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Human settlement in England

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Latest podcast episodes about Warwick

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 63: Isaac Adams

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 101:09


Isaac Adams is an Australian Army veteran who served in Afghanistan. Upon his return to Australia, he began to suffer from PTSD. During his treatment, he discovered the healing power of horses. He now helps veterans and children of veterans by teaching them about relationships with horses. Isaac was such an inspiring person to talk to and I'm sure you will enjoy this conversation as much as I did.Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Kingdom Driven Entrepreneur Podcast with Shae Bynes
KDE 343: Embracing Your Trials to Discover Your Unique Path (Conversation with Warwick Fairfax)

Kingdom Driven Entrepreneur Podcast with Shae Bynes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:50


Today's guest on The Kingdom Driven Entrepreneur Podcast is leadership adviser and executive coach Warwick Fairfax.  Warwick grew up in a prominent family-owned media business in Australia and at the age of 26, he launched a $2.25B takeover bid that failed and led to him losing the 150-year-old family business. This experience was quite a setback for him, but it was also the beginning of new discoveries.  Listen in to hear his story, how he navigated such a significant challenge with faith, and how God has led him to use his story to help others experience rewarding new beginnings in their own leadership and life.

The Anthill
Climate Fight part 5: the art and chaos of negotiating the Glasgow Climate Pact

The Anthill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:39


A good negotiation is supposed to leave everyone feeling a little unsatisfied. So what happened at the world's biggest one – over the future of our planet? In part five, and our final episode of Climate fight: the world's biggest negotiations, host Jack Marley reports from Glasgow where he spoke to academics who have been researching the UN climate negotiations for decades, and the people representing their countries in the talks. Featuring Abhinay Muthoo, professor of economics at the University of Warwick in the UK; François Gemenne, director of the Hugo Observatory at the University of Liège in Belgium, and Lisa Vanhala, professor of political science at UCL in the UK. And Hadeel Hisham Ikhmais, a climate negotiator from Palestine.The Climate Fight podcast series is produced by Tiffany Cassidy. Sound design is by Eloise Stevens and our series theme tune is by Neeta Sarl. The series editor is Gemma Ware. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. A transcript of this episode will be available soon.Climate fight: the world's biggest negotiation is a podcast series supported by UK Research and Innovation, the UK's largest public funder of research and innovation.Further readingFive things you need to know about the Glasgow Climate Pact, by Simon Lewis, UCL and Mark Maslin, UCLThe world has made more progress on climate change than you might think – or might have predicted a decade ago, by Myles Allen, University of OxfordCOP26 deal: how rich countries failed to meet their obligations to the rest of the world, by Lisa Vanhala, UCLCoal: why China and India aren't the climate villains of COP26, by Daniel Parsons and Martin Taylor, University of Hull See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: What causes “Long COVID?”

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 24:30


Adam Voshosted this Thursday's episode of Louisiana Considered. Tulane University Assistant Dean of Clinical Research Dr. Vivian Foncecaargues the need for research on “long COVID,” a nickname for symptoms suffered by some COVID-19 patients for varying periods after they are no longer infected. Little is known about what causes the symptoms, which most commonly include headaches, fatigue, brain fog, and shortness of breath. Louisiana State Museum Division Director Rodneyna Hartand artist/photographer Johanna Warwick join us to talk about “The Yellow Book: Old South Baton Rouge,” an upcoming exhibit of Warwick's work documenting the negative effects of the highway system that was built practically on top of South Baton Rouge neighborhoods. The event opens to the public at Capitol Park Museum on Wednesday, Dec. 1. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Professional Christian Coaching Today
Crucible Leadership with Warwick Fairfax #320

Professional Christian Coaching Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:18


Sometimes as a leader, instead of soaring high, we crash and burn, and face the question, “How can I ever recover from this?” Our special guest today, Warwick Fairfax, has walked through that fire and has recovered.   Join us today to see how God can turn ashes into beauty as Warwick shares:   Philosophical and practical breakthroughs that will get you through the thick of your leadership issues, so you can turn your crucible into a defining moment   Insight on the common denominators among people who rise above and those who meltdown but never rise back up... so you'll have what you need to overcome blind spots   The choices you can make right now, to let your pain be used for a God-given purpose, so He can do some of His mightiest work in and through you     About Warwick Fairfax   Warwick Fairfax is the founder of Crucible Leadership, a philosophical and practical breakthrough in turning business and personal failures into the fuel for igniting a life of significance. He has been hailed by Forbes as offering “compelling insights for anyone who would like to wake up feeling inspired by their work but doesn't” ... insights rooted not in a checklist of glib to-do's but in his own experience at the epicenter of one of the most spectacular business failures in the history of his home nation of Australia. Fairfax was only 26 when, as the fifth-generation heir to a media empire bearing his family name, he led — and lost — a multibillion-dollar public takeover bid. The result? The company founded by his great-great-grandfather slipped from family control after 150 years, leaving him to examine not only his own shortcomings and losses but also his life's principles and the lessons he learned from family members who came before him and some of history's greatest leaders. It has been by shaping these insights as a leadership adviser that Fairfax has enabled others to learn from what he describes as their own “crucible experiences” and emerge to lead a life rooted in who they are. His journey has opened a door for men and women from all walks of life to not only bounce back from failure but to become the leaders they were born to be. Fairfax is the author of Crucible Leadership: Embrace Your Trials to Lead a Life of Significance (Mount Tabor Media, 2021). The book discusses for the first time his thoughts and actions in launching the John Fairfax Ltd. takeover and explains what he learned about himself from that devastating failure — who he was and was not his unique design, purpose, passions, and vision really were. He shares insights from his experience and interviews other leaders who have leveraged their crucible moments to live and lead with significance on the podcast BEYOND THE CRUCIBLE, available through all major podcasting channels. Fairfax holds an undergraduate degree in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from Oxford University and earned his MBA from Harvard Business School. He is an International Coach Federation (ICF) certified executive coach. He is an Elder at Bay Area Community Church. He lives in Annapolis, Maryland, with his wife, Gale. They have three children who are in the process of developing their own unique paths to lives of significance.   Learn more at https://crucibleleadership.com/.  

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 62: Emily Newman

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 133:00


Emily Newman was an Overland Safari Guide for over 7 years, crisscrossing the African continent while taking people on multi-month tours. Warwick met Emily in Kenya in June of 2017 and spent a magical two weeks working with horses and exploring Amboseli National Park underneath Mount Kilimanjaro.In this podcast, Emily talks about her life as a Safari guide and how her experiences have led her to see the world in an extraordinary light.Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-11-12: Steven Andrew King, Dashboard Confessional at Mohegan Sun, and Lucille Masse

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 3:00


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now, some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Steven Andrew King was a professional ice hockey forward who played from 1991 to 2000. He played 67 games in the NHL for the New York Rangers and Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, as well as time in both the minor American Hockey League and International Hockey League. He played hockey at Brown for four seasons and eventually returned as an assistant hockey coach and eventually executive director of the Brown University Sports Foundation. Next, an event that you should know about… This Saturday, November 13th, legendary emo rock band, Dashboard Confessional will be playing live at Mohegan Sun at 8pm.  Their tour is celebrating more than 20 years of music. Tickets start at $19 and are available at mohegansun.com.  See you there! Next, Are you interested in a new opportunity? Look no further, we're here again with another new job listing. Today's posting comes from the City of Norwich. They're looking for 911 Emergency Dispatchers and your responsibility will be to handle and keep accurate communications of calls made to the emergency system.  Pay starts at $51,000 per year. If you're interested, you can read more and apply by using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=c91650dde4931e5f Today we're remembering the life of Lucille Masse, a resident of Charlestown. In 1948, she married Theodore Francis, who preceded her in death. Born in Charlestown, she raised her children and then spent many years working in the Auditing Office of Sears & Roebuck in Warwick. Upon retirement she became a sports enthusiast, playing in ladies' golf and bowling leagues as well as following ice skating, tennis, golf, and the Red Sox. Throughout her life she enjoyed the hobbies of needlework, crocheting, knitting, rug-hooking and ceramics. Her family always looked forward to her Christmas Cookie trays, stuffed shells, apple and rhubarb pies and whiskey cake. She enjoyed her recent home overlooking Paquiset Pond, loved her hummingbirds, watching storms and the seasons change. During their marriage Lucille and Ted lived in several communities from Providence to Pawcatuck and made many life-long friends. They were the hosts of innumerable card games and memorable holiday gatherings at their home in East Greenwich. For many years they enjoyed the seaside life at their cottage in Jerusalem. Lucille leaves one son, two daughters, many grandchildren and great-grandchildren and many extended family and friends. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Lucille's life. Lastly, remember that reporting the local news is an important part of what it means to live here. Head over to Westerlysun.com and help us tell the stories of our community each and every day. Digital access starts at just 50 cents a day and makes all the difference in the world. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books Network
Ian Stewart, “The Joy of Mathematics” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 85:40


The Joy of Mathematics is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Ian Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick and bestselling science and science fiction writer. For Ian Stewart, mathematics is far more than dreary arithmetic, while mathematical thinking is one of the most important—and overlooked—aspects of contemporary society. This wide-ranging conversation explores what mathematics is and why it's worth doing, symmetry, networks and patterns, the relationship between logic and proof, the role of beauty in mathematical thinking, the future of mathematics, linking mathematical oscillations to animal gaits, how to deal with the peculiarities of the mathematical community, and much more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics
"Royal" Rebels, Tudor Style with Nathen Amin (ep 82)

British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 38:57


Henry VII claimed to end the Wars of the Roses. But he didn't make good on that until the end of his reign.Show Notes:Host: Carol Ann LloydGuest: Nathen Amin@nathenamin on Facebook, Instagram, twitternathenamin.comBooks: Henry VII and the Tudor Pretenders: Simnel, Warbeck, and Warwick (2021), The House of Beaufort (2017), York Pubs (2016), and Tudor Wales (2014)Creative Director: Lindsey LindstromMusic: Historical Documentary licensed through Audio Jungle/Envato MarketsSummaryFor Henry VII, the battle for the English throne didn't end at Bosworth. Nathen Amin explains how some Yorkist supporters rallied behind two significant attempts to topple the Tudors before the dynasty had a chance to take hold. It wasn't until the end of his reign that Henry VII could look back and see the results of his attempt to establish a new dynasty.

