of years?” People in the Bible used to live for thousands of years. Why don't we? I mean, *chuckles* that probably didn’t happen. But the question is, you have this very high dimensional space, and you have a fitness function. How big is the slope in a particular direction of that fitness function? How much more successful reproductively would Joe caveman have been if he lived to be 150 instead of only, 100 or something? There just hasn't been enough time to explore this super high dimensional space. That's the actual answer. But now, we have the technology, and we're going to f*****g explore it fast. That's the point that the big lightbulb should go off. We’re mapping this space out now. Pretty confident in 10 years or so, with the CRISPR gene editing technologies will be ready for massively multiplexed edits. We'll start navigating in this high-dimensional space as much as we like. So that's the more long-term consequence of the scientific insights.Dwarkesh Patel  40:53  Yeah, that's super interesting. What do you think will be the plateau for a trait of how long you’ll live? With the current data and techniques, you think it could be significantly greater than that?Steve Hsu  41:05  We did a simple calculation—which amazingly gives the correct result. This polygenic predictor that we built (which isn't perfect yet but will improve as we gather more data) is used in selecting embryos today. If you asked, out of a billion people, “What's the best person typically, what would their score be on this index and then how long would they be predicted to live?”’ It's about 120 years. So it's spot on. One in a billion types of person lives to be 120 years old. How much better can you do? Probably a lot better. I don't want to speculate, but other nonlinear effects, things that we're not taking into account will start to play a role at some point. So, it's a little bit hard to estimate what the true limiting factors will be. But one super robust statement, and I'll stand by it, debate any Nobel Laureate in biology who wants to discuss it even,  is that there are many variants available to be selected or edited. There's no question about that. That's been established in animal breeding in plant breeding for a long time now. If you want a chicken that grows to be *this* big, instead of *this* big, you can do it. You can do it if you want a cow that produces 10 times or 100 times more milk than a regular cow. The egg you ate for breakfast this morning, those bio-engineered chickens that lay almost an egg a day… A chicken in the wild lays an egg a month. How the hell did we do that? By genetic engineering. That's how we did it. Dwarkesh Patel  42:51  Yeah. That was through brute artificial selection. No fancy machine learning there.Steve Hsu  42:58  Last ten years, it's gotten sophisticated machine learning genotyping of chickens. Artificial insemination, modeling of the traits using ML last ten years. For cow breeding, it's done by ML. First Mover AdvantageDwarkesh Patel  43:18  I had no idea. That's super interesting. So, you mentioned that you're accumulating data and improving your techniques over time, is there a first mover advantage to a genomic prediction company like this? Or is it whoever has the newest best algorithm for going through the biobank data? Steve Hsu  44:16  That's another super question. For the entrepreneurs in your audience, I would say in the short run, if you ask what the valuation of GPB should be? That's how the venture guys would want me to answer the question. There is a huge first mover advantage because they're important in the channel relationships between us and the clinics. Nobody will be able to get in there very easily when they come later because we're developing trust and an extensive track record with clinics worldwide—and we're well-known. So could 23andme or some company with a huge amount of data—if they were to get better AI/ML people working on this—blow us away a little bit and build better predictors because they have much more data than we do? Possibly, yes. Now, we have had core expertise in doing this work for years that we're just good at it. Even though we don't have as much data as 23andme, our predictors might still be better than theirs. I'm out there all the time, working with biobanks all around the world. I don't want to say all the names, but other countries are trying to get my hands on as much data as possible.But, there may not be a lasting advantage beyond the actual business channel connections to that particular market. It may not be a defensible, purely scientific moat around the company. We have patents on specific technologies about how to do the genotyping or error correction on the embryo, DNA, and stuff like this. We do have patents on stuff like that. But this general idea of who will best predict human traits from DNA? It's unclear who's going to be the winner in that race. Maybe it'll be the Chinese government in 50 years? Who knows?Dwarkesh Patel  46:13  Yeah, that's interesting. If you think about a company Google, theoretically, it's possible that you could come up with a better algorithm than PageRank and beat them. But it seems like the engineer at Google is going to come up with whatever edge