Podcasts about Black Death

Mid-14th century pandemic in Eurasia and North Africa

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Best podcasts about Black Death

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Latest podcast episodes about Black Death

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Kyle Harper On Plagues And Covid

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 91:12


Kyle Harper is an historian who focuses on how humanity has shaped nature, and vice versa. He's a Professor of Classics and Letters at the University of Oklahoma and the author of several books, including The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire, and his latest, Plagues Upon the Earth: Disease and the Course of Human History. His mastery of the science is only matched by the ease of his prose. If I were to nominate a book of the year, it would be this one (alongside Jamie Kirchick's Secret City).For two clips of our convo — on the zombie bloodsucking fleas of the Black Death, and on how Covid doomed the careers of Trump and Boris — pop over to our YouTube page. Other topics: the bubonic plague's role in the fall of the Roman Empire, the Black Death, flagellants and anti-Semitism, the plague in 17th century London, the Spanish flu, the AIDS crisis, Thucydides, Camus' La Peste, “The Roses of Eyam,” monkeypox, lab leak, and the uprising over China's ghastly Covid policy. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

Dan Snow's History Hit

From a plague in Athens during the Peloponnesian War in 430 BCE, to another in 540 that wiped out half the population of the Roman empire, down through the Black Death in the Middle Ages and on through the 1918 flu epidemic (which killed between 50 and 100 million people) and this century's deadly SARS outbreak, plagues have been a much more relentless fact of life than many realise.Brian Michael Jenkins is one of the leading authorities on U.S. national security and an advisor to governments, presidents and CEOs. Brain joins Dan to discuss the legacy of epidemics— which is not only one of the lives lost but also of devastated economies, social disorder, and severe political repercussions.This episode was produced by Hannah Ward and edited by Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!Download History Hit app from the Google Play store.Download History Hit app from the Apple Store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Thankless Roll Players
S03E18 - Ars Magica - Black Death - Episode Two - The Hovels of the Dead

Thankless Roll Players

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 57:55


The magi of Tagalyn reach the outskirts of Whitchurch, in our playthrough of Thomas Kane's classic "Black Death" for Ars Magica. https://atlas-games.com/arsmagica

This Jungian Life
Episode 241 - GAMES: a metaphor for life

This Jungian Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 73:55


Humans have played games since prehistoric times. Games bring us together and pit us against each other. We agree to rules, take turns, develop tolerance for frustration, and learn to win and lose. We develop skills and submit to chance. Games range from luck to skill, from a throw of the dice to acing it at tennis. Games regulate aggression: only one can win, whether on a gameboard or the court. Shadow is sanctioned within the rules, creating monikers like The Black Death of chess and Boss of the Moss of golf—and in the heat of a game, shadier traits may also be revealed. But “playing games” in relationships is universally condemned as cheating. Games introduce us to conditions of life, for we must play the hand we've been dealt. Confronted with the limitations of ego and understanding, we may discover that games are metaphors for the movement of a mysterious cosmos. Here's the dream we analyze: “I dream of this place that is dark and largely empty. The doors to the place are open. Inside there is a void, and in the void, particles. They are ominous. Dark. They exert impact on things inside this place. There is nothing inside this place except cut-outs of what look like humans. They float eerily and move through the air quickly, like ghosts. As one approaches the window through which I am looking in, the cut-out impresses as very human-like, even though it is not. It is eerily human-like. I am startled. All of a sudden, there are humans inside this place. I become aware of a lady with a shaven head. Her head reminds me of the Borg [Star Trek reference]. These particles have been affecting her and have caused her to be gone. She is alive but no longer a human--cannot be reached. Her condition cannot be undone. I am now in a room with a male human. He is not gone to the particles yet. He presents me 4 books quickly. He says they will soon be stolen. That everything in this place is stolen quickly. He says to remember the headings of books as this is the only way to keep the information, namely in one's memory. The particles in the dream are rather ominous. The place is ominous. There is such hunger in this place, a kind that cannot be sated, hence the stealing of things.” GIVE US A HAND! Please become our patron: https://www.patreon.com/ThisJungianLife  RESOURCES: Learn to Analyze your own Dreams: https://thisjungianlife.com/enroll/ Enroll in our Philadelphia Jungian Seminar and start your journey to becoming an analyst: https://www.cgjungphiladelphia.org/seminar.shtml Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisJungianLife/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thisjungianlifepodcast/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thisjungianlife/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThisJungianLife

Half Baked History
Episode 40: The Black Death

Half Baked History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 47:29


In this episode of Half Baked History, Kelsey and Nick discuss one of the worst tragedies throughout human existence, the Black Death. Discover how the Bubonic Plague ravaged almost all of Europe and Asia during the 1300s thanks to the rapid spread by rats, poor medieval medicine, and horrible hygiene. Roll up, light up, and grab your plague doctor outfit, it's time for another episode of this weed fueled podcast!Contact Half Baked History Follow and engage with us on Instagram and Twitter Email us at halfbakedhistorypod@gmail.com - Business inquires only Thanks for listening and supporting the show!

Into the Impossible
Niall Ferguson: DOOM!

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 79:33


Niall Ferguson's most recent book is Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe. In this book he posits that disasters are inherently hard to predict. Pandemics, like earthquakes, wildfires, and financial crises. and wars, are not normally distributed; there is no cycle of history to help us anticipate the next catastrophe. But when disaster strikes, we ought to be better prepared than the Romans were when Vesuvius erupted, or medieval Italians when the Black Death struck.   Yet in 2020 the responses of many developed countries, including the United States, to a new virus from China were badly bungled. Why? While populist leaders certainly performed poorly in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, Professor Ferguson argues that more profound pathologies were at work. Drawing from multiple disciplines, including economics, cliodynamics, and network science, Doom offers not just a history but a general theory of disasters, showing why our ever more bureaucratic and complex systems are getting worse at handling them. Niall Ferguson, MA, D.Phil., is the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a senior faculty fellow of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard, where he served for twelve years as the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History. He is the author of sixteen books.  In 2003, Ferguson wrote and presented a six-part history of the British Empire for Channel 4, the UK broadcaster. The accompanying book, Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power, was a bestseller in both Britain and the United States. The sequel, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire, was published in 2004 by Penguin, and prompted Time magazine to name him one of the 100 most influential people in the world. The international bestseller, The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World, published in 2008 was adapted into a PBS series, winning the International Emmy award for Best Documentary, as well as the Handelszeitung Economics Book Prize. In 2011 he published Civilization: The West and the Rest, also a Channel 4/PBS documentary series. A year later came the three-part television series “China: Triumph and Turmoil.” The book based on his 2012 BBC Reith lectures, The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die, was a New York Times bestseller within a week of its publication. Ferguson has been a contributing editor for Bloomberg Television and a columnist for Newsweek. He began writing a twice-a-month column for Bloomberg Opinion in June 2020. www.niallferguson.com twitter.com/nfergus Connect with me:

Working Historians
Scotty Edler - The Black Death, the Spanish Flu, and Covid 19 (Part 1)

Working Historians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 76:52


During the next two episodes, Rob and James talk to Scotty Edler about his research into the causes and consequences of three major disease epidemics: the Black Death, the Spanish Flu, and Covid-19. Here we discuss the historical contexts of each disease and the lessons learned from each outbreak.

New Books in Literary Studies
Guido Ruggiero, "Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 54:58


Today Jana Byars talks to her PhD advisor Guido Ruggiero about his latest monograph, Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance (Harvard University Press, 2021) over the meaning of love in the early Renaissance. As a pandemic swept across fourteenth-century Europe, the Decameron offered the ill and grieving a symphony of life and love. For Florentines, the world seemed to be coming to an end. In 1348 the first wave of the Black Death swept across the Italian city, reducing its population from more than 100,000 to less than 40,000. The disease would eventually kill at least half of the population of Europe. Amid the devastation, Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron was born. One of the masterpieces of world literature, the Decameron has captivated centuries of readers with its vivid tales of love, loyalty, betrayal, and sex. Despite the death that overwhelmed Florence, Boccaccio's collection of novelle was, in Guido Ruggiero's words, a "symphony of life." Love and Sex in the Time of Plague guides twenty-first-century readers back to Boccaccio's world to recapture how his work sounded to fourteenth-century ears. Through insightful discussions of the Decameron's cherished stories and deep portraits of Florentine culture, Ruggiero explores love and sexual relations in a society undergoing convulsive change. In the century before the plague arrived, Florence had become one of the richest and most powerful cities in Europe. With the medieval nobility in decline, a new polity was emerging, driven by Il Popolo, the people, fractious and enterprising. Boccaccio's stories had a special resonance in this age of upheaval, as Florentines sought new notions of truth and virtue to meet both the despair and the possibility of the moment. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Guido Ruggiero, "Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 54:58


Today Jana Byars talks to her PhD advisor Guido Ruggiero about his latest monograph, Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance (Harvard University Press, 2021) over the meaning of love in the early Renaissance. As a pandemic swept across fourteenth-century Europe, the Decameron offered the ill and grieving a symphony of life and love. For Florentines, the world seemed to be coming to an end. In 1348 the first wave of the Black Death swept across the Italian city, reducing its population from more than 100,000 to less than 40,000. The disease would eventually kill at least half of the population of Europe. Amid the devastation, Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron was born. One of the masterpieces of world literature, the Decameron has captivated centuries of readers with its vivid tales of love, loyalty, betrayal, and sex. Despite the death that overwhelmed Florence, Boccaccio's collection of novelle was, in Guido Ruggiero's words, a "symphony of life." Love and Sex in the Time of Plague guides twenty-first-century readers back to Boccaccio's world to recapture how his work sounded to fourteenth-century ears. Through insightful discussions of the Decameron's cherished stories and deep portraits of Florentine culture, Ruggiero explores love and sexual relations in a society undergoing convulsive change. In the century before the plague arrived, Florence had become one of the richest and most powerful cities in Europe. With the medieval nobility in decline, a new polity was emerging, driven by Il Popolo, the people, fractious and enterprising. Boccaccio's stories had a special resonance in this age of upheaval, as Florentines sought new notions of truth and virtue to meet both the despair and the possibility of the moment. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Guido Ruggiero, "Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 54:58


Today Jana Byars talks to her PhD advisor Guido Ruggiero about his latest monograph, Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance (Harvard University Press, 2021) over the meaning of love in the early Renaissance. As a pandemic swept across fourteenth-century Europe, the Decameron offered the ill and grieving a symphony of life and love. For Florentines, the world seemed to be coming to an end. In 1348 the first wave of the Black Death swept across the Italian city, reducing its population from more than 100,000 to less than 40,000. The disease would eventually kill at least half of the population of Europe. Amid the devastation, Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron was born. One of the masterpieces of world literature, the Decameron has captivated centuries of readers with its vivid tales of love, loyalty, betrayal, and sex. Despite the death that overwhelmed Florence, Boccaccio's collection of novelle was, in Guido Ruggiero's words, a "symphony of life." Love and Sex in the Time of Plague guides twenty-first-century readers back to Boccaccio's world to recapture how his work sounded to fourteenth-century ears. Through insightful discussions of the Decameron's cherished stories and deep portraits of Florentine culture, Ruggiero explores love and sexual relations in a society undergoing convulsive change. In the century before the plague arrived, Florence had become one of the richest and most powerful cities in Europe. With the medieval nobility in decline, a new polity was emerging, driven by Il Popolo, the people, fractious and enterprising. Boccaccio's stories had a special resonance in this age of upheaval, as Florentines sought new notions of truth and virtue to meet both the despair and the possibility of the moment. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Early Modern History
Guido Ruggiero, "Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 54:58


