Podcast appearances and mentions of Booker Prize

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Latest podcast episodes about Booker Prize

Stories Behind the Story with Better Reading
Booker Prize-winning author George Saunders: on his first short story collection in 10 years

Stories Behind the Story with Better Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 32:44


One of Cheryl's all-time favourite guests, Booker Prize-winning author George Saunders, returns to discuss his first short story collection in 10 years, democracy, and how literature challenges a reader's point of view. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Books and Authors
A Good Read: Heidi Regan & Neil Delamere

Books and Authors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 27:48


Comedians Heidi Regan and Neil Delamere discuss their favourite all-time books with Harriett Gilbert. Heidi chooses a non-fiction book on the cult of positive thinking by the late Barbara Ehrenreich, called Smile or Die. Neil suggests a novel by Ronan Hession about two unambitious friends in their thirties; Leonard and Hungry Paul, and Harriett picks the novella Foster by Irish writer Claire Keegan, who has recently been nominated for the 2022 Booker Prize. Producer: Eliza Lomas for BBC Audio, Bristol Join the conversation on Instagram @agoodreadbbc

The Ezra Klein Show
George Saunders on the ‘Braindead Megaphone' That Makes Our Politics So Awful

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 62:22


George Saunders is regarded as one of our greatest living fiction writers. He won the Booker Prize in 2017 for his novel “Lincoln in the Bardo” and has published numerous short-story collections to wide acclaim, including his most recent book, “Liberation Day.” He also happens to be one of my favorite people to read and to talk to.Saunders is an incredibly prescient and sharp observer of American political culture. Way back in 2007, he argued that our media environment was transforming politics into a competition within which the loudest voices would command the most attention and set the agenda for everyone else. With the rise of social media — and the advent of the Trump era — that observation has been more than vindicated. So as we approach the midterm elections, I wanted to have Saunders back on the show to talk about how politics and media have changed, and how those changes are shaping the way we interact, communicate and even think.We discuss how Twitter takes advantage of — even warps — our “malleable” selves, how politicians like Marjorie Taylor Greene strategically manipulate our attentional environments, how Barack Obama leveraged our human desire to be seen as our best selves, whether discipline or gentleness is more effective in helping others grow, what options we have to resist anti-democratic tendencies in our politics, whether a post-scarcity future — with jobs for everyone — would leave us more or less satisfied, how the greatest evils can be committed by those trying to care for their loved ones, what attending Trump rallies taught Saunders about political violence and more.Mentioned:The Braindead Megaphone by George Saunders“Host” by David Foster Wallace“The Semplica-Girl Diaries” by George SaundersBullshit Jobs by David Graeber“What It Means to Be Kind in a Cruel World” by The Ezra Klein Show“I Didn't Want It to Be True, but the Medium Really Is the Message” by Ezra KleinBook Recommendations:The Storm Is Here by Luke MogelsonSugar Street by Jonathan DeeMarlena by Julie BuntinThoughts? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com. (And if you're reaching out to recommend a guest, please write  “Guest Suggestion” in the subject line.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Emefa Agawu, Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Mary Marge Locker. Original music by Isaac Jones. Mixing by Jeff Geld. Audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

Monocle 24: The Monocle Culture Show

Booker Prize winner George Saunders is a master of the short story form. His latest collection, ‘Liberation Day', contains nine tightly constructed tales that are underpinned by a sense of dystopia and the absurd. He joins Robert Bound to discuss the collection and what makes a great story.

Intelligence Squared
The Many Voices of Booker Prize Winner George Saunders

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 38:17


Sign up for Intelligence Squared Premium here: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/ for ad-free listening, bonus content, early access and much more. See below for details. Described as one of the most important and blazingly original writers of his generation, American author George Saunders is a master of the short story. He joins us on the podcast with critic John Self to discuss the voices that make up his insightful, hilarious and sometimes disturbing stories and how his work cuts into the absurdist experience of being human.  … We are incredibly grateful for your support. To become an Intelligence Squared Premium subscriber, follow the link: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/  Here's a reminder of the benefits you'll receive as a subscriber: Ad-free listening, because we know some of you would prefer to listen without interruption  One early episode per week Two bonus episodes per month A 25% discount on IQ2+, our exciting streaming service, where you can watch and take part in events live at home and enjoy watching past events on demand and without ads  A 15% discount and priority access to live, in-person events in London, so you won't miss out on tickets Our premium monthly newsletter  Intelligence Squared Merch Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Book Club Review
Bookshelf: Autumn reads