case or whatever improvement is possible.Steve Hsu  46:28  That's exactly what I would say. PageRank is deprecated by now. But, even if somebody else comes up with a somewhat better algorithm if they have a little bit more data, if you have a team doing this for a long time and you're focused and good, it's still tough to beat you, especially if you have a lead in the market.Dwarkesh Patel  46:50  So, are you guys doing the actual biopsy? Or is it just that they upload the genome, and you're the one processing just giving recommendations? Is it an API call, basically?Steve Hsu  47:03  It's great, I love your question. It is totally standard. Every good IVF clinic in the world regularly takes embryo biopsies. So that's standard. There’s a lab tech doing that. Okay. Then, they take the little sample, put it on ice, and ship it. The DNA as a molecule is exceptionally robust and stable. My other startup solves crimes that are 100 years old from DNA that we get from some semen stain on some rape victim, serial killer victims bra strap, we've done stuff that.Dwarkesh Patel  47:41  Jack the Ripper, when are we going to solve that mystery?Steve Hsu  47:44  If they can give me samples, we can get into that. For example, we just learned that you could recover DNA pretty well if someone licks a stamp and puts on their correspondence. If you can do Neanderthals, you can do a lot to solve crimes. In the IVF workflow, our lab, which is in New Jersey, can service every clinic in the world because they take the biopsy, put it in a standard shipping container, and send it to us. We’re actually genotyping DNA in our lab, but we've trained a few of the bigger  clinics to do the genotyping on their site. At that point, they upload some data into the cloud and then they get back some stuff from our platform. And at that point it's going to be the whole world, every human who wants their kid to be healthy and get the best they can– that data is going to come up to us, and the report is going to come back down to their IVF physician. Dwarkesh Patel  48:46  Which is great if you think that there's a potential that this technology might get regulated in some way, you could go to Mexico or something, have them upload the genome (you don't care what they upload it from), and then get the recommendations there. Steve Hsu  49:05  I think we’re going to evolve to a point where we are going to be out of the wet part of this business, and only in the cloud and bit part of this business. No matter where it is, the clinics are going to have a sequencer, which is *this* big, and their tech is going to quickly upload and retrieve the report for the physician three seconds later. Then, the parents are going to look at it on their phones or whatever. We’re basically there with some clinics. It’s going to be tough to regulate because it’s just this. You have the bits and you’re in some repressive, terrible country that doesn’t allow you to select for some special traits that people are nervous about, but you can upload it to some vendor that’s in Singapore or some free country, and they give you the report back. Doesn’t have to be us, we don’t do the edgy stuff. We only do the health-related stuff right now. But, if you want to know how tall this embryo is going to be…I’ll tell you a mind-blower! When you do face recognition in AI, you're mapping someone's face into a parameter space on the order of hundreds of parameters, each of those parameters is super heritable. In other words, if I take two twins and photograph them, and the algorithm gives me the value of that parameter for twin one and two, they're very close. That's why I can't tell the two twins apart, and face recognition can ultimately tell them apart if it’s really good system. But you can conclude that almost all these parameters are identical for those twins. So it's highly heritable. We're going to get to a point soon where I can do the inverse problem where I have your DNA  and I predict each of those parameters in the face recognition algorithm and then reconstruct the face. If I say that when this embryo will be 16, that is what she will look like. When she's 32, this is what she's going to look like. I'll be able to do that, for sure. It's only an AI/ML problem right now. But basic biology is clearly going to work. So then you're going to be able to say, “Here's a report. Embryo four is so cute.” Before, we didn't know we wouldn't do that, but it will be possible. Dwarkesh Patel  51:37  Before we get married, you'll want to see what their genotype implies about their faces' longevity. It's interesting that you hear stories about these cartel leaders who will get plastic surgery or something to evade the law, you could have a check where you look at a lab and see if it matches the face you would have had five years ago when they caught you on tape.Steve Hsu  52:02  This is a little bit back to old-school Gattaca, but you don't even need the face! You can just take a few molecules of skin cells and phenotype them and know exactly who they are. I've had conversations with these spooky Intel folks. They're very interested in, “Oh, if some Russian diplomat comes in, and we think he's a spy, but he's with the embassy, and he has a coffee with me, and I save the cup and send it to my buddy at Langley, can we figure out who this guy is? And that he has a daughter who's going to Chote? Can do all that now.Dwarkesh Patel  52:49  If that's true, then in the future, world leaders will not want to eat anything or drink. They'll be wearing a hazmat suit to make sure they don't lose a hair follicle.Steve Hsu  53:04  The next time Pelosi goes, she will be in a spacesuit if she cares. Or the other thing is, they're going to give it. They're just going to be, “Yeah, my DNA is everywhere. If I'm a public figure, I can't track my DNA. It's all over.”Dwarkesh Patel  53:17  But the thing is, there's so much speculation that Putin might have cancer or something. If we have his DNA, we can see his probability of having cancer at age 70, or whatever he is, is 85%. So yeah, that’d be a very verified rumor. That would be interesting. Steve Hsu  53:33  I don't think that would be very definitive. I don't think we'll reach that point where you can say that Putin has cancer because of his DNA—which I could have known when he was an embryo. I don't think it's going to reach that level. But, we could say he is at high risk for a type of cancer. Genomics in datingDwarkesh Patel  53:49  In 50 or 100 years, if the majority of the population is doing this, and if the highly heritable diseases get pruned out of the population, does that mean we'll only be left with lifestyle diseases? So, you won't get breast cancer anymore, but you will still get fat or lung cancer from smoking?Steve Hsu  54:18  It's hard to discuss the asymptotic limit of what will happen here. I'm not very confident about making predictions like that. It could get to the point where everybody who's rich or has been through this stuff for a while, (especially if we get the editing working) is super low risk for all the top 20 killer diseases that have the most life expectancy impact. Maybe those people live to be 300 years old naturally. I don't think that's excluded at all. So, that's within the realm of possibility. But it's going to happen for a few lucky people like Elon Musk before it happens for shlubs like you and me. There are going to be very angry inequality protesters about the Trump grandchildren, who, models predict will live to be 200 years old. People are not going to be happy about that.Dwarkesh Patel  55:23  So interesting. So, one way to think about these different embryos is if you're producing multiple embryos, and you get to select from one of them, each of them has a call option, right? Therefore, you probably want to optimize for volatility as much, or if not more than just the expected value of the trait. So, I'm wondering if there are mechanisms where you can  increase the volatility in meiosis or some other process. You just got a higher variance, and you can select from the tail better.Steve Hsu  55:55  Well, I'll tell you something related, which is quite amusing. So I talked with some pretty senior people at the company that owns all the dating apps. So you can look up what company this is, but they own Tinder and Match. They’re kind of interested in perhaps including a special feature where you upload your genome instead of Tinder Gold / Premium.  And when you match- you can talk about how well you match the other person based on your genome. One person told me something shocking. Guys lie about their height on these apps. Dwarkesh Patel  56:41  I’m shocked, truly shocked hahaha. Steve Hsu  56:45  Suppose you could have a DNA-verified height. It would prevent gross distortions if someone claims they're 6’2 and they’re 5’9. The DNA could say that's unlikely. But no, the application to what you were discussing is more like, “Let's suppose that we're selecting on intelligence or something. Let's suppose that the regions where your girlfriend has all the plus stuff are complementary to the regions where you have your plus stuff. So, we could model that and say,  because of the complementarity structure of your genome in the regions that affect intelligence, you're very likely to have some super intelligent kids way above your, the mean of your you and your girlfriend's values. So, you could say things like it being better for you to marry that girl than another. As long as you go through embryo selection, we can throw out the bad outliers. That's all that's technically feasible. It's true that one of the earliest patent applications, they'll deny it now. What's her name? Gosh, the CEO of 23andme…Wojcicki, yeah. She'll deny it now. But, if you look in the patent database, one of the very earliest patents that 23andme filed when they were still a tiny startup was about precisely this: Advising parents about mating and how their kids would turn out and stuff like this. We don't even go that far in GP, we don't even talk about stuff like that, but they were thinking about it when they founded 23andme.Dwarkesh Patel  58:38  That is unbelievably interesting. By the way, this just occurred to me—it's supposed to be highly heritable, especially people in Asian countries, who have the experience of having grandparents that are much shorter than us, and then parents that are shorter than us, which suggests that  the environment has a big part to play in it malnutrition or something. So how do you square that our parents are often shorter than us with the idea that height is supposed to be super heritable.Steve Hsu  59:09  Another great observation. So the correct scientific statement is that we can predict height for people who will be born and raised in a favorable environment. In other words, if you live close to a McDonald's and you're able to afford all the food you want, then the height phenotype becomes super heritable because the environmental variation doesn't matter very much. But, you and I both know that people are much smaller if we return to where our ancestors came from, and also, if you look at how much food, calories, protein, and calcium they eat, it's different from what I ate and what you ate growing up. So we're never saying the environmental effects are zero. We're saying that for people raised in a particularly favorable environment, maybe the genes are capped on what can be achieved, and we can predict that. In fact, we have data from Asia, where you can see much bigger environmental effects. Age affects older people, for fixed polygenic scores on the trait are much shorter than younger people.Ancestral populationsDwarkesh Patel  1:00:31  Oh, okay. Interesting. That raises that next question I was about to ask: how applicable are these scores across different ancestral populations?Steve Hsu  1:00:44  Huge problem is that most of the data is from Europeans. What happens is that if you train a predictor in this ancestry group and go to a more distant ancestry group, there's a fall-off in the prediction quality. Again, this is a frontier question, so we don't know the answer for sure. But many people believe that there's a particular correlational structure in each population, where if I know the state of this SNP, I can predict the state of these neighboring SNPs. That is a product of that group's mating patterns and ancestry. Sometimes, the predictor, which is just using statistical power to figure things out, will grab one of these SNPs as a tag for the truly causal SNP in there. It doesn't know which one is genuinely causal, it is just grabbing a tag, but the tagging quality falls off if you go to another population (eg. This was a very good tag for the truly causal SNP in the British population. But it's not so good a tag in the South Asian population for the truly causal SNP, which we hypothesize is the same). It's the same underlying genetic architecture in these different ancestry groups. We don't know if that's a hypothesis. But even so, the tagging quality falls off. So my group spent a lot of our time looking at the performance of predictor training population A, and on distant population B, and modeling it trying to figure out trying to test hypotheses as to whether it's just the tagging decay that’s responsible for most of the faults. So all of this is an area of active investigation. It'll probably be solved in five years. The first big biobanks that are non-European are coming online. We're going to solve it in a number of years.Dwarkesh Patel  1:02:38  Oh, what does the solution look like?  Unless you can identify the causal mechanism by which each SNP is having an effect, how can you know that something is a tag or whether it's the actual underlying switch?Steve Hsu  1:02:54  The nature of reality will determine how this is going to go. So we don't truly  know if the  innate underlying biology is true. This is an amazing thing. People argue about human biodiversity and all this stuff, and we don't even know whether these specific mechanisms that predispose you to be tall or having heart disease are the same  in these different ancestry groups. We assume that it is, but we don't know that. As we get further away to Neanderthals or Homo Erectus, you might see that they have a slightly different architecture than we do. But let's assume that the causal structure is the same for South Asians and British people. Then it's a matter of improving the tags. How do I know if I don't know which one is causal? What do I mean by improving the tags? This is a machine learning problem. If there's a SNP, which is always coming up as very significant when I use it across multiple ancestry groups, maybe that one's casual. As I vary the tagging correlations in the neighborhood of that SNP, I always find that that one is the intersection of all these different sets, making me think that one's going to be causal. That's a process we're engaged in now—trying to do that. Again, it's just a machine learning problem. But we need data. That's the main issue.Dwarkesh Patel  1:04:32  I was hoping that wouldn't be possible, because one way we might go about this research is that it itself becomes taboo or causes other sorts of bad social consequences if you can definitively show that on certain traits, there are differences between ancestral populations, right? So, I was hoping that maybe there was an evasion button where we can't say because they're just tags and the tags might be different between different ancestral populations. But with machine learning, we’ll know.Steve Hsu  1:04:59  That's the situation we're in now, where you have to do some fancy analysis if you want to claim