Podcast appearances and mentions of Vincent van Gogh

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Dutch post-impressionist painter

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Artfully Told
Episode 073 - Sandy Woodson

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:06


In today's episode, I welcome Sandy Woodson! Sandy is a filmmaker and photographer who recently quit her 9-5 to be a full-time documentarian. She discusses her experiences helping to share the stories of those whose voices have been historically silenced in Kansas City, including in the LBGTQ communities, and also about her passion for widening the audience for all artists in KC, whether they produce art for major companies or for their own small shows. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode displays a tulip flag from Womontown, which you can read more about in the full episode notes.)   Get in touch with Sandy Woodson: sandywoodson12@gmail.com Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   More about Sandy's project "Womontown:" In the late 1980s, Drea Nedelsky and Maryann Hopper had a vision.  They imagined a neighborhood where they could be themselves without fear,  a place where women could walk hand in hand down the street without the judgments and criticisms normally encountered in the straight world. Drea picked the Longfellow / Dutch Hill neighborhood from 30th to 27th, Harrison to Charlotte, because it was cheap. This was a neighborhood that had once housed Kansas City's elite but had fallen on hard times by the time the 80s rolled around.  Drea saw the economic benefits and security home ownership could provide and wanted to make that available for the people like them who were on the edges of society and faced countless discriminations not only because they were lesbians but because they were women.  In the late 80s and early 90s, a woman in Kansas City could not get a home loan on her own.  She needed a parent or husband to cosign. Being handy, Drea had no fear buying a house with no windows, electricity or plumbing even though it was next to an apartment building that housed drug dealers. Drea could see a future of like-minded women, buying these beat up, cheap houses and helping each other fix them up to make homes.  So Drea and Maryann put the word out and lesbians from all over the United States responded by coming to KC, buying houses and setting up a new community. As an organized effort, it lasted about 5 years, but the ripple it created is something that 30 years later can still be seen and felt.   Episode 73 - Sandy Woodson [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I am so excited to have as my guest today, Sandy Woodson. She is a documentarian, which I am so excited to hear all about how that journey came about. But thank you so much for being here, Sandy. I'm really excited to talk with you about art. [00:02:35] Sandy Woodson: I'm excited to be here. Thanks for the invite. [00:02:38] Lindsey Dinneen: Of course, absolutely. Well, Sandy, you know, you and I met through Kansas City Fringe Festival, which I have talked about many, many times on this podcast because I think it's such a special thing. But I would love if you wouldn't mind, maybe we could start there, sharing a little bit about how you've helped the festival over the years and even your own participation and then go from there. [00:03:01] Sandy Woodson: Okay. Yeah, it was somewhere around 2009 or 2010. We haven't really been able to remember between Cheryl and I, but early on, I was in a freelance mode. I was contracting with KCPT or KCPS. But I was just contracting and I had some open time and somehow or another, I think I first talked to Cheryl because I wanted to create an app that all the festivals in Kansas City could be listed on. I knew through the film festival, Kansas City Film Festival, introduced me to Cheryl to talk about that. And then as always, you know, if you talk to Cheryl, you become a volunteer pretty quickly for the Fringe Festival. So that's what happened. And at the time I had extra time, so I got involved with, you know, I jumped in with both feet and also, that was the first time I really started displaying photography. I've always been interested in it. I've always had it as a hobby. And I actually did some photography for Fringe that year. I believe it was that year. And I've pretty much done it every year since then. I haven't been as involved in the last couple of years, but in all the years leading up to that, I was pretty involved in the organization side of it. [00:04:17] Lindsey Dinneen: For sure. Yeah. And, oh my gosh, I know you, you know, basically once, well, even beforehand, but certainly once the festival starts, you're hitting the ground running like literally almost 24/7. [00:04:30] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. For a lot of years, it was like that. And then, like I say, the last couple of years, I kind of stepped back a little bit because my work started to get more intense. And so I didn't have as much time as I used to. [00:04:44] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, for sure. Well, are you planning to still, you know, participate in some ways and, and continue to exhibit your own work? [00:04:53] Sandy Woodson: Yeah, absolutely. And hoping to get now that I'm not nine to five, full-time somewhere. I'm hoping to get more involved with the festival next year, too. I'm happy that it looks like we're going to be able to meet in person again. That'll be awesome. [00:05:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, hallelujah. I'm so ready for that. Okay. Yeah. Well, yeah. Thank you for sharing a little bit about that. And then, you know, specifically with your artwork, do you want to share what you kind of focus on as far as your photography? [00:05:26] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. So early on, my big thing was kind of spawned by the fact that I've, you know, had the way I put it-- I went to one too many bad photography exhibits where it's nothing but naked women. And I was like, so where all the naked men, you know, so I kind of got started on that path and did that for quite a few years. I was helped by that with not only Fringe where I could literally post, you know, or hang whatever kind of photos I want to do. At the time April McInerney, who I love, had a gallery called Slap and Tickle Gallery. And so she really opened things up for me. There was one time where she let me take over the whole gallery space and I hung, I had probably four or five different themes or years of work that I hung up. And then I set up a little area with rope and stanchion and a TV and a recliner and a cooler. And I said, I had a sign that said the "North American Male in his Native Habitat." And I had different guys show up every half hour to sit in the chair and do whatever they wanted to do. I was like, I don't care what you do. We just kind of want to here's guys. And here's what they do because that kind of went with the theme of all the photography I'd been doing the years leading up to that. [00:06:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, and that is an interesting thing. Again, native habitat. I like it. Yeah. And what a cool opportunity to get to take over that gallery, so to speak and that's awesome. [00:06:56] Sandy Woodson: Oh yeah, she was so awesome. I mean, she let the gallery go a few years ago. But you know, with Fringe, I was always able to do two sets of photography every year because they had a blue gallery or the gallery where the naked stuff went and so for Fringe, I'd always have something everybody could see and then something people not everybody could see. And April, her gallery, it was like whatever I wanted to put in there. Yeah, so it was an awesome time. And in the years since then, particularly in the last couple of years, I have been documenting LGBT history in Kansas City or what I'm hoping, you know, history in the making, things that are happening now that in the future, hopefully somebody will want to look back at and see, but so that's mostly what I've been doing with my photography since I haven't. Since Fringe has been virtual-- well I say that-- this last Fringe, I hung ballroom photos, and I can talk about that too. That's one of my documentary, documentary projects that I'm kind of working on. [00:08:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh yeah. I'd love to hear about that. [00:08:07] Sandy Woodson: Well, and when you hear ballroom, people think of men and women dancing in a kind of a formal way. This is more the African-American trans community ballroom. And like, if you ever saw the documentary, "Paris is Burning," from the eighties or what really kind of brought it all back up was the "Pose" series that was on FX, I think. And that's really how I got to know the people in Kansas City that are part of that community is I went to that screening. They were screening it at Tapcade, a weekly show for, I don't know, 6, 7, 8 weeks. And so I would go and, and I started to meet the people who do ballroom in Kansas City. And they've been very nice in letting me. There was a ball two years ago that they let me videotape and photograph. And for Fringe this last year is when I hung those ballroom photos. So that's been a big interest of mine over these last couple of years. [00:09:06] And I met Michael Robeson, who was co-creator of "Pose" because he's related in the ballroom community to a guy here in Kansas City named Xavier and Xavier is actually the Grandfather of Ballroom in Kansas City. So anyway, it's been an awesome experience. The people I've met are amazing and very kind and letting me poke my nose in their business. And now that COVID is getting better. I hope to get a couple of more. You know, recordings of balls that I know are coming up. [00:09:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. How exciting and what a cool opportunity. And it's great that you're keeping track of, of history there because, you know, we, we would want to be able to look back on that and really, you know, dive in. So yeah. Yeah. I definitely think so and well, and that's a perfect segue. I know you've had, you know, a really amazing career in a lot of different ways and venues and all sorts of fun stuff. But I know now you're kind of on a, on your own trajectory again, you know, as far as I know, not working for other, for a specific other person anymore or other company. And so, you mind sharing a little bit about your kind of dreams and plans for your future? [00:10:30] Sandy Woodson: There are so many right now. I'm just loving everything right now. So I worked at KCPBS off and on for the last 25 years or so. And there were two other times where I went freelance and contracted with the station and did some other things that I was working on at the time. So this time I, the station had approved me, given me the go-ahead to do a Womontown documentary. And I can explain that topic in a second. And so what I did is I got all of it, everything's shot and kept not being able to spend the time editing it because my full-time job was too crazy for me to be able to do that. So I was going to buy a house. I took some money out of my retirement account, the house didn't come through. And I was like, "Hey, I got enough money in there. I could live for a while off of that." So that's what I'm doing. And I have four documentary projects ahead of me. [00:11:29] Well, and, and if you don't mind, I'd like to explain. I mean, so a couple of years ago for Fringe, I was in San Francisco. I was walking down the street and in the sidewalk, I saw a heart with two men's names in it, and I thought, "Wow, I've never seen that before." And it got me started down a path of trying to document men who'd been together 20 years. And I did that as a photography project. I did audio- recorded interviews with these men as to how they met, their favorite things about each other. I was keeping it short and sweet because when you were at Union Station looking at the photos, you could scan a QR code and it would go to the site where you could listen to their interview. So when I was interviewing them, all of them had had met at the Cabaret Bar. And I started hearing about the Cabaret, which I'd never been to. When the Cabaret was around, I was, you know, living north of the river and having kids. So I didn't really know anything about it and got very interested in that. [00:12:33] And then somewhere down the line, I decided I wanted to talk about HIV aids in the eighties because I didn't, you know, I know people have done documentaries on that for other parts of the country, but not for here in Kansas City. So I got excited about doing that. And then I was talking to Rashaan Gilmore and he's like, "This is not just a history thing in my community. This is happening now." Because in the African-American community, if the rate continues as it is from what he told me, there will come a time where one out of every two African-American men will be HIV positive. So it became the history and the current state of HIV/AIDS in Kansas City. [00:13:16] So because I'm straight and I don't know anything or didn't know anything at that time, a couple of years ago when I first started this, I just started meeting people, talking to people. I'm talking about the Cabaret, talking about what it was like to be gay in Kansas City in the early days, what's it like now. I started documenting Drag Queens and female impersonators and that met the ballroom community, started documenting that. So it's just kind of taken off from there. And I think for me, I'm real passionate about this because I feel like the people in the LGBT community until somewhat recently, it wasn't safe for people to be coming out. So all of this history that's gone on for all of these decades, very little documenting has been done about it, particularly with video. And I started partnering with the Gay and Lesbian Archive of Mid-America with Stewart Heinz