The Book Club Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 36:41


A stack of books for Autumn nights: Laura dives in to the page-turning but ‘questionable' Run by Anne Patchett, and is riveted by Gwendolyn Riley's My Phantoms, while all Kate can think about is mushrooms thanks to Merlin Sheldrake's Entangled Life. She's also been dipping into Empire of Pain author Patrick Radden Keefe's essay collection, Rogues.  Also discussed Amazon reviews vs. Goodreads, how ‘good but flawed' is often quite a good sign in a book-club read, the marketing history of quorn, how lucky we are not to be Carpenter ants, how surprised to we were to learn that the Dutch have mobsters, the emotional perils of reading too much fiction, and more… BOOKLIST Run by Anne Patchett Entangled Life by Merlin Sheldrake My Phantoms by Gwendolyn Riley Rogues by Patrick Radden-Keefe WHAT'S NEXT City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk The Marriage Portrait by Maggie O'Farrell Keep up with us between episodes on Instagram @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or drop us a line at thebookclubreview@gmail.com.  On the episode page on our website you'll find a transcript, full shownotes and a comments forum – let us know your thoughts on any of the books discussed in this episode, comments there go straight to our inboxes and we will reply. You can also browse our archive of past episodes, everything from Booker Prize specials to book club debates. And you can sign up to our bi-weekly ish newsletter for featured books, our tips for what to read next and our current reads.

Writers and Company from CBC Radio
Nick Drnaso captures modern anxieties with quiet brilliance in his acclaimed graphic novels

Writers and Company from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 54:52


Nick Drnaso is the first – and only – graphic novelist to be nominated for a Booker Prize for his 2018 title, Sabrina, which was hailed as a "masterpiece." Now he's back with an ambitious new work, Acting Class, in which ten characters sign up for an acting class at their local community centre, where nothing is quite what it seems. *Please note this conversation deals with abuse.

The Verb
The Verb Narrators

The Verb

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 44:14


How or what is the voice of the narrator, and what happens in a story when the narrator proves to be unreliable? Booker Prize winner Damon Glagut's novel The Promise toys with the idea of the narrator as different people at different times disorientating the reader and exposing the duplicity of the novel, poet Daniel's latest collection Single Window explores the 'I' in the poem and the poet, Sheen Patel's debut novel I Am A Fan is about an obsessed young woman and the unreliability of the internet and Prof. Mike Sharples is the author of Story Machines: How Computers Have Become Creative Writers. Presenter: Ian McMillan Producer: Cecile Wright

World Economic Forum
Shehan Karunatilaka

World Economic Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 32:21


In this episode, author Shehan Karunatilaka discusses the inspirations for his Booker Prize-winning novel The Seven Moons Of Maali Almeida. It tells the story of a Sri Lankan war photographer, who realises he's in a processing centre for souls in the afterlife and sets out to solve his own murder, which involves leading his friends to a box of incriminating photos under a bed. 

The Maris Review
Episode 180: Nick Drnaso

The Maris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 32:11


Nick Drnaso was born in 1989 in Palos Hills, Illinois. His debut, Beverly, received the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Best Graphic Novel. His followup, the graphic novel Sabrina, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2018 and received nominations for the Booker Prize, the Eisner Award, the LD and LaVerne Harrell Clark Fiction Prize, the Orwell Prize for Political Fiction, and the New York Public Library's Young Lions Award. Sabrina has been published in fifteen countries. Drnaso lives in Chicago with his wife and their two cats. Recommended Reading: The Third Person by Emma Grove • Our Little Secret by Emily Carrington Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Books On The Go
Ep 223: Classic Crime books by Margery Allingham

Books On The Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 24:44


Anna and Annie discuss the Booker Prize winner, The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Shehan Karunatilaka. In Keep or Cull, Anna culls Mrs March by Virginia Feito and Annie keeps Seeing Other People by Diana Reid. Our books of the week are Sweet Danger and Death of a Ghost by Margery Allingham, one of the queens of classic crime. Both books feature gentleman sleuth Albert Campion. Described as 'addictive as cocaine' (Independent), Agatha Christie said 'Margery Allingham stands out like a shining light.'   Coming up: Real Bad Things by Kelly J Ford and The Marriage Portrait by Maggie O'Farrell. Follow us! Instagram: @abailliekaras and @mr_annie Email: booksonthegopodcast@gmail.com Facebook: Books On The Go Twitter: @abailliekaras and @mister_annie Credits Artwork: Sascha Wilkosz

KQED’s Forum
George Saunders on his New Collection of Short Stories, 'Liberation Day'

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 55:34


George Saunders is widely considered one of the greatest fiction writers alive, attested to by all the prizes, the respect of other writers, and even book sales. He's got his first book of short stories in a decade. It's called Liberation Day, and it will surprise no one that it is a brilliant work filled with generosity, pain, and characters who can't quite answer the door when honesty comes knocking. The book affirms that lurking in every office, off every highway, underneath the ground, there are humans, and so there are stories. Forum talks to George Saunders about his new book, the changing political climate for fiction, and the magic of short stories. Guests: George Saunders, writer, MacArthur "genius" and Booker Prize winner, "Liberation Day: Stories"

Writers and Company from CBC Radio
Ian McEwan on private lives, global events and the accidents of fortune that shape us

Writers and Company from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 64:27


One of Britain's leading novelists, Ian McEwan is the author of such acclaimed works as the Booker Prize-winning Amsterdam and the hugely popular Atonement, which was made into an Oscar-nominated movie. Now, he's back with Lessons, a story about a fictional alter-ego, Roland, with whom McEwan shares an intimate background -- until a transformative event leads Roland down a very different path. Ian McEwan spoke to Eleanor Wachtel onstage before a live audience at the Toronto International Festival of Authors.

RTÉ - Arena Podcast
Booker prize winner Shehan Karunatilaka - John McLachlan celebrates Leland Bardwell - New albums

RTÉ - Arena Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 43:38


The winner of this year's Booker Prize for Literature was Sri Lankan writer, Shehan Karunatilaka - John McLachlan celebrates his mother, the poet Leland Bardwell - New albums by Aoife Neasa Frances, The Mary Wallopers, and Babyface.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Guest: Sri Lankan Author Shehan Karunatilaka to discuss the 2022 Booker Prize winner ‘The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida'. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sydney Writers' Festival
Julian Barnes: Elizabeth Finch

Sydney Writers' Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 54:36


Booker Prize-winning British author Julian Barnes returns to Sydney Writers' Festival to introduce his latest novel, Elizabeth Finch. Charting the story of a remarkable teacher through the recollections of a former student, the book has been hailed as a loving tribute to philosophy, a careful evaluation of history and an invitation to think for ourselves. Julian appeared live via video at the 2022 Festival, in conversation with host of ABC Radio National's The Book Show Claire Nichols, to discuss how questions of love, friendship and biography are woven through the story and his broader body of work, including Flaubert's Parrot and The Sense of an Ending. Sydney Writers' Festival podcasts are available on all major podcast platforms. If you enjoyed this episode, please rate and subscribe to our channel.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Song Exploder
Book Exploder: George Saunders - Victory Lap

Song Exploder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 18:52 Very Popular


George Saunders has won the Booker Prize, and he's the recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant. He won the Folio Prize for his collection of short stories, Tenth of December, which includes the short story “Victory Lap.” In this episode, Susan and George talk about a passage from “Victory Lap.” “Victory Lap” is about two teenagers, Alison and Kyle, and what happens when a stranger tries to abduct Alison. In his conversation with Susan, George discusses a passage from the light-hearted opening of the story, before it takes its darker turn. For more, visit bookexploder.com/episodes/george-saunders.

Uncorking a Story
Mysterious Ways, with Kamila Shamsie

Uncorking a Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 43:20


U2's seminal album Achtung Baby was released during my senior year in high school. At the time, I was a huge fan and didn't know what to make of this new release as it was so different from their earlier work. Once I heard the song Mysterious Ways, though, I really started to dig what I was hearing. I can honestly say I love that album even more today than I did back then. What's the connection between U2's Mysterious Ways and today's guest Kamila Shamsie, well, you will just have to listen to find out! Meet Kamila Shamsie: Kamila Shamsie is the author of several novels, including Home Fire, which won the Women's Prize for Fiction, was longlisted for the Booker Prize, and was a finalist for the International Dublin Literary Award, among other honors. She recently joined me to talk about her career and latest novel, Best of Friends. Key Topics: How she pursued writing as a career even though it took five books before she could earn a living by being an author. Why she was inspired to write about childhood friendships in her latest novel, Best of Friends. How the America she envisioned while growing up in Pakistan did not live up to the expectations she had watching pirated videotapes as a child. Why would she tell her younger self to take more risks.  “Having complete control over what you are writing also means having complete responsibility. And that can be terrifying.” — Kamila Shamise Buy Best of Friends Amazon: https://amzn.to/3SFpTE4 Bookshop.org: https://bookshop.org/a/54587/9780593421826 Connect with Kamila Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kshamsie/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kamilashamsie Connect with Mike Website: https://uncorkingastory.com/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSvS4fuG3L1JMZeOyHvfk_g Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/uncorkingastory/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/uncorkingastory Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/uncorkingastory LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/uncorking-a-story/ If you like this episode, please share it with a friend. If you have not done so already, please rate and review Uncorking a Story on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Monocle 24: The Globalist
Tuesday 25 October

Monocle 24: The Globalist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:00


We report on Rishi Sunak becoming the next UK prime minister. Plus: global efforts to reconstruct Ukraine, Malaysia prepares to go to the polls, and Booker Prize winner George Saunders on his new collection of short stories. 

Red Hot Chilli Writers
Episode 85 - Claire McGowan, David Beckler, The Booker Prize, and Ireland's 'vanishing triangle' disappearances

Red Hot Chilli Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 39:34


In this episode we chat to crime writers Claire McGowan and David Beckler, discuss the Sri Lankan winner of this year's Booker Prize, and reflect on Ireland's infamous 'vanishing triangle' disappearances of women in the 1990s.

RNZ: Saturday Morning
NZ can claim some of Booker Prize winner's success

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 22:30


The dead do tell tales: sometimes they are the only ones who can speak to the living about the costs of civil war, terror and corruption. Sri Lankan writer Shehan Karunatilaka won the Man Booker Prize on Monday for his second novel The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida. In it the ghost of a dead war photographer tells the tale of a mission to solve his own murder. The judges unanimously gave the novel one of the most prestigious awards in literature, describing it as "an entirely serious philosophical romp that takes the reader to 'the world's dark heart'." Karunatilaka himself escaped some of the worst of Sri Lanka's civil war, spending time in New Zealand at Whanganui Collegiate and Massey University. The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida will be available widely here in December.

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
'A murder mystery and a ghost story' about Sri Lanka's civil war wins Booker Prize

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022


Shehan Karunatilaka, author of "The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida," is winner of the 2022 Booker Prize. Karunatilaka talked with The World's host Marco Werman about the ways in which Sri Lanka's grim history of civil war — along with a bit of "gallows humor" — shaped the ideas in his award-winning novel.

The Maris Review
Episode 178: George Saunders

The Maris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 32:45


George Saunders is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eleven books, including A Swim in a Pond in the Rain; Lincoln in the Bardo, which won the Booker Prize; Congratulations, by the Way; Tenth of December, and The Braindead Megaphone. He teaches in the creative writing program at Syracuse University. His newest story collection is called Liberation Day. Recommended Reading: The Storm Is Here by Luke Mogelson The Book of Night Women by Marlon James Insurrections by Rion Amilcar Scott White Cat, Black Dog by Kelly Link Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PRI's The World
Liz Truss is out. What's next for Britain?

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 47:50


Just 44 days into the job, Liz Truss announced today that she is stepping down as the UK's leader. Her resignation follows weeks of chaos in the UK markets. A new prime minister is expected to be elected into office within a week. And, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has said that 30% of Ukraine's power stations have been hit by Russian airstrikes. Ukraine is now restricting its electricity supplies as the country prepares for a long winter. Also, the US Inflation Reduction Act is raising alarms in the European Union. German and French officials warned on Wednesday that US policies offering subsidies to benefit the American electric vehicle industry would lead the two economic powerhouses into direct competition. Plus, the acclaimed novel, “The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida,” by Sri Lankan writer Shehan Karunatilaka, has clinched the 2022 Booker Prize.

Otherppl with Brad Listi
795. George Saunders

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 91:02


George Saunders is the author of the story collection Liberation Day, available from Random House. Saunders is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eleven books, including A Swim in a Pond in the Rain; Lincoln in the Bardo, which won the Booker Prize; Congratulations, by the Way; Tenth of December, a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the inaugural Folio Award; The Braindead Megaphone; and the critically acclaimed collections CivilWarLand in Bad Decline, Pastoralia, and In Persuasion Nation. He teaches in the creative writing program at Syracuse University. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Available where podcasts are available: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, etc. Subscribe to Brad Listi's email newsletter. Support the show on Patreon Merch @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Monocle 24: The Globalist
Tuesday 18 October

Monocle 24: The Globalist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 60:00


Russia launches a fresh offensive on Ukraine's cities, the British public is reassured that the prime minister “is not under a desk” as political turmoil continues, and Canada and the US send defence equipment to Haiti as the crisis deepens. Plus: the winner of the 2022 Booker Prize and the BBC marks 100 years.

PRI's The World
Haitians skeptical of international ‘armed intervention'

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 47:14


The UN secretary-general sparked controversy on Monday when he called for an international “armed action” in Haiti to reopen a port closed by armed gangs. The US and Canada sent armored vehicles and other supplies to Haiti's national police this past weekend, but some Haitians are skeptical. And many Central Americans who fled their homes last week during Hurricane Julia are returning and assessing the damage. Severe storms and flooding like this can lead to an increase in migration to the United States. Also, in northeastern Turkey last Friday, 41 people died in a coal mine explosion. Victims' families and union organizers are calling for greater safety measures, but criticizing the state-run mine can be risky. Plus, Sri Lankan writer Shehan Karunatilaka wins the Booker Prize.

Squiz Today
Wednesday, 19 October: Diamonds clash with the miners; Australia changes tack in Israel; The Booker Prize winner is announced; And Eurovision is down 2 entrants

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 11:03


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Click here to get it in your inbox each weekday morning. Other things we do: Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topics. Squiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age-appropriate news without the nasties!

Monocle 24: The Monocle Culture Show
Do literary prizes still matter?

Monocle 24: The Monocle Culture Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 30:00


We draw back the curtain on literary prizes – what they mean for writers and literary agents – and what it's like to be a judge on a major literary award. We speak with Clare Conville, co-founder of the literary agency C+W, Monocle's books editor and Baillie Gifford prize judge, Georgina Godwin, and Eleanor Catton, winner of the Booker Prize in 2013 for her novel, ‘The Luminaries'.  

Front Row
The Booker Prize for Fiction 2022

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 42:06


The live ceremony for the 2022 Booker Prize for Fiction, hosted by Samira Ahmed. The winner of the £50,000 prize will be announced by the chair of judges Neil MacGregor in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen Consort, who will award the trophy. The author Elif Shafak reflects on the recent violent attack on Sir Salman Rushdie, whose novel Midnight's Children was chosen as the Booker of Bookers. And the singer songwriter Dua Lipa gives her thoughts on the power of books. Photographer credit: John Williams Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Sarah Johnson

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Booker Prize winner to be announced today with Claire Keegan shortlisted

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 5:56


Edel Coffey, author and journalist, describes the work of Irish writer Claire Keegan, as a 'rare gift' which the reader is compelled to return to again and again.

The Book Club Review
The Booker Prize 2022

The Book Club Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 88:10 Very Popular


Our most demanding, but possibly also our favourite episode of the year as we're joined by Chrissy Ryan of Bookbar and journalist Phil Chaffee to discuss and debate this year's six shortlisted books. Although we might rail at this much required reading all in one go, the truth is we love tackling the Booker shortlist, which expands our horizons and stretches us as readers like nothing else. So listen in to find out which books we loved, which ones we wished we could have avoided, and which one we think should win the 2022 Booker Prize. Booklist The Trees by Percival Everett  audiobook read by Bill Andrew Quinn (Tantor Audio) Oh, William by Elizabeth Strout Audiobook read by by Kimberly Farr (Penguin Audio) The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Shehan Karunatilaka Glory by NoViolet Bulawayo  Audiobook read by Chipo Chung (Penguin Audio) Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan Audiobook read by Aiden Kelly (Faber audio) Treacle Walker by Alan Garner Audiobook read by Robert Powell (Fourth Estate) –– Other books mentioned were Spoons Carpets: An Appreciation by Kit Caless  Car Park Life by Gareth F. Rees Erasure by Percival Everett Percival Everett by Virgil Russell Open Water by Caleb Azumah-Nelson Piranesi by Susanna Clarke Lanny by Max Porter Follow us on instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast to keep up with us between episodes, or head to the episode page on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk for full show notes, transcript and comments forum - let us know your thoughts on the Booker shortlist and winner.  

Midday
'The Last White Man': Mohsin Hamid's fantasy on race, empathy

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 32:14


It's Midday on Books.  A little later in the hour, Tom speaks with Dan Fesperman, a former journalist with the Baltimore Sun who for many years has had a successful career as an author of thrillers, and he's written a new one that's terrific. But we begin with one of the most original and compelling voices on the literary scene today. Mohsin Hamid has written five novels and a collection of essays. Two of his previous novels, Exit West and The Reluctant Fundamentalist, were New York Times best sellers and finalists for the Booker Prize. His latest book explores the dynamics of race, and the notion of transformation. It is spare and powerful; ingenious, touching, and completely engrossing. It's called The Last White Man.  Mohsin Hamid joined us on Zoom from Lahore, Pakistan. His conversation with Tom was recorded last week, so we're not able to take any calls or on-line comments today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Bonus: George Saunders on "Liberation Day"

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 31:40


Writer George Saunders received a MacArthur fellowship in 2006, and his first novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo,” published in 2017, won the Booker Prize. His latest collection of short stories, “Liberation Day,” is scheduled for release on October 18. Ahead of Saunders' upcoming appearance at Harvard Bookstore (October 25) GBH's Arts and Culture reporter James Bennett II interviewed Saunders about the writer's penchant for surreal settings, his quirky -- yet fully realized -- characters and his knack for sublimating the drama of daily drudgery. We hope you enjoy this bonus podcast!

How To Own The Room
18.3 Elizabeth Strout, Writer

How To Own The Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 32:50


How can you overcome stage fright? Viv Groskop talks to award-winning writer and nominee for this year's Booker Prize, Elizabeth Strout, ahead of the ceremony. She reveals an intervention that enabled her to handle public events that would previously have sent her spinning into panic. Elizabeth tells Viv how the spaces that allow her to write are the ones in which she's not needed by anyone. Riding the subway is good, but even better is her studio in Maine. Despite Elizabeth's success now seeming to come easily, she tells Viv that it has been hard won and how the intuition that penetrates her work has sometimes been painful to live with. She also shares some top tips on handling criticism or ungenerous remarks. Find out more about Elizabeth Strout's Booker Prize-shortlisted novel, Oh William! A new updated edition of Viv's book, How to Own the Room is out now. @vivgroskop

The TASTE Podcast
149: George Saunders

The TASTE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 46:07 Very Popular


It was with great anticipation, and some unknowns, that we spoke with George Saunders, the author of many works, including the Booker Prize–winning Lincoln in the Bardo. This is a really great conversation that switches gears often. We talk about pizza and Italian delis on the South Side of Chicago, as well as lunch in the Texas oil fields. We talk about success in the kitchen and how intuition crashes together with luck. We talk about food in the year 2300. We talk about the near future and mustard collections in a short story from his new work, Liberation Day. We talk about perfectionism, Santa Cruz coffee, and time traveling to find out how dinner has been prepared over thousands of years. The great George Saunders is on the show. Enjoy it.More from George Saunders: Ghoul [The New Yorker]Story Club with George Saunders [Substack]Eat, Memory: The Absolutely No-Anything Diet [New York Times Magazine]

Front Row
Hieroglyphs at the British Museum, Emily Brontë biopic, Shehan Karunatilaka

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 42:23


Emily is a new film starring Emma Mackey (of Sex Education fame) as the author of Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë. Emily is as wild as the windswept moorland she lives in; her relationships with her sisters, Anne and Charlotte, her dissolute brother, Branwell, and her lover, the curate Weightman, are as raw as the relentless rain, and as tender as the flashes of sunshine. But writer and Director Frances O'Connor's debut film is very much an imagined life. So, what will reviewers Samantha Ellis, author of a biography of Emily's sister, Anne, and the archaeologist Mike Pitts make of it? Samantha and Mike will also review Hieroglyphs: unlocking ancient Egypt. The new exhibition at the British Museum brings together more than 240 objects, some shown for the first time, and some very famous -the Rosetta Stone, Queen Nedjmet's Book of the Dead - to tell the story of the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphs. Exhibitions about ancient Egypt tend to focus on the dead – mummies, Tutankhamun – this one is about how the Egyptians lived, wrote, and spoke. Lord Vaizey, former Conservative Culture Minister from 2010- 2016 has been appointed Chair of the Parthenon Project advisory panel. He joins Front Row to discuss the campaign to return the “Elgin Marbles” to Greece. Concluding Front Row's interviews with all of this year's Booker Prize shortlisted novelists is Shehan Karunatilaka. He discusses his second novel, The Seven Moons of Maali Almedia, a dark satire set against the backdrop of a civil war-ravaged Sri Lanka. Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe Producer: Kirsty McQuire Main Image: Temple lintel of King Amenenhat III, Hawara, Egypt, 12th Dynasty, 1855 - 08 BC. © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Front Row
Live from Belfast with Ruth McGinley, Conor Mitchell, Claire Keegan

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 42:24


Front Row comes from Belfast where Steven Rainey hears about some of the highlights of this year's Belfast International Festival. Pianist Ruth McGinley talks about her new album AURA, a collection of traditional Irish airs re-imagined for classical piano. Ruth found success at a young age after winning the piano final of the BBC Young Musician of the Year competition but felt burnt out by the pressure and demands of life as a concert pianist. She discusses her return to playing and the freedom she's found in collaborating with other musicians and composers. Composer and theatre maker Conor Mitchell is known for his ground-breaking operas covering topics including the trial of Harvey Weinstein and homophobic comments from a DUP politician. His new musical, Propaganda, is set during the Berlin blockade and asks questions about the ransoming of supplies. He discusses Propaganda's contemporary parallels and using a musical to explain political turmoil. Claire Keegan has been shortlisted for this year's Booker Prize for her novel Small Things Like These. Set in the 1980s in County Wexford, Ireland, at a time when the infamous Magdalene laundries were still operating, the book follows a coal merchant and father of five daughters who is faced with a moral choice. Presenter: Steven Rainey Producer: Olivia Skinner

The Sunday Magazine
The fiction of finding closure and other lessons from Booker Prize-winning author Ian McEwan

The Sunday Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 29:36


Ian McEwan's new novel Lessons follows the life of one man over several decades and asks how we value our experiences, how we understand trauma – and how all of it changes over time. The Booker Prize-winning author joins Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss how we tell our own stories, and why he took a page from his own life and family experience to craft this one.

Books On The Go
Ep 221: Booker Prize Special Episode

Books On The Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 24:29


Anna and Annie discuss the death of Hilary Mantel and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Annie Ernaux. Our books of the week are Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies by Maddie Mortimer and After Sappho by Selby Wynn Schwartz, both long-listed for the 2022 Booker Prize.  We also discuss the Booker Prize Shortlist and our winner predictions. Coming up: Limberlost by Robbie Arnott Follow us! Instagram: @abailliekaras and @mr_annie Email: Booksonthegopodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @abailliekaras and @mister_annie Litsy: @abailliekaras and @mr_annie Credits Artwork: Sascha Wilkosz  

Front Row
Camilla George, Elizabeth Strout and Iranian artist Soheila Sokhanvari

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 41:59


Jazz saxophonist Camilla George plays live in the studio and talks about her new album Ibio-Ibio - a tribute to her Ibibio roots in Nigerian. Iranian artist Soheila Sokhanvari joins Samira to discuss Rebel Rebel, her first major work in the UK. The exhibition at the Barbican's Curve features 27 miniature portraits of pioneering female performers who blazed a trail in cinema, music and dance before the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Elizabeth Strout is the latest of the authors shortlisted for this year's Booker Prize to be featured on Front Row. She's been shortlisted for the third novel in her series of Lucy Barton novels, Oh William! We hear an extract from her interview with Open Book about the novel. BBC Scotland's arts correspondent, Pauline McLean, reports on the financial pressures that are besieging Scotland's cultural institutions. Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Julian May Main image: Camilla George Photographer's credit: Daniel Adhami

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast
The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Shehan Karunatilaka (Booker Prize SHORTLIST 2022)

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 69:56


The Drunk Guys have a hangover for seven moons after they discuss The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Shehan Karunatilaka. They don't have Blue Moon, but they do have: Hereafter by Threes, Escape by Torch and Crown, Bamboo Torture by Nightmare Brewing, and Grammatical Fiction by Root + Branch.

Front Row
Alan Garner Booker Shortlisted, Orfeo Reimagined, Baz Luhrmann on Peter Brook

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 42:11


Alan Garner's 10th novel, Treacle Walker, may be one of the shortest books to make the Booker Prize shortlist but once read the slim volume which explores the nature of time weighs on the reader's mind. Alan talks to Nick Ahad about the creation of Treacle Walker and what's it like to be the oldest author ever to be nominated for the UK's most celebrated literary prize. Monteverdi's opera, Orfeo, is regarded as the first great opera and while there have been numerous productions since its premiere in 1607 none of those have attempted the approach being taken by Opera North this week. Monteverdi's opera is being recreated through a collaboration between Indian and Western classical music traditions. The co-music directors - composer and sitarist Jasdeep Singh Degun and conductor and harpsichordist Laurence Cummings - along with the opera's director, Anna Himali Howard, join Nick to discuss why Monteverdi's opera provides the perfect gateway to a new form of music storytelling. When Baz Luhrmann was a young theatre and opera director he had the opportunity to assist Peter Brook on his epic production of the Mahabharata, which Brook was staging in a quarry in Australia. Luhrmann tells Nick Ahad that he didn't have much to do he did a good deal of observing, and that he learned a great deal. Presenter: Nick Ahad Producer: Ekene Akalawu Production Co-ordinator: Lewis Reeves Main image: Alan Garner Photographer's credit: David Heke

The Sunday Magazine
Scandal at Hockey Canada, Uncovering Inuit history, Canada's delegation to Taiwan, and author Ian McEwan

The Sunday Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 89:37


Host Piya Chattopadhyay is joined by sports journalists Shireen Ahmed and Dan Robson to discuss the future of Hockey Canada, Inuk writer and scholar Norma Dunning explores the "disc system" that disrupted Inuit culture, political science professor Lynette Ong breaks down the shifting geopolitical landscape in Taiwan, and Booker Prize-winning author Ian McEwan interrogates how we tell our own stories with his new novel Lessons. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/1.6608835

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast
Glory by NoViolet Bulawayo (Booker Prize SHORTLIST 2022)

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 64:03


The Drunk Guys won't say nay to beer this week when they read Glory by NoViolet Bulawayo. Their beers are glorious, including: Kitty King by Beer Tree Brew, Wild Little Thing by Sierra Nevada, Doggo by Finback, and Life and Fate 12 by Root + Branch Brewing. Join the Drunk

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast
The Trees by Percival Everett (Booker Prize SHORTLIST – 2022)

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 53:26


The Drunk Guys have a reckoning after all the beer when they read The Trees by Percival Everett. They also find some strange fruit, such as: The Carver by Barrier, Bad Omen by Medusa Brewing, Sixth Birthday Zombie by KCBC, and Chillen' With Villians by Alewife. Join the Drunk Guys

Dan Snow's History Hit
Remembering Hilary Mantel

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 26:45 Very Popular


Dame Hilary Mantel died on 22 September 2022 at the age of 70. Her acclaimed Wolf Hall trilogy - which brought the life of Thomas Cromwell so vividly to life - has sold more than five million copies worldwide. She won the Booker Prize twice - for Wolf Hall and its sequel, Bring Up the Bodies.In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb and History Hit's Dan Snow pay tribute to one of the greatest English-language novelists of our century.The Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie. It was edited and produced by Rob Weinberg.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store.Complete the survey and you'll be entered into a prize draw to win 5 Historical Non-Fiction Books- including a signed copy of Dan Snow's 'On This Day in History'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Bookshop Podcast
Abdulrazak Gurnah, Author, Winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature 2021

The Bookshop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 24:10


In this episode, I'm chatting with Abdulzarak Gurnah about how his life has changed since winning the Nobel Prize in Literature, 2021, his new novel, Afterlives, colonialism in Africa, and what drew him from Tanzania to the county of Kent in the UK and a life dedicated to teaching.Abdulrazak Gurnah is the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature 2021. He is the author of ten novels: Memory of Departure, Pilgrims Way, Dottie, Paradise (shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Award), Admiring Silence, By the Sea (longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Los Angeles Times Book Award), Desertion (shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize) The Last Gift, Gravel Heart, and Afterlives, which was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for Fiction 2021 and longlisted for the Walter Scott Prize. He was Professor of English at the University of Kent, and was a Man Booker Prize judge in 2016. He lives in Canterbury.Afterlives, Abdulrazak GurnahBooks by Abdulrazak GurnahSupport the show

Not Just the Tudors
Remembering Hilary Mantel

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 26:25 Very Popular


Dame Hilary Mantel died on 22 September 2022 at the age of 70. Her acclaimed Wolf Hall trilogy - which brought the life of Thomas Cromwell so vividly to life - has sold more than five million copies worldwide. She won the Booker Prize twice - for Wolf Hall and its sequel, Bring Up the Bodies.In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb and History Hit's Dan Snow pay tribute to one of the greatest English-language novelists of our century.The Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie. It was edited and produced by Rob Weinberg. For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >For your chance to win five non-fiction history books - including a signed copy of Dan Snow's On This Day in History - please fill out this short survey.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Man Wrongfully Hanged at Cardiff Prison

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 26:39 Very Popular


In September 1952 Mahmood Hussein Mattan became the last to be executed at Cardiff Prison, but Mahmood had in fact been framed by the police and 70 years later South Wales Police formally apologised to his family for his wrongful conviction.Mahmood originally hailed from Somalia and had been a merchant seaman who had ended up settling in Cardiff and marrying a Welsh woman called Laura Williams. They lived in the Tiger Bay district of Cardiff and had three children before their separation in 1950. Mahmood faced racism and discrimination and had several encounters with the police. His vocal distrust of the police had made him unpopular with the local force though and when Lily Volpert, a Cardiff shopkeeper, was found murdered and her shop robbed they quickly turned to Mahmood. Despite a lack of any firm evidence linking him to the crime, he became the prime suspect. He was poorly represented in court and facing a hostile jury he was convicted in July 1952 and sentenced to death. The sentence was carried out three months late. The case never went away though and his family kept the fight alive for 45 years until 1998 when his case was the first to be reviewed by the newly created Criminal Cases Review Commission. His conviction was quickly quashed but it was another 25 years before they received the apology they and Mahmood deserved.To discuss Mahmood's case author Nadifa Mohamed joins Dan for this episode of the podcast. Her novel The Fortune Men, which has been longlisted for the Booker Prize, is based on the case and she immersed herself in Mahmoud's life and the history of Cardiff's multicultural Tiger Bay area to bring this story of injustice to life.The audio editor was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.