Today Jana Byars talks to her PhD advisor Guido Ruggiero about his latest monograph, Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance (Harvard University Press, 2021) over the meaning of love in the early Renaissance. As a pandemic swept across fourteenth-century Europe, the Decameron offered the ill and grieving a symphony of life and love. For Florentines, the world seemed to be coming to an end. In 1348 the first wave of the Black Death swept across the Italian city, reducing its population from more than 100,000 to less than 40,000. The disease would eventually kill at least half of the population of Europe. Amid the devastation, Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron was born. One of the masterpieces of world literature, the Decameron has captivated centuries of readers with its vivid tales of love, loyalty, betrayal, and sex. Despite the death that overwhelmed Florence, Boccaccio's collection of novelle was, in Guido Ruggiero's words, a "symphony of life." Love and Sex in the Time of Plague guides twenty-first-century readers back to Boccaccio's world to recapture how his work sounded to fourteenth-century ears. Through insightful discussions of the Decameron's cherished stories and deep portraits of Florentine culture, Ruggiero explores love and sexual relations in a society undergoing convulsive change. In the century before the plague arrived, Florence had become one of the richest and most powerful cities in Europe. With the medieval nobility in decline, a new polity was emerging, driven by Il Popolo, the people, fractious and enterprising. Boccaccio's stories had a special resonance in this age of upheaval, as Florentines sought new notions of truth and virtue to meet both the despair and the possibility of the moment. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Buffalo, What’s Next?
Buffalo, What's Next? | Black Entrepreneurship, And “Reimagining Black Death”

Buffalo, What’s Next?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 60:00


Jennifer Parker will be with us to talk about entrepreneurship, minority and women owned business, mentorship, business development, and community. And then performer and artist Drea d'Nur -- the founder of Feed Buffalo -- talks about “Reimagining Black Death: A Requiem for Our Suffering” It's a soundscape experience that begins and lands on love, exploring ancestral modalities of sound, movement and remembrance, that permits us to be present with our grief, our feelings and with one another.

The Guys Review
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

The Guys Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 57:55


Monty Python and the Holy Grail Welcome to The Guys Review, where we review media, products and experiences.  **READ APPLE REVIEWS/Fan Mail**Mention Twitter DM group - like pinned tweet @The_GuysReviewRead emails theguysreviewpod@gmail.comTwitter Poll **ASK CHRIS AND TREY ABOUT THEIR RATING FOR Saving Private Ryan** Monty Python and the Holy Grail Director:Terry GilliamTerry Jones Starring:  Graham ChapmanJohn CleeseTerry GilliamEric IdleTerry JonesMichael Palin Released: April 3, 1975 Budget: $400,000 ($2.2M in 2022) Gross $5M ($27.7M in 2022) Ratings:   IMDb 8.2/10 Rotten Tomatoes 98% Metacritic 91% Google Users 91%  Here cometh thine shiny awards Sire. My Lord Tucker the Wanker second Earl of Wessex. Lord of the Furries. Heir of Lord baldy the one eyed snake wrestler. Protector of Freedom units. Step Sibling with funny feelings down stairs. Entertainer of uncles. Jailor of innocent. Spanker of innocent milk maids and stable boys. The toxic wanker. Big Cheif sitting doughnut. Teepee giver to the great Cornholio. Edgar Allan Poe's shaved muse. No awards, but garnered high praise when it came out. First Time you saw the movie? Plot:In AD 932, King Arthur and his squire, Patsy, travel Britain searching for men to join the Knights of the Round Table. Along the way, Arthur debates whether swallows could carry coconuts, passes through a town infected with the Black Death, recounts receiving Excalibur from the Lady of the Lake to two anarcho-syndicalist peasants, defeats the Black Knight and observes an impromptu witch trial. He recruits Sir Bedevere the Wise, Sir Lancelot the Brave, Sir Galahad the Pure, and Sir Robin the Not-Quite-So-Brave-as-Sir-Lancelot, along with their squires and Robin's minstrels. Arthur leads the knights to Camelot, but, after a musical number, changes his mind, deeming it "a silly place". As they turn away, God appears and orders Arthur to find the Holy Grail. Arthur and his knights arrive at a castle occupied by French soldiers, who claim to have the Grail and taunt the Britons, driving them back with a barrage of barnyard animals. Bedevere concocts a plan to sneak in using a Trojan Rabbit, but no one hides inside it, and the Britons are forced to flee when it is flung back at them. Arthur decides the knights should go their separate ways to search for the Grail.A modern-day historian filming a documentary on the Arthurian legends is killed by an unknown knight on horseback, triggering a police investigation. Arthur and Bedevere are given directions by an old man and attempt to satisfy the strange requests of the dreaded Knights Who Say "Ni!" Sir Robin avoids a fight with a Three-Headed Knight by running away while the heads are arguing amongst themselves. Sir Galahad is led by a grail-shaped beacon to Castle Anthrax, which is occupied exclusively by young women, who wish to be punished for misleading him, but he is unwillingly "rescued" by Lancelot. Lancelot receives an arrow-shot note from Swamp Castle. Believing the note is from a lady being forced to marry against her will, he storms the castle and slaughters several members of the wedding party, only to discover the note is from an effeminate prince. Arthur and his knights regroup and are joined by three new knights, as well as Brother Maynard and his monk brethren. They meet Tim the Enchanter, who directs them to a cave where the location of the Grail is said to be written. The entrance to the cave is guarded by the Rabbit of Caerbannog. Underestimating it, the knights attack, but the Rabbit easily kills Bors, Gawain and Ector. Arthur uses the "Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch", provided by Brother Maynard, to destroy the creature. Inside the cave, they find an inscription from Joseph of Arimathea, directing them to Castle Aarrgh. An animated cave monster devours Brother Maynard, but Arthur and the knights escape after the animator unexpectedly suffers a fatal heart attack. The knights approach the Bridge of Death, where the bridge-keeper demands they answer three questions in order to pass or else be cast into the Gorge of Eternal Peril. Lancelot easily answers simple questions and crosses. Robin is defeated by an unexpectedly difficult question, and Galahad fails an easy one; both are magically flung into the gorge. When Arthur asks for clarification on an obscure question about swallows, the bridge-keeper cannot answer and is himself thrown into the gorge. Arthur and Bedevere cannot find Lancelot, unaware that he has been arrested by police investigating the historian's death. The pair reach Castle Aarrgh, but find it occupied by the French soldiers. After being repelled by showers of manure, they summon an army of knights and prepare to assault the castle. As the army charges, the police arrive, arrest Arthur and Bedevere for the murder of the historian and break the camera, ending the film.  TOP 5​1: Done on an incredibly small budget, the Pythons found funding from an unlikely sources—rock bands. Groups like Led Zeppelin, Jethro Tull, and Pink Floyd helped get the money up for the production, with a portion of the funds coming from the Floyd's album “The Dark Side of the Moon.” This is a trend that would continue later with The Life of Brian, when a large portion of the funding came from former Beatle George Harrison. When Harrison was asked why he funded the film, he responded “Because I wanted to see it.” 2: The film also represents the directorial debuts of both Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam, who decided that anyone named Terry got to direct the Pythons' first film. Attempting to co-direct at the same time led to conflicts, so the Terrys split up the responsibilities with Jones handling the actors while Gilliam worked on the cinematography. They'd go on to direct the remaining Python films together and Jones would additionally direct Mr. Toad's Wild Ride, while Gilliam's lengthy directorial career would include such artistic classics as The Fisher King, Brazil, Time Bandits, Twelve Monkeys, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus, and more. 3: The vicious Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog had parts of its fur dyed red to represent the blood of the knights that it spilt with its large, pointy teeth. Unfortunately, the dye used wouldn't wash out afterwards and the rabbit's owner was furious. 4: By the time the Pythons actually got around to doing the credits, they'd run out of money. As a result, the credits were very simple and Palin decided to spice them up a bit by adding the Swedish subtitles and llama references. When the film was shown for the first time at Cannes, firemen rushed in at the end of the credits to evacuate the audience due to a bomb scare. The crowd didn't leave at first because they thought it was part of the show. 5: n part due to the low budget, Chapman and Cleese did all their own stunts for the Black Knight scene. The two used heavy swords and some acrobatics for added realism. Connie Booth had brought her and Cleese's young daughter to the filming, who during the fight turned to her mum and said “Daddy doesn't like that man, does he?” **TRIPLE LINDY AWARD** **REVIEW AND RATING**TreyChrisStephen 1.5Tucker 3 TOP 5Stephen:1 Breakfast club2 Saving Private Ryan3 Ghostbusters4 Sandlot5 Color out of space Chris:1. sandlots2. T23. trick r treat4. rocky horror picture show5. hubie halloween Trey:1) Boondocks Saints2) Mail Order Brides3) Tombstone4) Very bad things5) She out of my league Tucker:1. T22:Saving Private Ryan3: Tombstone4: My Cousin Vinny5: Ghostbusters WHAT ARE WE DOING NEXT WEEK? Web: https://theguysreview.simplecast.com/EM: theguysreviewpod@gmail.comIG: @TheGuysReviewPodTW: @The_GuysReview - Twitter DM groupFB: https://facebook.com/TheGuysReviewPod/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYKXJhq9LbQ2VfR4K33kT9Q Please, Subscribe, rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts from!! Thank you,-The Guys

History Extra podcast
Queens in the Age of Chivalry

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 44:44


The 14th century was an era of high drama in England – from the toppling of two kings and the Hundred Years' War to the Black Death and Peasants' Revolt. Speaking with Emily Briffett, bestselling historical author Alison Weir charts the dramatic lives and tangled legacies of five queen consorts during the turbulent ‘Age of Chivalry'. Read more on the debate surrounding Edward I's murder here: https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/the-big-debate-was-edward-ii-really-murdered/?utm_source=acast&utm_medium=acast.com&utm_campaign=Bitly (Ad) Alison Weir is the author of Queens of the Age of Chivalry (Vintage, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fqueens-of-the-age-of-chivalry%2Falison-weir%2F9781910702116 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Irish History Podcast
The Black Death in Ireland

Irish History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 12:39


The Black Death changed Europe and Ireland forever. This disease which swept across the continent through 1348 carried off around 40% of the population. Its aftermath was no less sensational as social upheavel, wars and revolts broke out across Europe. Ireland was no different, indeed it was arguably affected in more profound ways than most of the continent. Over last few months I have produced a new hour three hour audio feature on the Black Death in Ireland based on my 2016 book 1348: A Medieval Apocalypse.This podcast previews the audiobook explaining the fascinating history behind these events. How can you get your audiobook of The Black Death in Ireland?Get the book as a one time purchase. You can buy the book for €5.99 in a one time purchase here https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory. Select 'The Black Death in Ireland Audiobook' and then you can download the audio to your podcast app.Become a supporter. Supporters of the show at patreon.com/irishpodcast also have access to the book. This recurring monthly fee also gives you access you my extensive back catalogue of exclusive show and my upcoming series on the Civil War. Find out more at https://patreon.com/irishpodcast Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Thankless Roll Players
S03E17 - Ars Magica - Black Death - Episode One - The Knight at the Gates

Thankless Roll Players

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 53:58


The magi of Tagalyn heed the call & come to the aid of their plague-ravaged sisters and brothers, only to find much darker forces at play, in our playthrough of Thomas Kane's classic "Black Death" for Ars Magica. https://atlas-games.com/arsmagica

This Week in Evolution
TWiEVO 84: Decoding our defenses to the Black Death

This Week in Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 91:42


Nels and Vincent review the use of ancient DNA to identify loci that may have been under selection during the Black Death by studying populations before, during, and after the pandemic. Hosts: Nels Elde and Vincent Racaniello Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiEVO Links for this episode Evolution of immune genes associated with Black Death (Nature) ERAP2 and respiratory disease (medRxiv) Time stamps by Jolene. Thanks! Science Picks Nels – Interview with Paul Turner in Current Biology and Map of the World if you are a fish Vincent – Smallpox and its eradication Music on TWiEVO is performed by Trampled by Turtles Send your evolution questions and comments to twievo@microbe.tv

Race and Tyler Talk Wikipedia
94: The Black Death

Race and Tyler Talk Wikipedia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 59:54


We discuss the pandemic that not only killed a shocking percentage of Europe during just a few years in the 1300s, but also shook the human species to its core, changing the course of history. We also discuss The Seventh Seal, the 1957 classic film depicting the angst and suffering of 14th century Swedes tormented by Death.

Extreme Genes - America's Family History and Genealogy Radio Show & Podcast
Episode 438 - Ordinary People With Extraordinary Finds- Chicago Man Finds Ties To Execution of King Charles I / Long Island Man Learns Dad Fought Nazis... In The USA!

Extreme Genes - America's Family History and Genealogy Radio Show & Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 44:16


Host Scott Fisher opens the show with David Allen Lambert, Chief Genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and AmericanAncestors.org. Family Histoire News begins with a fab news concerning one of the Fab Four… Ringo Starr. Hear how the remarriage of a great grandmother likely changed pop history! Then, over 100 people are each inheriting $60,000 from a man they never met and likely never even heard of. Catch the story. Next, a Canadian woman who lost her Swedish-born mother decades ago is reconnecting with her through a stash of her mother's letters shared with her by a relative in Sweden. Now, the daughter is learning Swedish! In Scandinavia, some more Viking graves have been found… but two of them are remarkable for what was found with them. Finally, hear why the “Black Death” may be causing you health problems today! In Segment 2, Fisher talks with Scott Norrick of Chicago. Scott's research has led him to a New England ancestor suspected of playing a key role in British history, but his altered identity still presents challenges. Then, hear Long Island, NY resident Andrew Malekoff talk about what he learned about his father and his activities as a teenager in the 1930s. It was an eyebrow raiser for Andrew and it will be for you too! David then returns for two more of your questions on Ask Us Anything. That's all this week on Extreme Genes, America's Family History Show!

Fringe Radio Network
Black Death - Down The Rabbit Hole

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 63:36


What was the black death and what caused it? Listen in as Brandon goes down the Rabbit Hole and looks into the history of the black death.

EXTRAordinary Lives
Jim Black: Death Row and Peanuts Comics

EXTRAordinary Lives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 35:39


Jim Black, a criminologist and professor emeritus of Sociology at the University of Tennessee, constantly looks to apply God's principles in his everyday life, and in some unusual places such as Death Row and Peanuts Cartoons. You'll enjoy his fascinating stories and see how God has influenced his life and decisions. He is a man of integrity who desires to be humble and kind and is grateful for the "friend we have in Jesus." In the podcast, Jim mentions two fun and enlightening books, The Gospel According to Peanuts by Robert L. Short and The Pastor is In: A Thirty-Day Faith Devotional by Rigel J. Dawson. Ellen quotes Ephesians 4:1-2 and Matthew 25:35-36 and reads lyrics from the hymn, "What a Friend We Have in Jesus."

Skip the Queue
Why smell is a form of mind control, with Liam Findlay

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 37:20


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://aromaprime.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/liam-r-findlay/Smells for Theme Parks and Dementia Care: AromaPrime on BBC NewsKickstarter for the game where a reward is a scent collection, based on the locations in the game Smell tour of Amsterdam Liam R. Findlay is a designer of themed attractions who also works for AromaPrime, advising attractions on how to enhance their experiences using scent. AromaPrime was founded in 1973, and it creates weird and wonderful pongs for venues like Alton Towers, The British Museum and Madame Tussauds. The company's collection of over 400 concoctions ranges from Dinosaur to Dungeon, and Pirate Ship to Penguin Sick. While Liam helps clients select or develop the best smells to tell their stories, he also assists in implementing them in the most effective ways. Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson.We're getting smelly on the podcast today as I speak with Liam Findlay, Multisensory Attraction Designer and Sensing Specialist at AromaPrime. Liam discusses the use of Aroma's storytelling and psychological influences in your attraction and why smell is a form of mind control. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Liam, hello. Welcome to Skip the Queue.Liam Findlay: Hi, how are you?Kelly Molson: I'm very good. How are you is the question?Liam Findlay: I'm very good. Fatigued from lots of orders, but it's a good thing.Kelly Molson: Right, we'll talk about that in a minute because it's a very busy season for you. Our listeners will find out why soon, but first, icebreaker questions. So I'm going to start with a couple of topical ones. I want to know, what is your favourite smell and also, what is the smell that turns your stomach?Liam Findlay: My favourite smell is probably a kind of, when I was growing up there was an attraction called The Timewalk in the town I lived in, and it had a musty smell in a Black Death scene. And it was very scary and dark in there and it had that horrible smell but the attraction's been closed for over a decade now, and everyone in the town remembers it for its Black Death smell. And now I work for the company that made that smell, so I have kind of a personal connection to it.Kelly Molson: Oh, how funny. Okay, so do they have the smell in the archives? So can you go and find the smell and it takes you back to that attraction?Liam Findlay: Yeah, we're selling it now as The Timewalk smell for locals who might want to transport themselves back.Kelly Molson: This is amazing. And again, this is something that we will talk about a little bit later, the reasons why smell is so emotive for people. Okay. And what about the worst smell?Liam Findlay: I'm not sure when it comes to that because I'm so used to all sorts of horrible smells, and especially with AromaPrime, everything's artificial so I know it's just chemicals, so I don't tend to be repulsed by them. Personally, I think things that are to do with people's mouths, like food-related smells or if someone's just been eating and you can smell it.Kelly Molson: Like if someone had eaten raw onion or something like that? Yeah, okay. All right. I mean, mine's tequila but there's a whole other story around that that we'll save for another day. All right. What are you most likely to buy when you exit through the gift shop?Liam Findlay: Probably a magnet for my parents' fridge.Kelly Molson: Do they collect magnets when they go on holiday and stuff? Is it full of them?Liam Findlay: Yeah, it's kind of a mandatory thing, if someone goes on holiday they have to get a magnet for the fridge.Kelly Molson: Okay. All right, I like that. That's quite a good collection to have. Liam Findlay: Unless they sell smells, Efteling sells smells of its rides in its gift shop. So that's a must do for me.Kelly Molson: I've never heard of that before. Is that the only attraction that you know that does that?Liam Findlay: I think Europa Park might have done it, and Blackpool Pleasure Beach has candles that are inspired by the rides, but they aren't the actual smells. So yeah, I don't know why more places don't do it.Kelly Molson: Well, maybe they will after they hear this podcast, Liam, who knows? Okay. And if you could choose any attraction to create a smell for, what attraction would it be?Liam Findlay: It's hard to say because I kind of work on lots of smells for all sorts of attractions anyway. I think I always enjoy kind of time travel ones, maybe linking back to The Timewalk attraction that I grew up with, because they always have a nice variety of smells with all the different time periods you can go through.Kelly Molson: Okay, yeah, all right. So yeah, there's a little bit of variety involved in what you could create with them, so it wouldn't all be the same.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Okay, interesting. Thank you. All right, Liam, what's your unpopular opinion?Liam Findlay: I would say that bad smells are not necessarily bad in that like I was just saying they can bring back memories. We work with lots of care homes at AromaPrime, and sometimes you can have a horrible fishy smell that's used in scare mazes, but it's also used to bring back memories for people that used to be fishermen or fisherwomen. Bad smells, if you put them in different contexts, they can actually not be so bad. Sometimes you can have a kind of horrible manure smell, but if you present it as something like a lovely countryside kind of atmosphere, people can react positively to it. And actually, rhino dung, I was sniffing some rhino dung last week.Kelly Molson: As you do.Liam Findlay: At Chessington World of Adventures, and we were saying how it's just got a lovely kind of grassy smell to it because the rhinos eat grass, but then when you realise it's rhino dung, you might end up reacting to it negatively.Kelly Molson: So we need to reframe our minds around what that smell is and take away the bad connotation of it?Liam Findlay: Yeah. Bad smells are perhaps not always necessarily bad depending on how you look at them, that's my message.Kelly Molson: All right, listeners, well let us know what you think. As ever, I'm going to need to reframe tequila in my mind. Maybe, I don't know, maybe if we meet up at an event, someone can help me do that, who knows? I thought about you while I was on holiday a few weeks ago, Liam. I don't often think about many of my podcast guests when I'm on a holiday, but you definitely came to mind. It was because of some of the things that we're going to talk about today.So I took my husband and my daughter into the Museum of Torture, which was a very small museum in Tuscany, in Sienna, probably not child friendly, I'm not going to lie. I don't think my 14 month old was overly impressed. But it was very small museum, we went down into the dungeon area and it was very small and it was very dark and it smelt really musty. And it was the one part of the museum for me that really captured that sense of for like, "Oh, this is a dangerous place to be, something horrid is going to happen here." And it was because of the smell. You didn't have that in any of the other areas.And it was really fascinating, you walked around and you looked at these torture instruments and you saw how people were treated and what they did to people but that area was the one place that it really got under my skin and up my nose, but for the right reasons because of the smell. And it instantly made me think about you and what you guys do. So tell us a little bit about AromaPrime and then tell us a little bit about what your role is there.Liam Findlay: Well, AromaPrime's been around since 1973, so we're turning 50 next year and throughout that time we've been making immersive smells for visitor attractions. So it could be to kind of increase anticipation and anxiety in a rollercoaster queue with the smell of fire, for example, like at Alton Towers it's Wickerman rollercoaster. Or it could be to educate people and engage them in the past if it's a historical smell. It could be to kind of bring about certain feelings if they're walking into a hotel and you want a lovely signature scent that's going to make people relaxed, or if it's historical or a nostalgic sense that are used in care homes like I was just saying to kind of bring back fond memories. So there's kind of lots of ways you can use smells to trick the mind and change how people feel, maybe feeling anxious in the Torture Museum.And my job is to advise attractions on how to implement these smells and which smells might work best and kind of lead to the best results in their attractions. So whether they want to make people feel a certain way or if they want to tell a certain story and use smells to change how the story's being told as it developed. So it's very exciting, always lots of different projects.Kelly Molson: It is. And I'm really intrigued about how you came to be in this role. So your bio says that you advise on Aroma's storytelling influences, psychological influences and thematic influences, as well as practical ways to utilise aroma in different environments. All of this is really, really fascinating. But what did you study and how did you get to be this person that advises them on all these things?Liam Findlay: Well, I actually did an animation degree and then I worked in the animation industry for a while. And from that I kind of learned lots of design skills and storytelling skills and I ended up putting that into work at an escape room where I designed escape rooms. So there was kind of sound design and visual design and telling stories again. And then I ended up working freelance designing experiences and museum interpretation for attractions like castles and more escape rooms and a ghost train on one occasion. And through working in the attractions industry as a designer, I wondered if I could maybe contribute my kind of understanding of the processes behind attraction design and put that into smell. And I knew that AromaPrime existed and I wondered if maybe I could help them out through that. So I sent them an email and they said, "Oh, we're looking for someone like you," and they took me on and I think it was late 2018 maybe so it's been a few years now and it's been going quite well.Kelly Molson: So you've kind of honed your craft working at AromaPrime. So can you just explain a little bit about, I understand about the storytelling influences that we talked about and how smell brings back those memories and it can transport you to a different place, tell me about the psychological influences and the thematic influences. What do you mean by those? How does that work?Liam Findlay: It's a bit like what I was saying about the rollercoaster queue or in a scare maze, for example, you might use a pleasant smell that lots of people have a familiar connection with like the smell of bananas. Maybe not everyone likes bananas, maybe the smell of chocolate, to kind of lift people's spirits and give them a false sense of security so that when they suddenly turn a corner and see something horrid and it has a disgusting kind of rotten smell, you're kind of crafting the psychological journey for them. So you're bringing back these pleasant emotions and memories and then you're twisting it. And maybe that horrible smell will be the smell of vomit that most people will have really unpleasant associations with and it'll make them feel uncomfortable when suddenly a pig man jumps out with a chainsaw. So you can tie the sense into how the story develops and manipulate or influence emotions as it goes along.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And what about the thematic influences? What does that mean in terms of smell?Liam Findlay: It's probably the most basic way of looking at sense. So at fantasy experience for example, like we did a wizard mini golf attraction recently, so it's kind of binding or creating sense that apply to a theme. And sometimes that can be tricky if it's a fantasy theme, you might not really be sure what kinds of smells potions have. But with our unicorn smell, for example, we sniff some horses, as you would, and we read lots of ancient myths about unicorns and we kind of approached it like we would approach historical smells. So we want them to be backed up with stories and kind of authenticity where possible to make sure that the theme is as strong as it can be.Kelly Molson: Isn't that funny though because when you said unicorn, the image of unicorn in my head is glittery and pink because every little girls are obsessed by glittery pink unicorns. And so I was like, "Oh yeah, but for me, unicorns smell a bit sugary," a sweet sugary smell they'd smell like.Liam Findlay: Yeah, well that's what the final product is really. It's like got a little undertone of horse, but it's mostly like a birthday cake.Kelly Molson: Yes. Oh, I love that. Thank you for explaining that. That's put me right. Yeah, it's really weird how you see what something looks like and you instantly imagine what it smells like, even though I have no clue what a unicorn smells like, obviously.I guess it's the same feeling, the one that you spoke about in terms of making people feel comfortable and then shocking them is, I can remember reading something years ago about if you are selling your house, have some freshly baked bread just come out of the oven because that is a smell that everyone finds quite comforting and quite homely. And so then if you can smell that while you're in a new home, you think, "Oh yeah, I could see myself living here. This is a cozy place to be, isn't it?" So it's that kind of sense that you're trying to get build in people.Liam Findlay: Yeah, it's a big thing in retail using scents in shops. There was a study where people went into a room, I think it was full of shoes and it wasn't scented and they kind of responded to what they thought of the products, whether it was shoes or not. And then there were some other participants who went into a room that was scented and it had the same products and the people in the scented room valued the products as being more expensive, or they guessed that they would be more expensive because they saw them as a higher quality because the room was scented even though they didn't realise it was the scent that was causing that.Kelly Molson: Because they could smell the leather and the... Right, okay. Gosh, that's interesting, isn't it? How it can affect how you perceive something as well.Liam Findlay: Yeah, it can change perception. And also like you say about pleasant smells, if you smell something like bread, it makes you kind of hungry because it kind of triggers those memories of enjoying bread and therefore you'll start to kind of seek it out and you won't necessarily find bread, but you'll seek out some kind of satisfaction and that satisfaction might end up being purchasing something.Kelly Molson: A very expensive house purchase.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: How do you create smells? Because I watched one of the interviews that you did, I think it's for the BBC, which I will link to in the show notes, it's really interesting. But I think one of them said that your recipes, some of them are based on 30 year old recipes, these smells. So how do you even start to create the smells?Liam Findlay: Well, yeah, well like I was saying, we are turning 50 next year, so it was actually slightly inaccurate in the BBC video is-Kelly Molson: Sorry, kids, it's wrong.Liam Findlay: Well that was my fault, I told them the wrong date. Because actually, there are not many records about the company history and I only a while ago realised or found a document that said when it was founded. So it's always been a bit of a mystery. But yeah, over that time we've accumulated over 400 aromas, so we've kind of got a big stock of anything anyone could imagine just about. And if they want something that's a bit more specific, sometimes we might combine our existing scents. So it might be a bit of grass with a bit of rotten eggs for some kind of Roald Dahl soup for example. And then if we are making something from scratch, it will be a case of finding the chemicals that kind of have certain qualities like you might have a chemical that is generally used in rose products because it has a rose smell and then you can combine it with others. And often we'll have references like maybe rhino dung, we've been sent otter poo and jaguar urine before to get that right.Kelly Molson: In the post? Go get the post today, I wonder what could be in it, that's a surprise.Liam Findlay: Yeah. So sometimes we'll be kind of mixing things and sniffing and then we'll also send lots of samples to the clients so they can say if it's accurate or not and it works that way.Kelly Molson: That's brilliant, isn't it? Funny to understand what might turn up in your letter box each day. So when you work with an attraction, Halloween is a very obvious market for you. There's lots of scare things that happening and they are very smell related. But how do you work with an attraction? What's that process of them calling you in and going, "Look, we've got this thing that we are doing, how can you work with us?" What do you do?Liam Findlay: It kind of varies on what their end goal is. Sometimes regardless of what the kind of function of the attraction is, sometimes it will just be a case of them telling us how large the space is and then we'll advise on the kind of machine that they'll need because we do machines as well and the themes as well and then we'll suggest some scents and then they put them in the machines. And it can be quite a quick process sometimes.If it's more complex, it might be like a museum that wants a historical scent and they don't want it spreading around the whole museum and stinking things out or ruining the paintings down the corridor, there can be more advice to give in that regard. So museums often it's good to use what's called dry diffusion when you have an object that's scented rather than liquid kind of going out as a mist into the air. So that object will just kind of emit a smell and you can maybe put a lid over it or have it in a container that has a puffer. So yeah, I would often ask what the end goal is and then kind of make some suggestions from there.Kelly Molson: Yeah, because I hadn't thought about if it's a museum, those artefacts and those things could be damaged by certain smells. It's also, I guess you have to be quite consultative in your approach about what you offer to them individually.Liam Findlay: Yeah, another case or another issue can be around whether people want to smell things or not. Like if they go to a scare maze, they'll probably expect to be repulsed. But if you go into a museum, I suppose it's because people aren't really used to it, they're not always prepared to sniff things. So it can be good to have flaps so people can choose whether they're going to smell things or not. Or maybe some places will put up little warnings if it's kind of a profound world war trench set that they can walk into and there's going to be horrible smell of bodies and things. Sometimes there might be a warning because it almost equates to having gory images, like in museums you'll have warnings that there'll be gory images here.Kelly Molson: Yeah, and I guess talking about what we were saying earlier about those emotive, it can take you right back to a place, I guess that could be quite frightening for some people as well if they don't want to be taken back to those places, for example.Liam Findlay: Yeah. And because smell's kind of flexible and a horrible smell relating to war could also be a horrible smell relating to some other unpleasant personal memory. So yeah, sometimes you have to think about how the smell's going to be presented in a way that's going to work for the visitors.Kelly Molson: Okay. Thorpe Park, the Dungeons and Warwick Castle all have promotional scent ranges. This is something that you helped them develop, isn't it? I think this was during the pandemic. Am I right? So can you tell us about this? How did this happen?Liam Findlay: Well, it was a tricky time because all the parks were closed so the parks were wondering what to do while they were closed. And the parks were our customers as well, so we couldn't sell to them. So everyone was kind of out of action at that point. So we were kind of thinking of ways that we could engage people in our products for the parks and for us. So I think it was Thorpe Park we approached first and we just suggested that we could kind of release some of their smells that they used in their scare mazes and eventually it was Warwick Castle and the smells they used in their Kingmaker Experience and the Dungeons and their smells to make them available, branded under the scenes that they appear in those attractions so people could buy the Blacksmith smell at the Warwick Castle Kingmaker Experience. And that was a nice way to take people back to the attractions while they weren't able to visit.And it helped AromaPrime as well because we were kind of profiting from the customers of our customers in a way that everyone was kind of happy with because it was promoting the parks and the customers were happy because they were being taken back to the parks. There was one customer who contacted me and was thanking me for the opportunity to buy the smell of the Tomb Blaster ride at Chessington World of Adventures because her sister had autism and she was really struggling with the lockdown and being able to transport herself back to the ride through the smell during lockdown kind of brought her lots of comfort. So it turned out to be a kind of lovely and beneficial project for everyone, a nice way of adapting to the scenario.Kelly Molson: That is so wonderful, isn't it? By the power of smell, being able to be in your favourite place without being able to leave your house. That's incredible, what an amazing thing to have been able to do.Liam Findlay: Yeah, and fans really enjoy it. The Wicker Man Woodsmoke smell from Alton Towers is really popular and we get people that diffuse it in their living room and make all the lights red and they play the music and send us photos.Kelly Molson: That's taking true fan to a whole nother level, isn't it? Recreating the smell of your favourite attraction in your living room, wow. Okay, that's great. But there's other ways of using smells as well, isn't it? And I think this is something that you've been talking about quite a lot on LinkedIn that I was really interested in. A smell tour of Amsterdam has been developed. And you've been part of this, haven't you? So this isn't just about attractions, this is about tourism as well. Tell us about this. I don't fully understand what it is and how you've developed it.Liam Findlay: Well, this was run by Odeuropa, who I've been collaborating with a lot. And Odeuropa is a kind of global group of academics who are working to improve the ways that senses are used to tell historical stories and how they are used their museums. And one of their projects was this smell tour of Amsterdam and this was done through a scratch and sniff card. So my job was to illustrate the card and it was a map of Amsterdam so you could kind of follow a route and go to an apothecary that had a certain ingredient to its perfume that it once used or you could go down to the canals and smell what the canals used to smell like hundreds of years ago and kind of scratch as you went around. And they developed an app as well so you could kind of track where you were going.And that was a really nice way to engage people in history and they were able to access the stories themselves. They weren't just going through a museum and reading stuff, they were properly exploring and sniffing and taking it all in. And it was a really exciting way. It was throughout the month of September and the cards were available at Amsterdam Museum and it was an exciting way to get people enjoying and almost living the past because they were going through the real places where all this stuff happened.Kelly Molson: That's such a brilliant idea. So yeah, it's completely immersive, isn't it? You are in the area, you're doing a walking tour so you can see the places that are being described to you and then you can smell what they smell like a hundred years ago.Liam Findlay: Yeah, it was cool.Kelly Molson: Wow. That is really cool.Liam Findlay: Got lots of good responses.Kelly Molson: And I guess you worked with them in the same mode that you would an attraction, it's just understanding what used to be there, finding the smells that you already have and then bringing them all together into the scratch card.Liam Findlay: Yeah. In this case, Odeuropa already had the smells because they've been working on lots of different historical smells themselves like the smell of hell, I think based on a kind of 1700s painting, maybe it was another century.Kelly Molson: And what does hell smell like? Can you describe it to us?Liam Findlay: From what I understand, it's mostly fire and bodies.Kelly Molson: Burning hot stuff? Okay.Liam Findlay: But one of the members of Odeuropa had worked on an exhibition in The Hague where people could go around a gallery and they had paintings and smell puffers like foot pumps so they could pump it and a smell would come out and that would be the smell of the painting or of something that was in the painting. And it was a nice way to kind of engage them with the contents of the painting, kind of look a bit harder and think about what's making that smile and why did it smell that way? So Odeuropa already had lots of interesting smiles that they could incorporate into this.Kelly Molson: That's brilliant. I would absolutely go on a scratch and sniff tour of anywhere.Liam Findlay: Yeah, well it's a nice model because you can kind of apply it to any city or even, I don't know, an ancient school or a hospital or all sorts of places.Kelly Molson: And if you think, I guess there's just so many advantages to it as well for people that can't see the places that they're in but can still feel that emotive connection to them by being able to smell what those places smell like.Liam Findlay: Yeah, smell is very good in terms of accessibility because even if you're on a theme park ride and you're going along in a boat and maybe there are cannons going off, if you can't see the cannons or you can't hear the cannon sound effects, if you smell it, it kind of means that you're not missing out on the story.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's brilliant. I hope they do more of those, I'd be up for that.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: There's a quote that I read from you that said, "Smell is a form of mind control." It really resonated with me, especially because of some of the things that we've been talking about. But let's go back to what you started to talk about at the beginning of our interview was about the smells for care homes because you've worked on quite a few projects for those as well. And I think obviously this is not attraction related, but I just think this is such a wonderful thing to be able to use your skillset for. Tell us a little bit about what you've done.Liam Findlay: Well, care homes was one of the company's first kind of activities I suppose back in the seventies. I mean, back then it would be the smells of the 1920s that would be made to take people back into the past. And that's something interesting as well because the kind of residents who are always getting that bit older and the smells that will be familiar to them change gradually so we have to kind of think, okay, maybe World War smells, I saw on Twitter someone was complaining that their mother was being subjected to World War II songs, even though most care home residents probably weren't around back then anymore or at least a small number.So yeah, we've been producing nostalgic smells for care homes for a long time and it can be really nice if there's like carbolic soap for example is a popular one. If there's a smell that lots of people perhaps with dementia who will have personal memories with, it's a nice way of unlocking those memories, especially you tend not to lose your smell memory. So if you smell something from the past and even if you have memory problems, smelling that can kind of unlock something from years and years ago and bring back those memories and encourage conversation with the other residents that you might live with about their memories and then they'll kind of start talking about it and sniffing and it can be a nice way to lift spirits as well as bringing back memories.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's wonderful, isn't it? I saw the clip, and again this was in the clip that we will add into the show notes, but it was about the soap smell and the lady said, "Oh, it just makes me feel comfortable." It took her to a happier place where she just had really good memories of it and it was just such a lovely clip to see, you could almost see her face kind of light up with the smell because it took her back there instantly. It was just brilliant. And just think that's such a lovely thing to do.Liam Findlay: Yeah, there's a company called Rempods, which they make a kind of sets for all care homes like a recreated nostalgic pub from the sixties or a train carriage, that's quite a popular one. So like a wall and there's a window that's a screen and you can see the countryside going past. And we work with them quite a lot to supply smells to kind of bring that whole experience together. So that kind of ties into the theme entertainment as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's like a mini attraction in a care home with sense. That's incredible. I had no idea that that was even a possibility. What a brilliant thing to be able to do for people.Liam Findlay: Yeah. It could even be as simple as a memory box that. We have a customer who makes memory boxes for care homes, which are just kind of full of props and things that the residents might be familiar with and they include the smells as well. And that same customer, she is a funeral director and we have what are called aroma cubes, which are normally used by care homes and they're just little cubes you can pick up and sniff. And there was someone who was in her chapel of rest who had died and the person who had died had worked in a bakery so this funeral director had put the smell of bread in a little aroma cube just in the same room. And when her family, the person's family visited in the chapel, they could smell this and they just found it really kind of nice and it took them back to her bakery and it wasn't kind of gimmicky, the room wasn't full of bread smells, it was just a little thing that they could use to have a nice moment with. And it worked really well.Kelly Molson: That is so lovely. I was just thinking, because I lost my granddad a really, really long time ago, I think I was like 20 when I lost him. And if I could be in a room now and his smell would be Polos, he had Polos, pockets full of Polos everywhere, even when he passed away, all of his cardigans had Polo packets in them. And that would be the smell that would bring me back to him instantly. So I can completely imagine how comforted they were by smelling that. Oh, it sounds really lovely. Liam, I know that you're super busy at the moment because we are recording this at the beginning of October and Halloween is coming and everyone goes crazy at Halloween, right? So you've been busy since probably a good few months with people ordering in their smells. What's the most popular Halloween smell on order at the moment?Liam Findlay: I'd say the familiar one is the most popular because you want smells that are going to affect the largest range of people. So it will be things like vomit and poo and rotting flesh is actually popular. And I suppose not many people would be familiar with that.Kelly Molson: It's not a statement you hear very often, "Rotting flesh is very popular." It's not popular here.Liam Findlay: We've released a new blocked urine smell as well. Because we already had a urine smell, but I wanted to try something that had more of a kick to it. So we've got kind of two urine choices this year.Kelly Molson: Wow, wow. We've taken it to a whole new level of poo and wee smells on the podcast people. Liam, thank you for joining us today. I've thoroughly enjoyed talking about this and I think it's such a fascinating subject to talk about. So thanks for sharing your insight. We always ask our guests for a book that they'd like to recommend to us, something that they love or something that's helped them in some way. What would you like to share with us today?Liam Findlay: Mine is Theme Park Design and the Art of Themed Entertainment by David Younger. And this is like, I think-Kelly Molson: It's like a Bible, Liam. It's huge.Liam Findlay: Yeah. Well I was just going to say, lots of attraction designers kind of treat this as their Bible because it's like a big encyclopedia of everything to do with theme park design. So there's a bit about smells in it, there's a bit here about costumed characters, there's stuff on cues and how different cues work. So it's like anyone wants to go into theme park design or attraction design in general, even if it's like museums, this is a great resource.And actually David Younger, the author, I've just been working with him because he's started a Kickstarter for a video game that's based on a theme park sort of. And we've put together a scent collection of the different locations in the game so as people are playing, they can sniff the smells and kind of transport themselves into the world of the game.Kelly Molson: Oh, how cool. You must send over the link to us and then we can pop that in the show notes for any of the listeners that will be interested in it.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Okay. So look, as ever, I feel like this is going to be an expensive one for my marketing budget, because that looked like a really big book, Liam. But as ever, if you'd like to win a copy of this book, then if you pop over to our Twitter account and retweet the episode announcement with the words, "I want Liam's book," then you'll be in a chance of winning it. Liam, thank you for joining us on the podcast today. Good luck with Halloween, I know it's a really crazy busy time, but thank you for coming on and sharing all of your wonderful smells with us today.Liam Findlay: That's all right. Thank you for having me. It's been fun to talk about them.Kelly Molson:  Thanks for listening to Skip The Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

All Around Science
Why do we like being scared?

All Around Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:53


On today's episode: The same things that cause autoimmune diseases may have helped our ancestors survive the Black Death. It's Halloween! Let's talk about the science of why we like scary things! All that and more today on All Around Science. LINKS: [ARTICLE] Bubonic plague left lingering scars on the human genome THEME MUSIC by Andrew Allen https://twitter.com/KEYSwithSOUL http://andrewallenmusic.com

Ask Doctor Dawn
All about the longevity gene FOXO3, genetics and bubonic plague, bilirubin, eosinophils and more

Ask Doctor Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 50:39


KSQD 10-26-2022: Gene of the week: FOXO3 is important for longevity; States with conservatives policies have higher mortality statistics; Genes selected for survival during bubonic plague (the Black Death during Middle Ages) has increased risks for other diseases; Suppressing tumors before they are detectable by inhibiting blood vessel growth; Why are my eosinophils and bilirubin levels high? Patient diagnosed with intractable cervical radiculopathy may also have a cerebrospinal fluid leak

The Black Myths Podcast
Myth: Profiting Off Black Death Pt. 2

The Black Myths Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 120:02


For part 2, we delve deeper into part 2 of co-host Too Black's essay, "Laundering Black Rage." We cover the three phases in which Black Rage is laundered to serve white capital via the state. We explore how the tragedy of Black Death is used to funnel Black Rage into commodity form. Throughout this process, we note how class interests within the African diaspora are fundamental to laundering Black rage into a flattened form. In our modern time, Black Rage becomes situated around Black celebrities and upper-class interests thereby cleaning Black Rage of it's militancy. We hope this analysis helps our listeners understand how Black Death cannot by itself explain why people are profiting and/or benefitting from the struggle.  Pt. 1 https://blackagendareport.com/laundering-black-rage  Pt. 2  https://www.blackagendareport.com/laundering-black-rage-part-2 Patreon patreon.com/blackmyths

The Science Pawdcast
Season 4 Episode 34: Black Death, Dogs and Stress, and Dr. Derek Miller on LEDs and Lab Coats!!!

The Science Pawdcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 71:29


This week on The Science Pawdcast we chat about a new study that found survivors of the Black Death had a gene which increased their chances of survival BUT may be causing issues today for some folks!  In Pet Science, another science study concludes just how powerful the sense of smell is for dogs...with stress!  Our Guest in Ask and Expert is Material Sciences Engineer Dr. Derek Miller!  He chats with us about LED technology AND his passion to build a better lab coat!Dr. Miller's Links:https://twitter.com/geniuslabgeargeniuslabgear/com/bunsenhttps://geniuslabgear.com/pages/lab-coat-projectBunsen and Beaker Links:The Bunsen and Beaker Website has adorable merch with hundreds of different combinations of designs and apparel- all with Printful- one of the highest quality companies we could find!www.bunsenbernerbmd.comOur Spaces Sponsor: Bark and Beyond Supplyhttps://barkandbeyondsupply.com/Bunsen and Beaker on Twitter:https://twitter.com/bunsenbernerbmdBunsen and Beaker on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/bunsenberner.bmd/InstaBunsandBeakshttps://www.instagram.com/bunsenberner.bmd/?hl=enSupport the showFor Science, Empathy, and Cuteness!Being Kind is a Superpower.https://twitter.com/bunsenbernerbmd

The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove
Episode 360 - UK Politicians and Aussie Netballers

The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 67:33


In this episode we discuss: Black Death and Crohn's Truss to Rishi Sunak The lead up to the resignation How UK see it How Aussies see it How Germans see it Things that didn't age well Britain's Conservative Party is collapsing on itself Netballers and Hancock Mining Why there are no winners off the court in netball saga The Statement Just tax Gina Michael Jones Consistency Bilibili Lydia Thorpe Queensland Christian school principal asked students if they knew unmarried teacher lived with boyfriend What's wrong with America ep 360 Child labour Trump and USS John McCain Sanctions Face Slapping How to decide whom to train as RAF fighter pilots How to support the Podcast Make a per episode donation via https://www.patreon.com/ironfistvelvetglove (Patreon) or Donate through https://www.patreon.com/ironfistvelvetglove (Paypal) and tell your friends.

This Week In Video Games
111: Plague Tale Requiem and Scorn plus Silent Hill returns

This Week In Video Games

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 48:47


This week I've been playing A Plague Tale: Requiem, where Hugo and Amacia take on the Black Death. I've also been getting ready for Halloween by checking out Scorn, plus we've had showcases from the Silent Hill team and Resident Evil too. All that plus I'll be saying goodbye to Google Stadia, plus checking in on the state of seasonal events in Destiny 2. Timestamps 00:00 Introduction 03:42 A Plague Tale Requiem review 09:34 Scorn review 15:30 Silent Hill returns 21:02 Charts 22:45 Goodbye Google Stadia 31:47 Resident Evil Showcase 35:52 Festival of the Lost and the State of Seasonal Events in Destiny 2 45:07 Games coming soon Google Stadia Shutting Down https://www.polygon.com/23378721/google-stadia-shutting-down Stadia shutdown shocked developers https://www.theverge.com/2022/9/30/23381106/google-stadia-shutdown-shocked-developers-too Resident Evil https://kotaku.com/resident-evil-showcase-october-re4-remake-village-dlc-1849684286 Silent Hill https://www.eurogamer.net/silent-hill-is-back-but-is-it-too-much-too-soon RELATED LINKS Support This Week In Video Games through Patreon by becoming a member https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinvideogames Check out the MERCH store https://this-week-in-video-games-store.creator-spring.com/ Subscribe to This Week In Video Games YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyIiL5xk1ut5HY6pPnBUXlQ Rate & Review the podcast https://ratethispodcast.com/thisweekinvideogames More ways to listen https://anchor.fm/this-week-in-video-games https://gopod.me/thisweekinvideogames Music by Christian Hounslow and Jaya McQuaid.

Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
Brain cells play pong, genes for surviving the Black Death, a penguins extra egg, black hole burps and a natural history of spirits

Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 54:11


Brain cells play Pong; DNA shows the Black Death had a huge impact on our evolution; This penguin lays two eggs so it can throw one away; Black hole's digestive delays; In time for a Halloween tipple? A new book about the science of spirits;

The Black Myths Podcast
Myth: Profiting Off Black Death

The Black Myths Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 92:08


In this episode, we discuss the (partial) myth of profiting off Black Death. Although Black Death is certainly profitable, the claim is often an incomplete critique that misses other critical elements driving the profit—particularly, Black Rage. Using the recent essay published by co-host Too Black—"Laundering Black Rage"—as a framework, we investigate how regularly Black Death occurs and how many of the opportunities created to profit and benefit from Black Death are also generated by exploiting Black Rage. Without Black Rage and the labor that follows there would not be money for an organization like BLM global to hoard, book deals to cash in on, or diversity jobs to fill. More broadly, we discuss how money laundering functions via capitalism and thus precipitates the laundering of Black Rage to ultimately serve the class interests of white capital via the State. By understanding crucial the role Black Rage plays in this process the better we can recognize our own agency in reverse-laundering it.  Laundering Black Rage Pt. 1 https://blackagendareport.com/laundering-black-rage Pt. 2 (We will discuss this in part 2 of the series) https://www.blackagendareport.com/laundering-black-rage-part-2 Patreon patreon.com/blackmyths    

Dead Ringers
Dead Ringers 58 - THEY LIVE + SOCIETY

Dead Ringers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 176:34


Nolan is joined by Emily von Seele, Paul Farrell, Philip Yount, and Ben McBride to discuss John Carpenter's THEY LIVE (1988) and Brian Yuzna's SOCIETY (1989). The crew dive into new discoveries, rewatches, and recent releases before uncovering a gooey conspiracy that threatens all of humanity. Other movies discussed on this episode: BARBARIAN (2022), GLORIOUS (2022), THE CRAZIES (1973), VIDEODROME (1983), EVIL DEAD (2013), ORPHAN (2009), ORPHAN: FIRST KILL (2022), JAWS (1975), HELLRAISER (1987), HELLBOUND: HELLRAISER II (1988), HELLRAISER III: HELL ON EARTH (1992), HELLRAISER: BLOODLINE (1996), TALES FROM THE CRYPT: DEMON KNIGHT (1995), TALES FROM THE CRYPT: BORDELLO OF BLOOD (1996), DEATH BECOMES HER (1992), I'M DANGEROUS TONIGHT (1990), WHO INVITED THEM (2022), NO EXIT (2022), BLACK DEATH (2010). Links of interest and/or sources cited for research on this episode: Fantastic Fest 2022 Review: V/H/S/99 is Another Fun Entry in the Horror Anthology Series by Emily von Seele (Daily Dead) Fantastic Fest 2022 Review: David Bruckner's HELLRAISER Builds Upon Clive Barker's World in Horrifyingly Beautiful Ways by Emily von Seele (Daily Dead) SWALLOWED Review: An Incredible Queer Body Horror Film You Won't Soon Forget by Emily von Seele (Dead Ringers) [North Bend Film Fest] NEXT EXIT Review: A Beautiful Story of Humanity in the Face of Uncertainty by Emily von Seele (Dead Ringers) ‘The Werewolf of Fever Swamp' – One of the Best ‘Goosebumps' Stories on Page and Screen [Viewer Beware] by Paul Farrell (Bloody Disgusting) ‘Disney's Halloween Treat' – 40 Years of Disney's Spooky Halloween Special by Paul Farrell (Bloody Disgusting) Knight Philtorias (Twitch)

NWCZradio's Down The Rabbit Hole

what was the black death and what caused it? Listen in as Brandon goes down the Rabbit Hole and looks into the history of the black death. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nwczradios-dtrh/message

Kottke Ride Home
Thu. 10/20 - How the Black Death Changed Our Genes

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 16:08


How the Black Death changed the course of human evolution. Plus, the exoplanet with a marshmallow-like atmosphere. And IKEA is testing out autonomous delivery vehicles.Sponsor:Shopify, Get a 14-day free trial at shopify.com/coolLinks:The Black Death Shaped Human Evolution, And We're Still in Its Shadow (ScienceAlert)The Black Death shaped the evolution of immunity genes, setting the course for how we respond to disease today, researchers find (EurekAlert)Black Death etched a mark on our genetics, warping immune responses, study finds (Ars Technica)How the Black Death changed our immune systems (Science)A Fluffy 'Marshmallow' World Has Been Discovered With Incredibly Low Density (ScienceAlert)'Marshmallow' world orbiting a cool red dwarf star (Phys.org)We've Found A ‘Marshmallow' Planet That Would Float In A Bathtub, Say Scientists (Forbes)Ikea Is Testing Autonomous Delivery in Texas (Gizmodo)Ikea is trialing driverless truck deliveries in Texas (Engadget)IKEA teams with self-driving truck startup Kodiak Robotics to test deliveries in Texas (CNBC)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Missing Princeton University student Misrach Ewunetie found dead TikTok Parent ByteDance Planned To Use TikTok To Monitor The Physical Location Of Specific American Citizens Black Death 700 years ago affects your health now Steve Bannon Former Trump strategist facing jail time in contempt case New York court dismisses Kevin Spacey sexual assault lawsuit Harry Dunn Anne Sacoolas admits causing crash death Two security incidents occur at Supreme Court in same hour Alleged Raleigh gunman was found with bullet wound and handgun The Crown Dame Judi Dench accuses Netflix hit of crude sensationalism Trump taps firm to handle his Jan. 6 committee subpoena Trump questioned in court over rape accusers defamation case Federal court rules Georgia prosecutors can force Lindsey Graham to testify Nova Scotia shooting Inquiry releases audio of RCMP commissioner call Ukraine war Iranian drone experts on the ground in Crimea US Liz Truss resigns as prime minister after Tory revolt Justice Barrett rejects groups effort to block Bidens student debt relief program from taking effect Chess cheating row Hans Niemann sues accusers Magnus Carlsen and Chess.com for libel

News Headlines in Morse Code at 10 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Liz Truss resigns as prime minister after Tory revolt Missing Princeton University student Misrach Ewunetie found dead The Crown Dame Judi Dench accuses Netflix hit of crude sensationalism Alleged Raleigh gunman was found with bullet wound and handgun Two security incidents occur at Supreme Court in same hour Black Death 700 years ago affects your health now Nova Scotia shooting Inquiry releases audio of RCMP commissioner call Ukraine war Iranian drone experts on the ground in Crimea US New York court dismisses Kevin Spacey sexual assault lawsuit Chess cheating row Hans Niemann sues accusers Magnus Carlsen and Chess.com for libel Federal court rules Georgia prosecutors can force Lindsey Graham to testify Trump questioned in court over rape accusers defamation case Harry Dunn Anne Sacoolas admits causing crash death Steve Bannon Former Trump strategist facing jail time in contempt case Justice Barrett rejects groups effort to block Bidens student debt relief program from taking effect TikTok Parent ByteDance Planned To Use TikTok To Monitor The Physical Location Of Specific American Citizens Trump taps firm to handle his Jan. 6 committee subpoena

News Headlines in Morse Code at 10 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Liam Hampson Australian rugby league player found dead in Spanish club Liz Trusss Ailing Government Sinks to New Low in Commons Vote Chaos Bloomberg Trump Set To Be Deposed In E. Jean Carroll Rape Defamation Case Giraffe kills toddler in South Africa game park Trump questioned in court over rape accusers defamation case College wrestlers mauled in gruesome grizzly bear attack Oklahoma murders of 4 friends very rare, police chief says as investigation ramps up Joe Bidens unusual fight to bring down gas prices Black Death 700 years ago affects your health now US reminds pro Putin Hungary its a Western ally Ukrainians told to charge everything as power grid hit by Russia Judge Trump Knew Voter Fraud Claims Were False MSNBC Child sex abuse Failing to report it should be made illegal major inquiry Ukrainians told to charge everything as power grid hit by Russia I failed Kevin de Le n tells CBS2 he is refusing to resign from LA City Council Truss future as PM more uncertain after day of disarray U.S. has viewed wreckage of kamikaze drones Russia used in Ukraine Whos growing and whos shrinking Enrollment numbers released for Utah institutions Abolfazl Adinezadeh Teenage protester shot dead by security forces sources

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv I failed Kevin de Le n tells CBS2 he is refusing to resign from LA City Council College wrestlers mauled in gruesome grizzly bear attack U.S. has viewed wreckage of kamikaze drones Russia used in Ukraine Trump Set To Be Deposed In E. Jean Carroll Rape Defamation Case Child sex abuse Failing to report it should be made illegal major inquiry Black Death 700 years ago affects your health now Joe Bidens unusual fight to bring down gas prices Trump questioned in court over rape accusers defamation case Judge Trump Knew Voter Fraud Claims Were False MSNBC Liam Hampson Australian rugby league player found dead in Spanish club Abolfazl Adinezadeh Teenage protester shot dead by security forces sources Giraffe kills toddler in South Africa game park Oklahoma murders of 4 friends very rare, police chief says as investigation ramps up Ukrainians told to charge everything as power grid hit by Russia Truss future as PM more uncertain after day of disarray Ukrainians told to charge everything as power grid hit by Russia Liz Trusss Ailing Government Sinks to New Low in Commons Vote Chaos Bloomberg Whos growing and whos shrinking Enrollment numbers released for Utah institutions US reminds pro Putin Hungary its a Western ally

Bullet Sponge
Fantasy Film Review | The Seventh Seal

Bullet Sponge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 12:44


The Seventh Seal is a 1957 Swedish historical fantasy film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman. Set in Sweden during the Black Death, it tells of the journey of a medieval knight and a game of chess he plays with the personification of Death, who has come to take his life. Bergman developed the film from his own play Wood Painting. The title refers to a passage from the Book of Revelation, used both at the very start of the film, and again towards the end, beginning with the words "And when the Lamb had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour". Here, the motif of silence refers to the "silence of God", which is a major theme of the film.

Story Mode
We Just Watched... Black Death

Story Mode

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 46:43


Our heroes watch an underrated film about how the olden days sucked ass.

Wyrd Realities
Double Double Toil & Trouble - Witch Movies on Watching Wyrd

Wyrd Realities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 73:51


Streamed live on Oct 6, 2022 Join the Watching Wyrd team as they honor the witches of cinema. Black Death is a 2010 German–British action horror film directed by Christopher Smith from an original screenplay by Dario Poloni. It stars Sean Bean, Eddie Redmayne and Carice van Houten. The Last Witch Hunter is a 2015 American fantasy action film directed by Breck Eisner and written by Cory Goodman, Matt Sazama, and Burk Sharpless. The film stars Vin Diesel as an immortal witch hunter who must stop a plague from ravaging the entire world. Hocus Pocus is a 1993 American fantasy comedy film that follows a villainous comedic trio of witches who are inadvertently resurrected by a teenage boy in Salem, Massachusetts, on Halloween night. Stardust is a 2007 romantic fantasy adventure film directed by Matthew Vaughn and co-written by Vaughn and Jane Goldman. Based on Neil Gaiman's 1999 novel of the same name, it features an ensemble cast led by Claire Danes, Charlie Cox, Sienna Miller, Ricky Gervais, Jason Flemyng, Rupert Everett, Peter O'Toole, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Robert De Niro, with narration by Ian McKellen. www.wyrdrealities.net linktr.ee/wyrdrealities --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wyrd-realities/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wyrd-realities/support

Get in Loser, We’re Doing Witchcraft
Episode 33: Spooktober Superstitions

Get in Loser, We’re Doing Witchcraft

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 65:56


Welcome back Witches! It's officially Spooktober, which means we're bringing the spooky ALL month long!!!  In this week's episode we're throwing all the Halloween superstitions your way, and let me tell you... there are some crazy ones in the mix!  So get in losers, and lets learn what not to do on Halloween with Spooktober Superstitions!! We would be forever thankful if you leave our podcast a 5-Star review. If you really loved the show and want more Get in Loser content, check out our Supercast link below, or search the Supercast website for Get in Loser, We're Doing Witchcraft. You can also find us at our Buy Me a Coffee link below.  There you can purchase a membership to our podcast and obtain exclusives like, getting episodes early, shout outs on the show, access to our “Ask me anything” forum, our monthly newsletter, a promo code for merchandise, and more. You can also find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @GetinWitches, on TikTok @weredoingwitchcraft or email us at weredoingwitchcraft@gmail.com. You  can support our show through our Supercast: https://getinloserweredoingwitchcraft.supercast.com/ Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/getinwitches   Music by Darren Curtis- My Dark Passenger ----more---- References Lovejoy, Bess. 12 (Mostly) Spooky Halloween Superstitions. (2017, updated 2020). Mental Floss. https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/511071/spooky-halloween-superstitions?fbclid=IwAR2CUCLXZfJOMmRb6c_EIoqhHWC4A7SauBPKqUq2snL5f56Awvh2akqpYL8 Melina, Remy. 13 Halloween Superstitions & Traditions Explained. (2011). Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/16677-halloween-superstitions-traditions/2.html Ward, Jason. Did Pope Gregory IX's Hatred of Cats Lead to the Black Death. (2021). Medium. https://medium.com/illumination-curated/did-pope-gregory-ixs-hatred-of-cats-lead-to-the-black-death-327d163adfb2  Harte, Jeremy. (October 2019). Michaelmas: The Day the Devil Spits on the Blackberries? Folklore Thursday. https://folklorethursday.com/folklife/michaelmas-the-devils-blackberry-day/ Monaghan (1 November). The Puca, and Blackberries after Halloween. The Fading Year. https://thefadingyear.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/the-puca-and-blackberries-after-halloween/ Spooky Wales- Noson Calan Gaeaf. (n.d.). BBC- Bitesize. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zbkdcqt History.com Editors. (2020). How Jack O'Lanterns Originated in Irish Myth. History.Com. https://www.history.com/news/history-of-the-jack-o-lantern-irish-origins  Smith, Ashley. (2016). Spiders- A Web of Superstitions on Halloween. Ehrlich. https://www.jcehrlich.com/blog/spiders-a-web-of-superstitions-on-halloween/ Buzz Staff. (2021). Where did Dressing up in Halloween Costumes Originate From? News 18. https://www.news18.com/news/buzz/where-did-dressing-up-in-halloween-costumes-originate-from-4244666.html Fabry, Merrill. (2015). A Brief History of Mischief Night. TIME. https://time.com/4093505/mischief-night-history/ Youtube:Brittney Crabb Strange in Maine

Clash Of The Titles
Black Death vs The Witch: Part 2

Clash Of The Titles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 92:13


300 episodes in and what better way to celebrate than with our second episode of Clashaween!! Clashaween is our spectacularly spooky lead up to the scariest night of the year. In our first episode we discussed 2010's Black Death, so this time we're turning to The Witch (2015)! A baby kidnapping is just the start of the chilling trauma a Puritan family experience on their New England farm. It's got all the ingredients for a brilliant scary film, but is it better than Black Death? Let's find out!***Please rate and review us on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your pods. It means a lot and makes it easy for other people to find us. Thank you!*** Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Clash Of The Titles
Black Death vs The Witch: Part 1

Clash Of The Titles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 94:08


Welcome to the first episode of the Clashoween countdown! In the lead up to the best night of the year we will be pitting scary, horror films in the ultimate barbaric battle. First up is 2010's Black Death, after the bubonic plague breaks out in England, killing hundreds of people, there is a report which states that some people are miraculously surviving. No better man to investigate than a monk. While in the blue corner we have 2015's The Witch, a horror film which Chris says he can't watch again… We're off to a strong start, it's Clashoween!***Please rate and review us on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your pods. It means a lot and makes it easy for other people to find us. Thank you!*** Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

FORward Radio program archives
Bench Talk | Marie Curie in Theater - Nanobodies vs. Cancer - Story of 12 Soils | October 3, 2022

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 28:59


A theatrical production of 'The Half-Life of Marie Curie' is playing at Bellarmine University (Louisville, KY) this week. Then, hear an interview with Ruby Mason (University of Louisville) on her research on 'Development of Novel Biologic Inhibitors to Target the Phosphatase PRL-3 in Cancers'. Then, Presley Woodrum Nickens (Murray State University) speaks on her research on 'Evaluating Topsoil Health Under Different Management Conditions: An Important Indicator for Sustainable Agriculture'. This show is interspersed with some of the latest science headlines on topics like cloned arctic wolves, Black Death, dogs that can smell our stress, and recently detected radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. ‘Bench Talk: The Week in Science' is a weekly program that airs on WFMP Louisville FORward Radio 106.5 FM (forwardradio.org) every Monday at 7:30 pm, Tuesday at 11:30 am, and Wednesday at 7:30 am. Visit our Facebook page for links to the articles discussed in this episode: https://www.facebook.com/pg/BenchTalkRadio/posts/?ref=page_internal Public-domain music is by Kevin MacLeod: 'Meditating Beat'.

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)
Episode 306 - Edgar Barrier

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 114:51 Very Popular


A frequent collaborator of Orson Welles, Edgar Barrier appeared with the Mercury Theatre onstage and on radio and he played Banquo in Welles' film version of Macbeth. Elsewhere, Barrier hunted the Phantom of the Opera on the big screen and voiced Simon Templar on radio. We'll hear him as a scientist trying to prevent an outbreak of plague in "Black Death" (originally aired on CBS on August 2, 1955) and as a man hunting for his ancestor's pirate booty in "The Treasure Chest of Don Jose" (originally aired on CBS on June 26, 1956). We'll also hear Barrier in "The Projective Mr. Drogan" from Lights Out (originally aired on CBS on January 26, 1943) and as Julius Caesar in "Twenty-Three Knives Against Caesar" from Crime Classics (originally aired on CBS on February 10, 1954).

Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend
Aguerotic Flux

Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 23:24 Very Popular


Conan talks with historian Joris in the Netherlands about the Black Death, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and what historical disease Conan would personally design. Wanna get a chance to talk to Conan? Submit here: TeamCoco.com/CallConan

Horror House: True Crime and The Macabre
Episode 33: 'The Black Death'

Horror House: True Crime and The Macabre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 71:21


The mother of all plagues, The Bubonic Plague, also known as 'The Black Death' ravaged Western Eurasia and North Africa between 1346 and 1353, killing an estimated 75 million to 200 million people, and wiping out a third of Europe. Join me and Horror House's amazing new co-host, Amy, as we get our plague on! *Unfortunately the episode contains some audio hiccups that I was unable to fix in post. Hopefully you still enjoy! . https://www.horrorhousetruecrime.com/ (https://www.horrorhousetruecrime.com/) Come hang out on the Cultiv8 Discord! https://discord.gg/4zVbvd7Hek (https://discord.gg/4zVbvd7Hek) Insta and Twitter: @horrorhouse_pod . Promos from Spoils of Horror and Torture Podcast

New Books Network
James Belich, "The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 70:39


In 1346, a catastrophic plague beset Europe and its neighbours. The Black Death was a human tragedy that abruptly halved entire populations and caused untold suffering, but it also brought about a cultural and economic renewal on a scale never before witnessed. The World the Plague Made is a panoramic history of how the bubonic plague revolutionized labour, trade, and technology and set the stage for Europe's global expansion. In The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe (Princeton University Press, 2022) Dr. James Belich takes readers across centuries and continents to shed new light on one of history's greatest paradoxes. Why did Europe's dramatic rise begin in the wake of the Black Death? Belich shows how the plague doubled the per capita endowment of everything even as it decimated the population. Many more people had disposable incomes. Demand grew for silks, sugar, spices, furs, gold, and slaves. Europe expanded to satisfy that demand—and the plague provided the means. Labour scarcity drove more use of waterpower, wind power, and gunpowder. Technologies like water-powered blast furnaces, heavily gunned galleons, and musketry were fast-tracked by plague. A new “crew culture” of “disposable males” emerged to man the guns and galleons. Setting the rise of Western Europe in a global context, Belich demonstrates how the mighty empires of the Middle East and Russia also flourished after the plague, and how European expansion was deeply entangled with the Chinese and other peoples throughout the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
James Belich, "The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 70:39


In 1346, a catastrophic plague beset Europe and its neighbours. The Black Death was a human tragedy that abruptly halved entire populations and caused untold suffering, but it also brought about a cultural and economic renewal on a scale never before witnessed. The World the Plague Made is a panoramic history of how the bubonic plague revolutionized labour, trade, and technology and set the stage for Europe's global expansion. In The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe (Princeton University Press, 2022) Dr. James Belich takes readers across centuries and continents to shed new light on one of history's greatest paradoxes. Why did Europe's dramatic rise begin in the wake of the Black Death? Belich shows how the plague doubled the per capita endowment of everything even as it decimated the population. Many more people had disposable incomes. Demand grew for silks, sugar, spices, furs, gold, and slaves. Europe expanded to satisfy that demand—and the plague provided the means. Labour scarcity drove more use of waterpower, wind power, and gunpowder. Technologies like water-powered blast furnaces, heavily gunned galleons, and musketry were fast-tracked by plague. A new “crew culture” of “disposable males” emerged to man the guns and galleons. Setting the rise of Western Europe in a global context, Belich demonstrates how the mighty empires of the Middle East and Russia also flourished after the plague, and how European expansion was deeply entangled with the Chinese and other peoples throughout the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross
Natalie Ross + Naomi Love on the Great Witch Hunts & Killing for Followers [episode 96]

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 109:38 Very Popular


Content warning - while we're not getting graphically gorey, this is an intense topic that still resonates with the challenges we face today in a society ruled by supremacy. Pay attention to your body and your needs, and if it's too much, pause or turn it off. Natalie + Naomi share how prosecuting witches was a marketing technique by the Protestant church to gain followers. You'll also hear about: What is - a witch, witchcraft, paganism, Wicca, a heretic, the Great Witch Hunts? The witch wound and the sisterhood wound  The link between the Great Witch Hunt and the Black Death  ♥♥♥ Join The Earth Speak Collective Membership! Join like-hearted folks in a sacred container and community where you'll: Connect deeply to yourself, others, nature & spirit Learn to trust your intuition Activate your Earth magic Expand your healing & divination skills Put your intuition into practice in everyday life Stop feeling lonely on your spiritual path Embody & express your creative power & truths Experience safe space without agenda or judgment When you join the Collective, you get access to all of our past workshops, any live workshops happening while you're a member, live weekly energetic reset calls, monthly community rituals, all the secret episodes, member-run meetups to explore magical topics, and a lively members-only forum (that's not on FB!). ▶▶▶ Learn more and sign up for the Collective membership here: https://www.earthspeak.love/collective ***** Natalie Ross helps magical entrepreneurs tweak their marketing, so they can reach more of the people they're meant to serve. She helps them go from feeling overwhelmed and not knowing how to talk about what they do to creating content that's fun and brings in more sales. She also produces the Earth Speak podcast and runs a community about connecting more deeply with self, others, nature and spirit. Learn more at www.earthspeak.love. Naomi Love is a ceremonialist & medicine woman with over thirty years of experience working with tens of thousands of clients and students around the world.Naomi is the Creatress of Wise Womb Medicine Path, an Earth medicine school guiding you through the Holy Trinity Blueprint of Womb Healing.She trains trauma-informed ceremonialists, Somatic Womb Mentors & Somatic Womb Therapists worldwide.IG: @wisewomboracle www.wisewombmedicinepath.com   In this episode, we talk about: The Witch wound  Reclaiming + geeking out on what really is a witch What it truly means to Natalie and Naomi to embody being a witch  Being nature-oriented, and finding safety in nature ‘ How we continue to perpetuate the stereotypes about witches Womb-witch, green-witch, word-witch  Working in co-creation with living lifeforce energies  Marketing and devising a common enemy to create unity  How prosecuting witches was a marketing technique by the Protestant church to gain followers  Natalie and Naomi share some of the dirty politics and ways witches have been tortured and forced to prove their innocence  The myth of purity  The outlawing of nature worship in the late 900s  Collective fawning and why we feel like we have to make ourselves small and appease others  The worldview of the dominator  Killing for followers  The modern-day witch hunts The link between the Great Witch Hunt and the Black Death  The sisterhood wound  The art of relating to the human and more-than-human Co-creation vs domination  On gravitating toward a guru   Naomi shares about her upcoming free virtual Womb Healing Retreat! And so much more!  Secret Episode! Get access to past secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret. Earth Speak Links: Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Become an Earth Speak Sponsor and reach more of the people you're meant to serve www.earthspeak.love/sponsor  Support the Earth Speak Podcast and purchase our t-shirt  Support Earth Speak and make a donation  Get the secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret Guest Links: Learn more about Naomi's offerings at www.wisewombmedicinepath.com Connect with Naomi on Instagram @wisewomboracle // https://www.instagram.com/wisewomboracle/  Learn more about Natalie's offerings at www.natalie.net Connect with Natalie on Instagram @natalie.alexandra.ross // https://www.instagram.com/natalie.alexandra.ross/  & @natalierossmedia // https://www.instagram.com/natalierossmedia/   References: Native Land https://native-land.ca/   Stuff You Should Know podcast https://www.iheart.com/podcast/105-stuff-you-should-know-26940277/   Witch-hunt https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witch-hunt  Paganism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paganism  Wicca https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicca  Witchcraft https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witchcraft  Celtic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celts  Animism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism  Kinship https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinship  Tantra https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tantra  Tattered Cover bookstore https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattered_Cover  Naomi Love on the Witches and Wine Podcast https://www.wisewombmedicinepath.com/musings/2020/2/7/witches-and-wine-interview  Museum of Witchcraft and Magic https://museumofwitchcraftandmagic.co.uk/  Occult https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occult  Split-leaf philodendron https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monstera_deliciosa  Herbalism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbal_medicine  Sharman https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shamanism  Kundalini https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kundalini  Protestantism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestantism  Catholic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church  Charlemagne https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne  Heretics https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heresy  Scapegoat https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scapegoat  Tv series || The Tudors https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tudors   Laws of Athelstan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86thelstan   Stonehenge https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge  Pope Alexander the IV https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Alexander_IV  Protestant reformation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reformation  Constructs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_constructionism#Definition  Sovereignty https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereignty  Documentary || Inside the Mind of Cats https://www.imdb.com/title/tt21340412/  Black Death https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death  Mongoose https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongoose  Book || The Hammer of Witches / The Malleus Maleficarum https://amz.run/5xnS  Gerald Gardner https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Gardner_(Wiccan)  Joan of Arc https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_Arc  Yogi Bhajan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harbhajan_Singh_Khalsa  Apotropaic magic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apotropaic_magic  Witchy Resources and References: Book || Witches and Pagans by Max Dashu https://amz.run/5xnM Scott Cunningham https://amz.run/5xoF  Book || The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America https://amz.run/5xnV  Book || The Witch: A History of Fear, From Ancient Times to the Present https://amz.run/5xnX  Book || High Magic's Aid https://amz.run/5xnY  Book || The God of the Witches https://amz.run/5xnZ  Book || The Gnostic Religion https://amz.run/5xna  Pagan studies scholar Ethan Doyle White https://independent.academia.edu/EthanDoyleWhite  Journey into Witchcraft Beliefs https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/learn/histories/journey-into-witchcraft-beliefs  Madeline Montalban https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madeline_Montalban  Witchcraft: Eight Myths and Misconceptions https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/learn/histories/eight-witchcraft-myths  Ten Common Errors and Myths about the Witch Hunts, Corrected and Commented http://www.brianpavlac.org/witchhunts/werrors.html  What really happened during the Salem Witch Trials https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVd8kuufBhM  Wicca: History, Belief, and Community in Modern Pagan Witchcraft https://www.academia.edu/12229695/Doyle_White_E_2016_Wicca_History_Belief_and_Community_in_Modern_Pagan_Witchcraft_Sussex_Academic_Press    ► Leave us a written review on iTunes, and get shouted out on the show! Theme music is “It's Easier” by Scarlet Crow http://www.scarletcrow.org/ and “Meeting Again” by Emily Sprague  https://mlesprg.info/ ► Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Follow Earth Speak on I