MoneyBall Medicine
Why AI-based computational pathology detects more cancers

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:36


Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky, it was negative and there was no cancer. But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps? Until recently, it's been a meticulous but imperfect manual process where a pathologist would put a thin slice of tissue under a high-powered microscope and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But now the process is going digital—and growing more accurate.Harry's guest this week is Leo Grady, CEO of, Paige AI, which makes an AI-driven test called Paige Prostate. Grady says that in a clinical study, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed prostate cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool. That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives—nice odds if your own health is on the line. This week on the show, Grady explains explain how the Paige test works, how the company trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how it won FDA approval for the test, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky it was negative and there was no cancer.But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps?Well, until recently, it's been an extremely meticulous manual process. A pathologist would create a very thin slice of your tissue, put it under a high-powered microscope, and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But recently the process has started to go digital. For one thing, the technology to make a digital scan of a pathology slide has been getting cheaper. That's a no-brainer, since it makes it way easier for a pathologist to share an image if they want a second opinion.But once the data is available digitally, it opens up a bunch of additional possibilities. Including letting computers try their hand at pathology. That's what's happening at a company called Paige AI, which makes a newly FDA-approved test for prostate cancer called Paige Prostate.The test uses computer vision and machine learning to find spots on prostate biopsy slides that look suspicious, so a human pathologist can take a closer look.So why should you care?Well, in a clinical study that Paige submitted to the FDA, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool.That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. At the same time there was a 24 percent reduction in false positives. I gotta tell you, if I were getting a prostate biopsy, I'd really like those improved odds. And it's a great example of the kinds of AI-driven medical technologies that I write about in The Future You, which is now available from Amazon in Kindle ebook format.So I asked Paige's CEO, Leo Grady, to come on the show to explain how the test works, how Paige trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how the company got the FDA to give its first ever approval for an AI-based pathology product, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Leo, welcome to the show.Leo Grady: Hi, Harry. Glad to be here.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. You know, I've been watching the company for some time now, and the big story here seems to be that we're really entering the area of digital pathology, also known as sort of computational pathology, and it's funny because I've been talking about digital pathology since I think I started my career back when I was 25, which seems like a long time ago at this point. But for a lot of laboratory tests that we use, like it's usually done by eye, and now we can get a lot from sort of AI being assistive in this way. So keeping in mind that some of the listeners are professionals, but we have a bunch of sort of non-experts, could you start off explaining the term maybe computational pathology and summarize where the state of the art is, which I assume you guys are right at the cutting edge of it?Leo Grady: Yeah, so I think it actually might help just to jump back a level and talk about what is pathology and how is it done today? So today, so pathology is the branch of medicine where a doctor is taking tissue out of a patient through a biopsy, through surgery and making glass slides out of that tissue, looking at it under a microscope in order to make a diagnosis. And today, all of that process of taking the tissue out, cutting it, staining it, mounting it on slides. Then gets looked at under a microscope by a pathologist to make a diagnosis, and that diagnosis the pathologist makes is the definitive diagnosis that then drives all of the rest of the downstream management and care of that patient. When pathologists are looking through a microscope, sometimes they see something that they're not quite sure what it is. And so they may want to do another test. They may want to do another stain. They may want to cut more out of the tissue, make a second slide. Sometimes they want to ask a colleague for their opinion, or if they really feel like they need an expert opinion, they may want to send that case out for a consultation, in which case the glass slides or are put in a, you know, FedEx and basically shipped out to another lab somewhere. All of those different scenarios can be improved with digital pathology and particularly computational pathology and the sort of technology that we build at Paige. So in a digital world, what happens instead is that the slides don't go to the pathologist as glass. They go into a digital slide scanner, and those slide scanners produce a very high resolution picture of these slides.Leo Grady: So these are quarter-micron resolution images that get produced of each slide. And then the pathologist has a work list on their monitor. They look through those those cases, they open them up and then that digital workflow, they can see the sides digitally. When they have those slides digitally, if they want to send them out to a second opinion or or show them to a colleague, it's much easier to then send those cases electronically than it is to actually ship the glass from one location to another. Once those slides are digital it, it opens up a whole other set of possibilities for how information can come to the pathologist. So if they want additional information about something they see in those slides, rather than doing another stain, doing another cut, sending for a second opinion, what we can do and what we do at Paige is we we identify all the tissue patterns in that piece of tissue, match those against a large database where we have known diagnoses and say, OK, this case, this pattern here has a high match toward to something that's in this database. And by providing that information to the pathologists on request that pathologists can then leverage that information, integrate it and use it in their diagnostic process. And this is the product that the FDA just approved. It's the first ever AI based product in pathology that is specifically aimed at prostate cancer and providing this additional information in the context of a prostate needle biopsy.Harry Glorikian: Well, congratulations on that. That's, you know, that's amazing. And I'm. You know, the fact that the FDA is being more aggressive than I remember them being in the past is also a great thing to see. But, you know, we've been talking and quote digitizing things in pathology for for quite some time, let's say, separate from the AI based analytics part of it moving in that direction. What was the kind of technology advance or prerequisite that you guys came up with when you started Paige that that took this to that next level.Leo Grady: Well, as you're pointing out, Harry, most slides are not digitized today, single digits of slides in a clinical setting get digitized. And the reason for that has been you need to buy scanners, you need to change your workflow, you need to digitize these slides. They're enormously large from a file size and data complexity. So then you have to store them somehow and you make all of that investment and then you get to look at the same slide on a monitor that you look at under a microscope. And so pathologists for years have said, why? Why would we make this investment? Why would we go through all of that expense? And that trouble and that change and learn a new instrument when we don't really get a lot of value out of doing so? And furthermore, there was even a question for a long time, do you get the same information on a digital side that you get on glass through a microscope? Yep. There have been a number of things that have been changing that over time. So one is the maturity of the high capacity digital side scanners. There are now a number of hardware vendors that produce these. Storage costs have come down. And one thing that we offer at Paige is is cloud storage, which is really low cost because we're able to effectively pool costs with the cloud providers from multiple different labs and hospitals, so we can really drive those prices down as far as possible.Leo Grady: So that lowers that barrier. And then back in 2017, the first digital side scanner got approved, which demonstrated there was equivalency in the diagnosis between looking at the slide on a monitor and looking at it under a microscope. And that is something that that we also replicated with our digital side viewer, demonstrated that equivalency between digital and glass. But all of those barriers were barriers just to going digital in the first place. And now, really, for the first time, because of the maturity of the scanners, because of the FDA clearance of just the viewer, because of lower cost storage, many of those barriers have come down. Now what has not happened is still a major clinical benefit for going digital in the first place. Yes, you can share slides easier. Yes, you can retrieve slides easier. Yes, you can do education easier. It's still a lot of cost and a lot of changed your workflow, so I really think that that the introduction of the kinds of technologies that that the FDA approved, which we built with Paige Prostate, that actually adds additional information into the diagnostic workflow that can help pathologists use that information help them. You get to a better diagnosis, reduce false positives, reduce false negatives, which is what we showed in the study that for the first time is is going above and beyond just going digital and some of these conveniences of a digital workflow to providing true clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, whenever I look at this from an investment perspective, like if you take apart something and break it into its first principles, you know, levels, you have to have certain milestones hit. Otherwise, it's not going to come together, right? And I've, you know, looking at digital pathology, it's the same thing. You have to have certain pieces in place for the next evolution to be possible, because it's got to be built on top of these foundational pieces. But, you know, once you get there, the exponential nature of of how things change, once it's digitized and once you're utilizing it and prove that it works is sort of where you see the, you know, large leaps of benefit for the pathologist as well as, you know, ultimately we're doing this for better patient care. But you know, your product was I think the FDA called it the first ever FDA approval for an AI product in pathology, which is a big deal, at least as far as I'm concerned, because I've been doing it for a long time. But because it was first, it must have been a one hell of a learning process for you and the FDA to figure out how to evaluate a test like this. Can you sort of explain maybe a little bit about the process? You know, how did you win approval? What novel questions did you have to answer?Leo Grady: It was a long process. You know, as you point out, this is this is the first ever technology approved in this space. And I think you saw from the FDA's own press release their enthusiasm for what this technology can bring to patient benefits. Fortunately, we applied for breakthrough designation back in early 2019, received that breakthrough designation in February of 2019. And as a result, one of the benefits of breakthrough designation is the FDA commits to working closely with the company to try to iterate on the study protocol, iterate on the the validation that's going to be required in order to bring the the technology to market. And so because of that breakthrough designation, we had the opportunity to work with the the FDA in a much tighter iterative loop. And I think that they are they were concerned, I mean, primarily about the impact of a misdiagnosis and pathology, right? Which is really understandable, right? Their view is that, yes, maybe in radiology, you see something and maybe aren't totally sure. But then there's always pathology as a safety net, you know, in case you ever really need to resolve a ground truth. You can always take the tissue out and look at it under a microscope. But when you're dealing with a product for pathology, that's the end of the road. I mean, that is where the diagnostic buck stops. And so anything there that that was perhaps going to misinform a pathologist, mislead them, you know, ultimately lead to a negative conclusion for the patients could have more severe consequences.Speaker2: The flip side, of course, though, is that if you get it right, the benefits are much greater because you can really positively impact the care of those patients. So I think they they, you know, appropriately, we're concerned with the exacting rigor of the study to really ensure that that this technology was providing benefit and also because it was the first I think they wanted to be able to set a standard for future technologies that would have to live up to the same bar. So there were a lot of meetings, you know, a lot of trips down to Silver Spring. But I have to say that that the FDA, you know, I think in technology, there are a lot of companies that are are quick to, you know, malign regulators and rules. I frankly both at Paige and my previous experience at HeartFlow, at Siemens, I think the FDA brings a very consistent and important standard of clinical trial design of of, you know, technology proving that is safe and effective. And I found them to be great partners to work with in order to really identify what that protocol looks like to be able to produce the validation and then to, you know, ask some tough questions. But that's their job. And I think, you know, at the end of the day, the products that get produced that go through that process really have met the standard of of not only clinical validation, but even things like security and quality management and other really important factors of a clinical product.Harry Glorikian: Oh no, I'm in total agreement. I mean, whenever I'm talking to a company and they're like, Well, I don't know when I'm going to go to the agency, I'm like, go to the agency, like, don't wait till the end. Like there, actually, you need to look at them as a partner, not as an adversary.Leo Grady: Yeah. And a pre-submission meeting is is easy to do. It's an opportunity to make a proposal to the FDA and to understand how they think about it and whether that's that's going to be a strategy that's going to be effective and workable for them. So I always think that that pre subs are the place to start before you do too much work because you generally know whether you're on the right path or not.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I agree. And it's funny because you said, like, you know, they're concerned about the product, but it's interesting. Like from all the College of American Pathology studies where you send slides to different people, you don't always get the exact same answer, depending on who's looking at it. So I can see how a product can bring some level of standardization to the process that that helps make the call so uniform, even across institutions when you send the slides. So I think that's moving the whole field in a really positive direction.Leo Grady: Well, only if that uniform call is correct, right? Or better? Great. I mean, if you bring everybody down to the lowest common denominator that that standardization, but it's not moving the field forward. So. Correct. One of the curses of of bringing that level of standardization is that you have to really meet the highest bar of the highest pathologists and not not just the average. That said, you know, we're fortunate to come from Memorial Sloan-Kettering and to have the opportunity to work with some of the the leading pathologists in the world to really build in that level of rigor and excellence into the technology.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So that brings me to like, you know. The algorithms are built on a fairly large training set would be my assumption and of pre labeled sort of images, where do you guys source that from? Is it you have like a thousand people in the background sort of making sure that everything is labeled correctly before it's fed to the to the algorithm itself?Leo Grady: Well, what you're describing is very common where you have pathologists or in radiology radiologists or other experts really marking up images and saying this is the important part to pay attention to. This part is cancer. That part's benign. Our technology actually works differently. Our founder, Thomas Fuchs, and his team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering actually really made a breakthrough not only in the the quality of some of the the AI systems that were building, but also in the technology itself. And what what they did, this was all published in Nature Medicine a couple of years ago, is basically find a way to just show the computer a slide and the final diagnosis without having a pathologist, you know, mark up the slide, but just show them the final diagnosis. And when you show the computer enough examples of the slide and the final diagnosis, the computer starts to learn to say, OK, this pattern is common to all grade threes. This pattern is common to all grade fours. Or whatever it is. And the computer learns to identify those patterns without anybody going through and marking those up. Well, this technology is important for a few reasons.Leo Grady: One, it means we can train systems at enormous scale. We can not just do thousands of cases, but tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of cases. Second, it means that we can really build out a portfolio of technologies quickly that are very robust and not have to spend years annotating slides. And third, it allows us to start looking for patterns that no pathologists would necessarily know how to mark up. You know, can we identify which tumors are going to respond to certain drugs or certain therapies? You know, no pathologists are going to be able to say, OK, it's this part of the the tumor that you need to look at because they don't really know. But with this technology where we we know these tumors responded, these tumors didn't it actually helps us try to ferret out those patterns. So that that's one of the real key benefits that differentiates Paige from from other companies in this space is just the difference in the technology itself.