that Italians have lower height potential than Nordics—which is possible. There's been a ton of research about this because there are signals of selection. The alleles, which are activated in height predictors, look like they've been under some selection between North and South Europe over the last 5000 years for whatever reason. But, this is a thing debated by people who study molecular evolution. But suppose it's true, okay? That would mean that when we finally get to the bottom of it, we find all the causal loci for height, and the average value for the Italians is lower than that for those living in Stockholm. That might be true. People don't get that excited? They get a little bit excited about height. But they would get really excited if this were true for some other traits, right?Suppose the causal variants affecting your level of extraversion are systematic, that the average value of those weighed the weighted average of those states is different in Japan versus Sicily. People might freak out over that. I'm supposed to say that's obviously not true. How could it possibly be true? There hasn't been enough evolutionary time for those differences to arise. After all, it's not possible that despite what looks to be the case for height over the last 5000 years in Europe, no other traits could have been differentially selected for over the last 5000 years. That's the dangerous thing. Few people understand this field well enough to understand what you and I just discussed and are so alarmed by it that they're just trying to suppress everything. Most of them don't follow it at this technical level that you and I are just discussing. So, they're somewhat instinctively negative about it, but they don't understand it very well.Dwarkesh Patel  1:07:19  That's good to hear. You see this pattern that by the time that somebody might want to regulate or in some way interfere with some technology or some information, it already has achieved wide adoption. You could argue that that's the case with crypto today. But if it's true that a bunch of IVF clinics worldwide are using these scores to do selection and other things, by the time people realize the implications of this data for other kinds of social questions, this has already been an existing consumer technology.Is this eugenics?Steve Hsu  1:07:58  That's true, and the main outcry will be if it turns out that there are massive gains to be had, and only the billionaires are getting them. But that might have the consequence of causing countries to make this free part of their national health care system. So Denmark and Israel pay for IVF. For infertile couples, it's part of their national health care system. They're pretty aggressive about genetic testing. In Denmark, one in 10 babies are born through IVF. It's not clear how it will go. But we're in for some fun times. There's no doubt about that.Dwarkesh Patel  1:08:45  Well, one way you could go is that some countries decided to ban it altogether. And another way it could go is if countries decided to give everybody free access to it. If you had to choose between the two,  you would want to go for the second one. Which would be the hope. Maybe only those two are compatible with people's moral intuitions about this stuff. Steve Hsu  1:09:10  It’s very funny because most wokist people today hate this stuff. But, most progressives like Margaret Sanger, or anybody who was the progressive intellectual forebears of today's wokist, in the early 20th century, were all that we would call today in Genesis because they were like, “Thanks to Darwin, we now know how this all works. We should take steps to keep society healthy and (not in a negative way where we kill people we don't like, but we should help society do healthy things when they reproduce, and have healthy kids).” Now, this whole thing has just been flipped over among progressives. Dwarkesh Patel  1:09:52  Even in India, less than 50 years ago, Indira Gandhi, she's on the left side of India's political spectrum. She was infamous for putting on these forced sterilization programs. Somebody made an interesting comment about this where they were asked, “Oh, is it true that history always tilts towards progressives? And if so, isn't everybody else doomed? Aren't their views doomed?”The person made a fascinating point: whatever we consider left at the time tends to be winning. But what is left has changed a lot over time, right? In the early 20th century, prohibition was a left cause. It was a progressive cause, and that changed, and now the opposite is the left cause. But now, legalizing pot is progressive. Exactly. So, if Conquest’s second law is true, and everything tilts leftover time, just change what is left is, right? That's the solution. Steve Hsu  1:10:59  No one can demand that any of these woke guys be intellectually self-consistent, or even say the same things from one year to another? But one could wonder what they think about these literally Communist Chinese. They’re recycling huge parts of their GDP to help the poor and the southern stuff. Medicine is free, education is free, right? They're clearly socialists, and literally communists. But in Chinese, the Chinese characters for eugenics is a positive thing. It means healthy production. But more or less, the whole viewpoint on all this stuff is 180 degrees off in East Asia compared to here, and even among the literal communists—so go figure.Dwarkesh Patel  1:11:55  Yeah, very based. So let's talk about one of the traits that people might be interested in potentially selecting for: intelligence. What is the potential for us to acquire the data to correlate the genotype with intelligence?Steve Hsu  1:12:15  Well, that's the most personally frustrating aspect of all of this stuff. If you asked me ten years ago when I started doing this stuff what were we going to get, everything was gone. On the optimistic side of what I would have predicted, so everything's good. Didn't turn out to be interactively nonlinear, or it didn't turn out to be interactively pleiotropic. All these good things, —which nobody could have known a priori how they would work—turned out to be good for gene engineers of the 21st century. The one frustrating thing is because of crazy wokeism, and fear of crazy wokists, the most interesting phenotype of all is lagging b

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Nomad Futurist
Compliance Is Not Security!

Nomad Futurist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 49:21


In another fascinating Nomad Futurist Podcast, Tom Brennan, the Executive Director of CREST, a cybersecurity company, spoke with Phil and Nabeel about his life as a public interest technologist. Brennan has had a fascination with technology ever since he was a child. He lived as an island boy in his teens, repairing an old Tele video 802-H brought by his grandfather from its work. His first exposure to machine repair led him to work at a local computer store selling and installing used IBM computer equipment.  In addition to working in the digital field, he served in the Marine Corps, where he learned how to serve a greater cause than himself. Even though he left the army in 1991 after breaking his back in a recorded live fire shooting, this experience was the foundation for his burgeoning career in cybersecurity. From then on, he used technology as a method in forensics, investigation, and assisting in various startups. “I don't necessarily think that schools need to change the mentality, but I do think that there should be a reward program as it's been difficult for most of the cyber folks.” Brennan expressed that the least the companies could do is require the applicant to do a first-hand demonstration of essential incident response, security services, or penetration testing. He said that while there are many book smarts, the most qualified candidates for the job are passionate about convergence, the physical and electronic sides of security. He believes the most common misconception in cybersecurity is that people mistake it for convenience. People are unaware that the fundamentals will cause them to lose all their information and passwords.  “It serves the ethics side of the good guys and the ethics of the bad guys because the internet is a wonderful place. It allows everybody to operate. So, it's in everyone's interest to make it operational.” He emphasised that while the scope of their job is to keep an eye out for users who are prone to data breaches, people should also understand that the field is highly dynamic and that they should learn how to protect their accounts.  “You are your own bank. If you're going to be your own bank, and you're going to go ahead and have controls in place… you must determine what good looks like.” In his final message to the youth, he stated that to be successful in the field, one must be exposed to the right company and experiences. It will assist them in collaborating skills that will fruit their specialities.  “Security is not compliance. Compliance is compliance; security helps. But if you're secure, you're most likely going to be compliant because all the standards out there are the best practices.” Tom leads the Americas Council and collaborates with government and commercial organisations to maximise our value as a cybersecurity accreditation body and advocate for industry standards. His attention is drawn to the cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency's 16 critical infrastructure sectors, which are essential to US security, the national economy, and public health and safety. He directs strategic plans for our organisation's expansion while serving as an industry evangelist and educator on the importance of using accredited cybersecurity products and professionals to improve consumer privacy, security, and protections globally. Tom is a former US Marine who has been involved with CREST since 2016. He currently serves as the Chief Information Officer for the national law firm Mandelbaum Salsburg, overseeing critical infrastructure, privacy, and security operations. He is also a member of the Gerson Lehrman Group's Advisory Board, a member of the County College of Morris' Information Technology Advisory Committee, a Senior Advisor and Industry Advisory Board Member of the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and a member of the NYU Tandon School of Engineering's Cyber Fellows Advisory Council. Working with OWASP was also a previous...

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Detective Monday- Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Virginia Beach Matter (08-31-1950)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 29:28


Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar is a radio drama that aired on CBS Radio from February 18, 1949 to September 30, 1962. The first several seasons imagined protagonist Johnny Dollar as a private investigator drama , with Charles Russell, Edmond O'Brien and John Lund portraying Dollar in succession over the years. In 1955 after a yearlong hiatus, the series came back in its best-known incarnation with Bob Bailey starring in "the transcribed adventures of the man with the action-packed expense account – America's fabulous freelance insurance investigator." There were 809 episodes (plus two not-for-broadcast auditions) in the 12-year run, and more than 710 still exist today. Jim Cox's book American Radio Networks: A History cites "886 total performances" which includes repeat performances. Format. The format best remembered was instituted by writer-director Jack Johnstone. Each case usually started with a phone call from an insurance adjuster, calling on Johnny to investigate an unusual claim: a suspicious death, an attempted fraud, a missing person, or other mysterious circumstances. Each story required Johnny to travel to some distant locale, usually within the United States but sometimes abroad, where he was almost always threatened with personal danger in the course of his investigations. He would compare notes with the police officials who had first investigated each strange occurrence, and followed every clue until he figured out what actually happened. Johnny's file on each case was usually referenced as a "matter," as in "The Silver Blue Matter" or "The Forbes Matter". Later episodes were more fanciful, with titles like "The Wayward Trout Matter" and "The Price of Fame Matter" (the latter featuring a rare guest-star appearance by Vincent Price as himself; here Price and Dollar team up to retrieve a painting stolen by Price's insurance agent). Johnny usually stuck to business, but would sometimes engage in romantic dalliances with women he encountered in his travels; later episodes gave Johnny a steady girlfriend, Betty Lewis. Johnny's precious recreational time was usually spent fishing, and it was not uncommon for Johnny's clients to exploit this favorite pastime in convincing him to take on a job near good fishing locations. His past was rarely mentioned, but Dollar in “The Bennett Matter” described himself as a four-year US Marine veteran who then worked as a police officer for a decade before changing careers to insurance investigation. In "The Blackburn Case" Dollar also refers to his time as a Pinkerton Detective. Each story was recounted in flashback, and every few minutes the action would be interrupted by Johnny listing a line item from his expense account, which served as an effective scene transition. Most of the expense account related to transportation, lodging, and meals, but no incidental expense was too small for Johnny to itemize, as in "Item nine, 10 cents. Aspirin. I needed them." The monetary amounts weren't always literal: the smallest line item Johnny ever recorded was "two cents: what I felt like" after a professional setback; the largest was "one million dollars" (the way he felt after finding a missing woman and her daughter in a snowbound cabin). The episodes generally finished with Johnny tallying up his expense account and traveling back to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was based. Sometimes Johnny would add a sardonic postscript under "Remarks," detailing the aftermath of the case. ("The Todd Matter," which especially disgusted Johnny, ended abruptly with "Remarks – nil!") In later seasons the program sometimes referred to itself, with other characters recognizing Dollar's voice from the radio; in the episode “The Salkoff Sequel Matter” Johnny's radio show becomes an important plot point.