and just meeting tons of people. And so that's been, that's how all of that kind of got started. [00:14:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. That's amazing. Yeah. Well, I'm, I'm so glad that you're choosing to tell stories that are, have traditionally not been told and, you know, historically have been sort of, like you said, kind of underground, hidden, whatever. You just didn't talk about it. So I think it's, it's cool that, that your endeavor is to, you know, meet these people and tell their stories. [00:14:43] Sandy Woodson: Well, and it's been really awesome for me. I mean, I'm glad that I was doing all of this on my own and, you know, outside of my full-time job and, you know, because of that, it has been a couple of years since I really began all of this, but you know, still in all it's, you know, there are still people who are afraid to talk about it. There are people who are afraid of talking about HIV/AIDS. There's, I mean, the thing that blew me away when I started thinking about it was every person I spoke to about the HIV/AIDS crisis and about those early days, they started to cry. I mean, it's, it's one of these things that no, it's almost been 40 years and nobody's really talked about it. You know? They, it's not a general topic of conversation and it's just kind of a, such a sad thing that it's not talked about as much. And I think it's, it's almost like opening a wound. And I've asked people when they've gotten teary, whether they regret having agreed to talk to me. And they said, "Actually, it's kind of therapeutic." So 'cause they hadn't thought about it or talked about it in almost 40. [00:15:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. Wow. Oh my gosh. Yeah. That's, that's great that you're doing that and, and yeah, telling your personal story really does matter to someone who's willing to listen and not just listen, but like, ask questions, and "how was this experience for you and be empathic and that's, that's cool. So, awesome. Well so I'm, I'm curious then-- so going back, what got you involved in art and photography and all of those things, you know, at, at the beginning, what got, what sparked your interest? [00:16:32] Sandy Woodson: Well my dad does photography and so growing up, I was always looking at photography books and museums and artwork and reading. And my grandma, one of my grandmas painted. So there was always a lot of that for me when I was growing up and, but I got, I got pregnant and married very early at 18. And so-- well I was going to say things were put on hold, but they weren't. I got, I went right into theater at that point and got very involved in sets and props and doing tech backstage, sound and lights, and anything and everything really. I just loved being involved in theater and I love the process and the team effort that goes into it. And I just loved everything about it, but at one point 10 years later, I was going through a divorce and I thought, "Oh, I'll never make any money in theater. So I better stop that." [00:17:33] And I went into video and I started in corporate video. But all the things that I had learned in theater, some of those things translated, you know, these still need costumes, you still need props. You still need sets. You still need to organize how this all is going to come about and schedule people and crews and all of that. So that's how I became a video producer. And, but I didn't really do much except, you know, like I say, kind of playing around as a hobby with, with photography or writing or any of that until I got involved with Fringe, which was another 10, 20 years after that. And it's because, you know, as you know, Fringe is so accepting and they're all about, you know, we're not expecting everything to be perfect all the time. I started to understand what it means, what it means to go through the process. I mean, you have to get doing to grow and Fringe is so accepting of all of that, then it made me feel comfortable enough to start trying to do some things a little more seriously when it came to photography. [00:18:42] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's awesome. Yeah. I'm, I'm such a big proponent of the Fringe Festival concept of, you know, these are unjuried, uncensored projects or shows that are being put forth. And so it is a very welcoming audience of, you know, it's, it doesn't have to be perfect the first time or, you know, you can experiment at Fringe and still have ,yeah, and still have such a great audience. And their feedback is so helpful, but you know, they're, they're there with you cheering you on, I would say. And so it's a really place to produce art. [00:19:24] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. Yeah, definitely. And like you say, to experiment. I mean, I've seen people try a lot of different things that they wouldn't have any other place to do that. [00:19:35] Lindsey Dinneen: Absolutely. I completely agree. Yeah. So I'm curious, I'm sure that there are many moments that might come to mind, but are there any specific stories that you can think of, of times of when either you were witnessing some artwork that really touched you or you witnessed someone witnessing your artwork and, and sort of a story of, of maybe those moments to remember, just because they're really special? [00:20:00] Sandy Woodson: Well, the most recent one that I can remember is, I went with a group of people to Italy and I'm a huge museum freak. I just love museums. I could spend all day in museums, not only because of the artwork, but they're just as a whole, they're very peaceful, beautiful places. So, but we went to-- gosh, what was the guy's name? It was some famous Italian guy, it was his villa. And I saw the Botticellis. They're like 10 foot tall by 10 foot or 20 feet wide. And it was "Spring Primavera," which I think I've always thought of as a Venus in a half shell or something. I saw that and another one and I was just like, "This is the most amazing thing I've ever seen." And, you know, I actually felt the same way one time when I was in Amsterdam and saw Van Gogh. There is --it's called "Apple Blossoms". I think it's "Apple Blossoms" and it was the first time I'd ever seen it. Now, since then, I see it all over the place in posters. I have an iPad that has a cover that has that artwork on it. [00:21:08] But I realized as much as I see this artwork in books, it is nothing to compare to when you get to actually see it in person. And the Van Gogh was one of the first-- well, my first and all of these happened in Europe. I know there are things in Kansas City that I've seen at the Nelson that every time I go, I have to go by and look at it. But the ones that made the biggest impact were the ones in Europe, because I had a whole series of books on art museums. And I would just go through those things over and over again. And to see these things in person just blew me away. So, oh gosh. And "Winged Victory." I love sculpture. "Winged Victory" at the Louvre just stopped me in my tracks to just-- things like that, that you just see them, it's like, "Oh my God. That's beautiful." [00:22:01] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. Yeah. I, I agree is it's like, I mean, I can definitely relate to what you're saying about, you know, artwork and seeing it in person and the originals and such versus a photo. And I feel that way about art in general is just, if you can experience it live, there's nothing like that. It's so much better than, you know, it incorporates your senses and you just have these special-- I think it's cool too, because you often have-- I mean, I have many times gone to an art museum by myself and wandered around and, you know, enjoyed it thoroughly. But I think some of my favorite moments are connecting with people with art. I think that's a really special moment, you know? [00:22:43] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. And a lot of that for me is more like when I'm going to a play or going to an art movie or something that, yeah, there's definitely-- you can't compare watching it at home on TV or listening to it by yourself at home then that communal... That's I always love Shakespeare in the Park here in Kansas City. I love that, you know, all of us sitting outside and usually dying of heat, but you know, I, I really liked those experiences too. [00:23:15] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, this has really been a lot of fun. I have a couple of questions that I like to ask my guests if you're okay with that. [00:23:24] Sandy Woodson: Sure. [00:23:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Okay. So first of all, what is one change that you would like to see in the art world? Whether that is, you know, specifically through one of the mediums that you have enjoyed and, and worked on over the years or whether that's like, you know, art in general, just what's one change you'd really love to see? [00:23:48] Sandy Woodson: I don't think-- probably because my experience with Fringe, I get really tired of the fact that we in this community, we seem to focus on what is considered "high art." You know, it's not like I dislike any of these people or anything, but I'm just going to say it, you know, with the Ballet and Opera and Symphony, those people get enough support. I mean, I know they need to raise money every year, but when you're looking at these artists that are part of the Fringe Festival to me, that's real art, you know, and I don't think it gets enough attention and I think people poo poo it. And I think I've seen some of the most amazing things. [00:24:28] There was something I saw that Kyle Hatley did. I think it was called "Head" one of my first few years at Fringe. And I, I was so blown away by it. You see amazing things being done by high-end artists in Kansas City during Fringe, and they're just as amazing there as they are anywhere else. And they're helping to support their friend who's writing a play for the first time or somebody who's doing some choreography for the first time. And, and, and /or people like Kyle Hatley who wanted to experiment with a play idea that he had. So I just, to me, that's where the real art is, and I don't think it gets enough attention. [00:25:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Oh, I love that answer. And yeah, attention and funding, I think are our biggest complaints. [00:25:16] Sandy Woodson: One comes with the other. You get the attention first and then hopefully the funding. [00:25:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, exactly. And then also, is there something arts related that you've wanted to try? Maybe another form of art, but you just haven't yet. Or, you know, it's kind of been intimidating to, to start. What's one other art thing that you'd love to do? [00:25:38] Sandy Woodson: Absolutely. When I saw-- well first I saw it here-- Nick Cave did it during open spaces using multiple projections. And then I saw it when I was in France. That was an experience with-- in fact, right now there's something going on in Kansas City with Van Gogh, that's doing multiple projections in a space. But the one in France was an old hollowed out quarry with 50 foot walls. And I don't even know how many projectors they had in there, but anyway, it was such an amazing-- that kind of an immersive experience. I love projections, Stephen Goldblatt, who does this stuff for quixotic. I love that. I think it adds so much to the performance when, when they use those projections. So video projection is probably something I would like to try at some point. [00:26:28] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that sounds awesome. I did see an ad for that Van Gogh experience and I was like, "Oh man, I, I, if I can get up there, I'm have to do it." [00:26:38] Sandy Woodson: Yes. [00:26:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And then my final question is, at the end of your life, what's one art-related experience that you would want to experience again for the last time? [00:26:52] Sandy Woodson: Gosh, I mean, to me, I almost see art everywhere. I mean, I love architecture. I love fashion. I love jewelry design. There's so many things I love. Probably it would have to be going back to the Louvre, maybe? The last time I went, I dedicated two full days to going top to bottom. That was freaking stunning. So I'd probably try to go there one more time. [00:27:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. That's on my a definite bucket list. I haven't, I haven't made it there yet, but it's coming. [00:27:27] Sandy Woodson: You got to go to Napoleon's apartments. I also love furniture and decorative arts, and good lord, that stuff was amazing. [00:27:37] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Yeah, no, I will definitely have to do that. Well, thank you so much for sharing your stories and know what you're up to and, and all these exciting things, I'm just, I'm so thrilled for you. I'm glad you're in a place where you can really follow these passions of telling people's stories that need to be told. So I think this is really cool and congratulations on this new adventure. And is there a way for people to stay in touch with you or if they have questions or anything like that, is there a way for them to connect with you? [00:28:08] Sandy Woodson: Sure. You can email me at Sandy Woodson, S A N D Y W O O D S O N12@gmail.com. [00:28:18] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, thank you so very much, Sandy, for everything that you have brought to the world. Thank you so much for continuing to explore art and to share people's stories and to be a voice for those that haven't had that opportunity. And thank you again so much for being here today. And to everyone who has listened to this episode, if you're feeling inspired by it, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:28:52] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:29:01] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend
Pete Holmes is Back!

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 106:39


Comedian, actor, writer and podcast host Pete Holmes (You Made It Weird, HBO's Crashing) is back to talk about what he wore on his very first Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend appearance, fatherhood, the many Petes, killing his ego, why Bo Burnham is like Van Gogh, spirituality, knowing the names of people on set, leaving social media, his thoughts on my social media addiction, psychedelics, repairing his relationship with his parents, Byron Katie's books and so much more. We also answered your questions and did a round of Just Me Or Everyone. Past Appearances: 2012: https://www.alisonrosen.com/2012/02/this-is-where-ariynbf-101-with-pete-holmes-will-be/ 2012 (live show): https://www.alisonrosen.com/2012/08/ariynbf-128-with-pete-holmes-and-michael-rosas-live-from-nerdmelt/ 2014: https://www.alisonrosen.com/2014/01/ariynbf-245-pete-holmes-returns/ 2017: https://www.alisonrosen.com/2017/02/pete-holmes-4/   Products I Use/Recommend/Love: http://amazon.com/shop/alisonrosen Check us out on Patreon: http://patreon.com/alisonrosen   This show is brought to you by: RING: http://ring.com/bestfriend Buy Alison's Book: Tropical Attire Encouraged (and Other Phrases That Scare Me)  https://amzn.to/2JuOqcd You probably need to buy the HGFY ringtone! https://www.alisonrosen.com/store/

Confident Collective
55. How We Learned to Enjoy Doing Things Alone

Confident Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 53:23


Do you find it intimidating to do things solo? You're not alone. Kristina and Raeann get messages all the time asking for advice on how to feel more confident doing solo activities and being alone, and understand how it can be intimidating and difficult to branch out of your comfort zone. However, some of the best learning experiences, growth moments and memories in their lives have come from doing things alone. Today's episode is full of insight and inspo from Kristina and Raeann's lives about times where they've done things alone, how it has helped them reflect and learn about themselves and how to make solo adventures feel nurturing and exciting. We hope this podcast episode inspires you to try something new on your own, and continue building your self confidence. (Episode 55) What We Talk About: Recap of Raeann's sister's wedding Kristina and Steve's Van Gogh exhibit adventure feat. microdosing and the Polo Classic Raeann reflects on dating burnout and shares the signs & importance of taking a break Why Squid Game is the new show taking the world by storm Whether it could be offensive to call a fat person confident - reflecting on a Cosmopolitan article by Sesali Bowen The self confidence and growth that can be cultivated through doing things alone/spending time alone Ask Away Segment: How to deal with negative body commentary from your family New podcast episodes of Confident Collective drop every Tuesday. Resources: Cosmopolitan article: “Calling Plus-Size Women “Confident” Is Actually an Insult” “Bad Fat Black Girl: Notes from a Trap Feminist” by Sesali Bowen Follow us on Instagram: @confidentcollective  Follow the Hosts/Founders: @kristinazias & @raeannlangas Learn more: https://www.theconfidentcollective.com/ Stay in the know with our newsletter! 

No Sé, Dime Tú
38: Rockearé forever

No Sé, Dime Tú

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 58:16


Tenemos muchas cosas que decir sobre Van Gogh, Garbage y Alanis Morrissette.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Who ARTed
Vincent Van Gogh (Part 2)

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:46


In this episode, I continued my discussion with Chuck Hoff about Vincent van Gogh. We covered the later part of his life and career after he moved to France. The painting we specifically focused our attention on was The Starry Night from 1889. During the episode, we also briefly discussed The Night Cafe and Starry Night Over the Rhone. 1886 Vincent van Gogh moved to Paris and lived with Theo. This is where his work started to become much more colorful. While still continuing his studies in Paris, he is getting to know other artists like Emile Bernard and Henri de Toulouse Lautrec.  Theo found living with Vincent to be unbearable and in 1887, Vincent moved to a suburb where he got to know the pointilist painter Paul Signac. Vincent adopted some of their technique. One of the things and optical color theory is the use of complimentary colors to create vibrant effects. Vincent once wrote of a painting, that he “tried to express the terrible passions of humanity by means of red and green.”   In 1888 he moved to Arles. His hope was to get a fresh start and eventually form an artist colony. This was one of his most prolific periods. Most people don't realize in just a decade, van Gogh created about 2100 works of art and a good deal of that collection came in just the last two years of his life. This is where he had the yellow house that he shared with Gauguin for some time. Many of his famous works such as the sunflowers, his bedroom, the night cafe came from this period. Van Gogh was super excited to have Gauguin come stay with him. He prepped the place and he kind of went over budget buying furniture but wanted to impress his new roommate.  Over time the friendship soured. It was after a fight between the two of them that Vincent cut his ear off. Exactly what happened is unclear. The generally accepted story is that Gauguin was going to leave, van Gogh was distraught and chased after him, they had a heated exchange and van Gogh took a razor to his ear. As odd as this sounds, there was a character in a book who did something similar at this time and Vincent was known to have a history of self-injury. He believed he had chased away his friend and ruined his chance at his dream of an artist colony. There are others who believe that Gauguin cut off Vincent's ear in the heat of an argument.  After the ear incident, Vincent needed serious medical attention. For a while it was not clear whether he would survive and he claimed to have no memory of the incident indicating it happened during a severe mental breakdown. He stayed in a few hospitals for his physical and psychological problems. In 1889, he painted Portrait of Dr. Felix Rey. Apparently the doctor didn't think much of the painting and used it to repair a chicken coop before ultimately giving it away. I cannot help but wonder how that conversation went “Here take this portrait of me.” seems odd enough, but then adding “it was made by an unstable man and it was temporarily used to patch a hole in my chicken coop.” and someone else responded “sounds good. I'll hang that in my home.” The portrait that would have been featured on redneck repairs is now in a museum and valued over $50 million. Van Gogh entered the asylum at Saint Remy on May 8, 1889. It seems like this was a nice asylum. He had two cells, one of which he could use as a studio. The asylum at Saint Remy was run by progressives who believed that people would benefit from time out with nature and there were gardens around and Vincent was allowed to walk the grounds. In some ways, this was likely the healthiest he was during his artistic career because he was getting regular meals, or distracted by vices like drinking.  While he was free to work and painted quite a bit, he was limited in subject matter. He could walk the grounds a bit and did paint some landscapes but he also relied quite heavily on inspiration from other artists' works as well as re-working some of his older pieces. This is the period where we see all of his swirls and distortions coming through. When talking about a bundle of his paintings sent to Theo, Vincent referred to Starry Night as nothing special (He said some other things like a wheat field, mountain, orchard were a little good and lumped Starry Night in with “the rest” that meant nothing to him). In a tragic bit of irony, while today it is considered to be one of the greatest masterpieces ever painted, Vincent van Gogh considered The Starry Night to be a failure. As always, you can find images of the work discussed along with other resources on the website www.whoartedpodcast.com. If you have any connections, corrections or suggestions you would like to share, you can email whoartedpodcast@gmail.com 

It Girl Theory
Not It: Van Gogh Immersive Experience *Teaser*

It Girl Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 2:44


On this week's Not It, Marth & Kait rail against the Van Gogh immersive industrial complex, ponder how the United States could possibly be "out of money," and embrace their inner film bros.               

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
Fabric Of A Nation: Quilting Is Finally Being Recognized As Fine Art

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 23:59


When thinking about “fine art,” many minds immediately envision paintings by the likes of Monet or Van Gogh. But one artform – quilting – is finally being recognized as fine art, rather than just craft. African American quilters, in particular, are reclaiming the artform's history, after having been mischaracterized by scholars for decades. A new Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibition, “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories” features over 300 years of American quilts, and other visual and tactile artworks. It especially focuses on works by an underrecognized diversity of artistic hands and minds from the 17th century to today. The exhibition opened on October 10th and runs through January 17th, 2022. GUESTS: Jennifer Swope, associate curator of textile and fashion arts at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and exhibition curator of the MFA's “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories.” Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, author, curator, quilter, and founder of African American Quilt Guild of Los Angeles and Women of Color Quilters Network. Dr. Mazloomi's work “Strange Fruit II” is featured in the MFA's “Fabric of a Nation” exhibition. Gio Swaby, a Bahamian visual artist whose work centers on Black joy as a radical act of resistance. Her work “Love Letter 5” is featured in the MFA's “Fabric of a Nation” exhibition.

The Daily Gardener
October 8, 2021 Plant Named After 50 Years, John Hay, J. Carter Brown, Faith Ringgold, Deanna Raybourn, Epitaph for a Peach by David M. Masumoto, and Bill Vaughan

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:32


Today in botanical history, we celebrate an American civil servant and poet, an American art expert, and a Harlem artist and gardener. We'll hear an excerpt from historical fiction by Deanna Raybourn. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a lyrical book by a peach farmer. And then we'll wrap things up with the story of a humorist who made a living writing about the sunny side of life.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News Why it took nearly 50 years for scientists to name this mysterious tropical plant | CNN | Megan Marples Lauritzen Gardens - Omaha Botanical Center 20th birthday!   Important Events October 8, 1838  Birth of John Hay, American politician, diplomat, and poet. He served three assassinated American leaders, including President Lincoln. Along with John Nicolay, he co-wrote a ten-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln that helped shape his legacy. Like Lincoln, John lost a son, and the loss profoundly affected him. Three years later, he wrote, The death of our boy made my wife and me old at once and for the rest of our lives. After the death of his father-in-law, John became enormously wealthy and took over the family business and investments. His family enjoyed regular trips to Europe, a grand mansion in Washington D.C., and a cottage in New Hampshire that John called the Fells. John had cobbled together 1,000 acres of land after quietly buying up abandoned farms. The etymology of The Fells name was Scottish and means rocky upland pastures. John especially enjoyed time at The Fells, which overlooked pastoral view. In the foreground, sheep grazed among prehistoric boulders that dotted the landscape, and in the distance were views of scenic Lake Sunapee. John's wife, Clara, was a gardener, and she had a special love for roses and hydrangeas. In 1890, John wrote, I was greatly pleased with the air, the water, the scenery. I have nowhere found a more beautiful spot. In terms of poetry, John was best known for a collection of post-Civil War poems compiled into a book called Pike County Ballads (1871). Here's one of his poems called Words, in which he uses nature to show the power a simple word can have on our lives. When violets were springing And sunshine filled the day, And happy birds were singing The praises of the May, A word came to me, blighting The beauty of the scene, And in my heart was winter, Though all the trees were green. Now down the blast go sailing The dead leaves, brown and sere; The forests are bewailing The dying of the year; A word comes to me, lighting With rapture all the air, And in my heart is summer, Though all the trees are bare.   October 8, 1934  Birth of J. Carter Brown, American art expert, intellectual, and visionary. He was the director of the U.S. National Gallery of Art from 1969 to 1992. Although he was born in a family of great wealth - the Browns of Newport, the Browns of Brown University - he was a champion of public access to art. He believed people needed to see art in person and used a garden analogy to drive that point home: No one will understand a Japanese garden until you've walked through one, and you hear the crunch underfoot, and you smell it, and you experience it over time. Now there's no photograph or any movie that can give you that experience.   October 8, 1930 Birth of Faith Ringgold, American painter, writer, mixed media sculptor, and performance artist.  Faith was born in Harlem into a family that embraced artistic creativity. She grew up after the Harlem Renaissance, and her neighborhood was home to the likes of Duke Ellington and Langston Hughes. One of her childhood friends was jazz musician Sonny Rollins. Growing up, Faith had chronic asthma, so she learned to pass the time indoors, creating visual art with the help of her mom. She became an expert seamstress and began experimenting with fabric as a medium for her art. Today Faith is known for her narrative quilts. One of her most beloved quilts is Sunflowers Quilting Bee at Arles, which depicts a group of African American women working on a sunflower quilt with Van Gogh off to the side, bringing them a vase of sunflowers. In 1999, Faith had a garden installed at her Englewood, New Jersey home. She says, [I love] to be able to look at the garden the first thing every morning, and I love to paint the green in as many ways as I can.  For many years now, Faith has hosted a garden party in June to benefit the Anyone Can Fly Foundation. The mission of the Anyone Can Fly Foundation is to expand the art establishment's canon to include artists of the African Diaspora and to introduce the Great Masters of African American Art and their art traditions to children and adult audiences. In 2019, there was an exhibition of Faith's art at the Serpentine Gallery in Hyde Park/Kensington Gardens.   Unearthed Words Something had shifted between us, faintly, but the change was almost palpable. Our friendship had sat lightly between us, an ephemeral thing, without weight or gravity. Once, in the Boboli Gardens, “Bo-bah-lee” under the shadow of a cypress tree on an achingly beautiful October afternoon, he had kissed me, a solemnly sweet and respectful kiss. But weeks had passed, and we had not spoken of it. I had attributed it to the sunlight, shimmering gold like Danaë's shower, “Dan ah ee” and had pressed it into the scrapbook of memory, to be taken out and admired now and then, but not to be dwelled upon too seriously. Perhaps I had been mistaken. ― Deanna Raybourn, Silent in the Sanctuary   Grow That Garden Library Epitaph for a Peach by David M. Masumoto This book came out in 1996, and the subtitle is Four Seasons on My Family Farm. This memoir is a personal favorite. Mas's lyrical writing is a pleasure to read. Here are a few gems from the book: A new planting is like having another child, requiring patience and sacrifice and a resounding optimism for the future. I try to rely less and less on controlling nature. Instead, I am learning to live with its chaos. Good neighbors are worth more than an extra sixteen trees. Mas is an organic peach farmer who shares his story with humor, grace, and incredible insight into the natural world. The New York Times said, [Masumoto is] a poet of farming and peaches. This book is 256 pages of thoughts on growing from a peach farmer with the soul of a poet. You can get a copy of Epitaph for a Peach by David M. Masumoto and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $2.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart October 8, 1915 Birth of William E. 'Bill' Vaughan (pen name Burton Hillis), American columnist and author. In addition to his magazine features, he wrote a syndicated column for the Kansas City Star for over three decades. His folksy sayings include, Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. Experience teaches that love of flowers and vegetables is not enough to make a man a good gardener.  He must also hate weeds. The best of all gifts around any #Christmas tree: the presence of a happy family all wrapped up in each other. Bill Vaughan was beloved for his humor and his friendliness. He generally wrote thirteen paragraphs of humorous observations every single day for his column. He also was an artist. A 1970 profile of Bill in his beloved Kansas City Star stated, [He] has always had what art lovers describe as unfortunate yearnings to be an artist. While testing his fledgling wings as a columnist in Springfield, Vaughan became adept at drawing deep one-column sketches that relieved him substantially of the responsibility of filling the space with words. The day Vaughan filled virtually an entire column with a drawing of a garden hose with very little at either end, the editor ordered a halt to this sort of thing.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

The GHOLE Podcast
California's Nightmare & R. Kelly w/ Mike Feeney & Kerryn Feehan

The GHOLE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:51


I love Mike Feeney even though he hates Fall Out Boy, he's hilarious, we talk music and what's wrong of my music taste. Kerryn Feehan joins in after walking her talk and we discuss whoever the Californian nightmare who is on AM radio in Central Pennsylvania. We also talk about Van Gogh, Picasso, and Only Fans, fun times! follow Mike & Kerryn on twitter at @IamMikeFeeney & @KFreeHams

Who ARTed
Vincent Van Gogh (Part 1)

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 40:23


This week's episode is going to be a 2 part episode. My good friend, fellow art teacher and former mentor, Chuck Hoff joined me to talk about one of my favorite artists of all time, Vincent Van Gogh. In part 1, we discuss his early life and his first major masterpiece, The Potato Eaters from 1885. Born March 30, 1853 in Groot-Zundert a predominantly Catholic province in the Netherlands. His father was a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church. Vincent was said to be a pensive child. He was initially taught by his mother and a governess, then went to the village school in 1860 and he was sent to a boarding school in 1864. He was unhappy there and asked to come home. Instead, they sent him to a different boarding school in 1866. He felt abandoned and miserable. While at the boarding school in Tilburg, he learned from Constant Cornelius Huijsmans who had been a reasonably successful artist in Paris. He was known for his rejection of common technique and favoring impressions of common objects and nature. Vincent was mainly focused on how miserable he was and abruptly returned home in March of 1864 (about 11 years). He later described his childhood as “austere, cold and sterile.” n 1869, Vincent's uncle got him a job as an art dealer because this was a time when 16 year olds would be starting their careers. He was apparently pretty good at the job. He transferred to the London branch and at just 20 years old, he was earning more than his father. This was a happy time for Vincent. His sister in law later said it was the best year of his life. Unfortunately that happy period ended as he had some unrequited love, then became isolated and more religious. In 1875, he was transferred to Paris but became resentful of how art was being commodified which is a really ironic stance for an art dealer. Unsurprisingly he was dismissed from that job after about a year. He focused intensely on religion and wanted to become a pastor. He stayed with his uncle, a theologian,  while studying for the entrance exam to the University of Amsterdam. He failed the exam and left his uncle's house.  He failed another course, but he was determined and in 1879 he took a position as a missionary in Belgium. While there, van Gogh gave his comfortable lodging to a homeless man and he stayed in a hut sleeping on a straw bed. Apparently this behavior was seen as beneath the dignity of the priesthood and in 1880, he returned home to Etten. His brother Theo encouraged Vincent to study art under a Dutch artist, Willem Roelofs, who encouraged Vincent to attend Academie Royale des Beaux-Arts. He studied anatomy, modeling and perspective at the academie. The first major work from this time period was The Potato Eaters. Vincent felt like his brother Theo was not doing enough to sell his works. Theo said they were too dark and not in line with the colorful style of the Impressionists which were popular at that time.  Vincent was supported financially by his brother, but he lived in poverty and barely ate because he preferred to spend the money Theo sent him on supplies. Next week we will discuss how his art shifted after moving to France, his ill fated dream of forming an artist's colony in Arles and of course, The Starry Night which went on to become his most famous masterpiece.  Check out www.whoartedpodcast.com for more images, information and resources.

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers
Monocle Reads: Martin Bailey

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 24:07


Martin Bailey co-curated Tate Britain's 2019 exhibition ‘Van Gogh and Britain'. He is the author of several books on the artist and writes the weekly newsletter ‘Adventures with Van Gogh' for ‘The Art Newspaper'. Bailey tells Georgina Godwin about his latest book, ‘Van Gogh's Finale: Auvers & the Artist's Rise to Fame', a comprehensive analysis of the artist's suicide and what followed.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 1 - Rain, Rain, Go Away!

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 17:40


We discuss the potential for ACL Fest getting rained out, why Shaq is too big to stage dive, and Are You Smarter Than Jason Dick. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Breaking Beauty Podcast
From A Strap-On Cryo Mask to a Mix-It-Yo' Self Vitamin C Potion, These Are The #DamnGood Fall 2021 Products We Can't Stop Talking About

Breaking Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 45:37


Brrr… is it getting fresh in here? That's not the cool fall air, it's Charlotte Tilbury's new “Cryo” face mask that you strap on straight-outta the freezer! In today's episode, Carlene & Jill test the latest, buzziest fall beauty products, like Drunk Elephant's overhauled Vitamin C-Firma Fresh Day Serum that you mix yourself for max potency. Jill dabbles in colour-correcting using Chanel's fancy new Le Teint concealers. And is Selena Gomez' highly anticipated first mascara (one entire year in the making) living up to her millions of fans' expectations? Dr. Dennis Gross cracks the freshness code with swipe-on retinol pads that just may rival the OG Alpha Beta peel on Jill's permanent top shelf. A Van Gogh-inspired fragrance that truly is a “work of art,” and more must-gets in today's must-listen episode!   Get social with us and let us know what you think of the episode! Find us on Instagram, Twitter,  Join our private Facebook group

, or give us a call and leave us a voicemail at 1-844-227-0302.    For any products or links mentioned in this episode, check out our blog: www.breakingbeautypodcast.com/blog   Thank you to our show partners. When you support them, you support the creation of Breaking Beauty Podcast!    Flip Beauty Shopping App Flip is the new interactive way to shop for beauty products. Download FLIP beauty shopping app in the Apple App Store and Google Play today. Simply search for “FLIP Beauty Shopping App” and USE CODE GLAM30 for 30% OFF towards your first purchase, plus enjoy free shipping and returns. Thursday Plantation: Find out why Thursday Plantation is the #1 Natural Brand for Acne-Prone Skin in Australia, helping Canadians find clearer-looking skin since the 90's. Get 15% off by visiting www.thursdayplantationcanada.ca with promo code BEAUTY15  *Disclaimer: Unless otherwise stated, all products reviewed are gratis media samples submitted for editorial consideration.*   Hosts: Carlene Higgins and Jill Dunn Theme song, used with permission: Cherry Bomb by Saya
 Produced by Dear Media Studio

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
Why your flu immunity might be weaker this year, plus immersive Van Gogh exhibits are taking over

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 49:37


Dr. Anthony Fauci is urging everyone to get vaccinated against influenza and coronavirus as soon as possible. Last year, thanks in part to masks, social distancing, and quarantine measures, there was hardly a flu season. “Because most of us were not infected by flu viruses last year … that means we didn't get the typical population-level immunity boost that we all normally get,” says Katherine Wu, Atlantic staff writer covering science. Also, only about a quarter of soon-to-be moms are vaccinated against COVID. What's behind the low rate? Later, Press Play gets a sneak peek of “The Many Saints of Newark,” the prequel film to the TV series “The Sopranos,” and dives into the international popularity of immersive Vincent Van Gogh exhibits.

Colleen & Bradley
9/28 Tues Hr 1: COBRA GANG: BRINTEY: Is Britney even in charge of her Instagram account?!

Colleen & Bradley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:52


PLUS: Holly has the Dirt Alert, BLIND ITEM: Which media personality is going to have a full-circle moment? AND BRARNA: They went on a date at the Van Gogh exhibit

Unsolved Mysteries: Solved?
#59 - Was Vincent Van Gogh Unalived By Wizards?

Unsolved Mysteries: Solved?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 35:16


How many paintings can a man produce in a day? How much would it really hurt to cut off your own ear? And just what happened to Vincent van Gogh that fateful day? Find out to these questions and many more you never thought to ask on this episode of Unsolved Mysteries: SOLVED!

Foodie Chap
Liam's List: Dear Evan Hansen, 49ers & Van Gogh experience

Foodie Chap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 3:35


KCBS Radio's Foodie Chap, Liam Mayclem, gets you set for the weekend's 49ers v. Packers showdown, Dear Evan Hansen and celebration of a Mexican artist. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
TOP 3 NFT PICKS OF THE WEEK!

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 11:30


What a week! NFTs are still the hottest thing in crypto right now. That's why we are dropping TWO episodes a week. The NFT space is showing no signs of slowing down! Stay tuned for a brand new NFT project primed to PUMP! Today's quick NFT news updates: John Cena had a complete epic fail with his recent NFT drop. Only 7% of the total NFT supply sold. John is on the record saying, “we sold 37 of them. It was a catastrophic failure!” The more positive news is that the Pluto Alliance drop sold out in 2 hours! Huge success! During the presale all 10k sold to holders of BITT or CGG! ArtPunks uses AI to scan famous works, and remakes the cryptopunks in those styles (fusion apes) Picasso, Salvador Dali, Van Gogh, I've seen modern art mixed but not classic art mixed. This should be an instant success! Secret Agent Stache! A new blockchain game from Crypto Stache, dropping on WAX! This is an interesting interactive game. Players buy packs of build cards that can be crafted to make the different rarities Standard, Vintage, Shadow, or Signature! To play the game, you need to join the Secret Agent ‘Stache livestream every Thursday at 4pm PST (7pm EST). During the livestream, go to the Play tab on this website and redeem your NFT while the show is live. Lonely Alien Space Club has some interesting updates for holders. They just released unique planets to Alien holders. Holders can go to their website, plug in their alien token ID and then claim their planet! Super cool way to keep people involved! Also if you are quick enough you may be able to go and scoop up an alien to claim unclaimed planets.

Defend Cleveland Podcast
Episode 194 - Goats Are Scary As Hell And Why Would Anyone Want To Pet The Damned Things

Defend Cleveland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 240:12


DC's Mike James and Mollie Ames discuss: All terrestrial segments for this episode were recorded live on September 18th (Day 261 of 2021), and all podcast segments were recorded live on September 21st (Day 264 of 2021) Part 1 of 3 of the Podcast only content – How long do we have to be patient with this Browns defense before we find out if it's actually any good or not? And the month old lawsuit filed against Omar Vizquel that no one seems to be paying any attention to that's far more frightening and horrifying than most anything you would ever imagine Terrestrial: Hour 1 (begins around 0:20:00) Talking QB tiers in the NFL and why Baker is in tier 3, which is not just our opinion, it's also the opinion of 50 current NFL coaches and scouts (according to The Athletic) Rooting for Urban Meyer to fail is befitting the monster he has proven himself to be time and time again If there's no justice, just empty words and promises for the greatest gymnasts this country has ever proved, can we ever expect justice for any other women who are victims of sexual assault and violence? Part 2 of 3 of the Podcast only content – Dumb people going to dumb, no matter what (begins around 1:18:00)  Lachlan MacKinnon's ‘Best of Edition' Let Me Tell You A Story: “Cleveland's Angriest Door Guy” (begins around 1:33:00) Terrestrial: Hour 2 (begins around 1:41:00) The digital Van Gogh is to the art world what planetarium laser light shows are to seeing Pink Floyd live in concert Definitively proving that we are living in the worst decade for music while ranking each era from the 60's to present day Part 3 of 3 of the Podcast only content – Mollie's Weekly Reports...  (begins around 2:41:00) Terrestrial: Hour 3 (begins around 3:03) The new 30 For 30 documentary "Once Upon A Time In The Queens" is fantastic, and not just because of how great and unique the '86 Mets were Mollie's Weekly Reports, terrestrial edition!  All this and so much more on this episode of the Defend Cleveland Podcast. Enjoy~ To contribute to this 100% listener supported show please go to our Patreon page by clicking here. Check out Lachlan MacKinnon's best selling book, ‘Let Me Tell You A Story: Small Stories Of A Large Family'! Thank yous to  91.1-FM WRUW Cleveland for being home to the show, and to the city that inspires us, Cleveland, Ohio. Your recommended listening this week is the album "Structure" by Water From Your Eyes The intro and outro to Lachlan's segment is the song “My Summer In Traction” by the band Ohio Civil War , and it's used with permission.

Loper & Randi in The Morning
9-21-21 Loper & Randi - KFC Smugglers, Gabby Petito, MGK vs Corey Taylor, Treadmill Trivia, Eric Clapton, Over-served At Smokeout

Loper & Randi in The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 107:37


Loper learned that Randi's friends were "over-served" at the Great Summer Smokeout. Where the hell is this Van Gogh exhibit? MGK and Corey Taylor are having a feud. A friend of the show, Jo Koy, and Chelsea Handler are now a thing. Plus, Treadmill Trivia, KFC smugglers, the border, Gabby Petito, Eric Clapton's hypocrisy and more!

The Brain Candy Podcast
EP551: Van Gogh Immersion, Happy Elephant, & Bears on Trial

The Brain Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 76:13


Today we find out why Sarah is in a zen period (maybe Susie's giggle phase brings Sarah peace?). We discuss an art installation Sarah went to, and why she loved it, but worries about the implications. We find out about an elephant in the Bronx zoo who is lonely because her best friend got murdered (!), and the only answer is for her to become...a person? We debate the ethics of zoos and we fantasize about animals going to court. Plus, we talk to Suzanne O'Sullivan about her book The Sleeping Beauties and the reasons why "psychosomatic" illnesses are more complicated than they appear. Join our book club, shop our merch, sign-up for our free newsletter, & more by visiting The Brain Candy Podcast website: Connect with us on social media: BCP Instagram: Susie's Instagram: Sarah's Instagram: BCP Twitter: Susie's Twitter: Sarah's Twitter: For 20% off your first order, go to For a free trial of Noom, visit Get 10% off your first month of therapy at To try the greatest vitamins ever, go to More podcasts at WAVE:

Vegas Revealed
Perfect Weather for Las Vegas Visitors, Donny Osmond Nails It, Raiders Fill Stadium with Only Vaccinated Fans, Immersive Van Gogh Opens | Ep. 86

Vegas Revealed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 44:16


The triple digits are behind us and that means it's the perfect time to visit Las Vegas! In fact, a new Ultra Pool opens at Sahara Las Vegas just in time. Plus, Donny Osmond's solo show at Harrah's Las Vegas  "wows" Sean and Dayna! They explain why it's so good. The Las Vegas Raiders impress the country with a new stadium and an incredible Monday Night Football game. You build it, they will come. The stadium was packed! The team also requires vaccines to be inside Allegiant Stadium. NASCAR takes over the Las Vegas Motor Speedway next weekend. The National Association of Broadcasters conference cancels. The Main Street Station Casino opens up again in downtown Las Vegas. Immersive Van Gogh opens at Crystals at Aria. Sean and Dayna talk to the producer about what you can expect. Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=UCMULZYF325PL)

The Week in Art
Uyghurs: human rights abuses in China; Van Gogh's last years and death; master printer Kenneth Tyler on Helen Frankenthaler

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 73:13


This week: as a tribunal in London hears of human rights atrocities against the Uyghur community and other Muslim groups in China, how will museums, galleries and other cultural institutions working with government-supported institutions in China respond? We talk to The Art Newspaper's editor-at-large Cristina Ruiz, who has heard many hours of disturbing evidence at the tribunal, and to Sir Geoffrey Nice, the tribunal's chair.Also, this week, Martin Bailey tells us about his latest book, Van Gogh's Finale, looking at his final months, his death and his legacy. And in this episode's Work of the Week, we talk to Kenneth Tyler, the master-printmaker who has collaborated on some of the great prints of the post-war era, about his collaboration on a group of six woodcuts by Helen Frankenthaler, The Tales of Genji (1998), now on view in an exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Global News Podcast
US tries to calm French anger over security pact with UK and Australia

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 28:28


The US tries to calm French anger over the new security pact with Britain and Australia. Iran sends fuel supplies to Lebanon, as the economic crisis deepens. And an early work by Vincent Van Gogh is discovered by art experts in the Netherlands.

Love Your Work
264. Creative Waste

Love Your Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 9:10


When Vincent van Gogh began his career as an artist, he had already failed at everything else. He even got fired from his own family's business in the process. Not seeing any alternative, he completely immersed himself in art. In one two-week period, he created 120 drawings. But exactly none of those drawings are famous today. [This is Love Your Work, and I'm David Kadavy] What feels like waste is not waste Last week, I talked about the Iceberg Principle – the idea that any masterpiece you see is just the tip of the iceberg. There's far more knowledge and experience beneath the surface, giving that masterpiece confidence and grace. But as you're adding layer after layer to your iceberg, it doesn't feel like that's what you're doing. It feels like you're wasting your energy. But you're not. After Van Gogh's frenzied first couple weeks seriously pursuing art, he settled in to a more conservative pace. Instead of 120 drawings in two weeks, he was instead shooting to make just twenty a week. He figured that's how many he'd have to make to end up with one good piece each week. “Waste” takes many forms What feels like “waste” can take many forms: Failed projects: You made something, and nobody likes it. Off on timing: Nobody like it yet, but some day someone will. Unfinished projects: You started, got a little ways, and maybe Shiny Object Syndrome took over. For whatever reason, you didn't finish. Research and Preparation: You don't always know what you're trying to learn, but all sorts of tinkering may seem like a waste. Creative waste is part of the creative game Sometimes what feels like “waste,” makes it directly into a current or future project, thus making it clearly not waste. But even the stuff that never becomes a part of your body of work is part of the creative game. I talked in episode 256 about the Barbell Strategy. To succeed in creative work, put most of your efforts toward “sure bets” that protect your downside and keep you in the game. With the rest of your time and energy, play “wildcards,” that have a chance of big upside. Creative work happens in Extremistan, not Mediocristan. Success won't be a steady climb up-and-to-the-right. Instead, it will look more like a poorly-shaved porcupine. Long periods of time where it doesn't seem like much is happening, punctuated by big spikes that level up your career one at a time. Yes, you're showing up every day and putting in the work, but all that is a series of small bets. You hope for one or two or a few to turn into positive Black Swans. Projects that take off, and take on a life of their own. In the course of playing this strategy, you can't tell what will be wasted, and what will not. You have to trust that “waste” is part of the process. Projects will fail, projects will go unfinished, and iterations will burn in the fire. That doesn't make you a procrastinator or a dilettante – that makes you a creator. Waste in Van Gogh's first masterpiece Vincent van Gogh's first masterpiece was full of waste. He did not just a sketch, but a small study, a medium study, and a print he could give out to test his idea. This was all before working on the final canvas. And that had many iterations, and four coats of varnish. He left it in his friend's studio to prevent himself from “spoiling it.” Then he still came back and worked on it some more. All that waste was on top of the years of work he did leading up to the project. The painting was about peasants, and he wandered around living like a peasant himself, begging people to model for him. And, there was the twenty drawings a week he had done. And those 120 drawings he did in a two-week period? We don't even know what they look like, because he destroyed them. Once this first masterpiece, The Potato Eaters, was done, it must have felt like a waste to Vincent. Everyone hated it. He got in a fight with his brother about it, and he completely cut off a friend who attacked it, viciously. Vincent van Gogh's first masterpiece was the result of a lot of waste. Each of those drawings was a failed project, surely many were left unfinished. He did a massive amount of research and preparation, and he was certainly off on timing. The Potato Eaters is regarded as a masterpiece today. Creative waste adds to the iceberg You already heard last week about how any masterpiece is just the tip of the iceberg. There's far more below the surface. So what new do you learn from creative waste? Sometimes, you can't see the tip of the iceberg. Sometimes it all just feels like waste. Your projects are failing, and your preparation and planning isn't getting you anywhere, causing you to leave projects unfinished. Just remember that other creators have embraced creative waste. I told you last week about how Margaret Mitchell re-wrote nearly every chapter of Gone With the Wind at least twenty times, Jerry Seinfeld says joke-writing is “ninety-five percent re-write,” Meredith Monk's charts and graphs go to waste and don't end up in the final performance, and Stephen King reminds you to “kill your darlings.” Those are all fine when you're deep in a project and you can see where it's going, but what do you do when entire projects get scrapped? Great creators embrace waste That's when you need to remind yourself of the approach Picasso took to his paintings. He did one after another. He saw them as like “pages in [his] journal.” He understood that not all his works would be successful. Even once he had a finished piece, he didn't know its true fate. “The future will chose the pages it prefers,” he said. “It's not up to me to make the choice.” Embrace creative waste. No waste, no wins. Image: Tale of Hoffmann by Paul Klee About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is author of Mind Management, Not Time Management, The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative. Follow David on: Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher YouTube RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »     Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/creative-waste/

Mom Is In Control Podcast
872: [MINDSET] Find Your True Voice {Interview with Emmy Brunner}

Mom Is In Control Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 35:54


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced." -Vincent Van Gogh   In this episode, Emmy and I talk about: How to silence your inner critic How to step into your courage   How to live your life with joy Emmy Brunner is a Psychotherapist, Hypnotherapist, Personal Empowerment and Transformation Coach, CEO, Author and Speaker with more than 20 years' experience in the business and clinical worlds. Emmy's first book, Find your true voice (Penguin Life) is launching in May 2021. Emmy believes that we've all experienced trauma in our lives and that what we refer to now as ‘mental illness' is actually our response to those traumas with her clinical work framed by this belief. Her focus today is upon working with dynamic and ambitious women whom she inspires and empowers to reconnect with their true selves. Alongside her one-to-one coaching program and online course, From Lost to the River, she is the founder of Europe's leading outpatient service, The Recover Clinic, treating sufferers of trauma, depression, body dysmorphia, anxiety, eating disorders and addiction. Emmy also developed The Brunner Project - a social enterprise that funds treatment and opportunities for support to women throughout the UK. Emmy has written for numerous media publications and has featured in documentaries for both the BBC and ITV.   Check out Emmy's new book, Find Your True Voice: www.emmybrunner.com/findyourtruevoice Continue the conversation on Instagram @heatherchauvin_    

We Can Do Hard Things with Glennon Doyle
SEXUAL DESIRE: How do we know who and what we really want?

We Can Do Hard Things with Glennon Doyle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 58:18


1. How Abby discovered she was gay while out to dinner with her parents at a Macaroni Grill. 2. The moment Glennon knew for sure she was queer (in an Amish Boogie Nights bathroom)—and the song that sealed the deal. 3. How, as a straight, cis woman, Amanda never had to wrestle with her sexuality, why she thinks that stunted her exploration. 4. How Glennon's failed Van Gogh visit inspired Amanda's next sex steps. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Entre Versos Y...
Un Jueves con La Oreja de Van Gogh

Entre Versos Y...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 19:12


Espero que estés súper. Hoy vengo con un episodio como los que hacía hace 10 episodios. Me senté a investigar y te desmantelé la canción ¨Jueves¨ de La Oreja de Van Gogh y llegué al punto que tuve que parar por que me tocó la canción y el mensaje. Definitivamente un episodio que te va a hacer llorar (o por lo menos ponerte un ¨chin¨ triste). Una buena canción que carga con una historia y una trama incomparable. Síguenos en instagram www.instagram.com/entreversosy_pd/

Sunday Sauce Podcast
XQC Reacts To A Philion Video, Paddy Pimblett Is OP, Are NFT's Real Art? | Sunday Sauce EP97

Sunday Sauce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 66:18


Paddy Pimblett is DUMMY BROKEN, Vinny sells his Dogecoin, and Phil is absolutely fed up with NFT's. Vincent Van Gogh cut off his ear for the love of his life, and Dobby just wants a sock. This is Sunday Sauce Episode 97.

Sunday Sauce Podcast
XQC Reacts To A Philion Video, Paddy Pimblett Is OP, Are NFT's Real Art? | Sunday Sauce EP97

Sunday Sauce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 66:18


Paddy Pimblett is DUMMY BROKEN, Vinny sells his Dogecoin, and Phil is absolutely fed up with NFT's. Vincent Van Gogh cut off his ear for the love of his life, and Dobby just wants a sock. This is Sunday Sauce Episode 97.

Everything is Awesome with Jeff and KC
Episode 2: I Promise More Pothole Talk

Everything is Awesome with Jeff and KC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 102:14


  Foolish Wits continues with a deep dive into COVID-19 (skip to 55 minutes in if you want avoid it), then we shift into discussing the Afghanistan pullout, podcasts that do fun topics, potholes, anecdotes, a cool documentary about a mad genius, debating what makes an artist, Rachel not liking Van Gogh and Picasso, photography giving power to the people, hip hop, mashups, the democratization of art, emotional catharsis with other people, cover bands, the notion of standup bit revival, Rocky Horror, Vaudeville, What's Up, Frank?, Emily Dickinson clones, our new Shattered Worlds RPG livestream, the coverup is often worse than the crime, Blizzard doing crap, Vedas and UFOs, and Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse, nominee for the 2021 Hugo Award for Best Novel   Check below for more topics!   Contact us:   Jeff Richardson on Facebook @eljefetacoma on twitter   Rachel Aanstad on Facebook   Check out our website: http://awesomepod.squarespace.com   Listen to our other shows! Shattered Worlds RPG  and check out the livestream: twitch.tv/shatteredsworldsrpg   The War for the Tower Twelfth Night Podcast by Rose City Shakespeare and coming eventually...   Electric Bard!    

RCN Digital
Rcn Digital - Septiembre 04 de 2021

RCN Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 51:11


En este episodio de RCN Digital:- Música presente en películas de artes marciales a propósito del día mundial del Taekwondo- La cucuteña que creó un videojuego que funciona como una herramienta de evaluación psicológica.- Las mejores aplicaciones para aprender ejercicios de artes marciales- La llegada de un nuevo dispositivo móvil que desarrolló un diseño inspirado en 'La Noche Estrellada' de Van Gogh y la obra 'El jardín de verano', del pintor francés Claude Monet- Recomendados de la plataforma HBO- El nuevo sistema de proyección del Planetario de Bogotá- El evento de Play Station que se anunció para la próxima semana

Blazed University
Disability or Creative Genius? You decide...

Blazed University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 56:17


This week Alley and Spencer outdo themselves with their topics. Choosing topics that a truly near and dear to their hearts the girls toke up and dive deep into their passions. Alley tells the story of Van Gogh an artist that has inspired her not only through his amazing artwork but also through his life struggles. And Spencer gives an unfiltered and vulnerable look at disabilities and how often they are invisible to outsiders but can truly affect your life. This is an episode you're not going to want to miss. We hope you enjoy this episode and if you do we'd appreciate a review and five stars!! Episode 6 Resources: https://dreamscapefoundation.org/living-with-learning-disabilities/?gclid=CjwKCAjwgISIBhBfEiwALE19SVbUbzBOOzFqWDpBowguwcQPluu3YVkvKdETQT9m4l7H2khTFInYzhoCErIQAvD_BwEhttps://ldaamerica.org/types-of-learning-disabilities/https://www.waldenu.edu/online-masters-programs/ms-in-psychology/resource/seven-learning-disabilities-every-psychology-professional-should-studyhttps://www.ednc.org/more-than-just-a-pc-term-for-learning-disabilities/https://www.indy100.com/tech/this-website-shows-what-it-s-like-to-read-when-you-have-dyslexia-7292521https://www.vincentvangogh.org/ About The Show: Blazed University is the passion project of two stoner friends who love to learn. In each episode, Alley and Spencer will teach each other something new. No subject is off-limits. But wait...there's a twist, they're both always high. Light up and join them, or don't. You're in for some good laughs and education like you've never experienced before. Check us out on social media:Instagram- www.instagram.com/blazeduniversityTik Tok-@BlazeduniversityFacebook- www.facebook.com/blazeduniversityFor sponsorship opportunities email Blazeduniversity@gmail.comDisclaimer: Medicate responsibly and at your own risk. This podcast is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Any information in this podcast is not and should not be considered legal or medical advice. This podcast features information about cannabis a substance that may be illegal in your country of/state residence, this podcast does not support illegal activity. 

We Need 2 Talk
Manifest is Saved, Kanye's Changing His Name and a bunch of Stream it or Skip its

We Need 2 Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 35:52


This week We Need 2 Talk Yankees, Charlie Watts, White Lotus, Clickbait, 9 Perfect Strangers, Manifest, Van Gogh exhibit, Big Brother, Cocaine Cowboys and SO MUCH MORE! 

The Joe and Mike Show
Microphone Therapy 779 - Something Something Something Codorniu Sparkling Wine Review

The Joe and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 70:52


779It's Microphone Therapyon this episode We call Mims - Clays mom and wish her a happy birthday and talk about the Van Gogh exhibit in San Francisco - which is supposed to be amazingWe review Codorniu Sparkling WineCava wines in generalESPN 8 The Ocho has been running promos as part of the Dodgeball AnniversaryThe Hyatt in Los Angeles off Sunset, which is referred to as The Riot HouseLos Angeles, Venice Beach, and San Francisco have turned into homeless tent cities, trash holes, and havens for public drug abuse, bathrooms, and "bum fights".the Dark Knight Returns parts 1 and 2 animated movieChristopher Nolan's Batman SeriesHeathers top 5, which is really a top 2 and includes Dodgeball. She also likes The Goonies and A Clockwork Orange

Historic Hole
Episode 88: Episode 88 - The Life of Vincent van Gogh

Historic Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 59:26


The group explores the life of Vincent van Gogh and discover that he wanted to bang his cousin which I'm sure he would want to be remembered for.Contact: HistoricHole@gmail.com On Instagram & Twitter @HistoricHole 

INGRID Y TAMARA EN MVS 102.5
Comentarot - “Van Gogh”

INGRID Y TAMARA EN MVS 102.5

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 11:52


Si te comprometes, mantente comprometido. Usa la luz del día para enfrentar la noche. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Crime World
Crime World Extra: The Arrest Of Kinahan-Linked Mafia Boss Raffaele Imperiale

Crime World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 24:26


Considered one of Italy's most dangerous fugitives, suspected of being a boss of the Camorra mafia and the one-time owner of two stolen Van Gogh masterpieces, Raffaele Imperiale is now counting the cost of his life of crime. Arrested earlier this month in Dubai, he is facing hefty charges back in Italy and a lengthy prison sentence for his role at the very top of organised crime. But Imperiale is no ordinary mafia Don. Documents from the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in the U.S. suggest that he was part of a European cocaine super cartel which included, amongst others, the Kinahan mafia. Nicola Tallant chats with Sunday World deputy editor Niall Donald about what his capture means for the takedown of the European narcos and how it leaves Daniel Kinahan as one of the last men standing in Dubai.

Creative Codex
25: Vincent van Gogh • At Eternity's Gate (Madness, Genius, & Tragedy: Part 4)

Creative Codex

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 91:38


On this episode we explore the tragic death of Vincent van Gogh. We seek to answer, once and for all, was it: suicide or homicide? In the process we discover that the two popular theories explaining Vincent's death are deeply flawed, and a new theory emerges. This episode follows the events of that fateful day through Theo's perspective. After a thorough investigation, we explore the aftermath, and meet the woman who made Vincent van Gogh a household name: Johanna van Gogh-Bonger. The original music of this episode features a very special guest, singer & songwriter: L'FREAQ. (Also known as Lea Cappelli.) Follow all of L'FREAQ's music through her Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lfreaq/ Listen to L'FREAQ on Spotify: L'FREAQ Spotify And enjoy her YouTube music vids (one which I directed!): https://www.youtube.com/user/leacappelli --------- Explore the paintings mentioned in this episode by visiting this companion gallery I made: https://mjdorian.com/vincent/ --------- Diaries of Johanna van Gogh: https://www.bongerdiaries.org/dagboek_jo_3_section_83 --------- Watch my video about Vincent's most disturbing painting, done while he was suffering from a psychotic episode: https://youtu.be/EHkm6LMXjiA --------- Become a supporter of the show, and receive access to all the Creativity Tip episodes and Episode Exclusives here: https://www.patreon.com/mjdorian --------- Creative Codex is written & produced by MJDorian. Let's connect: https://www.instagram.com/mjdorian/ For Merch & News: https://mjdorian.com/

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Ayaan Hirsi Ali: Human Rights Activist

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 44:46


Today's guest on Danger Close is a women's rights activist, free speech advocate and New York Times bestselling author of Infidel, The Caged Virgin, Nomad, Heretic, The Challenge of Dawa, and Prey who is unafraid to tackle some of the world's most pressing issues.  Ayaan was born in Somalia and grew up in Africa and the Middle East before seeking asylum in the Netherlands where she served as a member of the Dutch Parliament. She was working with Theo van Gogh on a film titled SUBMISSION when he was murdered by an Islamic extremist with terrorist ties who took issue with the film's portrayal of Islam. After shooting Van Gogh multiple times he used a butcher knife and sawed into Van Gogh's throat before stabbing a letter into the filmmaker's chest. That letter was addressed to Ayaan Hirsi Ali. She was named one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2005, one of the Glamour Heroes of 2005, and Reader's Digest's European of the Year. Today, Ayaan continues her fight as a human rights activist as the founder of the AHA Foundation, an organization fighting for the rights of women around the globe. She is a fellow at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, an Adjunct Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, and a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University Ayaan's latest book, Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women's Rights is on shelves now. She also hosts The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast. You can follow Ayaan on Twitter @Ayaan and learn more about her work at ayaanhirsiali.com. Presented by SIG Sauer. Featured Gear:  The Vickers Guide Library  This week's “Featured Gear” is brought to you by Schnee's Boots. For 10% off your first pair go to  Schnees.com and be sure to use promo code JACK21.

StarTalk Radio
Starry Starry Night with Roberta Olson, Jay Pasachoff, & Heather Berlin

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 52:32


Can you hear colors? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore science through art in Van Gogh's Starry Night with art historian Roberta Olson, astronomer Jay Pasachoff, and neuroscientist Heather Berlin. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/starry-starry-night-with-roberta-olson-jay-pasachoff-heather-berlin/ Thanks to our Patrons Rob Carter, Will, Matthew Power, David Born, CARLOS A HERNANDEZ, jon delanoy, and Trisha Donadio for supporting us this week. Photo Credit: Vincent van Gogh, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

UnFollowVic
S:2 Ep:16 OnlyFans & Talibans

UnFollowVic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 43:22


UnFollowVic S:2 Ep:16  Aired 08/23/2021Click The Link Below & Show Us Some Lovehttps://linktr.ee/UnFollowVicIntroThe Jelly Whisperer Vinny's Military UpdateTalibans Back in Business OnlyFans Vic Goes on a Rant Van Gogh : The Immersive ExperienceOutro and More....YouTube:https://youtu.be/Oi8tCBK1w3IThank You to All the Listeners Support the show (https://linktr.ee/UnFollowVic)

Talk Art
Timmy Mallett

Talk Art

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 70:05


Russell & Robert meet legendary TV presenter and broadcaster Timmy Mallett to discuss his lifelong love for painting, sketching and ART!!!We discover why Timmy's been hailed 'the cycling artist' and how he recently became a TikTok sensation with 'Mallett's Pallet', a series where Timmy paints on live stream in front of a global audience of art fans!! We learn of Timmy's fascination with Van Gogh but also Claude Monet and Impressionism. We explore his mammoth cycle trip to the El Camino de Santiago and how he learned to live in the present thanks to his brother Martin, who passed away a week before Timmy's epic cycling pilgrimage. We hear how he learned to paint via his father, who started out as a commercial artist in advertising. Timmy's fully-illustrated new book 'Utterly Brilliant!' is out now.We learn of his admiration for other painters including David Hockney, Edward Seago and hear of a visit to Andrew Lloyd Webber's home to view his incredible private collection of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. We explore his 1980s radio and TV years where he worked with other broadcast legends including Chris Evans, Mike Myers (Austin Powers) and Robert's hero Kylie Minogue on ITV's hit kids show the 'Wide Awake Club'... Princess Diana was one of his most famous viewers, tuning in weekly with her sons Harry & William!!!Follow Timmy on Instagram @Timmy.Mallett Visit Timmy's official website at www.TimmyMallett.co.ukUtterly Brilliant!, his entertaining and surprisingly moving autobiography is out now where Timmy shares his journey through TV stardom, cycling the El Camino de Santiago and his passion for art. Published by SPCK Publishing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pop Culture Man Children
198: Van Gogh: Immersive Experience

Pop Culture Man Children

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 56:30


On today's show Mike and Jen talk about their trip to Van Gogh: the Immersive Experience. What they expected from the show and what they got from it. The various aspects of the interactive experience. Mike and Jen also rate the highs and lows of the show, as well as, what you should expect if you decide to go. Follow @PCMCpod on Twitter, Instagram, and TikTok.

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show
#2739: The Deposition

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 81:49


Mike has a few questions about Starbucks… just call him “Mister Tea”.  Intrigue and mystery means Oscar has a revised schedule today, but he still talks about a wild weekend where he and Shannon paint the town.  Robb drops Robert III off at WVU but still finds some “Daddy time”.  Plus: tipping protocol in these crazy times.  Van Gogh for it!

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
#1 BEST SoundCloud Killer!

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 8:02


We all know the adage about the starving artist. Vincent Van Gogh died penniless, and partially earless I've heard, but that's another story. We know that musicians today struggle to be fairly compensated for their work, with every hit song attracting a myriad of middle men lining up to take their cut of the profit. When an artist signs with a major label, they give up the rights to their own recordings, or the masters as they're called in the music industry. Just ask Kesha, Taylor Swift, or Kanye West, who put out a firestorm of tweets on the subject back in September 2020. Emerging musicians notoriously have a hard time making ends meet, and it's high time we SHOW THEM THE MONEY!! And that's where Audius comes in. A blockchain-based music streaming service that connects listeners to artists, and has the potential to cut out the middleman and pay musicians directly when their songs are streamed. The future of music is decentralized!

Drawing From Experience
Episode 120: Incantations with David Van Gough- Part 2

Drawing From Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 45:23


Join us for the second part of our interview with David Van Gough, master Necro-Surrealist painter. This episode chronicles David Van Gough's journey into creating "Infernal: The Denouement," the third and final series to complete an overarching story that has spanned over the better part of a decade. The theme song "Motivation For The Everyday Artist" was written and recorded by Shane Izykowski.Sponsors:Dianne Hoffman's WebsiteDianne Hoffman's InstagramDianne Hoffman's FacebookShow Notes:David Van Gough's WebsiteDavid Van Gough's InstagramDavid Van Gough's Patreon“Infernal: The Denouement” at The Dark Art EmporiumPurgatoriumParadiso's FallChristopher UlrichAlexandra ManukyanLinnea StridBeksinskiBelgica Paola Rodriguez's YouTube Channel

Real College Podcast

In this episode of Real College Podcast we analyze how the art of indigenous people has been appropriated for profit, have conversations with a local artist surrounding the gains of corporations at the expense of others, discover what happens when fast fashion meets art icons, learn how the right sound can turn dollar signs, and take a dive into the controversial murder mystery surrounding art icon Vincent Van Gogh!

Stuff You Should Know
Seven - No, Wait, Five - Mysteries of the Art World

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 52:09


When you get a bunch of artistic types together into a community – aka, the art world – some intrigue and mystery are bound to arise. Listen in as Chuck and Josh cover strangeness around Van Gogh, Caravaggio, Raphael, and Vermeer – plus don't miss Hilter! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com