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, it's funny because I must admit, like when we talk about stuff like this, I get super excited because I can see where things can go. It's. It's always difficult to explain it where somebody else can envision what you've been thinking about because you've been thinking about it so long, but it's super exciting. So let's jump to like the most important benefits, like if you had to rank the benefits of the technology, I mean, I've I read on your website that in the clinical study you guys submitted to the FDA, pathologist used using the Paige Prostate were seven percent more likely to correctly diagnose the cancer. Is that the major innovation? Would that by itself be enough to justify an investment in the technology? I mean, I'm trying to. You know, if you were to say God, this is the most important thing and then go down the list, what would they be?Leo Grady: Yeah, that's right. So so the study that we did was like this. We had 16 pathologists. They diagnosed about six hundred prostate needle core biopsy patients and they they did their diagnosis. They recorded it and then they did it a second time using Paige so they could see the benefit of all this pattern matching that that Paige had done for them. And what we did is we compared the diagnosis. They got the first time and the second time with the ground truth, consensus diagnosis that we had from Memorial. And what we found is that when the pathologists were using Paige, they had a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. They had a 24 percent reduction in false positives, and their interest in obtaining additional information went down because they had more confidence in the diagnosis that they were able to provide. And what was interesting about that group of 16 pathologists is it it included pathologists that were experienced, that were less experienced, some that were specialists in prostate cancer, some that were not so specialized in prostate cancer. And among that entire group of pathologists, they all got better. They all benefited from using this technology. And what's more, is that the gap between the less experienced, less specialized pathologists and more experienced, more specialized pathologists actually decreased as they all used the technology. So it allowed them to, like we were talking about before, actually come up to the level of of the better pathologists and even the better pathologists could leverage the information to get even better.Harry Glorikian: So as a male who you know who's going to age at some point and potentially have to deal with, hopefully not, a prostate issue, we want them to make an accurate diagnosis because you don't want the inaccurate diagnosis, especially in in that sort of an issue. But what about the speed? I mean, you've you talk about that, you know, it helps streamline the process and reduce reduce turnaround time for for patients. What does that do to workload and and how quickly you're able to turn that around compared to, say, a traditional method.Leo Grady: Our study was really focused on clinical benefit and patient benefit. We were not aiming to measure speed and the way in which the study was designed and the device is intended to be used is that the pathologist would look at the case, decide what they they think the result is, and then pull up the Paige results and see if it changes their thinking or calls their attention to something that they may have missed. So the focus of the the product was really on the the benefit to the the clinical diagnosis and the clinical benefit to patients by providing more information to the doctors. And the result of that information was, you know, clearly demonstrated benefit. Now if they can get to that result by looking at the Paige results and they don't need another cut, they don't need another stain, they don't need another consultation, then that's going to get the results back to the urologists faster, back to the patient faster and will ultimately enable them to start acting on that diagnosis more quickly. But the intention of the study, the intended use of the device is not around making pathologists faster. It's really around providing them this additional information so that they can use that in the course of their diagnosis and get the better results from patients.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So I asked this out of naivete because I didn't I didn't go looking for it. But have you guys done a health economic analysis of the system?Leo Grady: We have one. It certainly it's, as you know, it's really key to be able to look at that we have a model that we've built. We're still refining it with additional data. There was a study that was announced in the U.K. a couple of weeks ago where the NHS is actually funding a prospective multicenter trial that includes Oxford, Warwick, Coventry, Bristol to be able to evaluate the the health, economics and clinical benefits of using this technology in clinical practice prospectively. So that's something that we engaged with NICE [the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence] on in order to try to get the design correct that will help feed in real world data into the model. But we have a model that we've been using internally and are continuing to build and refine.Harry Glorikian: So. Again, incredible that you guys got FDA approval, I think the company was founded in 2017, if I'm correct. Can you talk about, you know, the founders and yow you guys, you know, built this so quickly, I mean time scale wise, it's a pretty compressed time scale, relatively speaking.Leo Grady: Well, yeah, it isn't, it isn't, ...so the company started in 2017, our first employee was actually middle of 2018 and we had our first venture round and in early 2018. However, the work that went into the company that spun out of Memorial Sloan-Kettering started earlier. So there is a group of really visionary individuals at MSK that back, I want to say, 2014, 2015, actually had started this push toward digital pathology, computational pathology, really seeing where the puck was going and building this technology. They formed something called the Warren Alpert Center, and the Warren Alpert Center provided some initial funding to really get this going and to hire some of the founders and to really move this technology in the right direction. And it was really because that technology started to show such promise that MSK made the decision that that was at a point where it could be better, you know, more impactful to actually go outside of MSK into a company where where we could industrialize the technology and really bring it to hospitals and labs around the world. So the technology started earlier, 2014, 2015. Paige was really launched in, I would say, 2018, although technically it was incorporated earlier and and then from that point I personally joined in 2019. And so I'm not I'm not a founder, but when I joined in 2019, you know, we we really spun up a significant team and and brought to bear some of my own experience and industrializing AI technology and bringing it out to clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Well, you know, most founders don't take the company all the way. It's a rare breed that's able to get it that far. So you know this a great story, but let's step back here and talk about like now you have to like, get people to accept this technology right, which is the human factor which I always find much more confounding than the the the the computational factor. So you've got to get, you know, somebody inside a hospital or pathology lab. Do you run into resistance or pushback from the technology, I mean, are they skeptical about the algorithm? How do you get a human to sort of buy off on this? I remember when we were presenting this, oh God, again, 25 years ago, they hated it. I mean, just hated it. And as time has gone by, you've seen that that digitization is slowly taking effect and where you know, it's assistive as opposed to something, I remember when we first launched this, it was, "This is going to be better than" or "take your job," which is a great way to make an enemy on the other side. And I see that the two actually being better than one or the other per se on on its own. So how are you guys approaching this? And do you have any anecdotal stories that you might be able to share?Leo Grady: Yeah, and so I think there are two elements are one is, you know. Are people resistant by the nature of the technology because they feel threatened by it, and then the other is how does market adoption start with this sort of technology to just the first point? You know, I tend to be very careful about the term AI. I feel like it know it often introduces this concept of, you know, people think of a robot doctor that's going to run in and start doing things. And it's just it's not. I mean, AI is a technology that's been in development for four decades. I did my PhD in AI, in computer vision, 20 years ago, and it's just a technology, right? It's like a transistor. It can be used to build many different things. At its core, it's just complex pattern matching, which is what we how we leverage that technology. In the case of Paige Prostate was to help provide that information. I think, you know, the better frame to think about this technology is as a diagnostic. This is just like a diagnostic test. You validate it with a standalone sensitivity and specificity. The information gets provided the doctor. You have to do a clinical trial that samples the space effectively of the patient population and the intended use.Leo Grady: And you have to make sure the doctors understand the information and know how to use it effectively. It's before my time, but I heard that when immunohistochemistry was first really introduced in pathology, that there is a discussion that this was going to take all the pathologists' jobs. And who needs a pathologist if you can just stain with IHG and get get a diagnostic result out of it? Well, you know, 20 years, IHT is an essential component of of pathology, and it's a key element of of the diagnostic workflow for pathologists. So, far from replacing any pathologists, it's empowered them. It's made there the benefit that they can provide to the clinicians, even more valuable and even more important. And I think we're going to see a similar trajectory with this computational technology. Now your first question about market adoption, how people adopting this, I would say that, you know, last week I went to the College of American Pathology meeting, which was in person in Chicago. It's my first in-person meeting since COVID, so a year and a half ago. And I noticed--and this was this was right after the announcement by the FDA of of the approval for Paige Prostate--I noticed there was a market shift in the conversations I was having with pathologists.Leo Grady: It was a shift away from "Does this technology work? Is it ready for prime time? What does it really do?" Toward, "Ok, how do we operationalize this? How do we bring it in house, how do we integrate this into a workflow and how do we how do we pay for it?" You know, those are the conversations that we were having in Chicago at CAP. Not does this work? Is it ready for prime time? So I do think that there is a market understanding that the technology is real, that it works, that it can provide benefit. Now it's just a question of how do we operationalize and how do we get it paid for? Because today there's no additional reimbursement for it. But you know, again, with market adoption, you're got your Moore adoption curve for anything. You get them and you get your innovators and early adopters, your early majority, late majority and your laggards. And you know where I think we're at a stage where we've got innovators and early adopters that are excited to jump in and start leveraging this technology. And I think, you know, we're going to get to your early majority and the late majority over time. It's always going to be a process.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no. I mean, you know, reflecting on your IHC [immunohistochemistry], that's where I started my career. Like, I think I taught like two hundred and fifty IHC courses over the first, say, three or four years that I was in the in the business. Three or four years. And you know, I agree with you. There's no way that any one of these technologies takes the place of [a pathologist]. They're additive, right? It's just a tool that helps. Make the circle much more complete than it would be in any one component, all by itself.Leo Grady: Could you ever hear when you were teaching these classes? Did anyone ever say that like, are we even going to need pathologists anymore?Harry Glorikian: No, it was when the is is when imaging systems came out that said the imaging system would then replace the pathologists. The IHC was was really the cusp of precision medicine, where I remember when I first started because we were working with ER and PR and, you know, when I first learned, you know about like, you know, the find and grind method, I would always be like, OK, it's x number of femtomoles. Like, What does that really telling you, right? Compared to this stain over here where I can see, you know, the anatomy, I can see where the cells are. I can see. I mean, there's so much more information that's coming from this that lets me make a better call. I will tell you selling it was not that hard to a lot of people, they they could see the benefit and you could you could really sort of get them to adopt it because they saw it as a tool.Leo Grady: Was that post-reimbursement?Harry Glorikian: Uh, even pre-reimbursement.Leo Grady: Really interesting. Yeah, there's there's a lot we can learn from you then.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, it was. It was. It was an interesting ride back then. I mean, I remember my first day at work. My boss comes to me and says. By the way, you're going to give a talk in Arizona in two weeks, and I was like, What do you mean I'm going to go? Who am I going to give a talk to you? He goes, Oh, you got to give a talk on the technology and how to use it. And I said, who's in the audience? And he said histo techs, and there'll be some pathologists. And I was like, Are you kidding me? And he goes, You got two weeks to get ready. Oh my God, I was cramming like crazy. I was in the lab. I was doing all the different types of assays that we had available. And you know, it was you went out there and I learned very quickly like, the show must go on, like you got to get out there and you got to do your thing. But it was it was a great time in my career to be on that on that bleeding edge of what was happening. So quickly, like, why did you guys start with prostate cancer, though like? It's not the most common cancer, although it's high on the list, so. Or maybe it's the second most type of cancer, but why did you guys start with that and where do you guys see it going from there, I guess, is next.Leo Grady: Well, the the decision of how to rank the different opportunities for, you know, ultimately we believe this technology can benefit really the entire diagnostic process, no matter what the question is in pathology. However, we did have to prioritize right and elements of of where to start, right. The elements of prioritization had a few factors. So one factor was how how prevalent is the disease? I mean, as you know, prostate cancer is one of the big four. Second, is there are a lot of benefit that we can provide today with prostate cancer. You know, man of a certain age goes in, gets a PSA test. It's high, they go and they get 12 cores, 14 cores, 20 cores out of their prostate and that produces. You know, it can be 30 slides, it can be 50 slides, I mean, it really depends, and this can take the pathologist a long time to look through. Most of those cores are negative. In fact, most of those patients are negative, but the consequence of missing something is really significant. And so we felt that this was a situation where there was a big need. There's a lot of there's a lot of screening that goes on with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is prevalent and the consequence of missing something is really significant. So that's where we felt like we could provide maximum benefit, both in terms of the patient, in terms of the doctor, and also that it was a significant need across the space.Leo Grady: We also had the data and the technology that we could go after that one well. But that said, you know, we announced that we have a breast cancer product that is got a CE mark in an enabling clinical use in Europe. We're doing a number of investigational studies with that product in the US right now and and working toward bringing that one to market. You know, after our our recent funding round, we spun up a number of teams and a number of of verticals that were we're going after in other cancer types and ultimately even beyond cancer. So there's more to come. We wanted we really take seriously the quality, the regulatory confirmation as well as the deployment channel. I mean, we built the whole workflow to be able to leverage this technology throughout the workflow in a way that is meaningful to the pathologist. So the development is is maybe a little bit more heavy and validation than some other companies where you have a PhD student that says, Oh, you know, I won some challenge and I went to go bring this to market building real clinical products, validating them, deploying them, supporting them is a real endeavor. But prostate was just the first, breast is second, and we have a whole pipeline coming out. So stay tuned.Harry Glorikian: So before we end here, I want to just tilt the lens a little bit towards the consumer and say, like, you know. Why would consumers show interest or at least be aware that these things are coming? Because I always feel like they're almost the last to know, or they just don't know at all. But, you know, in the future, you know, with technologies like this, do you see it identifying tumors sooner, faster, more accurately? Or, you know, will it will it help increase survival or help us find better drugs? I mean that that's I think, what people are really... If you went down one level from us of the people that are affected by this. Those are the sorts of things they'd want to know.Leo Grady: Well, I think, you know, a useful analogy is what happened with the da Vinci robot. You know, when it was necessary for a patient to get prostate cancer surgery, they often chose centers that had the da Vinci robot. Why? Because they believed that they were able to get better care at those centers. And it's not because the surgeons at the other centers were no good. It's because the the da Vinci added elements of precision and standardization and accuracy that could be demonstrated that would enable the the patient to feel more confident they're getting the best treatment at those centers. So as I think about Paige Prostate and and ultimately the other technologies that we're bringing to market behind that, I would imagine that from the standpoint of the patient, they would want the diagnosis done at a lab where they had access to all of the available information, all the latest technology that could inform the pathologists to get the right answer, right? So would you want to go to a lab where the pathologists had no access to IHC? Would you want to send it to a lab where the pathologist had no ability to do a consultation? Do you want to send your your sample to a lab where the pathologist doesn't have access to Paige? I think in the future the answer is going to be no.Leo Grady: And I think that we're going to see ultimately, insurance companies and Medicare recognize that those labs are able to provide better care to patients and are going to encourage them and incentivize them to adopt these technologies. So, you know, ultimately from a patient standpoint, they they want to choose centers where they're going to get the best care, they're going to get the best diagnosis. I think one of the exciting elements of digital technology is that not everybody is able to go to Memorial Sloan-Kettering, not everyone's able to go to MD Anderson or Mayo Clinic. I think the opportunity with digital technology is to really increase the accessibility and increase the availability of these diagnostic tools that can really empower and enable pathologists in many parts of America, as well as beyond to really get to better results for their patients. And ultimately, you know, every patient cares about getting those those results accurately for themselves and for their loved ones.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm always explaining, you know, to different people like once you digitize it, there's so many opportunities that may open up to make things better, faster, easier, more accurate and even start to shift the business model itself of what can be done and where it can be done. So it's it's a super exciting space, and thanks for taking the time. It was great to talk to you. I mean, I don't get to talk to people in pathology all the time anymore. I'm sort of all over the place, but it's it's near and dear to my heart, that's for sure.Leo Grady: Well, thank you so much, Harry. We're so excited by these recent developments with the first ever FDA approved technology in this space and, you know, really excited to help roll this out to labs and hospitals around the country and around the world to really benefit those doctors and patients.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, I look forward to hearing about the next FDA approval.Leo Grady: Working on it. Look forward to telling you.Harry Glorikian: Thanks.Leo Grady: All right. Thanks so much, Harry.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Beyond the Crucible
Embracing Authenticity #91

Beyond the Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:40


Being authentic is not easy; in fact it is hard. So how do you develop that kind of mature authenticity? And what are the benefits when you do? Host Warwick Fairfax and cohost Gary Schneeberger discuss the key building blocks of an authentic life – from having an anchor for your soul to finding true friends, from putting yourself in the environment that fits who you are to doing what you're good at and passionate about. And be sure to listen for an excerpt from the just-released audio version of Warwick's book Crucible Leadership: Embrace Your Trials to Lead a Life of Significance about why authenticity is so hard, but also so essential, in moving beyond setbacks and failures in business and in life.   To order Warwick's book, and explore other Crucible Leadership resources, visit www.crucibleleadership.com  

The Paul Minors Podcast: Productivity, Business & Self-Improvement
PMP #231: Time blocking my colleague's calendar

The Paul Minors Podcast: Productivity, Business & Self-Improvement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 9:36


If you've read my blog for a while, you've probably heard me talk about time blocking before. This is a technique I've been following since 2010 to schedule time on my calendar to work on specific tasks and projects. While I think it's a very powerful technique and one of the best methods you can use to plan out your work, not everyone finds this technique easy to adopt. My colleague, Warwick, is a good example. Since he started working with me full-time in early 2021, we've been doing an end-of-week review where we run down our list of clients and plan what needs to be done next for each one. Warwick would then schedule time on his calendar for this work. While he was good at making his initial plan when it came to updating his calendar and making time for new work that comes in during the week, he started to fall behind and his calendar quickly became out of date. Show notes (please leave me a comment with your questions and feedback) » https://paulminors.com/231 If you enjoyed this episode, I'd love it if you could leave me a review. Intro/Outro Music: "Synthia" by Scott & Brendo --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paulminors/message

Beyond the Crucible
It Didn't Happen To You, It Happened For You: James Kelley #90

Beyond the Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 55:28


How could viewing your crucible not as something that happened to you, but something that happened for you, change the way you chart a course for moving beyond it? This week you'll hear from James Kelley, author of THE CRUCIBLE'S GIFT, who discusses with Warwick how setbacks and failures can be a catalyst to increase self-awareness, live with greater integrity and develop deeper compassion – for others, yes, but also for ourselves.   To learn more about James Kelley, visit www.qchange.com/ To order Warwick Fairfax's book CRUCIBLE LEADERSHIP: EMBRACE YOUR TRIALS TO LEAD A LIFE OF SIGNIFICANCE, and to explore other helpful resources, visit www.crucibleleadership.com

Hammer Lane Legends
86: Straight From The Pitt | Phil Warwick

Hammer Lane Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 144:33


In Episode 86: Straight From The Pitt, we are joined by Phil Warwick. Phil is a driver from the Pitt Ohio Norristown, PA terminal, and he is also the person who trained Tony how to drive trailer years ago! Brian and Tony have a fun conversation with Phil about the state of the trucking industry today, and where it's heading in the future with the implementation of automation. So buckle up and enjoy another ride straight from The Pitt! KEEP US FUELED: buymeacoffee.com/hammerlane GET MANSCAPED: manscaped.com PROMO CODE: "HAMMERLANE" for 20% OFF! EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOOD: www.preparewithhll.com LEAVE A VOICEMAIL: 515-585-MERK(6375) EMAIL US YOUR STORIES: hllpodcast@protonmail.com Website: www.hammerlanelegends.com Gear: https://www.hammerlanelegends.com/gear YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC5TWlB5Yqx8JlQr3p3bkkMg Facebook: www.facebook.com/hammerlanelegends Instagram Desktop: www.instagram.com/hammerlanelegends Instagram Mobile: @hammerlanelegends Twitter Desktop: www.twitter.com/HLLPodcast Twitter Mobile: @HLLpodcast Produced by: Jack Merkel

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 61: Carolyn Resnick & Nancy Zintsmaster

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 117:52


Carolyn Resnick realized during her years of studying wild horses, that she could communicate with them based on a language that was natural to them. From this communication, she created The Waterhole Rituals,  a unique method of training horses at Liberty. In the 1970s Carolyn originated the term "Liberty Training".In 2017, The Resnick Method of Horsemanship launched The Resnick Method Liberty Training® Academy. Carolyn Resnick and Nancy Zintsmaster, co-created this academy to empower people who need help in connecting to the very heart of the horse, and to help people understand how to use horses as our guides for self-realization; to address the whole being, mind, body, and spirit. It is our mission to help grow the new world consciousness that is now ready to receive this next step in valuing horses as teachers and healers, making the horse a true partner in our journey of self-healing, personal growth, and transformation.The Resnick Method Website: https://www.carolynresnick.com/Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Arts & Ideas
Green Thinking: Climate and the media

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 26:55


Would it help to see Superheroes do their recycling? Do viewers feel more invested in climate protests depending on what the protesters look like? And how does bingeing box sets contribute to emissions and a bigger carbon footprint? Pietari Kaapa explains how blockbusters might be able to have a bigger impact than documentaries about the climate emergency, and Sylvia Hayes describes the changes in news images of climate change protest influence audiences. Sylvia Hayes is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Exeter and is currently on placement with Carbon Brief, a climate change news website. Her research looks in to the use of media and images in reporting climate change news. https://geography.exeter.ac.uk/staff/index.php?web_id=Sylvia_Hayes Dr Pietari Kaapa is Reader in Media and Communications at the University of Warwick, where he specialises in environmental screen media, particularly film and television. He is also the Principle Investigator for the Global Green Media Network. https://globalgreenmediaproduction.wordpress.com/ Dr Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough is a New Generation Thinker based at the University of Durham. The podcast series Green Thinking is 26 episodes 26 minutes long looking at issues relating to COP26 made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. It explores the latest research and ideas around understanding and tackling the climate and nature emergency. New Generation Thinkers Des Fitzgerald and Eleanor Barraclough are in conversation with researchers about a wide-range of subjects from cryptocurrencies and finance to eco poetry and fast fashion. The podcasts are all available from the Arts & Ideas podcast feed - and collected on the Free Thinking website under Green Thinking where you can also find programmes on mushrooms, forests, rivers, eco-criticism and soil. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 For more information about the research the AHRC's supports around climate change and the natural world you can visit: Responding to climate change – UKRI or follow @ahrcpress on twitter. To join the discussion about the research covered in this podcast and the series please use the hashtag #GreenThinkingPodcast. Producer: Sofie Vilcins

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia
119 - Selling Without Sleaze w/ Sarah Jolley-Jarvis

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:26


Thanks for tuning into the Catapulting Commissions Sales Talk with your host, Anthony Garcia. This week, we're sitting down with Sarah Jolley-Jarvis from Warwick, England. She's an international best-selling author and speaker, and she is helping businesses secure more sales. She's going to break down her Selling Without Sleaze philosophy and share how she catapults her and her team's commissions.    Sarah's brand, Selling Without Sleaze, is built around helping people with sales techniques where they don't actually have to feel compromised, as far as their own ethics are concerned.    When we think about leads, there are two totally different skillsets: generation and conversion--convoluting the two is not a good idea. Sarah works with clients who may not be ready to scale up either through paid ads or otherwise. Sometimes it's about nailing down your messaging before you put your product under a microscope. Throwing money at Facebook ads when your messaging isn't clear is just paying for feedback--you can get that for free. Get your organic engagement in a healthy place first.    Sarah's mission is to show people you can do sales successfully without having to sell yourself without having to do things that don't sit right with you. It's about equipping people with the resources with the tools with the skills to be able to go out and sell their product to their ideal clients.   Salespeople can be trained, Sarah says. There's a lot of skills you can take from normal life -- a lot of scenarios where you're naturally selling. You're just taking those skills, they're all rough around the edges, and you're molding them into something a lot more succinct.    Being introverted doesn't mean you won't have success in sales. At the same time, it's important to get out there. You wouldn't let your best friend pass by an opportunity. If you're really passionate about your product, and your product can truly help that perfect customer, are you really going to sit by and let that person sail past when they could have been a perfect example of how great your offering is? Sometimes, you just need that person to get you to that point. Confidence comes from structure, and that doesn't mean reading off a script. It's about having signposts that can guide your conversations.    So, how do you close without the sleaze? It's about understanding whether it's a want or a need, how important it is, what the priority is for them, and you're driving it based on what their needs are, and what their outlook is. The customer should be doing most of the talking. Then you'd move on to explaining and relating how your product and its features and benefits relate to that need. 

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2704 - Decades-Old Myths Of The "War On Drugs", And How They Shape Our Perception Of Mexico w/ Benjamin T. Smith

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 67:32


Sam and Emma host Benjamin T. Smith, professor of Latin American history at the University of Warwick, to discuss his recent book The Dope: The Real History of the Mexican Drug Trade. They begin by addressing the myth of the Mexican drug trade, built by both US and Mexican authorities around this moral binary of cops and federal agents versus evil Mexican cartel members, birthed, in part, from this image of a Mexican marijuana culture that never really existed outside of prisoners and soldiers, and how these elements worked to reinforce US nativist ideology. Professor Smith then discusses how the drug industries in Mexico did come around, looking at the massive boom in marijuana consumption in the US starting in the 1960s, and the resulting increase in Americans looking to Mexico for their product, before he dives into the role of local governments and police in protecting cartels for a small black market tax, even while the federal government in Mexico and the US brought out more and more punitive measures for drug trafficking. This brings them to the DEA, as they dive into their “divide and conquer” policy of turning cartels against each other and taking out kingpins with relative success working to bolster their war on drugs financially, even as addiction, drug use, and overdoses continue to soar, and they take on the similarities between this war, and the amorphous, never-ending war on terror. Professor Smith, Emma, and Sam wrap it up by looking at the continued development of organized crime as it has moved from the drug trade to more violent industries, and how this has been handled in the transition from Nieto's policy of “hugs not bullets” to Obrador's work with the Military during his presidency. Emma and Sam also discuss Mitt Romney's first pro-immigration stance when it comes to billionaires, and Joseph McCarthy's white scare of a rumor. And in the Fun Half: Pep from WA calls in to discuss US immigration and discrimination between US-sponsored vaccines and non-CDC accepted vaccines, Dan from the infertile crescent talks objectivism, Ayn Rand, and what boss you would take to a deserted island. Emma and Sam watch Tucker just get blown away by hearing someone else reiterate his own talking points on the feminization of the US, Jimmy Dore proves that lack of reading comprehension is truly a side effect of not moving past the headline, Rep. Cawthorn gets laughed out of a Dartmouth College Republicans meeting, and Thomas from VA calls in to discuss rampant Right-wing success in the suburbs and local Dems favoring incumbents over party strength, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsor: MySolarNerd.com: There are a lot of homeowners that aren't aware of the solar options currently available. It is now possible to retrofit a home with solar panels for no money down. Most homeowners that switch over to solar see significant savings starting in their first year. This is possible thanks to the Solar Investor Tax Credit (going away soon). My Solar Nerd's mission is SIMPLE: Help you find the best solar program for your home and make the transition as EASY and SMOOTH as possible. Go to mysolarnerd.com and fill out the inquiry form now. Make sure you select Majority Report Listener for how you heard about My Solar Nerd to receive a $200 gift card upon installation! Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

Eternal Leadership
Embrace Your Trials to Lead a Life of Significance | Warwick Fairfax 390

Eternal Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 44:54


Warwick Fairfax is the founder of Crucible Leadership, a philosophical and practical breakthrough in turning business and personal failures into the fuel for igniting a life of significance. Fairfax was only 26 when, as the fifth-generation heir to the Australian media empire bearing his family name, he led―and lost―a multibillion-dollar public takeover bid. The result? The company founded by his great-great grandfather slipped from family control after 150 years, leaving him to examine not only his own shortcomings and losses, but also his life's principles and the lessons he learned from family members who came before him and some of history's greatest leaders. By shaping these insights as a leadership adviser, Fairfax has enabled others to learn from what he describes as their own “crucible experiences” and emerge to lead lives driven by vision and passion and dedicated to serving others. Find Warwick's latest book here!

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 60: Brendan O'Reilly

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 92:17


Professional mixed-martial-arts fighter Brendan O'Reilly has been working with horses from a young age. After getting a Bachelor of Applied Science at the University of Queensland, Brendan began prepping for his first fight in 2008, jumping into the scene in 2009. A saddlemaker, horse trainer, and personal trainer, Brendan has many talents outside of the ring. In this episode, Brendan and Warwick discuss the similarities between horses and martial arts, as well as some mental training that has helped Brendan work his way to fighting in Las Vegas.Brendan's Saddlery: https://www.facebook.com/OReilly-Colt-Saddle-Co-100464018922898Instagram: @relentless_badger_ufc

The Jersey Arts Podcast
Gyllenhaal, Warwick & Colbert Headline 10th Annual Montclair Film Festival

The Jersey Arts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Feinberg, Colbert, and Morris chat with host Maddie Orton about:00:45: Montclair Film Festival 10 years ago and today5:36: Highlights of the 10th Anniversary Season7:23: NJ filmmaker Scott Morris' documentary, American River15:28: Montclair Film Festival's role in the Garden State19:50: Reopening historic Clairidge CinemasLINKS:Montclair Film FestivalAmerican River at MFFThe Lost Daughter at MFFStay connected to your local arts and entertainment scene at JerseyArts.com SUPPORTED BY:ArtPride New JerseyNew Jersey State Council on the ArtsNational Endowment for the Arts

Faith Radio Podcast from The Meeting House
Fairfax, Warwick - Crucible Leadership

Faith Radio Podcast from The Meeting House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:26


The author of the book, Crucible Leadership: Embrace Your Trials to Lead a Life of Significance, Warwick Fairfax, discussed how God helped him find his purpose in the aftermath of deep financial loss.  You can find out more at crucibleleadership.com.

Grooving Goddess
Shannah Warwick: Black Boots Were Made For Astral Walking

Grooving Goddess

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 60:00


Enjoy this episode with my friend and talented designer, witch and intuitive and be sure to give her all the follows. Her workshop on 11/4 is affordable and valuable which can be found here: https://blckbts.com/products/astral-and-dreamspace-workshop-nov-4th Find Shannah on IG @BlckBts FB https://www.facebook.com/Blckbts/ and her website https://blckbts.com/

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 59: The Importance of a Passing Grade

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 59:24


In another Q&A session with Robyn, Warwick answers what were meant to be "random" questions asked by people on the Facebook group. However, most of the questions and issues people were having with their horses could be explained by having a high pass-to-fail ratio, otherwise known as a passing grade.Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Arts & Ideas
Sugar

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:42


Could the modern world be built on the back of our craving for an addictive substance? Matthew Sweet marshals historians Mimi Goodall and Dexnell Peters, and artist and theorist Ayesha Hameed, to see how far we can push the idea that our desire for sugar led to the development of new forms of agriculture, as well as slavery, empire and capitalism, indeed the initiation of a new era in the earth's geological history and climate. And they consider how we can think through such massive, world-historical shifts. Ayesha Hameed is Co-Programme Leader for the PhD in Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her video Black Atlantis: The Plantationocene is here: https://vimeo.com/415428776 Dexnell Peters is Teaching Fellow in History at the University of Warwick and Supernumerary Fellow at Exeter College, Oxford Mimi Goodall has just finished a DPhil in History at Oxford Producer: Luke Mulhall You might be interested in episodes exploring Black history available on the Arts & Ideas podcast or a playlist on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p08t2qbp

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast
The Best BBQ joint in QLD | Bluebird Kitchen and Smokehouse

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:52


There are BBQ restaurants, there are BBQ joints, and then there's Bluebird Kitchen and Smokehouse. Inspired by American barbecue, Jim and Katie Osborn have brought authentic Texas BBQ to Warwick, Queensland. Armed with a love of food, a do it yourself attitude and plenty of brisket, pork ribs, sausage and chicken, this husband and wife barbeque foodie team have created what is, in my opinion, one of the best restaurants you're ever going to find.  All of the food is done in traditional Texas style. All the smoked meat is done on site in an offset smoker, using nothing but the best woods available. Combining outdoor cooking with indoor dining, everything in this restaurant is simply delicious. Mentioned above, not only is the smoked meat incredible, but all of the side dishes are first rate as well. I can personally vouch for Bluebird - I've been there once, and I'll get there again soon. Seriously, it's some of the best BBQ I've ever eaten. You should do yourself a favour and eat at this restaurant: it's first rate. In this full episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast, Jim, Katie and I get into: How they like to BBQ their salmon on their kettle grill (2:56) Why they look to cook on drum smokers at BBQ competitions (4:07) Winning the GC at Mackay (16:06) How Bluebird Kitchen and Smokehouse came about (21:58) How and Why they have a seasonal menu (35:11) Jim and Katie's best tips for getting into competition BBQ (42:51) This episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast is proudly brought to you by our Podcast Partner, JAGRD Woodfired Smoker Ovens. If you're looking for your next Barbeque, smoker or grill, be sure to check them out. They have a wide range of well-performing units available, and love doing custom work and commercial kit outs as well. Check out: https://jagrdwoodfired.com.au    If you would like to become a Podcast Partner we'd love to hear from you. Send Ben an email at ben@smokinghotconfessions.com and let's get that conversation started! To get your free copy of 'The Beginners Guide to Real BBQ', including some smoked meat recipes, head to: https://smokinghotconfessions.com  

Scale Up Your Business Podcast
How To Overcome Failures & Setbacks - With Warwick Fairfax

Scale Up Your Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:25


How do you go back from failure and build a life of purpose and significance? Nick is in conversation with a man who has done just that, Warwick Fairfax Founder of Crucible Leadership grew up as the heir to a multi-generational media group but following his takeover, the company failed and as Warwick explains it was a crucible moment in his life because ultimately things don't happen to you, they happen for you In this compelling listen, he candidly discusses the lessons he learnt and  how he found his purpose along with success and significance because crucible moments in life are tough but they don't have to be the end of your story   KEY TAKEAWAYS I didn't grow up wondering what I was going to do in life it was always set for me With hindsight as soon as I launched the takeover, it was doomed to fail I didn't listen to the good advice, people said it was a bad idea but because I didn't want to hear it I didn't listen and went to the people who told me what I wanted to hear I felt as I was in a gilded cage and when it ended it was very painful. Things don't happen to you, they happen for you Wealth doesn't make you happy, there is no number that will make you happy but if you use money to help others it changes everything We are only fulfilled when we serve a bigger purpose, a higher cause or serve others Significance can be defined as  a life of purpose dedicated to serving others, this is about a higher purpose Most businesses that have long term success have an aspect of altruism If you want to be successful long term you need to tie your vision to doing something that will make an impact in the world and links to your values  and beliefs I'm a great believer that a life of significance will not only make you feel more fulfilled it will in the long term it will make you more successful The crucible moment for me was losing a 150-year-old two-billion-dollar business and the process of coming back was drop of grace by drop of grace, brick by brick Understand your  values and beliefs and find a calling that fits with that In the business world, people don't like talking about failure but its real and people connect with it The smart entrepreneurs are the ones who learn from their mistakes and want to do it better next time   BEST MOMENTS ‘I went there and did exactly what you shouldn't be doing' ‘Success and significance are not at odds with each other they can be in harmony' ‘Your life is not defined by your worst day or mistake'   VALUABLE RESOURCES Scale Up Your Business – scaleup.vip/podcast Join the free Scale Up Your Business community: scaleup.vip/community Take the Predictable Growth Assessment™, to measure your current business performance and show you where to focus next to get to where you want to be: https://scaleup.vip/PredictableGrowthAssessment Scale Up Your Business Global Crucible Leadership https://www.linkedin.com/in/warwick-fairfax-8902081   ABOUT THE HOST  My name is Nick Bradley. I'm an entrepreneur, author, speaker, and investor. My background is in growing and scaling VC and Private Equity backed businesses.   Having successfully built, bought and sold a number of companies, and removed myself from day-to-day operations, my focus now is on helping entrepreneurs get to where they want to be, in business and in life. As well as investing in growth businesses and backing turnarounds - with the ultimate aim of creating value from significant capital events.   I'm passionate about personal and professional development - showing up and being the best version of myself ... every day.   My bigger vision is to help bring entrepreneurial skills, experience and mindset to people in developing nations - so they can follow their dreams, live life more on their terms - utilising entrepreneurship as a global force for good.   CONTACT METHOD Nick's Facebook Page: https://scaleup.vip/FB   Nick's LinkedIn: https://scaleup.vip/LI   Nick's Instagram: https://scaleup.vip/IG   Scale Up Your Business website: www.suyb.global                                       See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

National Fire Radio
Episode 85: Ret. Lt. Jason Erban

National Fire Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 125:53


Today we sat down for a special interview on location at RagTop Industries with Retired Warwick RI Lieutenant Jason Erben. Jason's career in Warwick spanned 21 years where he retired as the Lieutenant of Special Hazards 1. We hit on family influence from Jason's Father being a retired Battalion Chief, PTSD, growing up in the fire service, and the accomplishments of his career. But one event stands out and Jason shares with us the story of a bitterly cold night in February of 2003 when the alarm rang in for the Station Nightclub. February 20th of 2004 would prove to be one of many pivotal fires in Jason's career and during our time he touches on the superhuman response of that evening, his family's involvement, and why sharing this experience is crucial in keeping the memory of those we lost from this incident alive. Jason recently found himself being called back to the job and has since started a second career with New London Fire (CT), is an instructor with Eckert Fire Tactics, Vector Rescue, and the Rhode Island Fire Academy as a Tech Rescue Instructor. This episode is one you won't want to miss. Head to www.nationalfireradio.com to pick up some of our latest merchandise Check us out on Facebook and Instagram, Spotify and more! Facebook: www.facebook.com/nationalfireradio/ Instagram: @National_Fire_Radio Twitter: @National_Fire_Radio YouTube: youtube.com/nationalfireradio Soundcloud: @nationalfireradio IG: @Rush_The_Bus Soundcloud: @rush-the-bus IG: @The_Size_Up Soundcloud: @the-size-up IG: @forkandhose

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-10-12: Allen Michael Doyle, New RI Heritage Hall of Fame Inductees, and John Czerkiewicz, Sr.

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 6:01


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Allen Michael Doyle was a professional golfer who played on the Nike Tour, PGA Tour, and Champions Tour? Despite winning numerous amateur titles, he did not turn professional until he was 46. In 1995, his first full professional season, he won three times on the Nike Tour. From 1996 to 1998 Doyle competed in 58 PGA Tour events, making the cut in 31, including two top-10 finishes. Doyle joined the Senior PGA Tour when he turned 50 and became the oldest US Senior Open Champion at nearly 58 years old, his fourth senior major championship win. Now for our feature story: The Rhode Island Heritage Hall of Fame recently announced nine inductees for 2021. The Hall of Fame is composed of illustrious Rhode Islanders, from Roger Williams and the chief sachems of the Narragansett and the Wampanoag tribes to those of the present day. The Hall was created in 1965 to honor “any individual who has brought credit to Rhode Island, brought Rhode Island into prominence, and contributed to the history and heritage of the state.” Inductees, according to board of trustees President Patrick Conley, must have been born in Rhode Island, lived, studied or worked in Rhode Island for a significant time, or made his or her reputation here. The 56th induction ceremony will take place on Oct. 23 at the Crowne Plaza in Warwick. The following are the inductees: Charles Butler is a Pioneering Black athlete who starred on several local integrated amateur and semi-professional championship baseball teams in the late 1940s. Timothy “Tim” Gray is A national award-winning documentary film director, producer and writer, especially for PBS, and founder of the prestigious World War II Foundation. James H. Leach is a Major real estate developer and chairman of numerous public and private boards, including the Rhode Island PBS Foundation. William P. McCormick was U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand and co-founder of the 93-restaurant chain McCormick & Schmick's. John M. Murphy Sr. is a Leader of the Home Loan Investment Bank, financier, public official, civic leader, philanthropist and humanitarian. Elizabeth Morancy is a Strong advocate for social change and justice, first as a religious sister, then as a state representative and finally as a director of several important humanitarian organizations. Dr. William Oh is a Nationally prominent pioneer and researcher in the field of neonatal medicine, teacher and author of 443 peer-reviewed studies in pediatrics, most in his specialty — neonatal intensive care. William “Bill” Reynolds is a Prolific columnist and sports writer for the Providence Journal, star athlete and author of several highly regarded books on local sports, especially basketball. Louis Yip is a Major Blackstone Valley real estate developer, prominent restaurateur, humanitarian and philanthropist. For more about the coronavirus pandemic, the recovery, and the latest on all things in and around Westerly, head over to westerlysun.com. There are a lot of businesses in our community that are hiring right now, so we're excited to tell you about some new job listings. Today's Job posting comes from Crimmins Residential Staffing in Westerly. A couple in Watch Hill is looking for a part-time housekeeper. Pay is $35 per hour and you'll work there 3 days per week in season and one day per week during the off-season. For more job requirements, check out the link in the description: https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=028da372fc87d663 Today we're remembering the life of John Czerkiewicz, Sr., of Rockville. Born in West Warwick, John was a loving devoted father. John also leaves his loving partner, Maureen Power of Chepachet. He is survived by his brother, sister along with all his loving nieces and nephews, 7 grandchildren who he cherished and enjoyed taking them for hikes, ATV rides and teaching them his love for animals and his land. John worked at Arnold's Motorcycles in Providence as their Service Manager from the 1960's till the close of business. He was a member of Arnold's Harley-Davidson Racing team and personally drag raced for Harley-Davidson, where he won and set numerous International and National records. John also would periodically assist Harley-Davidson with product design. John then continued his love for motorcycles and opened his own shop on his farm, where riding enthusiasts would come from all over the country for his expertise and knowledge of the Harley-Davidsons. For many years, John worked with the Rhode Island State Police Motorcycle Division as one of their instructors. John was an avid woodsman who enjoyed countless days with his friends hunting, hiking, ATV riding and beekeeping. His farm consisted of many animals throughout the years. His compassion to nurse and care for injured deer was witnessed by all who knew him. One of his greatest pleasures in life was having his family and friends around to share his passion. If you were John's friend, you knew you were always welcome to stop by, hang at the garage and share some stories with all the guys. The echoes of laughter from John, Randy, Mikey, Sal, CJ, Pete, and his countless other best friends (too many to name) can be heard the minute you drive up to the farm. These memories will always be treasured by all who knew him. This is just a short story of his life. John was truly a unique and amazing man, but always humble. He accomplished so much yet he lived life simply. He had so much more to teach everyone, and his Spirit will live on in the woods he loved so much. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate John's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in Religion
Eleanor Nesbitt, “Exploring the Sikh Tradition” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 130:49


Exploring the Sikh Tradition is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Eleanor Nesbitt who is Professor Emeritus of Education Studies at University of Warwick and a poet. Eleanor Nesbitt is an expert on Hindu and Sikh culture and her interdisciplinary approach straddles religious studies, educational theory, ethnography and poetry. After inspiring insights about the time Eleanor Nesbitt spent in India and her academic path, this wide-ranging conversation provides a detailed exploration of the Sikh tradition: the history, religious tenets, other people's misconceptions about it and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books Network
Eleanor Nesbitt, “Exploring the Sikh Tradition” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 130:49


Exploring the Sikh Tradition is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Eleanor Nesbitt who is Professor Emeritus of Education Studies at University of Warwick and a poet. Eleanor Nesbitt is an expert on Hindu and Sikh culture and her interdisciplinary approach straddles religious studies, educational theory, ethnography and poetry. After inspiring insights about the time Eleanor Nesbitt spent in India and her academic path, this wide-ranging conversation provides a detailed exploration of the Sikh tradition: the history, religious tenets, other people's misconceptions about it and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Eleanor Nesbitt, “Exploring the Sikh Tradition” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 130:49


Exploring the Sikh Tradition is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Eleanor Nesbitt who is Professor Emeritus of Education Studies at University of Warwick and a poet. Eleanor Nesbitt is an expert on Hindu and Sikh culture and her interdisciplinary approach straddles religious studies, educational theory, ethnography and poetry. After inspiring insights about the time Eleanor Nesbitt spent in India and her academic path, this wide-ranging conversation provides a detailed exploration of the Sikh tradition: the history, religious tenets, other people's misconceptions about it and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Beyond the Crucible
Warwick's New Book: Listen All About It #87

Beyond the Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:53


In advance of the Oct. 19 release of host Warwick Fairfax's book, CRUCIBLE LEADERSHIP: EMBRACE YOUR TRIALS TO LEAD A LIFE OF SIGNIFICANCE, he and cohost Gary Schneeberger discuss the key building blocks inside its pages. You'll hear helpful, hopeful details -- from Warwick's own journey and the stories of some of history's greatest leaders -- about the importance of embracing your crucible, discovering your purpose, crafting your vision and leading and living with impact. You'll also get your first extended glimpse into why CRUCIBLE LEADERSHIP has been called "equal parts memoir and master class," "moving and vulnerable," "a gift" and "a must for all leaders" filled with "nuggets of leadership gold."   To explore Crucible Leadership resources, and to pre-order CRUCIBLE LEADERSHIP: EMBRACE YOUR TRIALS TO LEAD A LIFE OF SIGNIFICANCE, visit www.crucibleleadership.com

CEO Spotlight
Andrew Wright, General Manager, Warwick Melrose – Dallas

CEO Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 12:38


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

National Fire Radio
Episode 85: Ret. Lt. Jason Erban

National Fire Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 113:57


Today we sat down for a special interview on location at RagTop Industries with Retired Warwick RI Lieutenant Jason Erben. Jason's career in Warwick spanned 21 years where he retired as the Lieutenant of Special Hazards 1. We hit on family influence from Jason's Father being a retired Battalion Chief, PTSD, growing up in the fire service, and the accomplishments of his career. But one event stands out and Jason shares with us the story of a bitterly cold night in February of 2003 when the alarm rang in for the Station Nightclub. February 20th of 2004 would prove to be one of many pivotal fires in Jason's career and during our time he touches on the superhuman response of that evening, his family's involvement, and why sharing this experience is crucial in keeping the memory of those we lost from this incident alive. Jason recently found himself being called back to the job and has since started a second career with New London Fire (CT), is an instructor with Eckert Fire Tactics, Vector Rescue, and the Rhode Island Fire Academy as a Tech Rescue Instructor. This episode is one you won't want to miss. Head to www.nationalfireradio.com to pick up some of our latest merchandise Check us out on Facebook and Instagram, Spotify and more! Facebook: www.facebook.com/nationalfireradio/ Instagram: @National_Fire_Radio Twitter: @National_Fire_Radio YouTube: youtube.com/nationalfireradio Soundcloud: @nationalfireradio IG: @Rush_The_Bus Soundcloud: @rush-the-bus IG: @The_Size_Up Soundcloud: @the-size-up IG: @forkandhose

TopMedTalk
Cancer and anaesthetic drugs | EBPOM 2021

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 51:52


Cancer and anesthetic drugs, informed by the basic science the pre-clinical work and observational studies suggest the way that we provide anesthesia could have an impact on cancer outcomes. This piece explores the evidence, with reference to trials both resolved and ongoing. Presented by Monty Mythen with Tom Wall, consultant anesthesiology in the Mater Hospital he also has an academic affiliation with University College Dublin, Joyce Yeung, associate clinical professor of anesthesia and critical care, University of Warwick and Director of the UK perioperative medicine clinical trials network, Bernhard Riedel, Professor, Director of the Department of Anesthesia, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, with an honorary academic appointment at the University of Melbourne and Vijaya Gottumukkala, Professor of Anesthesia and Deputy Chair at MD Anderson.

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 58: Maddy Butcher

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 94:04


Maddy Butcher is a Journalist, Author, and the Director of the Best Horse Practices Summit, which fills the need for a common sense, research-supported conference to improve horse-human connections. The Summit strengthens links between equine research and horsemanship circles by highlighting the practical and academic strategies that make horses' lives better.I'll be presenting at this year's Best Horse Practices Summit, October 29-31 in Lexington Kentucky. You can sign up here: https://www.besthorsepracticessummit.org/NickerNews Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NickerNewsNickerNews Website: https://nickernews.net/Maddy's Newest Book Horse Head: https://horsehead.info/horse-head-now-available Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Something You Should Know
SYSK Choice: How Probability REALLY Works & Proven Ways to Master Motivation

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 50:05


I'll bet there have been times when someone has offered to help you and you declined. You probably said something like, “No, that's ok I got it.”? Well, why say that? Why we are so reluctant to ask other people for help when we likely could use it? This episode begins with a discussion on why asking for help is hard and yet it is one of the smartest things you will ever do. http://rd.com/advice/relationships/phrases-make-people-trust/ Your Life is ruled by chance and probability. Yet how much do you understand about them? Ian Stewart knows about them better than most people. Ian is a Professor Emeritus of math at the University of Warwick in England and author of the book Do Dice Play God?: The Mathematics of Uncertainty (https://amzn.to/2MWjer8). Listen as he explains, for example, how a slot machine appears to be “hot” one day but not another. Or, what really determines whether a coin flip will end in heads or tails. And most importantly, how this all applies to you. When women sit down at a restaurant, where do they typically put their purse? They sling it over the back of the chair or put it on the floor. Listen as I explain why both of those options are really bad ideas that can easily get your identity stolen. I'll also explain a simple way every woman can secure her purse and never worry again. http://rd.com/advice/travel/purse-theft-safe/ Motivational speakers can be very inspiring – but motivation for you can't really come from someone else's story. Susan Fowler, author of the book Master Your Motivation: Three Scientific Truths for Achieving Your Goals (https://amzn.to/2HJneXV) joins me to explain the real science of motivation – and how it works. Listen and discover how to find the motivation that will sustain you to achieve even when times are tough. PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! Listen to Build For Tomorrow with Jason Feifer, our favorite new podcast, right here! https://apple.co/3rPM8La or visit https://www.jasonfeifer.com/build-for-tomorrow/ Go to https://backcountry.com/sysk to get 15% OFF your first full-priced purchase. Firstleaf – the wine club designed with you in mind! Join today and you'll get 6 bottles of wine for $29.95 and free shipping! Just go to https://tryfirstleaf.com/SOMETHING Discover matches all the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically and is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that take credit cards! Learn more at https://discover.com/yes Omaha Steaks is the best! Get awesome pricing at https://OmahaSteaks.com/BMT T-Mobile for Business the leader in 5G, #1 in customer satisfaction, and a partner who includes benefits like 5G in every plan. Visit https://T-Mobile.com/business For more information on fire safety products, safety tips and educational activities you can do at home with your family visit https://firstalert.com/firepreventionmonth   Download the five star-rated puzzle game Best Fiends FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play! https://bestfiends.com https://www.geico.com Bundle your policies and save! It's Geico easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Welsh History Podcast
Episode 153: As the Kingmaker Turns

Welsh History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:46


After years of feeling taken advantage of Earl of Warwick, Richard Neville has finally reached his breaking point. You can support the podcast at patreon.com/WelshHistory Get some Welsh History Podcast Merch at teepublic.com/stores/welsh-history-podcast Music: Celtic Impulse - Celtic by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100297Artist: http://incompetech.com

You Don't Have to Yell
What Makes a Political Extremist? | Quassim Cassam

You Don't Have to Yell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 49:37


Quassim Cassam of the University of Warwick discusses the philosophical distinctions of a political extremist, the link between extremism and conspiracy theory, and how the current political conditions in the US eerily resemble those that created the 9/11 hijackers.

The Anthill
Climate Fight part 1: where's the money?

The Anthill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:26


In the first episode of our new series Climate fight: the world's biggest negotiation, we're talking about climate finance – money pledged by the world's richest countries to help the poorest parts of the world adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change. Where is it being spent and is it really working?Featuring Jessica Omukuti, COP26 Fellow in Climate Finance at the University of York and a research fellow on inclusive net zero at the University of Oxford, Harpreet Kaur Paul, a PhD candidate in climate justice at the University of Warwick and Alina Averchenkova, distinguished policy fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change, London School of Economics and Political Science. Thanks to the reporting of Maryam Charles, we also hear from two residents of Zanzibar about why some climate finance can leave people feeling worse off. The Climate Fight podcast series is produced by Tiffany Cassidy with reporting from Maryam Charles in Zanzibar. Sound design is by Eloise Stevens and our series theme tune is by Neeta Sarl. The series editor is Gemma Ware. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. A transcript of this episode is available here.Climate fight: the world's biggest negotiation is a podcast series supported by UK Research and Innovation, the UK's largest public funder of research and innovation.Further reading:Climate finance: rich countries aren't meeting aid targets – could legal action force them? by Harpreet Kaur Paul, University of WarwickClimate adaptation finance is ineffective and must be more transparent, by Jessica Omukuti, University of YorkCOP26: what's the point of this year's UN climate summit in Glasgow? by Federica Genovese, University of Essex and Patrick Bayer, University of Strathclyde Climate change: convincing people to pay to tackle it is hard – treating it like a pension could help by David Comerford, University of Stirling See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders
Dr. Elena Antonacopoulou - Phronesis

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 39:21


Dr. Elena  Antonacopoulou is the founder and director of GNOSIS an international, interdisciplinary, and independent research and leadership development Institute. She has held full-time Professorial appointments at the Universities of Liverpool, Manchester, and Warwick and currently holds Visiting Professorial appointments at Western University, Canada, University of Lincoln (UK), and the Royal Norwegian Airforce Academy (Norway). Her scientifically rigorous collaborative research in management and organization studies has earned her many research grants, awards, and accolades recognizing the impact of the ideas developed. Her principal research expertise lies in the areas of Strategic Change, Organisational Learning and Resilience, Knowledge, and Crisis Management with a focus on leadership implications. Elena's work is published widely in international journals including Academy of Management Learning and Education Journal, Journal of Management Studies, British Journal of Management, Journal of Management Inquiry, Management Learning. She has co-edited 5 books including two new volumes (Sensuous Learning for Practical Judgment in Professional Practice) advancing innovative learning modes that enhance the impact of management practice. She has been elected and served in multiple leadership roles in the top professional bodies in the management field and has received several awards for her outstanding leadership and service contributions and teaching excellence. She is frequently invited to deliver keynote speeches at international conferences, and deliver workshops that inspire and promote action choices that serve the common good. She is a certified coach from the International Coaching Federation.Connecting with ElenaGoogle ScholarLinkedInQuotes From This Episode"Phronesis is a creative act, especially when navigating the unknown...It's not just what happens when we're faced with dilemmas, paradoxes, and crucible moments. Of course, that's where our strength of character shines and guides our action choices, which is why we mark it as an act of practical wisdom.""Practise is about repetition, not replication. I emphatically highlight in my work the distinction between repeating and replicating. I draw on Deleuze, who asserts that repetition is always about the difference. Hence, for me practising is about the leap of faith.""Reflexivity is this moment where we are in a situation fully present. So we show up, and we are experiencing it by allowing ourselves to feel and participate as an insider, at the same time, simultaneously, as we have the capacity to extrapolate and see it from an outsider's perspective.""Sensuousness is the secret intelligence that I don't think we've even begun to tap into, which is so important to phronesis. I call it CORE (Centeredness, Oneness, Reflex and Energy) Intelligence (CQ) because it is about tapping beyond our sensibility and sensitivity into our sentience".Resources Mentioned in This EpisodeEikeland, O. 2008. The ways of Aristotle: Aristotelian phrónêsis, aristotelian philosophy of dialogue, and action research. Shotter, J. & Tsoukas, H. 2014. In search of Phronesis: Leadership and the art of judgment. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 13: 224-243The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho About The International Leadership Association (ILA)The ILA was created in 1999 to bring together professionals with a keen interest in the study, practice, and teaching of leadership. Connect with Scott AllenWebsite

The Verb
Green Places and Haunts - The Verb at Contains Strong Language

The Verb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 44:27


Ian McMillan is joined by an audience at the Belgrade Theatre as he explores Coventry's green places and the river that ghosts through the city with poets David Morley, John Bernard, Sujana Crawford and Olga Dermott-Bond. He is also joined by musicians from the City of Coventry Brass Band. Poet David Morley unpacks the meaning of the River Sherbourne, which flows through and under Coventry. David is Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Warwick and his latest collection is 'Fury' (Carcanet). He is also a freshwater ecologist and brings an ecologist's attention and ear for language to his Sherbourne poem. John Bernard also explores the River Sherbourne with a poem called 'Revered River'. John is a spoken word artist and rapper – and a finalist on Radio 1 Extra and Asian Network's ‘Words First' programme. He explores the idea that he has become 'acquainted' with the river. Sujana Crawford reads a poem called 'Marshland Whispers' - inspired by Brandon Marsh, a nature reserve and former quarry. She was commissioned to write the poem as part of Contains Strong Language's 'Green City' project. Sujana's work has featured in many anthologies; her plays have been staged at venues including the Birmingham Rep, and the Belgrade Theatre. Poet Olga Dermott-Bond has been spending time with the City of Coventry Brass Band learning about their history, and experiencing rehearsals. She performs two poems with Stephen McDonald and Christopher Moore from the City of Coventry Brass Band - inspired by listening to the band warm up and by their performance of the hymn 'Nicaea'. Olga is a former Warwick Poet Laureate, and was one of the winners of the 2018 BBC Proms poetry competition. 'Apple, fallen' is her debut poetry pamphlet.

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 57: Q&A - Shutdown Horses

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 103:10


In another special edition of the Journey On Podcast, Robyn and Warwick answer questions from members of our Facebook group. These questions discuss the particular situations with horses that are shutdown or have separation anxiety. Each question and answer illuminates Warwick's thought process behind problem solving.Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Business with Purpose
Embracing Trials to Lead a Life of Significance | EP 265: Warwick Fairfax, Founder of Crucible Leadership

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 42:58


My guest this week is Warwick Fairfax, a leadership adviser who helps people uncover their unique path to effective leadership through the learning power of story and an enlightening path of self-discovery. Growing up in a prominent family-owned media business in Australia that he eventually led – and lost – Warwick has both witnessed and experienced the challenges of high-pressure, high-impact leadership. After losing the 150-year-old family business, Warwick examined not only his own shortcomings and losses, but also life principles and lessons he learned from family members that came before him and some of history's greatest leaders. 5:07 – Warwick 101 Warwick's brand, Crucible Leadership, is about getting past setbacks and failures to lead a life of significance dedicated to serving others. He grew up in a very wealthy, privileged background in Australia. His family owned a 150-year-old massive media business. He spent many years trying to live up to his family's expectations. 9:16 – Company's ideals Warwick's family felt like the business had strayed from its ideals. Money, influence and prestige changed people's perspectives, and there was fighting among the family. 12:30 – Company goes south After Warwick took over the family business, the company went south. As a reserved person who doesn't like the limelight, it was a nightmare for him to deal with and very brutal. 15:03 – How he rebounded Warwick was fortunate that he came to America and married his wife. He realized God loves him unconditionally and he is more than his mistakes. He was never attracted to money, and it's not vitally important to him. He and his wife had kids in the 1990s, and his background was irrelevant to his children. 20:45 – Finding his identity It took years for Warwick to find his identity and purpose. You have to stop comparing yourself to others. Warwick does his best work, but he is not defined by what he does. 25:38 – Crucible Leadership Your worst day does not define you. Sometimes your mission in life comes out of a crucible. 28:26 – Life is about evolving He tells his children that life has a habit of evolving, and you need to make the best choice you can at the time. Trust the process and trust yourself. 34:16 – Get to know you Favorite TV show growing up? Skippy the bush kangaroo Favorite meal? Artichokes and cheesecake FEATURED QUOTES Your self-esteem isn't about how good a meal you cooked or how perfect your house is or how successful your business is. I'm not somebody that's ever been attracted by money. I'm not against it, but it's not something that's vitally important to me. I try and do my level best at whatever I do, but yet, I'm not defined by what I do. I'm trying to wean my self-esteem off of success and achievements. CONNECT WITH WARWICK FAIRFAX: https://crucibleleadership.com/ ABOUT WARWICK FAIRFAX: Warwick Fairfax is the founder of Crucible Leadership, a philosophical and practical breakthrough in turning business and personal failures into the fuel for igniting a life of significance. He has been hailed by Forbes as offering “compelling insights for anyone who would like to wake up feeling inspired by their work, but doesn't” … insights rooted not in a checklist of glib to-do's but in his own experience at the epicenter of one of the most spectacular business failures in the history of his home nation of Australia. Fairfax was only 26 when, as the fifth-generation heir to a media empire bearing his family name, he led — and lost — a multibillion-dollar public takeover bid. The result? The company founded by his great-great grandfather slipped from family control after 150 years, leaving him to examine not only his own shortcomings and losses, but also his life's principles and the lessons he learned from family members who came before him and some of history's greatest leaders. It has been by shaping these insights as a leadership adviser that Fairfax has enabled others to learn from what he describes as their own “crucible experiences” and emerge to lead a life rooted in who they are. His journey has opened a door for men and women from all walks of life to not only bounce back from failure, but to become the leaders they were born to be. Fairfax is the author of Crucible Leadership: Embrace Your Trials to Lead a Life of Significance (Mount Tabor Media, 2021). In the book discusses for the first time his thoughts and actions in launching the John Fairfax Ltd. takeover and explains what he learned about himself from that devastating failure — who he was and was not, what his unique design, purpose, passions and vision really were. He shares insights from his experience and interviews other leaders who have leveraged their crucible moments to live and lead with significance on the podcast BEYOND THE CRUCIBLE, available through all major podcasting channels. Fairfax holds an undergraduate degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Oxford University and earned his MBA from Harvard Business School. He is an International Coach Federation (ICF) certified executive coach. He is an Elder at Bay Area Community Church. He lives in Annapolis, Maryland, with his wife, Gale. They have three children who are in the process of developing their own unique paths to lives of significance. THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS:  Ready to ditch the bleach forever but can't find a bleach alternative that actually works? You've got to meet this Extra Strength Oxygen Powder by MamaSuds. It launches July 15th and I've had the chance to try it out early and I love it so much! It really tackles the dirt and odor in our clothes. And as usual there are multiple uses for this new product. Not only is it a laundry booster and stain remover, but it's a great scouring agent on any non-porous surface. If you head to their website and sign up for their email list you'll get an email with an early bird special coupon when oxygen powder launches PLUS use discount code MOLLY and get an EXTRA 15% off! www.mamasuds.com ---- Speaking of stories behind brands that change the world, I'd like to introduce you to Deux Mains. In French, Deux Mains means two hands. Why ‘two-hands'? Because everything they create is made by trained artisans who use their two hands to make their life better while crafting beautiful products. Truly, this is a company that set out to change lives and make a positive impact in the world. It started when the founder, Julie, wanted to create dignified jobs in Haiti, a place she was growing to love, and that was exploding with creativity. She wanted to share this talent with the world. Julie set up an educational program to train people with artisan skills and then went on to build a factory that operates on 100% solar energy. Deux Mains now employs more than 40 artisans that handcraft premium leather goods, jewelry and sandals. Their lives are forever changed by their craft. What's also cool is their products incorporate an eco-friendly twist, working with responsibly sourced materials and repurposed inner-tube and tires in their designs. When you buy from Deux Mains, you get to be part of a movement that is making a difference in the world, while adding an incredibly well-made piece to your closet that supports conscious living! You can discover their products online at deuxmains.com and use code MOLLY for 15% off!

Sound & Vision
Dennis Osadebe

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 77:16


Dennis Osadebe (born in 1991) is a Nigerian mixed-media artist wh o obtained a BSc in Business and Management from the Queen Mary University of London and a MSc from the University of Warwick, majoring in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Dennis' art has been featured in numerous contemporary art exhibitions since relocating back to Lagos in 2013, and has coined a new cultural movement he calls ‘neo-africa', which aims to deconstruct the notion of “African art” and escape the expectations often projected onto contemporary artists emanating from the African continent. He has shown his work worldwide from Paris to South Africa to Korea and beyond. He has an upcoming show at GR gallery in New York City called “When Power Plays.”

Murder In America
36: EP. 36 - RHODE ISLAND - AMERICA'S YOUNGEST SERIAL KILLER: CRAIG PRICE, "THE WARWICK SLASHER"

Murder In America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 75:14


In the 1980's, a series of brutal murders rocked a small suburban neighborhood in Rhode Island. Everybody knew that these murders were connected... but they had no idea that the killer started this blood-soaked killing spree when he was only 13 years old. This is the story of Craig Price, America's YOUNGEST serial killer. And you're listening, to MURDER IN AMERICA. - Clear up YOUR acne (and dramatically improve your skincare routine) with APOSTROPHE! Just click on THIS LINK and use code "STATE" at checkout!! https://www.apostrophe.com/pod/STATE/ - Sign up for HELLOFRESH and begin eating healthier, cheaper and with less effort! Just click on the LINK BELOW and use our custom code "STATE14" at checkout for free meals and shipping!! https://www.hellofresh.com/state14  - Use PROSE and see the difference in YOUR hair!! Seriously, PROSE gives you a spa experience right there at home. And if you use our custom link, you can get a FREE hair consultation AND 15% off!! Just click the link below!! https://www.prose.com/state - -

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 56: Q&A - Connection

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:04


In this episode, Robyn and Warwick do a Q&A session regarding connection-based issues people have been having. These questions were pulled from the Facebook group where Warwick often types his responses, however, this week he decided to share them in a different format. Have questions for future podcasts? Look out on the Facebook Group for our next submission post: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WarwickSchillerPerformanceHorsemanship Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Faith Positive Radio: Increase your Faith with greater Joy at work so you Love God and others more!

Warwick Fairfax is a trusted leadership adviser who helps people uncover their own unique path to more effective leadership through the learning power of story and an enlightening path of self-discovery.

The Journey On Podcast
Episode 55: Joell Dunlap

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 117:46


Joell Dunlap is a Registered Behavioral Technician and founder of the Square Peg Foundation, a therapeutic riding and equine rehabilitation center. An equestrian since childhood, she has participated in many different disciplines including racing, polo, hunting, jumping, three-day eventing and reining.  Joell has been published nationally in equestrian publications regarding a gentler and more creative approach to teaching students and training horses. Since she started working with developmentally challenged children, Joell has been developing a unique teaching method that resonates. Her philosophy of “Inspire, Guide, Challenge” and her sensitive style of instruction have helped hundreds of students to achieve important goals. In this episode, Joell shares some of her stories of healing horses and children.Square Peg Foundation Website: https://www.squarepegfoundation.org/Joell's Book A Damn Fine Hand: https://adamnfinehand.com/Warwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller