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Country in the Balkans

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  • May 22, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about bosnia

Sasquatch Chronicles
SC EP:856 Alaskan Killer Bigfoot

Sasquatch Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 64:09


Jeff Davis has a BS in Anthropology and an MA in Archaeology. He lived in England for nearly a year, while working on his Master's Degree on the Vikings in Greenland. He also worked for several years as a field archaeologist in the Pacific Northwest. Jeff spent many years in the U.S. military, serving in Italy, South Korea, Japan, Bosnia and Afghanistan in a number of positions, ranging from Infantryman to military historian, to putting on puppet shows at orphanages. Jeff has written several books on military history, ghosts, mythology, and archaeology. His best selling books were Weird Washington and Weird Oregon. Topics To Be Covered: Kennewick Man The Solutrean Hypothesis (Origins of the Clovis People) Alaskan Killer Bigfoot Paisley Cave Weird Oregon: Your Travel Guide to Oregon's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets Weird Washington: Your Travel Guide to Washington's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets   https://www.ghostsandcritters.com/main.html

PaxEuropeana
#381 Erdogan, leverage Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus in NATO now

PaxEuropeana

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 14:56


#381 Erdogan, leverage Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus in NATO now

House of Mystery True Crime History
Jack Leavers - Don't Play Dead with Vultures

House of Mystery True Crime History

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 56:06


Summer 2008 sees former Royal Marine John Pierce lured from running convoys in Iraq to a lucrative contract in the steamy jungles of French West Africa. He soon discovers this new theatre is even more dangerous than the war zone he left behind. Corrupt officials, drug cartels, and competing military factions rub shoulder-to-shoulder in a melting pot of greed and intrigue ...And a sadistic foe lurks in the shadows.When old intelligence contacts take an interest, the situation gets complicated fast. Dark forces emerge and events spiral out of control. Pitched into a desperate race against time, can Pierce's makeshift team of soldiers and civilians fight fire with fire and outwit vicious enemies?One thing's for sure, Pierce won't leave anyone to the mercy of a brutal adversary he knows only too well – no matter what it takes.Former Royal Marine Jack Leavers has over thirty-years' experience working in the military, private security, corporate investigations, maritime counter-piracy and risk management. His career spans numerous deployments to conflict zones worldwide such as Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Africa, and the Somali-pirate-infested waters of the Indian Ocean. Jack's novels are inspired by some of the more enterprising projects that got the green light, and other audacious plans that didn't.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Connections with Evan Dawson
Researcher Valery Perry on trends in political violence and extremism across the globe

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:41


In the second hour of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, researcher Valery Perry, based in Bosnia, discusses trends in political violence and extremism across the globe.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Business Leadership Under Fire with Pepyn Dinandt and Richard Westley

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 47:16


Our very special guests are global business guru Pepyn Dinandt and Military Cross holder, ex-army Colonel, Richard Westley OBE. They teamed up and wrote the book Business Leadership Under Fire. This is such a compelling show, packed full of hacks and lessons including: Why establishing leadership can stop your platform burning The “Who Dares Wins” approach to strategy and tactics Building and managing an excellent leadership team Team and organization structure to maximize business impact Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services Find out more about Pepyn and Richard below: Website: https://businessleadershipunderfire.com Pepyn on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pepyn-dinandt/ Richard on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-westley-obe-mc-66875216/   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach, or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as The Leadership Hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   What do you get when you smudge one of the world's global business leaders and one of the UK's top Army Colonels? The answer, Business Leadership Under Fire, our special guest today are Pepyn Dinandt and Richard Westley OBE, and they wrote the book, Business Leadership Under Fire, but before we dive in with Pepyn and Richard, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: Have you ever heard, focus takes you where it takes you? Inspired by a blog by Seth Godin many years ago, he had a focus of depth of field, and I'll share a story with you around how and why focus is so important. Picture the scene. There are two runners, both have exactly the same capability, exactly the same pace and the same injury, an injured left toe. The runner who's concentrating on how much their left toe hurts will be left in a dust by the one who's focused on winning. Even if the winner's toe hurts just as much. Hurt of course is a matter of perception. Most of what we think about is, we had a choice about where to aim that focus, aim that lens of our attention. We can relieve past injustices, settled old grudges, nurse festering sorts. We can imagine failure build up its potential for destruction and calculate its odds. Or we can imagine generous outcomes that we're working on. Feel gratitude, feel compassion for those that got us here and revel in the possibilities of what's next, we have an automatic focus are instinctive and cultural choices, and that focus isn't the only ones that are available to us. Of course, those are somewhat difficult to change, which is why so few people manage to do so, but there's no work that pays off better in the long run than focusing on positive and progressive outcomes. Remember the stories that you tell yourself, your story is your story, but you don't have to keep reminding yourself of the story you've told yourself before. If that story doesn't help you change positively for the future, it's probably not the right story in the first place. So, focus on the future stories that you want to tell yourself, and guess what? Those stories become a reality. That's been The Leadership Hacker New. Really looking forward to our conversation with Richard and with Pepyn. Let's dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: I'm joined by two very special guests on today's show. Pepyn Dinandt is a business executive with 30 years' experience successfully leading and restructuring companies in challenging situations as CEO and Chairman. Or in Amsterdam, Pepyn has lived in a number of countries over the years, including Turkey, Ireland, Switzerland, South America, and UK, where he attended University and now lives with his family in Germany. And he's joined by Richard Westley, a military cross holder, who's commanded soldiers and operations at every rank from Lieutenant through to Colonel and environments of desperate situations, including Albania, Afghanistan, Balkans. He retired from the army in 2010, having been responsible for pre-deployment training for forces bound for Iraq and Afghanistan. Between them, they teamed up and wrote the book Business Leadership Under Fire: Nine Steps to Rescue and Transform Organizations, Pepyn and Richard, welcome to The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Pepyn Dinandt: Hi Steve. Yeah, good morning. Happy to be with you. Steve Rush: Me too. Hi Richard. Ricard Westley: Hi Steve. Steve Rush: So, a little bit about your backstory independently, and then we maybe find out how you kind of collided to come together to write the book. So, Pepyn, a little bit about your backstory? Pepyn Dinandt: Well, after leaving University, I somehow ended up in Germany and after spending three years at McKinsey, which was my paid business school, as I like to say, I landed my first CEO role in Eastern Germany, which was then just, you know, unified with Western Germany. And I ran a company which had a revenue of 50 million euros, but also losses of 50 million euros. So that was my first contact with the challenge of rescuing and transforming businesses and challenging situations. And I had so much fun. I mean, obviously it was very tough at the time, but I had so much fun doing that, that I have kind of never left that type of challenge. Steve Rush: Brilliant. And I guess it's the thrive of being able to rescue those firms that has kept you in that space, right? Pepyn Dinandt: That, plus the fact that you know, these are environments where you need to learn, because if you're not willing to listen and learn, you know, you're going to fail. These are always very, let's say complex situations, they're fast moving, they're fluid. And you know, it really kind of sharpens your skills and obviously, you know, some cases have been more successful than others. You never have only just big successes, but I thoroughly enjoy helping teams be the best version of themselves and you know, rescue these companies, rescue these organizations. Steve Rush: Yeah, and Richard, before what you do now, have you always been a military man? Ricard Westley: Yes, I joined the military pretty much straight after school and spent 25 years as an infantry officer serving around the world. Almost exclusively in operations and training roles. I managed to avoid the major staff roles and the ministry of defense for my 25 years. And then I left earlier than I, perhaps needed to, but I was ready to move. And I spent the last 12 years working in a number of appointments in commercial companies and now run my own consulting business. Steve Rush: Great. So, when did the stars align for you to both meet? Pepyn Dinandt: Well, I have been always interested in the application of military best practices in business. And I had met about four years ago, a gentleman called Tim Collins. The famous Tim Collins and you know, I had been discussing these ideas that I had about this crossover between the military and business. And he introduced me to Richard, that's how the two of us met. Steve Rush: And then Richard, from your perspective, what was the moment you thought, how we are going to do some business together, we're going to write a book. How did that come about? Ricard Westley: Yeah, so Tim. I was working with Tim at the time, and he mentioned Pepyn. So, he would you be interested in a conversation. I said, well, I'm always interested in conversations, and I generally like meeting new and successful people. So, you know, Pepyn and I had initial discussions and then some supplementary conversations and started looking at some sort of solution for leaders. It was a discussion over a number of months really. And then the book was a nice fallout because at that time we were in lockdown, and I think Pepyn, and I were both looking for something else to occupy our minds. And hence the hence the book, Steve Rush: Of course, when you think of the role that the military play versus the role that the commercial enterprises play, there's such a lot of crossovers in this sphere of leadership isn't there? Pepyn Dinandt: Yeah, I think, you know, when we sat down and this is interesting because as Richard just said, you know, we started working together without actually having physically met each other. We were basically, you know, we got to know each other digitally and spend a lot of our early relationship on Zoom. So, you know, we used these experiences, both Richards and myself to kind of look at our learnings, our insights, you know, from good and bad experiences, as well as insights from research we did on successful leadership cases, as well as fade leadership cases and developed from that, the concept for, you know, the book, including obviously the nine steps and Richard being, you know, a very hands on guy than me. So ultimately being somebody who's you know, a hands-on executive, I think developed a book, which is very much rooted in real life experience, has a down to earth approach. We believe is straightforward to understand because it's nine steps, with which we try to really cover all angles that we believe is important for leaderships facing transformation challenges. And ultimately, we produced, we believe a very practical guide for leadership when transforming organizations. Steve Rush: Yeah. It's a very chronological approach to how leaders can really consider how to transform and continue to grow their business, which we're going to dive into a moment. But I want to come to you first, Richard, just to explore the parallels from military leadership to commercial leadership, we've been very fortunate to have a number of major generals appear on the show already. And the one thing that's been really consistent from them is that leadership as a behavioral almost has been drilled from the very moment you join an organization, but actually that's often learned in the commercial organization. Been interested in your spin on things. Ricard Westley: Very much so. I mean, the military has the luxury of being able to devote time and resource to training and developing their people. And officers go through the RMA Military Academy Sandhurst. Mottos, serve to lead and behaviors are really focused from the get-go. So, you know, a young graduate who spent three or four years at university in quite a selfish sort of environment is suddenly thrust into a very pressurized, initial six weeks of a yearlong course where they're put under significant amount of pressure and strain to behave in the right way. And doesn't matter how good or well prepared they think they are, or how fit and robust, or how intellectually gifted they are by about day 10 of the RMA Military Academy Sandhurst. You are so stretched physically, emotionally, mentally, you are quite exhausted, and you have to reach out left and right, and grab people and say, look, we need to work together here. This is not about me. This is about us. And so that team bonding which then translates into the leadership of that team you know progresses and then going through your military career, you know, you are prepared for every new role you go. You are course trained and you are developed. And then at the collective level, you know, units or battalions or regiments will prepare for operations, deploy on operations, recover from operations, then start that circle again, that cycle, of course, in the real world, in the commercial world, companies don't have that luxury. You know, they are on operations 24/7. And so, it becomes really important at that stage that the leaders make time to develop their people and to nurture their talent. So, I think there are things that both can learn from each other. The final point I would say is that business find themselves in very, very volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous circumstances most of the time, and certainly now, and the military is designed for that voker, uncertain world. And so, to me, it's a natural progression for the military to talk to business because they're comfortable and are designed for that voker world. Steve Rush: Yeah, Pepyn, I wonder from your expense of being chairman and CEO on a number of businesses, whether or not there's room for that preparation to take leaders out of the operation space and really immerse them into some intense training and support. Pepyn Dinandt: Well, look, the practice in most corporations is unfortunately completely different to what Richard has described. In other words, people are not really prepared systematically for leadership. And in the book, we talk about the so-called career X point, which is an interesting phenomenon we've seen with many failed leadership examples where people, you know, over time, they do learn initially, and they advance in their career. But when you get to a certain level in organizations, you suddenly believe your now CEO, head of big division, have been successful in the past that you don't need to learn anymore. When the learning line crosses the career line, which keeps going up and the learning line flattens, we talk about the career X points, and that's when people basically start making mistakes in business. Steve Rush: Yeah. Pepyn Dinandt: And that's why it's fascinating to look at the crossover because especially the British military, you know, very, very actively train their leaders to be good, not many businesses do it that way. It's more always, you know, advancement by chance, advancement by opportunities, but not those systematic. Steve Rush: Yeah, that makes those sense. So, let's dive into the book and the nine steps and maybe get some perspective from you as to how the steps within that book can help us and Pepyn we start with you. The first step in the book is that building platform, you call it establishing leadership. Tell us about that? Pepyn Dinandt: So, Steve, you know, you coach leaders, you coach people that run businesses, you know, so you're seeing a situation where there is an obvious problem with the business. Steve Rush: Right. Pepyn Dinandt: Financials are declining, for me, for us. When we define the steps, especially the first step, we said, you know, this is an environment. This is an opportunity. This is a window where you take that situation, and you call out a burning platform. And with that burning platform, you basically achieve two things. First of all, you establish yourself as the leader, that's going to take charge of this situation. You know, that's about conveying the fact that you are safe of hands, having simple messages on, you know, what's happening and what's going to happen and projecting certainty as a leader, in a sense of conveying to people. You have a plan; you're going to get this done. You're going to save the situation. So that's the establishing leadership part. The other part, and this is very often something that you see with formally successful businesses. You know, the organization, which is ultimately the people that work there are in the comfort zone. That's very often the reason why the business in trouble in the first place. And one of the things you need to really focus on is to galvanize the organization into action, into a change mode by explaining why they need to change. And that's why it's so important to do that in the very first step. If you don't get people in a mentally ready for small or big change, you're going to have trouble later on with the other steps. Steve Rush: Yeah. Complacency is a real killer in most organizations, but often people don't even realize they're in that comfort zone until others like you or I, or other people on their team pointed out to them and go, this is a problem [laugh]. So, step two, Richard, you call in the book analysis and determination of mission targets. So very much a military focus. Tell us how that translates? Ricard Westley: Yeah, so the military has a command philosophy called mission command. What we would call you know, empowerment and it really centers around telling your people what you want them to do and why, but not telling them how to do it because they should have the technical skills and they may well be considerably more able than you to actually do the, what. What this chapter is about is really making sure that you understand the intent of your boss or bosses or board or shareholders at whatever level, making sure that everything you do and all the direction that you give to your subordinates is in line with that. And what's required here is real clarity, real clarity of vision to make sure you've got it right. And then clarity of expression to make sure that everybody, you know, from other board members down to the people on the shop floor, really understand what you are about and why you are doing this, so that's what it is. And chapter two really digs into that idea of getting the big idea, right. And then conveying the message as simply as possible to your people. Steve Rush: And it's that simplicity that often gets lost in translation, because my experience tells me that the more simple people can align to a common goal, purpose, mission, vision, the more likely they're going to achieve it, the more complex it becomes, then people lose that through a bit of diffusion. Pepyn Dinandt: Yeah, you know, Richard and I, we had a discussion about step one and two in the sense of what comes first, but we like to use the following analogy. I think, you know, if you're going to be the new chef of a restaurant before you actually get told, you know, what the goal is, what the mission is, it's good. That's step one, to get to know the kitchen and the team before you do that discussion. Why step one first and then step two. Steve Rush: Yeah. It makes sense. There's been lots of debate about which comes first. And I think I concur with you that you have to, what if you just think of the chronological order, you get hired first before you decide what you're going to do exactly. And it follows that same principle, doesn't it? Pepyn Dinandt: Yeah. Steve Rush: And in step three, you talk about the evaluation of the environment. I kind like this theater of operations. Tell us about that? Pepyn Dinandt: You know, steps three is, ultimately very big step, but we like to keep it simple and practical. It's the moment when you look as a leader closely at your competition or in the military term, your enemy, as well as your, you know, your customers, your market that you are serving, or in the military term, the environment that you're operating in. And we've seen my own experience, learnings, you know, good and bad, but also from the research we did, we've seen a truly great business leaders, never underestimate their competition. Everything they do is centered around staying ahead of the competition. And, you know, I talk about the degree of skill and business acumen. So, what's important is to know your business very well from both an inside perspective and from an outside perspective, know your strengths and weaknesses and those of your competition, because very often when people develop strategies and we'll talk about that in step four, you know, they overestimate their own strengths, and they underestimate the strengths of their competition. And interesting under step three is the fact that you may find things. You may find out things about your business, about the competition, where the mission you've been set under step two becomes maybe not even only just difficult, but maybe even impossible. So, you know, we do write in the book that after step three, it may be necessary to revisit step two, depending on what you find out. Steve Rush: Is it fair to say that there will be a continual revisiting of step two as their business and their firm or their mission if you like starts to evolve? Pepyn Dinandt: No, I think if you do it properly, and there's a great Chinese general called Sun Tzu who wrote a book, The Art of War two and a half thousand years ago, you know, and in my experience, as he says, if you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of one hundred battles, but if you know, neither of the enemy, nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle. So, in other words, if you do your homework properly and you really know your business well, and you really know your competition, well, I think you can then move on to the next steps. I think could be that instant that instant where you need to go back once to step two. Yeah, but at some point, you just need to have done your homework. Otherwise, you're in trouble as a leader. Anyway, Steve Rush: I suppose it plays to the philosophy of having no plan B. Pepyn Dinandt: Yes, exactly. Steve Rush: Yeah [laugh] like it. Yeah, so in step four, I love title of step four, who dears wins. It's a very common used phrase in the military. I think this comes from the SAS, if my memory is correct. And this is about strategy and tactics, Richard. Ricard Westley: Yeah, and step four. I mean, I guess the theme that runs through step four is that simplicity rules. The military uses the acronym kiss, keep it simple, stupid, or keep it short and simple. But that strategy for me is about getting the big ideas, right. Giving clear instructions to your people as to what you want them to do. Supervising the execution, but not getting too close. And then having a good process for lessons identified in order to inform best practice. And the chapter actually draws on some work by Michael Porter, where he talks about cost leadership, differentiation and focus in niche markets in order to ensure that, you know, you can deal with your competitors, but stay on track. And as Pepyn says, it builds on, you know, you build on your strength and you attack your competitor's weakness, which is very much in keeping with the military maneuvers approach, which is, you know, find the enemy's weak point and exploit it whilst defending you know, your center of gravity. Step four, gets into an idea about risk taking and how you manage risk, how you mitigate risk and accepting the fact that you can never rule out risk. So, it leads on to stuff that we talk about later, such as contingency planning. And it also indicates that occasionally you have to go back to your mission and say, okay, something's happened. Something's changed. Is the mission still valid in its format at the moment? And therefore, you know, am I okay to crack on, or do I need a little bit of work here so that I can get on with the other steps? Steve Rush: It's an interesting spin on risk too. Because research has provided loads of evidence over the years that those organizations and entrepreneurs and business leaders who avoid risk actually prevent growth and stifle innovation. Ricard Westley: Absolutely, absolutely right. Steve Rush: Yeah. Ricard Westley: You know, from a military perspective, I always encourage my junior commanders to take risk. You know, my mantra was, go now with a 75% solution and tweak it. Because if you wait for the hundred percent solution, somebody will get there first. Steve Rush: Yeah. And I guess that spins then into step five Pepyn in the book, which is around determining the best course of action. And I guess the question I had was, is there ever a best course of action? Pepyn Dinandt: Well, that's a good question, Steve, but if we take a step back, one of the fascinating things for me, you know, looking at the crossover between military and business is that. Step five is something which in the military, in the best practice cases of the military is always done very, very, very well, but in business, not done very often. And the reason it's the following, you know, in business, a situation is typically where the leadership and the let's say top team develop a plan and then basically give the plan to the organization to get done. But what we say in step five is that, you know, if you want to do it properly, what you do is, you sit down as the planning group with the execution group and you get, you know, you brief them on what you want to happen, and they are allowed to give their feedback. And you know, you have to take the time to get that feedback. You, you know, you really have to also be open for a reality check of your plan. And the SES here is brilliant because, you know, in their mission success cycle, which is plan, brief, execute, debrief. The brief part is so important where the guys that have planned go to the guys that are going to execute, present the plan, but get feedback from the people that will be executing the operators and then maybe even change the plan because they see that from an execution perspective, things that are not well thought through maybe even unrealistic. And this reality check, that's step five. Entails is something whereas a leader, as a CEO, you need a healthy ego, you know, to be able to deal with that. Because it means that somebody may criticize your plan. You know, one of the people that you are going to be hiring or that you're going to be entrusting with opening the French office of a company that is up to now only sat in Britain. You know, he may be telling you, well, this plan's not going to work because ABC and you have to be able to accept that criticism and go back and redo the plan. So that's why step five is critical. And it's unfortunately not seen so often in business, you know, not well done in business. Steve Rush: And I love the notion of healthy ego. Again, similarly, there's been a lot of research that, and in fact, to be fair, there's been lots of publicity and things written, ego is a bad thing, and it is if it's overplayed and it's not helpful, but having a healthy ego gives you confidence, direction and purpose. And I wondered what your spin on that would? Pepyn Dinandt: Every leader need ego. By definition, a leader has ego, but the problem that we have, and we saw this when we did the research, especially for the bad leadership cases, you know, many of these leaders are egocentric. And we see this, for example, again, in the military, the special air services I think is very, is a great example here. You know, you can have great leaders that haven't healthy ego that are, let's say, aware of their own limitations, are open to criticism. And basically, as you, in that podcast mentioned, you know, they don't have a centric ego, but rather a healthy ego. And I believe that that you know, good business managers, good business leaders, not necessarily founders entrepreneurs like Jeff Bezos, but the people that are entrusted to lead these businesses in the second-generation. Key is for them to have a good, healthy ego, because it's so important to creating a learning organization. Steve Rush: Yeah. Pepyn Dinandt: And that stops you from, at some point in the future, getting into a problem where you need to do transformation. Steve Rush: And that also will help you find other people around you who bring additional strengths and characteristics, which is leading into step six, which is about building and managing that excellent leadership team. Richard, this is essential in the military as well as in the corporate world, isn't it? Ricard Westley: Yeah, it is. And you know, this, whole idea of pulling together and then maintaining a high-performance team is absolutely crucial to mission success, as is, you know, spotting and nurturing potential. And we've already mentioned you know, committing time and resource to developing your people to make sure that team that you've selected is then maintained and developing your team to make sure, you know, they've got clear aligned, you know objectives and values. Those teams need to be encouraged to communicate frequently and effectively, they need to be collaborative, you know, that sort of collaboration breaks down the silos that can often slow up business. And that team needs to build trust through relationships, but it also needs to be able to learn and adapt. And we get onto that in step nine, but it is, it's about making sure that you get the right people and that you don't default to just people, you know, but actually getting the right people and the right job, and then giving them the responsibility Steve Rush: And step seven plays into that lovely, doesn't it? As part of that whole organizational structure in order to get the right people in the right place to get the best results. Pepyn, what's your experience of making sure that in that space you've got the right people? Pepyn Dinandt: Yeah. Look, I think, in my own experience, very often you come into a company that is in trouble and you have to very quickly, you know, go through your steps and act. So, one of the key questions is to look at the culture of the organization and to try to understand, because often, as I said before, these companies have been successful. So for example, find a customer centric culture in this company, or is a very technical culture. It's important to understand, you know, what you're dealing with because ultimately, as I said before, the organization is, another way of saying, you know, five thousand people, ten thousand people, you know, whatever the size of the company is, you need to get them to do something different. So, is it a dynamic organization or is it a company that is clearly in the comfort zone? You need to understand this because then you have to organize yourself to take that plan and make sure you develop the structure that has maximizing the business impact from what you're trying to achieve. My own experience, Steve is that in general, smaller units are much more effective than large units. But the thing that ultimately guides, you know, the structure that you're going to be implementing is, what you are facing in the market. In other words, are you competing against smaller competitors who are organized in smaller entities? Is it a local market? So, you know, once you have all this information, you can then develop and define the structure that you believe. Steve Rush: Yeah. Pepyn Dinandt: Is going to be most effective. But what you need to do is, change it, only for the sake of getting it out of its comfort zone. So typically, I find larger structures, more functional organizations, and typically I define them smaller. And I like to call these business units that have, you know, delegated responsibility, or as Richard said before, you know, where the people leading these smaller entities take responsibility and have freedom. Steve Rush: Yeah. Pepyn Dinandt: And degree of decision making. Steve Rush: That makes load of sense. So, step eight, Richard, there's two words in there that have really interesting connotations. Campaign delivery. So, for me, when I read that, the first thing I thought of is, oh, this is wrapped up in a campaign strategy at IE. There's a start and end. There's lots of moving parts all in the right places. And of course, the one thing that's essential in every business is you have to deliver, what does it speak to? Ricard Westley: Yeah. So, you've got your plan and you're probably feeling quite proud of your plan. But how can you stress test it? And how's it going to survive contact with a competitive arena. And that's absolutely based on the military assertion that, you know, no plan survives contact with the enemy because your competitors or your opponents on a sports field for that matter, they have a vote. And have you contingency planned against their likely responses you know, what is the market going to do when you introduce some new product or service in there, which disrupts, what is their default setting going to be? And how do you plan against that? And this whole idea of contingency planning is that, of course you can't plan against every possible contingency. And I always in the military planned against the worst case and the most likely case, because if you've got a contingency plan for those two, anything else happens in between, you can sort of tweak it, but it is about war gaming and red teaming. And this is not confined to the military or to business. One of the examples we cite in step eight was the way that the British Olympic Committee approached their metal chances and the matrix that was created by the likes of John Steele and Peter Keen in the committee that they would go and pour over, you know, twice a week to make sure that actually they weren't missing something. And if they need a contingency plan against, you know, an outbreak of, you know, foot and mouth in the country just before, what were they going to do? So, war gaming and red teaming, you know, which businesses should do, but often pay lip service to become really important. And finally, it comes down to accountability. Yeah, it's the leader's responsibility. You know, you take the credit when things go well, I'm afraid if they don't, then you've got to be held accountable. And it's all down to you at the last at the last count. Steve Rush: When you start to get people to think about plan for the end planned. The mindset will take you to what you know, or broadly what you can anticipate. But I bet that's changed in the last two years. Me included by the way, got caught out big time with how the pandemic through that perspective to us. And I wonder if in the future organizations will be more thoughtful to that because of what's happened in the last few years. Pepyn Dinandt: I think Steve, you know, step eight is, obviously, it's the execution of the plan, but it's so much more than that. And, you know, I learned for example, an interesting military term, which I believe is also very applicable to business, which is UDA. You know, this is something developed, I think during the Korean war where they saw that the inferior U.S. jets were winning against superior Russian jets flown by the North Koreans. And somebody figured out that the reason was because the pilots flying those American jets were much more in tune in what was going on in the world, let's say, applying a concept that was later called UDA, which is observe, orientate, decide and act. In other words, they were, you know, able to adjust to what was going on in the field. So as Mr. Von Moltke a famous I think Prussian General once said, you know, no plan survives first contact with the enemy. And that's why we also emphasize in step eight that a leader needs to be close to the action. Needs to see what's going on in the field with his plan so that he can adjust real time. You know, as Richard just said, have a contingency plan, but make sure the leader is leading that change of plan together with this team. Steve Rush: Which is why step nine is also then so important, which is that final after-action review. Pepyn Dinandt: Yeah, and the after-action review is something for me personally, that was completely new. I learned this from Richard, you know, Richard can maybe add to this because he was very instrumental in bringing that to the British military, but this is a very interesting concept. And this is by the way for the SAS, their last step in their four-step model. So, you know, when you have finished your transformation program, be it, you know, a cost take out exercise or a relaunch of a growth initiative. You know, you sit down with everybody which includes the boss, but also the people that have been, you know, executing parts of the plan and you have an open and frank and honest discussion as to what went right, what was good, but also what did not go right? And what can we learn for the next time? So, it's seldom a business leader. I have to say that is, you know, able to sit there in the room and take constructive feedback, open bracket, maybe sometimes criticism, you know, of their plan and then take that and think about it and, you know, change things for the next time. But as I said before, this is something which is so important to do, right. Because you create with it, the ultimate learning organization. And I, myself, you know, as I said, this has been a great, interesting learning for me personally. I have seen it in very successful organizations where this is practiced. Maybe not so systematically as we describe it here in step nine, but it's definitely something I would recommend for all companies to do because it's so powerful. Steve Rush: Yeah, and it stops repeating mistakes in the past and focuses you on building on the strengths that you've achieved as well. Pepyn Dinandt: But also, you know, just a signal from leadership to do this, to you know, sit there and take criticism. I think it's so powerful for the organization because it just sends a signal. You know that there is a culture of openness where if it's constructive, if it objective, you know, people can step up and say, look boss, I don't think this is the right way. I think we need to do it differently because 1, 2, 3. Steve Rush: It's a really pragmatic nine steps. I'm really delighted that we were able to dive into them and get into them and we'll allow our listeners an opportunity to find out how they can get a copy and dive to learn a bit more about your work later on. But first I'm going to turn the tables a little bit. And this is part of the show where our listeners have become accustomed to where we get to hack into your leadership minds. So, I'm going to come in turn and quick fire, top three leadership hacks from you both. Pepyn kick us off? Pepyn Dinandt: My top three leadership hacks. One, you know, as I said before, absolutely paramount to get your first step right in a transformation situation. If you don't get that right, you're in trouble. Second, the plan is nothing. The planning is everything, you know. So, I love that saying from Benjamin Franklin, fail to prepare and prepare to fail. And three, if you want to be a really good leader, then you need to have a healthy ego because that is a key to being very impactful and leading a learning organization. Steve Rush: Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, Love it. Richard, what about your top three leadership hacks? Ricard Westley: First thing I'd say. Two leaders is a need to learn to listen and really listen. Not, listen to respond, but to really listen, to understand their people because otherwise they'll miss so much more than just the technicalities and the practicalities. They will miss stuff that involves culture and culture is important. Second one is, you know, whatever you do, issue clear instructions, let people know the intent, the why, and empower them to get on with it. And thirdly, you are there to make decisions. And as my first colour sergeant said to me, you know, at the end of the day, Mr. Westley, you have to make a decision, good decision, great. Bad decision, regrettable. No decision, unforgivable. Steve Rush: Yeah. And bad decisions lead to learning as well [Laugh] you know. Ricard Westley: Indeed. Yeah, yeah. You've got to fail to learn and thrive. Steve Rush: That's it, yeah. So, the next part of the show we call it Hack to Attack. So, this is where we ask our guests to share an event, a story or experience where something has particularly not gone well for them in their work or their life, but as a result of it, they've learned. And it's now a force of good in what they do. What would be your Hack to Attack Pepyn? Pepyn Dinandt: Yeah, look. First was when I was a, you know, first time CEO I had come from McKinsey, and I thought as many McKinsey do, that I could walk on water and do it all alone. But I was lucky because through fortunate circumstances, I very quickly learned that it's individuals that may play the game, but teams that beat the odds. And that's been one of my mantras ever since. And the other one is that later on in life, I learned the hard way that not every mission is accomplishable, yeah. So as a leader, you need to be brave enough to stand up to your board, sponsor, owner, and explain that this mission that you have been set is impossible and will not work as envisaged, you know, and not many leaders are brave enough to do that. Steve Rush: That's very important lessons learned there, and I can particularly resonate with the last, because there comes with a fear of particularly if you're leading somebody else's strategy, letting them know that they've also screwed up in the process. Pepyn Dinandt: Yep. Steve Rush: Yeah. Richard, how about you? Ricard Westley: Yeah, I'd harp back to a peacekeeping mission in Bosnia that very nearly failed. I mean, very nearly failed. It nearly brought down the UN and the British Prime Minister, John Major offered his position up to the cabinet because of what had happened to us. And we managed to model through and the town that we were defending did not fall unlike Srebrenica just up the valley and sadly but I would say what I learned from that is, you know, the depth of mine and other people's resilience and how you have to keep working at that and keep topping up their resilience banks when times are tight. I learn to never give up, to keep thinking, keep moving, and again, keep contingency planning at every level, Steve Rush: Really powerful lessons, particularly in times of crisis like that as well. You can rely on those foundations to help you through, can't you? Ricard Westley: Indeed. Steve Rush: So, the last part of the show is you get to do a bit of time travel and all the years of wisdom you've been able to attain in your more mature days, you get a chance to bump into yourselves at 21 and give yourselves some advice. What would Pepyn advice to Pepyn at 21 be? Pepyn Dinandt: Well, by the way, I wrote the book or we wrote the book or the idea for the book came about of providing my younger self, something useful and practical to work with. But to answer your question directly, I think for me, knowledge and experience, you know, the realization that these are greatest weapons in times of trouble that, you know, the good and experienced people that have trained it and done it a hundred times before. They are so valuable to you as a young person. And as a young man, I would advise myself to adopt the scout mindset. So be curious, be open, be grounded and learn. So, to listen and learn from those more experience around you, because typically, you know, young you, does not know at all, even if you think you do. Steve Rush: And the scout and soldier mindset are those kinds of different perspectives. And we can use a metaphor of almost a kind a growth and curious mindset versus a fixed and closed mindset, right? Pepyn Dinandt: Yes, exactly. Steve Rush: Yeah. Richard, 21. I guess you were heading off at Sandhurst, weren't you? Ricard Westley: I was pretty much passing out at Sandhurst at 21. Steve Rush: Oh, yeah [Laugh] Ricard Westley: What I would say to myself there is, the one thing I really learned is the most, for a military commander, but also in business, I guess that one of the most important information requirements you have is time. How much time have I got and when do I have to achieve this by? And so, I would say to young RJ Westley at 21 or 19, get better at time management. Because I don't think I was terribly good at it. And of course, I was fueled with the mindset of most young infantry officers that wanted to go and earn their spurs, go and prove themselves and yeah, and go into violent situations and win. And I guess what I would say to that young person is be careful what you wish for. Steve Rush: Yeah, very good advice, indeed. So, I've had a ball talking, I could spend the rest of the day diving into these subjects because as you probably already know, I'm a bit of a leadership geek and you have an enormous amount of lessons that we can learn from. So firstly, thank you for sharing them so far, but if our listeners did want to get a copy of the book, learn a bit more about the work that you both do now. Where's the best place for us to send them? Pepyn Dinandt: Well [laugh], there is a website, www.businessleadershipunderfire.com where they can learn more about the book. And then there is a link on the website to go directly to Amazon where they can then order it. I think that would be the recommendation for your listeners. Pepyn Dinandt: Perfect. And we'll include that link along with any social media links that you have in our show notes. So as soon as people listen to this, they can dive straight in and find a bit more about what you do. It just goes without saying, to say, thank you ever so much for coming on our show, joining our community here on The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Pepyn, Richard, thanks very much. Pepyn Dinandt: Steve. Thank you very much. Ricard Westley: Absolute pleasure. Thanks.   Closing Steve Rush: I want to sign off by saying thank you to you for joining us on the show too. We recognize without you, there is no show. So please continue to share, subscribe, and like, and continue to get in touch with us with the great new stories that we share every week. And so that we can continue to bring you great stories. Please make sure you give us a five-star review where you can and share this podcast with your friends, your teams, and communities. You want to find us on social media. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter @leadershiphacker, Leadership Hacker on YouTube and on Instagram, the_leadership_hacker and if that wasn't enough, you can also find us on our website leadership-hacker.com. Tune into next episode to find out what great hacks and stories are coming your way. That's me signing off. I'm Steve rush, and I've been your Leadership Hacker.  

Dishing Drama with Dana Wilkey UNCENSORED
Episode 78 - Deep Dive on Sanela Diana Jenkins (with Enty Lawyer) Part 1

Dishing Drama with Dana Wilkey UNCENSORED

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 10:56


Dana and reoccurring guest superstar, Enty Lawyer, take us on a deep dive uncovering the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills cast member,  Sanela Diana Jenkins!Diana's early life in Bosnia and the U.K... Her humble upbringing and questionable financials attending school in London...Diana's meeting and marriage to Roger Jenkins... his lawsuits and Barclays Bank... Amanda Staveley's involvement... Did Prince Andrew propose to Amanda? The ending of Diana and Roger's marriage... Roger Jenkin's connection to PK... Diana's house in Los Angeles, the changing of her name, and Roger Jenkin's mysterious rise in the ranks of Barclays... Was their relationship one of business or love?Muammar Gaddafi, former Libyan leader, his son, Mutassim Gaddafi, and the Lybian money trails... Mutassim Billah Gaddafi was a Libyan Army officer, and the National Security Advisor of Libya from 2008 until 2011. His mother was Safia Farkash, who had some Bosnian ancestry. Did Diana date Mutassim Gaddafi?Diana's book Room 23... Sex trafficking, escorting, and yachting... What celebrities are mentioned in the book?Hayden Panettiere's connection to Diana... Hayden's early home life, partying in France, and effect on her career... Ashanti and a South American President... Diana's charity with Sean Penn... Suspicions surrounding the Haiti organizations... Orphan trafficking in Haiti and other countries...The 14-year-old Bosnian girl who was sold to Jeffrey Epstein...Special thanks to Diamond Patreon,  Rhys Humphry, who helped research Diana and inspired some of the topics on this episode for Dana.Get Dishing Drama Dana Merch!https://represent.com/store/dishing-drama-dana-wilkeyFollow Dana: @Wilkey_DanaFollow Casey: @CaseyHanley$25,000 Song - Apple Music$25,000 Song - SpotifyTo support the show and listen to full episodes, become a member on Patreon.To learn more about sponsorships, email DDDWpodcast@gmail.comSupport the show

TNT Radio
Alex Thomson & Martin Snodden on Dolores Cahill Show - 14 May 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 54:33


GUEST OVERVIEW: Martin Snodden educated himself in mathematics, management consulting and history while a young prisoner in the 'H-blocks'. Martin has been involved in the peace process in the North, as well as involved in post conflict resolution in Haiti, Nicaragua, Bosnia, Serbia and Croatia. He is working on educating on the law, and freedom in the past two years.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, May 12, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Fourth Week of Easter Lectionary: 282All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Leopold Mandicclass="content"> May 12, 2021 Franciscan Media Image: Statue of Leopold Mandic | St. Jacob Church in Međugorje, Bosnia | photo by gnuckx Saint of the Day for May 12 (May 12, 1866 – July 30, 1942) Audio file Saint Leopold Mandic's story Western Christians who are working for greater dialogue with Orthodox Christians may be reaping the fruits of Father Leopold's prayers. A native of Croatia, Leopold joined the Capuchin Franciscans and was ordained several years later in spite of several health problems. He could not speak loudly enough to preach publicly. For many years he also suffered from severe arthritis, poor eyesight, and a stomach ailment. For several years Leopold taught patrology, the study of the Church Fathers, to the clerics of his province, but he is best known for his work in the confessional, where he sometimes spent 13-15 hours a day. Several bishops sought out his spiritual advice. Leopold's dream was to go to the Orthodox Christians and work for the reunion of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy. His health never permitted it. Leopold often renewed his vow to go to the Eastern Christians; the cause of unity was constantly in his prayers. At a time when Pope Pius XII said that the greatest sin of our time is “to have lost all sense of sin,” Leopold had a profound sense of sin and an even firmer sense of God's grace awaiting human cooperation. Leopold, who lived most of his life in Padua, died on July 30, 1942, and was canonized in 1982. In the Roman liturgy his feast is celebrated on July 30. Reflection Saint Francis advised his followers to “pursue what they must desire above all things, to have the Spirit of the Lord and His holy manner of working” (Rule of 1223, Chapter 10)—words that Leopold lived out. When the Capuchin minister general wrote his friars on the occasion of Leopold's beatification, he said that this friar's life showed “the priority of that which is essential.” Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Untold Killing
Irresolution

Untold Killing

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 49:35


Each survivors' release brought them to the start of a lifelong journey. Scattered across the world and Bosnia, they try to come to terms with what they'd lived through. For more information and resources visit: https://www.srebrenica.org.uk/podcast/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wolfgang Wee Uncut
Kjetil Hatlebrekke | Etterretning, E-tjenesten, Sikkerhetspolitikk, Ukraina, Rekruttering, Informasjonsflommen, Induksjonsproblemet, 9/11, Gresk Filosofi, Hemmelighold, Signal vs Støy

Wolfgang Wee Uncut

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 281:01


Wolfgang Wee Uncut #261: Kjetil Hatlebrekke er fagdirektør i Etterretningstjenesten, har tjenestegjort i Forsvaret siden 1990, har operativ erfaring fra Bosnia, Kosovo, Midtøsten og Afghanistan. Han er også tildelt Etterretningstjenestens fortjenestemedalje. #wolfgangweeuncut Se hele episoden her: https://youtu.be/Q6eNy4wVOa4Temaer: Etterretning, E-tjenesten, Sikkerhetspolitikk, Ukraina, Rekruttering, Informasjonsflommen, Induksjonsproblemet, 9/11, Filosofi, Hemmelighold, Signal vs Støy, +++ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

War & Peace
S3 Episode 17: Changing Dynamics in the Western Balkans

War & Peace

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 23:41


The Western Balkans, a region defined in part by not being in the European Union, also contains several countries that were devastated by war in the 1990s. Now it faces new troubles, driven in part by the legacies of the old. Bosnia and Herzegovina is confronted with calls for secession in the autonomous Serb-dominated region, Republika Srpska, as well as the ongoing electoral grievances of its Croat minority. Meanwhile, efforts to resolve Kosovo's dispute with Serbia over its independence have come to a standstill, leaving minority communities on both sides of the border vulnerable.This week on War & Peace, Olga Oliker talks to Marko Prelec, Crisis Group's Consulting Senior Analyst for the Balkans, about why ethnic tensions persist in the region and whether there is any risk of a return to conflict. They discuss the prospects for European integration, asking whether the promise of EU membership remains an effective incentive for resolving these longstanding disputes. They also consider what impact Russia's invasion of Ukraine has had for stability in the Western Balkans, a region where painful memories of war are still very salient today.For more of Crisis Group's analysis, make sure to check out our Balkans regional page and keep an eye out for our upcoming report on the risk of instability in the Western Balkans. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Douze Points! - The Eurovision Podcast
Episode 147 - Douze News! (10/05/22)

Douze Points! - The Eurovision Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 20:50


Eurovision is here! In this special Tuesday episode, we give you our LAST recap of everything that will be going down in Turin on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday night. Who had great rehearsals? Who really missed the mark? And most importantly, who is going to win Eurovision 2022!? We have NO IDEA!!Check it out!

Converging Dialogues
#135 - Human Rights and The Syrian Conflict: A Dialogue with Jomana Qaddour and Gissou Nia

Converging Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 68:20


In this episode, Xavier Bonilla has a dialogue with Jomana Qaddour and Gissou Nia about many of the human rights atrocities in the Syrian conflict. They discuss the origins and data on the Syrian conflict, a chronology of events in the conflict, and allies of the Syrian government. They discuss the atrocities of human rights violations and why the international community has been on the sidelines.  They discuss the international law dynamics and pragmatic ways in which aid could be delivered to the Syrian people.  Jomana Qaddour is a Senior Fellow of the Rafik Hariri Center and Middle East Programs at the Atlantic Council. Currently, she is a doctorate student at Georgetown University Law Center where her work focuses on ethno-sectarianism in Syria, Iraq, and Bosnia. She has been a Senior Policy Analyst at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom and Senior Research Assistant and Publications Manager for the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World at the Brookings Institution's Center for Middle East Policy. Twitter: @jomanaqaddour Gissou Nia is the Director of the Strategic Litigation Project for Middle East Programs at the Atlantic Council. She is a human rights lawyer and is the board chair of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center. Her main interests focus on human rights advocacy, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Twitter: @gissounia

Combat Story
CS#73: Lessons from a Delta Force Commander from Afghanistan to Panama | CEO | Author | Pete Blaber

Combat Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 107:13


Today we hear a rare Combat Story from a long-time Delta Force Commander and operator, Pete Blaber, who served in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Somalia, Colombia, and Panama. Call to Action: For former military, government and law enforcement, if you're looking for a high paying and meaningful job, check out our Trust & Safety Institute. Pete is an understated, humble, and soft spoken warrior leader who applies a commonsense approach to all of his decisions, to include those in combat. His decision to join the military came from studying centuries of warfare and how seemingly brilliant leaders made senseless decisions and wanting to avoid making the same mistakes. He spent most of his career in the special operations side of the Army from Ranger Battalion to Delta Force and then, after retiring, took on a role as a senior leader in a multi-billion dollar tech company. He has since written two books (The Mission, The Men, and Me: Lessons from a Former Delta Force Commander, and, more recently, The Common Sense Way: A New Way to Think About Leading and Organizing) that share the lessons he learned from leading in some of the most historic and high intensity conflicts in the past 35 years. I hope you enjoy this humble, understated, and unique perspective into the life and thinking of a Tier 1 operator and officer as much as I did. Find Pete Online: The Common Sense Way: A New Way to Think About Leading and Organizing The Mission, The Men, and Me: Lessons from a Former Delta Force Commander Instagram @blaberpete Find Ryan Online: Trust & Safety Institute - Jobs/Careers, News, Training, Policies Patreon Community Combat Story Merch Ryan's Linktree Instagram @combatstory Learn more about Ryan Intro Song: Sport Rock from Audio Jungle Show Notes 0:00 - Intro 0:55 - Guest Introduction (Pete Blaber) 2:02 – Introducing The Trust & Safety Institute 2:54 - Interview begins 3:14 - Childhood and the origins of the common sense perspective 7:16 - Being obsessed with military history as a kid and the impact it had 22:12 - Using notes from when he was deployed or in service to write his books 28:19 - If the military wasn't an option, what would you have done? 31:50 - Story of navigation skills at work trying to escape a wild animal in pursuit 46:37 - Path including Ranger Battalion, Infantry Offer, and Delta 49:29 - Combat Story #1 - First time in combat in Panama as a company commander in the military five years 1:05:33 - Formative time with Rangers and how it informed tactics as Company Commander and later with the Unit 1:10:05 - Combat Story #2 - Afghanistan mission from a leadership perspective 1:28:56 - The most rewarding point along the journey 1:38:38 - What did you carry into combat? 1:40:02 - Would you do it all again? 1:43:11 - Help connect those who served with meaningful and great paying jobs after service 1:45:49 - Listener comments and shout outs

Douze Points! - The Eurovision Podcast
Episode 146 - Douze News! (6/5/22)

Douze Points! - The Eurovision Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 26:11


We're less than a week from Eurovision 2022!! Tonight, Jack and Liz discuss the chaos of a sun that just won't rise, a no-show at rehearsals throws a spanner in the works, and what is Give That Wolf A Banana really about??Check it out!

TNT Radio
Rod Bishop Lt Gen USAF (Ret) on The Jim Breslo Show - 04 May 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 54:10


GUEST OVERVIEW: Lieutenant General Bishop retired from active duty in August 2008 after 34 years of service in the United States Air Force. His last assignment was as Commander, 3rd Air Force, United States Air Forces in Europe, Ramstein AB, Germany, where he oversaw all American air and space activities in the 93 countries in Europe and Africa. Additionally, he was responsible for the organizing, training and equipping of nearly 30 thousand airmen assigned to the 10 different Air Force Wings under his command throughout Europe. He was Deputy Director of Operations for both the USAF and US Transportation Command and Deputy Commander of US Southern Command (South and Central America and the Caribbean). He flew Mrs Clinton into Bosnia on the flight that became famous as they were allegedly fired upon; and he played a small role in helping the Hunter Biden Laptop Story see the light of day in Oct of 2020.

The Level Up English Podcast
#159 Learning While Travelling

The Level Up English Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 26:01


I recently returned from a trip to Bosnia and Herzegovina - my first post-pandemic trip. I had a fantastic time and tried my best to use as much of their language as possible. As with all my trips, I have a lot of reflections and ideas on language learning that I'd like to share that might help you. Join Level Up English - https://courses.levelupenglish.schoolBy becoming a member, you get access to all podcast transcripts, listen to the private podcast and join live lessons and courses on the website.Show notes page - https://levelupenglish.school/podcast159

Behind The U
Episode 68 - Aljosa Piric

Behind The U

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 49:52


Josh Darrow talks to Canes men's tennis coach Aljosa Piric, who shares his remarkable story of leaving war-torn Bosnia and Herzegovina as a teenager, how he ended up in Italy and then the United States, how tennis helped him navigate his journey, what drew him to college coaching and his goals as he continues to push the Canes program forward.

Mama Knows
Breaking the Cycle of Intergenerational Trauma w/ Selma Baćevac

Mama Knows

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 36:22


Research shows that not only can Intergenerational Trauma be passed on by the way we parent, but also through DNA. Join me this week with Selma Baćevac as we talk about what Intergenerational Trauma can look like and how to break the cycle.Selma is a mother of two toddlers and a psychotherapist entrepreneur. She works with women and parents who want to overcome and heal trauma by offering one-one consulting, online masterclasses, and community. Selma's message is simple: "No child should ever experience the two types of fear: the fear of war and the fear of their parents."Selma was born in Bosnia and Herzegovina, lived through the Siege of Sarajevo during the war and genocide in Bosnia and was a resettled refugee to the United States at 12 years old. Selma has been working as a psychotherapist for over 12 years. She has helped thousands of people heal their past traumas to move forward with their lives. More recently, Selma wrote and published a book, "Adem and the Magic Fenjer," where she helps parents with little children speak about refugees and how to hold compassionate and brave conversations. Pre-Order Selma's Book: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/adem-and-the-magic-fenjer-selma-bacevac/1141343130Website: https://msha.ke/balkanmamatherapy/Contact:  info@selmabacevac.comInstagram: @balkanmamatherapy________________________________________________________________Did you love this episode? BUY ME A COFFEE for support!Find me on Instagram@balkanina@mamaknowspodcastFind me on TikTokBalkaninaSubscribe to my NewsletterPrivate Facebook Motherhood-Podcast CommunityMama Knows FBDisclaimer: This podcast does not provide any medical advice, it is for informational purposes only!

The Decibel
The toll shooting war takes on photojournalists

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 20:33


Making a career out of holding a camera lens up to the frontlines of conflict, photojournalists can find themselves in tough - if not precarious - situations. The Globe's new documentary, Shooting War, features nine photographers known for their work in conflict zones.Santiago Lyon, featured in the documentary, worked with the Associated Press for 25 years covering conflicts around the world. He talks about the physical and mental toll capturing wartime images can take and the work he is doing now as the head of education at the Content Authenticity Initiative to counter misinformation.

Fuel the Fight
COL(P) Deydre Teyhen

Fuel the Fight

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 28:25


COL(P) Deydre Teyhen was born in Canton, Ohio and received her Bachelor of Arts in Sports Science at Ohio Wesleyan University. She earned her Master's Degree in Physical Therapy from the U.S. Army-Baylor University, completed her Ph.D. in Biomechanics from the University of Texas, and her Doctoral Degree in Physical Therapy from the Baylor University. COL(P) Teyhen graduated with honors from the U.S. Army War College with a Master's Degree in Strategic Studies.She currently serves as the Deputy Chief of Staff (Support), G-1/4/6, U.S. Army Medical Command and as the 20th Chief, U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps. COL(P) Teyhen most recently served as the Department of Defense Lead of Therapeutics for Operation Warp Speed at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Prior to joining HHS, she served as the Commander for Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the Department of Defense's largest biomedical research facility. COL(P) Teyhen led infectious disease, brain, and behavioral health research efforts; including research to prevent, detect, and treat COVID-19. Her previous assignments include Commander, U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks; Assistant Chief of Staff, Public Health at the Army's Office of the Surgeon General; Commander, Public Health Command Region-South; Deputy Director, Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center at Fort Detrick, MD; Associate Professor and Director of the center for Physical Therapy Research for the U.S. Army-Baylor University Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy at Fort Sam Houston, TX; Officer-in-Charge of Task Force 10 Delta Med in Al Kut, Iraq; Chief of Musculoskeletal Care Center and Chief of Physical Therapy at Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center, Fort Meade, MD; Chief of Outpatient Physical Therapy at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.; Chief of Physical Therapy, 21st Combat Support Hospital in Tuzla, Bosnia; and Physical Therapist at Darnall Army Community Hospital at Fort Hood, TX.COL(P) Teyhen's personal research portfolio focuses on Soldier health and medical readiness (public health, musculoskeletal medicine, behavioral health, resiliency, imaging, and technology). Her research accomplishments include over 210 peer-reviewed publications, editorials, book chapters, and published abstracts; 120 presentations at conferences; and 150 invited lectures.Her key military awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (3OLC), the Army Medical Department's Order of Military Medical Merit, the Surgeon General's “A” Proficiency Designator, and the U.S. Army War College Commandant's Award for Distinction in Research. Key civilian awards include Dissertation Award from the University of Texas, the American Physical Therapy Association, Margaret L. Moore Award for Outstanding New Academic Faculty Member, and inducted into the Kinesiology and Health Education Distinguished Alumna Hall of Honor, University of Texas.

The History of Yugoslav Football Podcast
Episode Seventy Six - Bombs Over Belgrade Part One

The History of Yugoslav Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 30:21


After Slovenia came Croatia. After Croatia came Bosnia. After Bosnia would come Kosovo.

Soul Search - ABC RN
New lease on life – Korean Buddhist arhats, and a Bosnian Muslim celebrates Eid

Soul Search - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 54:04


In what could be described as Korea's ‘terracotta warrior' moment, a farmer digging in a vacant field discovered scores of stone statues depicting arhats – or disciples of the Buddha. Unearthed from their hiding place, the Arhats now part of a luscious display touring around the world. In Sydney, a Bosnian refugee describes how she fled war in her home country and built a new life for herself after coming to Australia.

Amateur Traveler Travel Podcast
AT#711 - Travel to Bosnia (Repeat)

Amateur Traveler Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 61:47


Hear about travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina as the Amateur Traveler talks to Kenan from Highlander Adventures about his country.

Gem City Diversity
Youth Speak: Ajna, Aldin, and Nicholas

Gem City Diversity

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 3:22


In this episode, Ajna talks with Aldin and Nicholas about the differences between high school in Bosnia and the US. They discuss their experiences in high school, and how their schools differ. 

RøverRadion
Soldaten og Røvern

RøverRadion

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 35:50


#S6E13. Det er vanlig å sammenlikne aktive kriminelle med soldater. Media snakker for eksempel om gjengkrig, og fremstiller de ulike partene som grupperinger som kjemper for sitt område. Men hvor likt er livet på gata det egentlige soldatlivet? For å finne ut av dette har Røverne i Eidsberg fengsel invitert inn Sersjantmajor Rune Wenneberg. Han har studert militærfag og har vært kompanisjef i Telemark Bataljonen og har deltatt i militære operasjoner i Libanon, Bosnia, Kosovo, Irak og Afghanistan.Musikken i RøverRadions podkast er laga av Trond Kallevåg.RøverRadion er en veldedig organisasjon. Følg oss på Twitter, Facebook og Instagram, og gå på Røverhuset.no for å finne ut hvordan du kan støtte.

Amanpour
Remembering Madeleine Albright

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 56:27


Today the heights of Washington paid tribute to a titan of American diplomacy, as presidents and diplomats past and present gathered at the funeral of Madeleine Albright, the first female secretary of state. Instrumental in leading the U.S. and NATO allies to ending the genocide in Bosnia, she was the one who termed America the indispensable nation. Active and incisive to the last, in February - just one month before her death - Albright wrote an essay in the New York Times about Putin and Ukraine, warning that "invading Ukraine would ensure Mr. Putin's infamy by leaving his country diplomatically isolated, economically crippled and strategically vulnerable in the face of a stronger, more united Western alliance." At 84, she was prescient as ever, and President Biden paid tribute to this trailblazing woman at today's funeral. Christiane was also in attendance, so we take a look back at some of her interviews with Secretary Albright, which could scarcely be more relevant today.  Also in today's episode: US Ambassador Michael Carpenter, Russian economist Sergei Guriev, author Juliette Kayyem.   To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Blue Testament: for Sporting KC fans
Robert Voloder: "I want to show all the KC fans what I'm capable of."

The Blue Testament: for Sporting KC fans

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 16:20


At just 20-years-old, Robert Voloder has already had an interesting journey to MLS. Up to this point, not much was known about him and he was a bit mysterious to us. Even Sporting KC staff told us they were eager to learn more about him from this interview! He's a rather serious guy and is clearly wise beyond his years. But Cody & Thad get the SKC centerback to open up and have fun talking about the temptation of American food and the biggest crowds he's every played in front of.. by far. "Robbie", as his teammates call him, has appeared for both the Bosnia & Herzegovina and Germany youth national teams. We ask him just how closely he remains in contact with the German ranks. Might he get another opportunity soon? Voloder's English is very strong, but we learn that the youngster speaks several languages as well. The young German says he's beefed up since arriving, as is required for the physicality of MLS. He's blown away by the facilities & amenities with SKC. "Disciplined" is a great word to describe Voloder. He loves BBQ and the food here, but avoids temptation. He is always calm, even when subbing on as an emergency replacement in the 5th minute. He keeps it simple. "Just do your thing. Don't think about much. Prove to them what you can do." We loved talking to Robbie and think Sporting KC fans will enjoy getting to know him. Especially if he keeps those clean sheets coming. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Univision Reporta
La segunda fase de la guerra en Ucrania

Univision Reporta

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 24:17


Se acerca el 9 de mayo, una fecha de orgullo para los rusos porque se conmemora el Día de la Victoria ante los nazis. Los expertos coinciden en que ese día Vladimir Putin va a querer exhibir una victoria ante Ucrania para celebrar.  Nada sugiere que esta guerra llegará pronto a su fin.Vamos a platicar con Richard D. Downie, quien es experto en la materia, para entender el nuevo panorama. Downie fue Coronel en la Infantería y fue Oficial del Área Extranjera, por más de 28 años. Estuvo en la guerra de Panamá y en la de Bosnia, fue agregado de Defensa en México, fue comandante del Instituto de Cooperación para la Seguridad Hemisférica y dirigió el Centro de Estudios Hemisféricos de Defensa en Washington DC.

The Frankie Boyer Show
Jennifer Beever, Ella Čolić, and Matt Blashaw for Propane.com and Earth Day

The Frankie Boyer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 39:36


Frankie's Guests include B2B marketing consultant Jennifer Beever, young author Ella Čolić with new book about the Bosnian War that share similarities with kids feeing the Ukraine War right now, and HGTV and DIY Network's Matt Blashaw.Jennifer Beever is the original B2B Chief Marketing Officer for Hire for geeks, scientists and engineers. As a marketing consultant, she provides strategic marketing advice, plans and marketing implementation for businesses that want to grow faster. Jennifer has a unique ability to quickly assess business opportunities and create strategic marketing plans and tactics to achieve results. https://www.newincite.com/Ella Čolić is author of Trees without Roots, a book about two child Bosnian refugees coming from a mixed-religious background. Although her literary credentials are not extensive, her young age and interest provides a new outlook into the historical world of her family and culture. Inspired by her Justice Immersion trip to Tanzania and living with the Maasai community as well as other forms of social justice activism, Ella plans to pursue a career into reconstructive surgery, focusing on the humanitarian aspect of the medical field.https://treeswithoutroots.com/Matt Blashaw, Construction Expert joins the program to discuss ways Propane.com is helping our world. In celebration of Earth Day, Matt talks about the benefits of propane gas - "The more diverse America's energy mix is, the more reliable it is. Propane helps make families and businesses more secure.https://www.hgtv.com/shows/build-it-forward

Be Brave at Work
Episode 208: Phil Johnson

Be Brave at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 21:18


Join us on Be Brave at Work as we speak with Phil Johnson. Phil's first 20 years as an executive began in the semiconductor industry. For the past 21 years, he has been an executive coach, teacher and mentor dedicated to helping executives and organizations BET ON THEMSELVES by developing their emotional intelligence. As Founder and CEO of the Master of Business Leadership program, Phil offers members the opportunity for an EXTRAORDINARY life filled with EXPONENTIAL success. MBL program alumni are living in the US, Canada, UK, Europe, Japan, Germany, Bosnia, Africa, Australia, the Middle East and Saudi Arabia. Links of Interest LinkedIn Website Phil Johnson on Amazon A special thank you to our sponsor, Cabot Risk Strategies. For more information, please visit them at CabotRisk.com Please click the button to subscribe so you don't miss any episodes and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you! More information about Ed, visit Excellius.com © 2022 Ed Evarts

CounterVortex Podcast
CounterVortex Episode 120: Against Chomsky

CounterVortex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 40:50


In Episode 120 of the CounterVortex podcast, Bill Weinberg invites the enmity of his comrades on the left with a long-overdue deconstruction of the increasingly sinister, genocide-abetting politics of Noam Chomsky. In relentless sycophantic interviews, Chomsky inevitably opposes a no-fly zone for Ukraine, war crimes charges against Putin, or even sanctions against Russia, on the grounds that such moves would lead to nuclear war. He offers no acknowledgment of how capitulating to Putin's nuclear threats incentivizes such threats, and the stockpiling of the missiles and warheads to back them up. This is part of a long pattern with Chomsky. He has repeatedly engaged in baseless "false flag" theorizing about the Syria chemical attacks, leading activists in the Arab world to accuse him of "regime whitewashing." He similarly abetted Bosnia genocide revisionism and denial of the genocides in Rwanda and Cambodia. All this can be traced to the analytical and ultimately moral distortions of the so-called "Chomsky rule"—the notion that we are only allowed to criticize crimes committed by "our" side. Listen on SoundCloud or via Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/countervortex Production by Chris Rywalt We ask listeners to donate just $1 per weekly podcast via Patreon -- or $2 for our new special offer! We now have 32 subscribers. If you appreciate our work, please become Number 33!

KUCI: Film School
The White Fortress (Tabija) / Film School Radio interview with Director Igor Drljača

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022


THE WHITE FORTRESS (TABIJA) stars Pavle Čemerkić as Faruk. He is an orphan who lives with his ill grandmother in the rundown Sarajevo suburb of Alipasino Polje. Faruk and spends his days foraging for scrap metal and dabbling in petty crime. One day he meets Mona, a timid teen from a politically powerful and affluent family. As Mona dreams of escaping the overbearing toxicity of her home life, she seeks refuge and opens herself up to Faruk, a boy from a world entirely different than her own  THE WHITE FORTRESS was Bosnia and Herzegovina's Best International Feature Film selection to represent them at the 94th Academy Awards. The film is a Canada/Bosnia co-production feature that had its World Premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival as part of its Generation 14 plus section. The cast also includes Jasmin Geljo, Kerim Čutuna, Alban Ukaj and Irena Mulamuhić. Director and writer Igor Drljača joins us for a conversation on the declining quality of life that has come with fewer and fewer job opportunities in his hometown of Sarajevo, working with professional and non-professional actors and striking the right storytelling balance between despair and resiliency. To watch go to: gametheoryfilms.com/tabija To find out more go to: igordrljaca.com

Veteran Voices
Having the Wherewithal to Look Out for Yourself with John Freeman

Veteran Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 64:27


In this interview, Veteran Voices host Mary Kate Soliva welcomes John Freeman, a U.S. Army Veteran and Director of Law Enforcement Operations at the Human Trafficking Institute. After being raised in a military family, he became a combat paratrooper and went on to serve and work in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Kuwait, Bosnia, Panama, St. Criox, Nigeria, and Korea. It was while working as a Special Agent for the U.S. State Department in Korea as part of a visa/passport fraud detection unit that he came across a connection between many of the people they were investigating – just 5 IP addresses. It ended up being a crucial missing link between Korean organized crime and human trafficking. He had found the cause that would drive his work going forward. Mary Kate and John take this opportunity to discuss: • The surprise at finding himself on humanitarian missions while in the Army • Why transitioning out of the military can create such a feeling of insecurity and instability for Veterans • Just how pervasive and close to home the problem of human trafficking is today Additional Links & Resources: Learn more about Veteran Voices here: https://supplychainnow.com/program/veteran-voices Subscribe to Veteran Voices and other Supply Chain Now programs here: https://supplychainnow.com/subscribe Learn more about Vets2Industry: https://vets2industry.org/ This episode was hosted by Mary Kate Soliva. For additional information, please visit our dedicated show page at: https://supplychainnow.com/wherewithal-look-yourself-vv56

Bosnia and Herzegovina:  The Quest for Change
The Strategizing Continues Over How to Expand The Newly Formed Coalition The Country

Bosnia and Herzegovina: The Quest for Change

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 40:43


There are ongoing discussions within the Platform for Progress on how to expand the newly formed coalition, The Country. The coalition represents six political parties, which was spearheaded by the Platform for Progress, in an effort to form a united front to challenge the ruling nationalist parties. Platform president, Mirsad Hadžikadić, will be the presidential candidate for The Country in this year's general election in October. He and I recently spoke about the ongoing efforts to expand the coalition and the daily strategizing needed in preparation for the elections. Which, in his words, are incredibly important and crucial, in determining the future of Bosnia and Herzegovina, during these very troubling times.

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
55. Going Boldly: Military Thinking withScience Fiction

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 43:53


To Boldy Go, edited by COL Jonathan Klug and Steven Leonard, and published by Casemate Publishers in 2021, is subtitled “Leadership, Strategy, and Conflict in the 21st Century and Beyond.” Army Mad Scientist’s The Convergence podcasters Luke Shabro and Matthew Santaspirt explore how science fiction can inform the Army about the Operational Environment and the changing character of warfare with the books co-editors and contributors:COL Jonathan Klug is a U.S. Army Strategist serving as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Strategy, Planning, and Operations at the U.S. Army War College. Commissioned as an Armor officer, he served in Haiti, Bosnia, South Korea, Egypt, and Iraq. His strategy assignments included writing U.S. Army, U.S. Joint, and NATO Joint counter-insurgency doctrine; teaching at the U.S. Air Force Academy and the U.S. Naval Academy; serving as V Corps Deputy Plans and Strategy Officer; and strategic planning in the NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan, International Security Assistance Force Joint Command, and Operation Resolute Support Headquarters. He holds degrees from the U.S. Military Academy, Louisiana State University, and the U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies. He is a PhD candidate in Military and Naval History at the University of New Brunswick. COL Klug co-edited To Boldly Go and co-authored “Yours is the Superior” with Steven Leonard (below), and contributed “You Rebel Scum!” and “To Live and Die at My Command.” Steven Leonard is an award-winning faculty member at the University of Kansas, where he chairs graduate programs in Organizational Leadership and Supply Chain Management. As a former military strategist and the creative force behind the defense microblog Doctrine Man, he is a career writer and speaker with a passion for developing and mentoring the next generation of thought leaders. He is a senior fellow at the Modern War Institute at West Point; the co-founder of the national security blog Divergent Options; co-founder and board member of the Military Writers Guild; and a member of the editorial review board of the Arthur D. Simons Center‘s Interagency Journal. He is the author, co-author, or editor of five books, numerous professional articles, countless blog posts, and is a prolific military cartoonist. Mr. Leonard co-edited To Boldly Go and co-authored “Yours is the Superior” with COL Klug (above), and contributed “Beware the Beast Man” and “The Mirror Crack’d.”

Veterans In Politics by CampaignForce
Jody Mitic- Canadian Master Sniper, former Ottawa City Councillor

Veterans In Politics by CampaignForce

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 57:39


Veterans In Politics- Season 4, Episode 9  with  Jody MiticJody Mitic is a Master Sniper, double amputee and former Ottawa City Councillor.  He's also our very first guest from Canada and super cool guy!  He starred in The Amazing Race Canada,  and is the author of Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper.  It's a great read!I was introduced to Jody via a mutual veteran friend on LinkedIn.  We soon had a FaceTime and talked for hours!  I had to get him on the show.  We talk about his service in Bosnia, Afghanistan and in politics too.  This includes the moment he got wounded in action, losing both of his legs, and the challenges of his own recovery that followed.He is a super driven guy, family man and so open.  The synergies between the UK and Canada are evident, and the brotherhood of shared service and values strong.  You will love this chat.See Jody's book here: Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper: Amazon.co.uk: Mitic, Jody: 9781476795119: BooksNOTE- Please rate us on Apple Podcasts, donate or become our mate on our website HERE:  Donate - CampaignForce

Latter Day Lives - Talking with Latter Day Saints
Ep. 207 - Dejan Tahic - Leaving War-Torn Bosnia As A Teenage Refugee

Latter Day Lives - Talking with Latter Day Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 45:16


Dejan Tahic was a young teen when his native country of Bosnia erupted in war. He and his sister fled as refugees. This later led to Dejan reuniting with his parents, and moving to Canada where he finds a new life, an eternal love, and the restored gospel of Jesus Christ.

Backcountry BSing
Backcountry BSing #93 - Colonel Jon "Ice" Eisberg

Backcountry BSing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 112:45


Colonel Eisberg began his military career in the Navy in 1989 as an Anti-Submarine Warfare Sensor Operator, and Naval Aircrewman/ Helicopter Rescue Swimmer, and has since served a variety of positions within the US Army, including tours in both Bosnia and Afghanistan. We sit down and discuss a variety of topics including backpacking with children, his past service in the military, the current conflict in Ukraine (the main focus of our conversation), and his thoughts on recent UFO admissions by the pentagon. We had a fantastic time talking, and it was great to get expert opinions on the conflicts happening in Europe. Thanks for joining Colonel! And thank you for your service. Thank You to this episode's sponsor -artofthetrek.com

Interesting If True
Interesting If True - Episode 90: Take Me Out!

Interesting If True

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 31:01


Welcome to Interesting If True, the podcast that kills, poorly. I'm your host this week, Shea, and with me are: I'm Aaron, and this week I learned that I won't be leaving here with you… Oh, I know, I won't be leaving… here… with… you. This is the story of the most botched successful assassination ever. We're gonna start with the most badass-sounding secret society ever, no not the Skull and Bones, the Black Hand! The Black Hand, I'm a comic and superhero nerd so I get images of a clandestine cult of professional assassins and spies. According to the Elder Scrolls, they are the ruling party of the Dark Brotherhood, a group of elite assassins and spies, pretty much exactly as I picture them. In the real world though, the Black Hand was a Serbian secret terrorist organization that was formed days after Austria annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1908 when a group of Serbian ministers and officials met, angry with Austria and planned to win their country back. Well, I guess they started as Narodna Odbrana (National Defense) and a few years later 10 members made a super double secret organization within the National Defense called Ujedinjenje ili Smrt (Union or Death), also known as The Black Hand. By 1914, there were several hundred members, perhaps as many as 2500. Many members were Serbian army officers. The professed goal of the group was the creation of a Greater Serbia, by use of violence, if necessary. The Black Hand trained guerillas and saboteurs and arranged political murders. The Black Hand was organized at the grassroots level in 3 to 5-member cells. Above them were district committees. Above them, was the Central committee in Belgrade. At the top was the ten-member Executive Committee led, more or less, by Colonial Dragutin Dimitrijevic, (also known as Apis ). Members rarely knew much more than the members of their own cell and one superior above them, to ensure that the group's leaders would remain secret. New members swore "...before God, on my honor and my life, that I will execute all missions and commands without question. I swear before God, on my honor, and on my life, that I will take all the secrets of this organization into my grave with me." If you are as old as Steve, that date might stick out to you because you love watching old World War 1 documentaries. This is the year the first great war starts and if you pay attention to the documentaries you may also remember the Black Hand, the jackasses that started it. If you aren't an old man really into war documentaries you will recall from high school history the name Franz Ferdinand and how his assassination was the shot heard around the world, you might not know how difficult the shot was to take. A bit of back history in case you don't remember anything from high school. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, visited Sarajevo to commemorate Bosnia's induction into the empire on June 28th, 1914. A group of Serbian rebels learned of his plans and decided to assassinate the archduke to protest Bosnia's inclusion in the empire, feeling Bosnia should be part of a unified Serbian federal nation instead. The Serbian rebels, of course, were the Black Hand. The Black Hand, you'd think, would be a competent double super-secret society because they were made up of many Serbian military officers but you'd be wrong. It took 4 attempts and the final was pure luck. There were 7 assassins hired to kill Franz, all were amateurs and at least two had tuberculosis. Why they didn't use a member with some military background is beyond me… The asses, sorry assassins were each given a gun or a bomb and a small vial of cyanide in case they got caught. Some were given a small amount of training in the month leading up to the visit but not really much more than that. Franz Ferdinand accepted an invitation from Bosnia's governor, General Oskar Potoirek,

The John Batchelor Show
#Balkans: Political actors in Hungary, Serbia, Bosnia, France, favored by Moscow. Ivana Stradner @ivanastradner , advisor to @FDD Eastern Europe, cybersecurity, information operations, Russia's reflexive control, intl law.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 13:15


Photo:   Women selling poultry at the market, Krusevac, Serbia. Autochrome from Albert Kahn's Archives de la planète. #Balkans: Political actors in Hungary, Serbia, Bosnia, France, favored by Moscow. Ivana Stradner @ivanastradner,  advisor to @FDD  Eastern Europe, cybersecurity, information operations, Russia's reflexive control, intl law. https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/putin-is-making-inroads-into-europe

Popular Front
149. Is a New Conflict Coming to Bosnia?

Popular Front

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 56:27


We speak to journalist Mitchell Prothero about what some people are saying is the most potential for conflict in Bosnia since the 90s war. - www.patreon.com/popularfront - www.popularfront.co - www.twitter.com/jake_hanrahan - www.instagram.com/popular.front

Coaching Call
S3 Ep# 2 Phil Johnson: Founder & CEO ★ Master of Business Leadership Program ★ Executive Coach, Teacher & Mentor

Coaching Call

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 51:27


My guest today is Phil Johnson, Phil helps powerful people remember just how powerful they are. He leads from the front having spent the past 54 years on his own personal journey and the past 21 years as an executive coach, teacher and mentor. Phil is the founder of Master of Business Leadership program, where he helps extraordinary people become extraordinary leaders. Phil helps his clients see what they cannot see. Life-changing insights offer the potential for an exponential life filled with exponential success. There are MBL alumni in the US, Canada, UK, Europe, Japan, Germany, Bosnia, Africa, Australia, the Middle East and Saudi Arabia. Contact Phil: https://www.linkedin.com/in/philipjpjohnson/ If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a short review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really helps. If you enjoyed this episode buy me a cup of coffee, make it a large: I'm trying to keep this episode free of advertisements and could use your help with the cost of bringing your this fun and entertaining podcast. Anything you can donate to the cause is greatly appreciated. To donate go to: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/sifuRafael Subscribe: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coaching-call/id1546026323 Please leave a star rating and a review here Follow Coaching Call: Facebook: facebook.com/coachingcall Instagram: instagram.com/coachingcall Email: maxfitness@optonline.net LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maxfitness Youtube: https://bit.ly/coachingcallYoutube to watch the full interview. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coachingcall/message

Corriere Daily
Trent'anni fa Sarajevo, oggi l'Ucraina: quando la guerra insanguina l'Europa

Corriere Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 12:27


Nell'aprile del 1992 iniziava il terribile assedio alla città della Bosnia, che sarebbe diventata il simbolo del terribile conflitto nei Balcani. Insieme a Marzio G. Mian, Francesco Battistini (che era là in quei giorni ed era a Kiev lo scorso 24 febbraio, quando Putin ha dato il via all'invasione) analizza le somiglianze e le differenze fra due pagine di storia che il Vecchio continente pensava di non dover mai più rivivere.Per altri approfondimenti:- Aleksandar Hemon: “E' in atto un genocidio: il popolo ucraino distrutto come fu in Bosnia” https://bit.ly/3LOc1Um- “Maledetta Sarajevo”, la città e le sue ferite nel libro di Francesco Battistini e Marzio G. Mian https://bit.ly/3jgJJpi- Perché il consenso per Putin è salito all'83% https://bit.ly/3JgHdKg

World in Progress | Deutsche Welle
World in Progress: High time to act

World in Progress | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 29:58


There's tension in the air in Bosnia and Herzegovina – especially older people who've lived through the war are concerned. Where is the country headed? It's high time to act, warns the UN in its latest climate report. A theater troupe in Kenya is trying to do their bit by bringing together villagers to come up with solutions.

The Daily
Why Proving War Crimes Is Difficult and Rare

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 31:59


This episode details graphic scenes. Many around the world are calling the indiscriminate attacks on civilians in Bucha, a suburb northwest of the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, a war crime.But investigating such atrocities is painstakingly complicated. Could one case that resulted in convictions — the genocide in Bosnia in the 1990s — offer lessons on how to proceed?Guest: Roger Cohen, the Paris bureau chief for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: With Russian forces retreating, Ukrainians in Bucha are finding scores of bodies in yards and on the roads amid mounting evidence of intentional and indiscriminate killings.The images from Bucha spurred Western leaders to promise even tougher sanctions against Russia.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
March 26, 2022 - PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 26:34


On this edition for Saturday, March 26, Joe Biden speaks out against the war while in Poland today as Russian airstrikes of Ukrainian cities continue, ethnic divisions are re-emerging in Bosnia 30 years after the region's deadly war, and, a rich tradition of Black visual and textile art in Alabama finally gains recognition. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Bosnia became independent 30 years ago, but divisions in the region remain

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 11:01


Bosnia and Herzegovina was created in 1992 from the remains of the former Yugoslavia, setting off a sectarian war in which Serb forces committed genocide against Muslims, known as Bosniaks. While the war ended 30 years ago, as Special Correspondent Kira Kay reports, ominous sectarian tensions remain. The story is part of our ongoing initiative, 'Exploring Hate: antisemitism, racism and extremism,' and is produced in partnership with New York University's Global Beat program. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 3/22/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 111:29


On Tuesday's Mark Levin Show, Putin distributed a clear-eyed look at his goals to restore the ancient Russian Empire (Rus). Putin believes that Kyiv is the mother of all cities and brings together Lithuania, Bosnia, Latvia, Ukraine, and other former Soviet states that, at the time in the 4th Century, shared a common language and faith. Putin claims that Polandization and Latinization have impacted this culture over the centuries and intimates that this must be reversed. In response, Zelensky has shut down several political parties and newspapers to retaliate against Ukrainians that embrace the Russian language and culture that Putin espouses. Lincoln did similar during the Civil War to keep America whole during the first battle of Bull Run. Then, Zelensky banned antisemitism in Ukraine yet is still blamed for being a neo-Nazi because the Azov Battalion has been hired to fight pro-Russian forces. The Nazi narrative is a propaganda effort from the Kremlin. Later, on the second day of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Supreme Court confirmation hearing, she's indicated that she's contained to the text of the Constitution. Judge Jackson dodged a question on substantive due process revealing her bent as a judicial activist.

Those Conspiracy Guys
The Mystery of The Pyramids

Those Conspiracy Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 325:32


On this episode we casually hold our hand over our brow as we inquisitively stare into the glare of the midday sun; searching for an ancient truth in a barren land and uncovering possibly the ultimate mysteries of our creation, our civilisation and the nature of our planet in this episode all about The Mystery of the Pyramids. From the classic pyramid on the Giza plateau in Egypt to the buried pyramids under the lush undulating hills of Bosnia, the wide sprawling once thriving civilisations in deepest South American jungles or the diligently preserved and revered monasteries and holy structures in Asia; the pyramid has endured as a symbol of a time that came before and a way of life for humanity that has been forgotten. These fantastic structures have withstood the test of time; of war, greed, and wanton destruction; only to leave behind a mystery that is almost unfathomable. The clues found in these wonders of the world, are the steps closer we desperately want to take in fully understand where we can from and what our purpose is. Clues like the sacred geometry found in the great pyramid of Khufu; or the ancient carvings on walls long left untouched by human hands. These mega structures are found all over the globe and they hold great significance to our current age by communicating through the universal language of mathematics and showing us that a once presumed primitive people, were actually much more advanced than ever thought possible. With measurements that depict the astrological distances of the sun, moon and stars and even some other very complicated scientific concepts; these megalithic measurement markers are a definite proof of the existence of ancient civilisations much more advanced that we thought.  More mysterious still are the newly minted concepts of an even more ancient civilisation than the Egyptians, who created the pyramids and the thriving civilisations that built them. The Giza pyramids and The Sphinx showing signs of a much older creation date; mean that there is a hidden history of the human species and the power that these ancient people created is still present in our modern world. _____________________ This podcast is supported by the generous donations of the wonderful folks over at Patreon. If you want to support the show and get exclusive content, ad-free episodes, access to live chats and private social media like Instagram and Discord and a whole load of other stuff click here http://bit.ly/TCG-Patreon If you want to follow TCG on social platforms including the Discord, watch video versions of the livestream podcast and documentaries; or even join in on live chats about current events; buy TCG merch; get notifications of and buy tickets to upcoming live stage shows in the UK and Ireland or to just support the show on Patreon; all the links, info and instructions you can find by clicking this link http://www.taplink.cc/thoseconspiracyguys Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices