Podcasts about Tunisia

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  • 1,247PODCASTS
  • 2,265EPISODES
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  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Tunisia

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Latest podcast episodes about Tunisia

The Punch Out with Eugene Puryear - Your Daily Socialist News Hit

On Today's Episode of the Punch OutHousing Crisis in the US, Protests in Tunisia, Hazard Pay for Frontline Workers.

The Take
Taking the pulse of Tunisia's democracy

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 17:43


Tunisia has a new prime minister, the first woman in the Arab world to hold the job. She's replacing the prime minister that President Kais Saied sacked in July, when he suspended parliament. Many Tunisians, fed up with political parties and an economic crisis, thought that was the right move – but others called it a coup, and the question has lingered. As Saied continues to consolidate power, are these steps off the road to democracy, or will they make Tunisia's democracy stronger? In this episode:  Bernard Smith (@JazeeraBernard),  Al Jazeera correspondent  Rabeb Aloui (@rababalouii), Tunis-based journalist  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Bridge of Stories
A Decade After the Jasmine Revolution: Noelle's story on Tunisia

Bridge of Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 34:18


It has been over a decade since the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia, a campaign of civil resistance whereby people protested against corruption, as the start of the Arab Spring in the Middle East. Tunisia achieved peaceful power transfer after the demonstration and established a democratically-elected government. However, ten years passing, accusations towards the current president of corruption and authoritarianism have arisen again. This week, Noelle will talk us through the Tunisian politics since Arab Spring and what Tunisians actually think about the current regime.

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast
lo-Fi Global News: Lebanon, Africa/Malaria, EU-Trivia, Tunisia, NATO/Russia, California

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 6:21


Today's Topics: Lebanon Immunity Law, Africa to get Malaria Vaccine, EU-Trivia, Tunisia Shuts down TV Station, NATO Throws Out Russian Spies?, California sees Machines Make Water from Air Always remember that Lofi Poli Sci is more than just me, it's the “we”, that we be. Episode 43 Season 4 (series 359) Email: lofipolisci@planetmail.com Instagram: lofi_poli_sci_podcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lofi-poli-sci-podcast/id1513691477 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/4Ii0JKbsKEzkO8SA2u3796 Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xNzg1MjhjYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaLg4TOVb7nh4laDatZZ3yQ LinkedIn: Michael Pickering #lofipolisci #lofi #politicalscience #news #worldnews #globalnews #lofiGlobalNews #alwaysHope #podcast #lofipoliscipodcast #Top10 #GoodNewsFriday #PickeringUnplugged #LettersOfTheLofiPoliSci #Lebanon #Africa #Malaria #WHO #MalariaVaccines #EU #EuropeanUnino #Trivia #Tunisia #NATO #Russia #California #WaterTech

Simple English News Daily
Thursday 7th October 2021. World News. Today: Dubai ruler hacking. Russian prison abuse. UK PM speech. Austria Chancellor investigation.

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 6:55


World News in 7 minutes. Thursday 7th October 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Dubai ruler hacking. Russian prison abuse. UK PM speech. Austria Chancellor investigation. Africa malaria vaccine. Tunisia host arrested. Brazil sandstorm. US death penalty case. Chemistry Prize award. Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message on speakpipe for us to broadcast. With Namitha Ragunath. SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

In 4 Minuti
Lunedì, 4 ottobre

In 4 Minuti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 4:03


La prima donna a diventare Prima ministra della Tunisia e la Commissione europea che continua a rifiutare il Recovery Plan ungherese

Simple English News Daily
Monday 4th October 2021. World News. Today: Pandora Papers. US abortion protests. Honduras island fire. Germany coalition talks speed limit.

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 7:57


World News in 7 minutes. Monday 4th October 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Pandora Papers. US abortion protests. Honduras island fire. Germany coalition talks speed limit. Spain volcano. Italy crash. Tunisia president demonstrations. Algeria France problems. Iran Oman cyclone. China Taiwan air incursion. Philippines Duterte or not Duterte? Turkey man trying to find himself.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi and Maya Dil.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Economist Radio
Nobody's fuel: Britain's shortages

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 23:06


From chicken to petrol, Britons are facing long queues and bare shelves. We ask about the multifarious reasons behind the shortfalls, and how long they will last. Tunisia's democracy has been looking shaky for months; we examine what may change with yesterday's appointment of its first-ever female prime minister. And India's beleaguered unmarried couples at last are getting some privacy.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Nobody's fuel: Britain's shortages

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 23:06


From chicken to petrol, Britons are facing long queues and bare shelves. We ask about the multifarious reasons behind the shortfalls, and how long they will last. Tunisia's democracy has been looking shaky for months; we examine what may change with yesterday's appointment of its first-ever female prime minister. And India's beleaguered unmarried couples at last are getting some privacy.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Simple English News Daily
Thursday 30th September 2021. World News. Today: Japan elections. Rohingya activist killed. Tunisia new PM. DCR death rise. UK Labour leader

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 6:58


World News in 7 minutes. Thursday 30th September 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Japan elections. Rohingya activist killed. Tunisia new PM. DCR death rise. UK Labour leader speech. France visa cuts. Ecuador prison violence. Canada miners rescued. Wales first black head teacher statue.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message on speakpipe for us to broadcast. With Namitha Ragunath. SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Africa Today
Tunisia's president tasks a woman to form new government

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 22:55


The President of Tunisia has tasked Engineer and Professor Najla Bouden with forming a new government, raising hopes of an upcoming exit of the country from political limbo. Kenya Airways and South African Airways have signed a partnership that could pave the way for a Pan-African airline. We find out more about the allegations surrounding some W.H.O staff that they've sexually abused people they were supposed to help. And we take a look at what's been done in Liberia to help those who suffer from traumatic stress disorder after living through the horrors of the civil war eighteen years ago.

The World and Everything In It
9.29.21 Washington Wednesday, World Tour, and dairy farming

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 33:24


On Washington Wednesday, Mary Reichard talks to James Carafano about the Biden administration's ongoing defense of the disastrous pullout from Afghanistan; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on unrest in Tunisia and a prisoner swap in China; and Amy Lewis meets a family determined to keep the tradition of small dairy farms alive. Plus: commentary from Joel Belz, a wrong turn win, and the Wednesday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from Open the Bible…Taking you on a guided tour through the whole Bible story on October 16th. More at UnlockingTheBible.org. From Ambassadors Impact Network, a group of faith-driven investors who finance companies led by gospel-advancing entrepreneurs. More at ambassadorsimpact.com And from Dordt University, offering reimbursed campus visits to show you firsthand how Dordt's Christ-centered education leads to lifelong discipleship. Details at Dordt.edu/apply.

Democracy Paradox
Donald Horowitz on the Formation of Democratic Constitutions

Democracy Paradox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 49:26


The most beautiful thing that happened in Indonesia, by the way, which was a polarized society along religious lines more than anything else, was that by the end of the proceedings, everybody knew what everybody else's problems were, what everyone else's constituencies wanted. They knew if X noticed that Y was making a demand, before long X figured out what was behind the demand and why Y had to make it and whether it was a real demand or whether it was made just for the sake of being on record.Donald HorowitzA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a short review of Constitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment here.Donald Horowitz is the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus at Duke University. Key Highlights IncludeAccounts of constitutional formation in Tunisia, Indonesia, and MalaysiaThe role of consensusThe challenges of negotiated constitutionsThe need for an inclusive processWhy citizen participation is not always beneficialKey LinksConstitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment  by Donald Horowitz"Ethnic Power Sharing: Three Big Problems"  by Donald Horowitz in the Journal of DemocracyReconsidering Democratic Transitions Francis Fukuyama, Donald Horowitz, Larry Diamond on YouTubeDemocracy Paradox PodcastAldo Madariaga on Neoliberalism, Democratic Deficits, and ChileHélène Landemore on Democracy without ElectionsMore Episodes from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy

Monocle 24: The Globalist
Tuesday 28 September

Monocle 24: The Globalist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 60:00


We get the latest on the UK's supply chain crisis and find out about the political turmoil in Tunisia. Plus: the morning papers and a round-up of the latest urbanism news.

SBS World News Radio
Major protest in Tunisia

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 3:44


Several hundred protestors rallied in Tunis, the capital of Tunisia, to demand the resignation of President Kaïs Saied.

Simple English News Daily
Monday 27th September 2021. World News. Today: Germany elections. Iceland elections. Netherlands coronavirus restrictions. Switzerland gay m

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 7:28


World News in 7 minutes. Monday 27th September 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Germany elections. Iceland elections. Netherlands coronavirus restrictions. Switzerland gay marriage. Afghanistan executions. Koreas talk. Tunisia protests. Somalia. Haiti migrants. Argentina tango world cup...Help us with our testimonials page! send7.org/testimonialsSend your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi and Maya Dil.Listen to Hablemos Español podcast (for Spanish speakers/learners)....https://armandonegrete.com/hablemos-espanol-podcast-learn-spanish/SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Africa Today
Tunisia's president strengthens own executive powers

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 21:39


After suspending parliament and sacking the Prime Minister in July, the president of Tunisia helps himself to more legislative and executive powers. Tourism authorities in South Africa are puzzled by the UK's decision to keep the country on the Covid travel red list. A UN summit is looking to get the development goals on 'food for all' back on track, but local farmers are wary of agricultural giants. And The Somali National Theatre rises again, and after three decades, the movies are back in Mogadishu.

Simple English News Daily
Thursday 23rd September 2021. World News. Today: Tunisia president rule. Algeria stops Moroccan planes. SE Asia air pollution. Afghanistan

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 7:17


World News in 7 minutes. Thursday 23rd September 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Tunisia president rule. Algeria stops Moroccan planes. SE Asia air pollution. Afghanistan Ukrainian citizens. Dutch boarder checks. UEFA world cup plans. US police reforms. Haiti conditions worsen. UK mask recycling. Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message on speakpipe for us to broadcast. With Namitha Ragunath. SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

The Greek Current
What Turkey's détente with Egypt and the Gulf states means for the Horn of Africa

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 16:49


Over the last decade we've seen the involvement of Turkey and the Gulf states grow significantly in the Horn of Africa, and the region became one more arena - like Libya and Tunisia - of competition between Turkey and Qatar on the one hand, and Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE on the other. While clashing interests and ideologies still shape dynamics in the Horn, President Biden's election has brought about a recalibration of Egyptian, Gulf, and Turkish policies toward the region. Varsha Koduvayur joins The Greek Current to look at how this regional rivalry, and the current “detente” between them, has played out in the region, and what steps the US should take moving forward. Varsha Koduvayur is an Analyst at Valens Global, a security, research, and analysis firm, with an expertise on the Gulf States and the region. She is also the co-author of the recent op-ed: “Will Turkey's Détente with Egypt and the Gulf Extend to the Horn of Africa?”You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here: Central bank chief: Greece's roaring rebound paves way for continued ECB supportCypriot president snubs Archbishop in New YorkStatement by the Hellenic American Leadership Council and PSEKA

The Kitchen Counter - Home Cooking Tips and Inspiration
Around the World in Four Flavors

The Kitchen Counter - Home Cooking Tips and Inspiration

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 28:55


Sometimes you just need some new flavors to put to work in your regular cooking routine. On today's episode we take a quick trip around the world to look at four distinct and powerful flavors: Gremolata from Italy, Harissa from Tunisia, Black Bean Garlic Sauce from China, and Achiote from Mexico. For complete show notes on this episode, https://kitchencounterpodcast.com/195 Connect with the show at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kitchencounterpodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kitchencounterpodcast Twitter: @TKCpodcast Email: feedback@kitchencounterpodcast.com

Activist #MMT - podcast
Ep91[1/2]: Fadhel Kaboub: From childhood to parenthood

Activist #MMT - podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 77:02


Welcome to episode 91 of Activist #MMT. Today I talk with Fadhel Kaboub about his personal story: his childhood in Saudi Arabia and Tunisia, being a parent, his love of music, and how music has become part of his parenting. Fadhel is an economics professor at Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and the president of the Global Institute for Sustainable Prosperity, an interdisciplinary public policy think tank. The focus of his academic work is on how the lens of MMT can inform developing nations, which we talk about in the second half of part two. I've written a post filled with links to Fadhel's papers, posts, and appearances, a link to which you can find in the show notes. Today's story begins with a nine-year-old Fadhel at the center of a political drama between his two home countries of Saudi Arabia and Tunisia. When his grandparents in Tunisia fell ill, his father rushed home from his job in Saudi Arabia to take care of them. Saudi Arabia's immigration laws require foreign workers to give their employers not only their own passport, but also the passports of all their children. Unfortunately, when Fadhel's father left for Tunisia, the employer decided not to release Fadhel's passport, essentially holding the nine-year-old hostage. His family leveraged the media to shame Saudi Arabia into allowing the little boy to be reunited with his family. To this day, Fadhel has never seen his original passport. We then turn to the story of how Fadhel joined the fifth grade in Tunisia, with children who had a 3.5-year head start in learning French. This is the language spoken during half of the instruction time in the country. The overriding theme of Fadhel's story, however, is how there is no place on Earth where he is not considered an outsider or immigrant. Babies born in Saudi Arabia are only considered citizens if their father is a Saudi citizen. Fadhel's mother was a citizen but his father was Tunisian. When he moved to Tunisia, he had a Saudi accent and was unable to speak French. And now, even though a US citizen, he remains an immigrant. The experience, plus witnessing the experience of his parents and home countries, has greatly influenced and inspired not only his academic work but also his decisions as the parent of three little boys. This podcast, Activist #MMT, is dedicated half to academic concepts and half to the personal stories of how people, both laypeople and academics, came to MMT and how it changed them. The reason I believe these personal stories are so important is because it's not possible to separate the academic concepts from those who develop and promote them. This includes their personal stories: what they care about, and how they choose to use the power they have, or don't have. The idea was primarily inspired by Fred Lee in his 2009 book, A History of Heterodox Economics: Challenging the mainstream in the twentieth century, which was recommended to me by Nathan Tankus. Neoclassical economics would have you focus on only their maths and models, and not the discriminatory behavior of universities and journals, and those that back those universities, journals – and their economists. They would prefer you not look at any other discipline, such as history, culture, sociology, institutions, and especially politics. The entire neoliberal project would have you focus only on the how-are-you-gonna-to-pay-for-it question, and not the minor inconvenience of having to change the very foundation of human society, if we are not to go extinct in the coming decades. I talk much more about this concept of interdisciplinarity, in my introduction to episode 81 with Richard Tye. But for now, onto my conversation with Fadhel Kaboub. This is part one of a two-part conversation. Enjoy. (By the way, my 12-year-old keeps asking to hear the story in the above highlight, over and over again. :) ) By the way number two: At the (very) end of every interview, the introduction is repeated in full but without the theme music. I started this long ago on listener request, for those who find the music irritating or distracting from what I'm saying. Resources Fadhel's 2018 interview with Money on the Left.

Fightback
Western Canadian School #5: 10 years since the Arab Spring

Fightback

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 48:18


It's been 10 years since the Arab spring, the revolutionary movement that swept through the middle east and brought down dictatorial governments in Egypt and Tunisia. For a brief time the masses were victorious, before being pushed back by the forces of counter revolution. As we enter a new period of uprisings and revolutions, we should look back on what lessons can be learned from the movements of the past. Comrade Laine gives this talk on 10 years since the Arab spring.

Business Daily
The business of seed banks

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 17:28


Increasingly scientists are using genetic material from wild plants to make agricultural crops more resilient to climate change. To find out how, Rebecca Kesby heads to the Millennium Seed Bank for the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, in the south of England. There she meets Dr Chris Cockel, one of their project coordinators. We also hear from Asmund Asdal of the Global Seed Vault, which is located in a mountain on the archipelago of Svalbaard, between mainland Norway and the North Pole. We speak to Dr Shivali Sharma, who is developing climate resistant varieties of pigeon pea, a staple crop in many parts of rural India. And Mohamed Lassad Ben Saleh, farmer in Tunisia, tells us how breeding crops that combine properties of indigenous wild varieties has improved the quality and yield of his crops. Producers: Clare Williamson and Benjie Guy (Picture: a hand holding seeds. Credit: Getty Images.)

VOMENA at KPFA
An update on the political crisis in Tunisia and the Abraham Accords between UAE and Israel

VOMENA at KPFA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 58:06


Last month Tunisia's president Kaies Saeid decided to consolidate power around himself by suspending parliament, firing his prime minister, and assuming leadership of the defense, interior, and justice ministries. The country is now teetering over the edge of a possible return to the one-man rule Tunisians had rejected ten years ago. This week, we'll get an update on the political crisis in Tunisia from Tunisian scholar and political analyst Mohamed Dhia Hammami- Later in the program, we will speak with Elham Fakhro, a Senior Analyst at the International Crisis Group about the Abraham accord: On August 13th the United States brokered a normalization agreement between Israel and The United Arab Emirates, which was soon followed by Bahrain Sudan and Morocco.​​

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Brazil's Embattled President Tries to Rally his Supporters

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 29:02


There is only one power Jair Bolsonaro thinks can remove him from power, and that is God - at least that's what Brazil's President, told his audience at a rally on Tuesday. He had called on people to come out and support him at events across the country - and come out they did, though not perhaps the million he had hoped would attend. Mr Bolsonaro clearly wanted to demonstrate that he still has voter pulling power, what with his poll ratings tumbling ahead of elections next year. Many blame him for the huge toll from Covid, a disease the President famously once dismissed as "the sniffles." Now, there are more than half a million Brazilians dead from coronavirus, yet he remains unapologetic. Tuesday's rally saw the President on full throttle, railing against the Supreme Court, which is currently investigating him in response to various allegations - the judges, he said, were communists. Watching all this in Sao Paolo was Andrew Downie. When you hear that a country has declared a state of emergency, you might wonder what kind of calamity has befallen it – a natural disaster perhaps, or invasion by a foreign army. Poland declared a state of emergency this week, but not for any of these reasons. Rather it was a fear that thousands of refugees and illegal immigrants are about to come pouring across the country's border from next door Belarus. Hundreds have arrived already - most it seems originally from Afghanistan and Iraq. Belarus's President Aleksander Lukashenko, stands accused of encouraging these people to cross from his country into Poland – as a way of provoking the Polish government. Meanwhile, caught in the middle, are the new arrivals themselves, many trapped in no-man's land on the Belarus-Polish border, as Adam Easton explains. It was “farewell Mutti” from German MPs this week – “Mutti” being the German word for “mum,” and the nickname given to the country's chancellor, Angela Merkel. She made her final speech to the country's Parliament, two weeks before Germany holds national elections. The result of that contest is still very hard to predict, with polls showing the different political parties yoyo-ing up and down in popularity. However, there is one outcome which is certain: Chancellor Merkel will no longer be Chancellor – she will stand down at the end of the process, after nearly sixteen years in power. She was famously Germany's first female leader , and also the first from the formerly communist East Germany … and yet, not all these labels are quite as straightforward as they seem, according to Damien McGuiness. The attacks of September 11th twenty years ago marked the beginning of what was called the “Global War on Terror.” This was conducted in many countries and in different ways – western countries fearing they may be targeted, just as New York's Twin Towers and the Pentagon had been. And it was fought against countries accused of harbouring terrorists, most notably Afghanistan. With US troops pulling out of Afghanistan last month, there's no sign of that “War on Terror” abating. One place that it continues to be fought with particular ferocity is in Africa – from Tunisia in the north, which has seen horrific bomb and gun attacks on civilians, to Mozambique in the continent's southeast, where a relatively new Islamist insurgency has cost many lives. Catherine Byaruhanga has been to many of these hot-spots, and reflects on how Africa has fared since 9-11.

Teachers on Fire
205 - Defining Our SEESAW MISSION and VISION

Teachers on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:49


What's our ultimate vision for Seesaw? We want to use Seesaw to help us strengthen our culture of growth, reflection, and learning. We want the Seesaw journal to be so informative that engaged parents and reflective students have a clear sense of their learning progress every step of the way. No surprises at report card time. We want the Seesaw journal to be a source of celebration, pride, and joy for every diverse learner in our community. We are ALL learners, after all: even as educators — especially as educators and lead learners — we continue to grow, evolve, and change. We try, we fail, and we try again. We constantly inquire, we uncover, and we apply new information to upgrade our skills and expand our knowledge. We haven't arrived, and that's okay, because none of us can say where our own final destination lies. That's the beauty of learning. And that's what Seesaw makes space for. Welcome to SPARKS: mini-segments intended to spark your thinking and ignite your practice. These short episodes are based on my written reflections, which you can find on the Teachers on Fire Magazine at Medium.com. Read the blog post featured in this episode at https://medium.com/teachers-on-fire/defining-our-seesaw-mission-and-vision-54bcb0e49324. My name is Tim Cavey, and I'm proud to contribute to the education conversation through the Teachers on Fire podcast. Make sure to connect with me @TeachersOnFire on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to catch more from me and hear from amazing educators who are bringing growth and transformation to K-12 education today. CONNECT with ME On Twitter @TeachersOnFire (https://twitter.com/TeachersOnFire) On Instagram @TeachersOnFire (https://www.instagram.com/teachersonfire/) On Facebook @TeachersOnFire (https://www.facebook.com/TeachersOnFire/) On YouTube @Teachers On Fire (https://www.youtube.com/c/teachersonfire) On Voxer @TeachersOnFire (https://web.voxer.com/u/teachersonfire) On LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/timwcavey/ Visit the home of Teachers on Fire at https://teachersonfire.net/. SONG TRACK CREDIT Flight to Tunisia by Causmic Tangled by Emmit Fenn Mirror Mirror by Audio Hertz True Messiah by DJ Freedem Fast and Run by Nico Staf *All songs retrieved from the YouTube Audio Library at https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teachersonfire/support

The Greek Current
Greece's Vaccine Diplomacy: From the Western Balkans to Africa

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 16:27


This week when Greece's Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias travelled to Tunisia, he wasn't just traveling with a diplomatic team. He was also bringing 100,000 Covid-19 vaccines with him. This follows a delivery to Rwanda last week of 200,000 vaccines. These are the latest steps Greece is taking to combat the global pandemic that has seen it deliver vaccines to Libya, Albania, North Macedonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ukraine, Kenya, and Jordan. Nikos Efstathiou, a journalist with Kathimerini, joins us to talk about these initiatives and explore how Greece is looking into expanding its “Vaccine Diplomacy” to additional countries.Read Nikos Efstathiou's piece for Kathimerini here (In Greek): Η Ελλάδα στη διπλωματία των εμβολίωνYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here: Thousands gather in Greece for composer Theodorakis' funeralCyprus receives 157 million for Recovery and Resilience PlanEU disburses €157m in recovery funds to Cyprus

POMEPS Conversations
Bread and Freedom, Which Protests Count, Recent Political Developments in Tunisia (S. 11, Ep. 1)

POMEPS Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 64:37


Mona El Ghobashy of New York University talks about her latest book, Bread and Freedom: Egypt's Revolutionary Situation, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. The book is a multivocal account of why Egypt's defeated revolution remains a watershed in the country's political history. (Starts at 1:28). Killian Clarke of Georgetown University speaks about his new article entitled, "Which protests count? Coverage bias in Middle East event datasets," published by Mediterranean Politics. (Starts at 31:48). Laryssa Chomiak, the Director of Centre d'Etudes Maghrébines à Tunis, to talk about recent political developments in Tunisia. (Starts at 47:05). Music for this season's podcast was created by Bashir Saade playing Ney, along with Farah Kaddour on Buzuq. You can find more of Bashir's work on his YouTube Channel.

Wisdom of Crowds
Episode 69: Can We Even Do This If We Try?

Wisdom of Crowds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 56:08


With the drawdown complete, Shadi and Damir sit down to talk about what could have worked better in Afghanistan—and what the democracy promotion community can learn from America's two decade commitment. Could we have done Libya better, or are our dysfunctions baked in to our bureaucracy? And what hope is there for Tunisia now? Recommended Reading: Twitter thread on the Human Terrain System. Shadi's Atlantic piece. Damir's Examiner piece. Mike McFaul on Obama's realism.

PBS NewsHour - World
Tensions rise in Lampedusa, a small Italian island, over swell of economic migrants

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 6:52


Europe's human rights commissioner has called on the continent to welcome Afghan refugees with open arms. But this latest chapter in the refugee and migrant crisis will add to thousands of people, mainly from Africa, still making the desperate journey. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant just returned from the Italian island of Lampedusa, off the coast of Tunisia, where he filmed this report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Tensions rise in Lampedusa, a small Italian island, over swell of economic migrants

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 6:52


Europe's human rights commissioner has called on the continent to welcome Afghan refugees with open arms. But this latest chapter in the refugee and migrant crisis will add to thousands of people, mainly from Africa, still making the desperate journey. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant just returned from the Italian island of Lampedusa, off the coast of Tunisia, where he filmed this report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Al Jazeera World
My Own Private History in Jordan, Egypt and Tunisia | Al Jazeera World

Al Jazeera World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 46:39


Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1631: How to Balance Training for Aesthetics & Performance, The Muscle Building Effects of Intense Flexing, the Benefits of Adding Bodyweight Exercises to a Weight Lifting Routine & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 76:27


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin answer Pump Head questions about combining bodyweight and weight lifting in a workout, whether the intensity of the squeeze or clenching of a muscle matters, how to tell the difference between fatigue and tiredness, and how to program a balance between performance and aesthetics. Dad jokes with Mind Pump. (5:42) Mind Pump Investments: Welcome new sponsor, Path Water. (7:21) Another study tying fructose consumption to obesity.  (8:28) Apeel, minimizing fruit and vegetable waste.  (10:54) Fear and the future of humanity. (21:13) Adam vs. the stranger. (34:13) Fun Facts with Justin: How Star Wars nearly started a real-life war. (37:15) When it comes to the cancel mob, there is no statute of limitations. (38:57) Stock up on your Organifi Pumpkin Spice Gold Juice now! (42:00) Do you wear shoes in the house? (43:50) The origins of random terms with Mind Pump. (45:59) #Quah question #1 – Can you combine body weight and weight lifting workouts? (53:38) #Quah question #2 – Does the intensity of the squeeze or clenching of a muscle matter? (59:12) #Quah question #3 - How can you tell the difference between fatigue and tiredness? (1:02:41) #Quah question #4 - How do you program a balance between performance and aesthetics? (1:08:37) Related Links/Products Mentioned August Promotion: MAPS Strong and MAPS Powerlift 50% off!  **Promo code “AUGUSTSPECIAL” at checkout** Visit Path Water for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Code “mindpump” at checkout for the discount** Fructose in the diet expands the surface of the gut and promotes nutrient absorption Apeel | Food Gone Good Apeel bites into another $250M funding round, at a $2B valuation, to accelerate fresh food supply chains | TechCrunch HumanProgress Watch: US company Virgin Hyperloop unveils new video of passenger pods that can travel at 1,000 kmph Georgia Guidestones - Wikipedia How Star Wars nearly sparked a real-life war between Tunisia and Libya Joe Rogan Experience #1411 - Robert Downey Jr. Visit Organifi for the exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “mindpump” at checkout** Why Am I So Anal? | Psychology Today The vibrator: from medical tool to revolutionary sex toy Fire up your Central Nervous System to maximize Muscular Adaptation – Mind Pump Blog Mind Pump #610: Dr. Andy Galpin Sexy Athlete Bundle | MAPS Fitness Products Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Andy Galpin (@DrAndyGalpin)  Instagram

New Books Network
Aaron Y. Zelin, "Your Sons Are at Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad" (Columbia UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 64:40


Tunisia became one of the largest sources of foreign fighters for the Islamic State—even though the country stands out as a democratic bright spot of the Arab uprisings and despite the fact that it had very little history of terrorist violence within its borders prior to 2011. In Your Sons Are at Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad (Columbia UP, 2020), Aaron Y. Zelin uncovers the longer history of Tunisian involvement in the jihadi movement and offers an in-depth examination of the reasons why so many Tunisians became drawn to jihadism following the 2011 revolution. Zelin highlights the longer-term causes that affected jihadi recruitment in Tunisia, including the prior history of Tunisians joining jihadi organizations and playing key roles in far-flung parts of the world over the past four decades. He contends that the jihadi group Ansar al-Sharia in Tunisia was able to take advantage of the universal prisoner amnesty, increased openness, and the lack of governmental policy toward it after the revolution. In turn, this provided space for greater recruitment and subsequent mobilization to fight abroad once the Tunisian government cracked down on the group in 2013. Zelin marshals cutting-edge empirical findings, extensive primary source research, and on-the-ground fieldwork, including a variety of documents in Arabic going as far back as the 1980s and interviews with Ansar al-Sharia members and Tunisian fighters returning from Syria. The first book on the history of the Tunisian jihadi movement, Your Sons Are at Your Service is a meticulously researched account that challenges simplified views of jihadism's appeal and success. Beth Windisch is a national security practitioner. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Islamic Studies
Aaron Y. Zelin, "Your Sons Are at Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad" (Columbia UP, 2020)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 64:40


Tunisia became one of the largest sources of foreign fighters for the Islamic State—even though the country stands out as a democratic bright spot of the Arab uprisings and despite the fact that it had very little history of terrorist violence within its borders prior to 2011. In Your Sons Are at Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad (Columbia UP, 2020), Aaron Y. Zelin uncovers the longer history of Tunisian involvement in the jihadi movement and offers an in-depth examination of the reasons why so many Tunisians became drawn to jihadism following the 2011 revolution. Zelin highlights the longer-term causes that affected jihadi recruitment in Tunisia, including the prior history of Tunisians joining jihadi organizations and playing key roles in far-flung parts of the world over the past four decades. He contends that the jihadi group Ansar al-Sharia in Tunisia was able to take advantage of the universal prisoner amnesty, increased openness, and the lack of governmental policy toward it after the revolution. In turn, this provided space for greater recruitment and subsequent mobilization to fight abroad once the Tunisian government cracked down on the group in 2013. Zelin marshals cutting-edge empirical findings, extensive primary source research, and on-the-ground fieldwork, including a variety of documents in Arabic going as far back as the 1980s and interviews with Ansar al-Sharia members and Tunisian fighters returning from Syria. The first book on the history of the Tunisian jihadi movement, Your Sons Are at Your Service is a meticulously researched account that challenges simplified views of jihadism's appeal and success. Beth Windisch is a national security practitioner. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast
"Lo-fi Global News: Israel/Palestine, Tunisia, The Game, the Philippines, Paralympics, England"

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 9:27


Today's Topics: Violence Returns to Israel & Palestine, Tunisia's President Takes More Power, The Game-Are we landlocked or not, President Duterte Will Run for Vice President, More Women in Paralympics this Year, England and MacDo Milkshakes Always remember that Lofi Poli Sci is more than just me, it's the “we”, that we be. Episode Link: https://youtu.be/yP_J0RI_9MQ Episode 13 Season 4 (series 330) Email: lofipolisci@planetmail.com Instagram: lofi_poli_sci_podcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lofi-poli-sci-podcast/id1513691477 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/4Ii0JKbsKEzkO8SA2u3796 Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xNzg1MjhjYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaLg4TOVb7nh4laDatZZ3yQ LinkedIn: Michael Pickering #lofipolisci #lofi #politicalscience #news #worldnews #globalnews #lofiGlobalNews #alwaysHope #podcast #lofipoliscipodcast #Top10 #GoodNewsFriday #PickeringUnplugged #LettersOfTheLofiPoliSci #MiddleEast #Israel #Palestine, #Tunisia, #Philippines #Paralympics #England #MacDo #Milkshakes

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Tunisia's Unfinished Business

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 28:35


The political crisis which broke out in Tunisia last weekend is still simmering. Of all the countries in North Africa and the Middle East which toppled their dictators a decade ago, only Tunisia emerged as a full, multi-party democracy. Its free and fair elections, featuring candidates and groups of all ideological stripes, have been an exception in the wider region since then. But discontent has still mounted over the state of the economy, pandemic response and police tactics. Plenty of Tunisians don't necessarily see their country as a model for others - and President Kais Saied's recent moves to freeze Parliament and remove the Prime Minister were welcomed by many. Rana Jawad explores why the situation looks rather different from Tunis. Next week it will be a year since the chemical explosion that devastated the Lebanese capital, Beirut. It was one of the largest non-nuclear blasts in history – which killed more than 200 people and left more than 300,000 homeless. One of the worst-hit neighbourhoods was the close-knit district of Karantina, right next to the port. Survivors who've gone back to their rebuilt homes there hope that its special character can be preserved. But there are also some visionary, larger-scale proposals to redevelop the city – and as Tim Whewell found, the new plans might not leave room for everyone. This November, Barbados is planning to celebrate its 55 years of independence and become a republic – meaning the Queen will no longer be its head of state. It's seen as a turning point in the country's history - and a chance for Barbados to move even further on from its colonial past. Other historic legacies may be harder to unpick, though. Barbados was Britain's first slave-holding society abroad; and the economic impact, and the debts, of the slavery era are still much discussed across the Caribbean. Zeinab Badawi recently visited a surviving 17th century mansion in the north of this island, which is now a museum. The UNHCR estimates that there are probably at least ten million individuals worldwide with no identity or nationality documents issued by any country. For them, the most basic challenges – registering a birth, getting childhood inoculation or exam certificates, applying for jobs or loans - can be insurmountable. But some countries are now deciding to make it easier to get legal status. In Kenya, hundreds of people from a Shona-speaking religious community with roots more than a thousand miles south, in Zimbabwe, were recently given a fresh chance. Vivienne Nunis saw several moments of pure joy at a ceremony to grant them citizenship. There's never been a summer Olympic Games quite like Tokyo's... and Covid restrictions also apply to the journalists who are meant to cover the event. Their task is even more important when the crowds of spectators aren't around to witness the sporting triumphs at first hand – but this time they definitely can't just wander around looking for athletes to speak to. Or soak up the atmosphere inside the Olympic village or on the streets of Tokyo. Alex Capstick has covered more sporting contests than he'd care to remember – but this time it's different… Producer: Polly Hope

The John Batchelor Show
1567: Erdogan crushed Kurdish democracy while chastising Tunisia for lack of democracy. Aykan Erdemir, @aykanerdemir

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 15:20


Photo:  Capo Kurdo - Kurdish Prince (From the Italian book 1876, Giro Mondo)کوردی: وێنەی میرێکی کوردی لە کتێبی مێژووی ئیتاڵی لە ساڵی ١٨٧٦ لەلایەن گیرۆ مۆندۆ. Erdogan crushed Kurdish democracy while chastising Tunisia for lack of democracy. Aykan Erdemir, Intl Panel of Parliamentarians for Freedom of Religion or Belief. @aykanerdemir

The John Batchelor Show
1564: Tunisia sheds democracy to popular acclaim. Roger McShane @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 11:50


Photo: Tarek el-Tayeb Mohamed Bouazizi  (29 March 1984 – 4 January 2011) was a street vendor who set himself on fire on 17 December 2010 in Ben Arous, Tunisia, which became a catalyst for the Tunisian Revolution and the wider Arab Spring against autocratic regimes. His self-immolation was in response to the confiscation of his wares and the harassment and humiliation inflicted on him by a municipal official and her aides. Here: his last days; screen grab.  CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Tunisia sheds democracy to popular acclaim. Roger McShane @TheEconomist https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/07/28/the-way-out-of-tunisias-crisis?utm_medium=pr&utm_source=us-e

The Daily
Trouble in Tunisia

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 26:51


Tunisia was supposed to be the success story of the Arab Spring — the only democracy to last in the decade since revolutions swept the region.Recently, after mass protests, President Kais Saied appears to be taking the reins of power for himself.What happened? We hear from Mr. Saied and citizens of Tunisia on the ground. Guest: Vivian Yee, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Why is Tunisia's promise of democracy struggling to bear fruit?In the days since their president staged a power grab, threatening their young democracy, many Tunisians are banking on the hope that things cannot get much worse.“Why do you think that, at 67, I would start a career as a dictator?” In a conversation with Vivian Yee, President Kais Saied vowed to preserve hard-fought rights.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

Economist Radio
Editor's Picks: August 2nd 2021

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 18:37


A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: growth in emerging markets, Tunisia faces a constitutional crisis (9:53) and dry bars of Ireland (16:03) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Sarah Yerkes on Tunisia's Democracy in Crisis

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 38:49


For the past decade, Tunisia's democracy has stood out as one of the few remaining bright spots of the Arab Spring. But earlier this week, it entered its own crisis as President Kais Saied declared a state of emergency, suspended parliament and stated his intent to move forward with widespread prosecutions as part of a long-promised anti-corruption effort. Some argue that Saied's strong-arm tactics are exactly what's needed to break the stagnation that's been plaguing Tunisia's economic and political systems, but others fear that it may be the beginning of the end for Tunisian democracy as we know it. To discuss these developments, Scott R. Anderson sat down with Sarah Yerkes, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and an expert on Tunisia. They discussed the context for Saied's actions, how other actors in Tunisia and the region have reacted, and what the international community can and should do about it.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Vox's Worldly
Trouble in Tunisia

Vox's Worldly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 41:44


Zack, Jenn, and Jen Kirby discuss the political crisis gripping Tunisia following the president's decision to fire the prime minister and suspend parliament. Tunisia was the big “success story” of the Arab Spring: the one country whose revolution produced a real, albeit rocky, transition to democracy — a democracy that is now in crisis. The gang explains what's going on, what it all means for Tunisia's future, and how — or whether — the international community should respond. References: Tunisia's president fired its prime minister and suspended parliament Is what happened in Tunisia a coup? A helpful timeline outlining Tunisia's democratic transition Tunisia's imperfect democracy was still a model, wrote Sarah E. Yerkes in 2019  Foreign Policy on the problem with calling Tunisia the Arab Spring's “lone success story” Bloomberg's Hussein Ibish on why this crisis is testing Tunisia's political divisions  The US secretary of state's Tunisia tweets   Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Jen Kirby (@j_kirby1), foreign and national security reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly's work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox's daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram. About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow us: Vox.com Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Morning Announcements
Thursday, July 29th, 2021

Morning Announcements

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 3:43


This morning we start with some COVID updates as things are getting…worse. On a kind of brighter note, let's bring back our favorite segment — Headlines That Speak For Themselves. Representative Jim Jordan admitted that he spoke with Donald Trump on January 6th, Simone Biles pulled out of the all-around competition yesterday, and a swastika was discovered in an elevator at the state department. Finally, we close with Susan Wright's loss to Texas state legislator Jake Ellzey and the questionable coup happening in Tunisia.

Apple News Today
Vaccine mandates gain steam amid surge in coronavirus cases

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 13:00


As U.S. coronavirus case numbers surge, driven by the highly transmissible Delta variant, more and more governments and businesses are mandating COVID vaccines. Washington Post health reporter Dan Diamond joins the show to explain the trend. Restorative justice is a form of conflict resolution that attempts to tackle problems that prison sentences alone don’t typically resolve, including by having offenders and survivors face each other. New York Magazine takes us inside the process. The Arab Spring protests began in Tunisia. Right now, democracy in that country is on shaky ground. Vox explains. NBC Sports reports on Simone Biles’ decision to pull out of the individual all-around gymnastics competition at the Tokyo Olympics to focus on her mental health.

The John Batchelor Show
1544: Arab Spring fail in Tunisia, where it all started. Josh Rogin @WashingtonPost

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 10:45


Photo: Tunisian hamsa Arab Spring fail in Tunisia, where it all started.  Josh Rogin @WashingtonPost   https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/07/26/biden-act-coup-tunisia-democracy/

Morning Announcements
Tuesday, July 27th, 2021

Morning Announcements

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 4:11


To start off the Morning Announcements, we begin with California and New York City's changes to their vaccination requirements for state workers yesterday. Next we cover another COVID-related announcement from the White House, President Biden's meeting with Iraq's president, and what's happening in Tunisia right now. Lastly, we wrap with Tom Barrack Jr.'s court arraignment.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
We need to think about the unvaccinated differently

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 17:03


There are limits to personal freedom and responsibility — it runs out when you put others at risk. You can’t drive drunk, for example. But are people who aren’t vaccinated for COVID-19 as brazen as a drunk driver? Or are they victims, scammed by bad information? Sociology professor Brooke Harrington has a great thread trying to reconcile all this, and we’re going to unpack it a bit on today’s show. Plus: Olympics highs and lows, the Frito-Lay strike and a sneak peek of tomorrow’s bananapants episode. Here’s everything we talked about today: Harrington’s thread on COVID vaccines “California, New York City to Mandate Covid-19 Vaccine or Regular Testing for Government Workers” from The Wall Street Journal “V.A. Issues Vaccine Mandate for Health Care Workers, a First for a Federal Agency” from The New York Times “Disinformation for Hire, a Shadow Industry, Is Quietly Booming” also from the Times “Frito-Lay Workers in Kansas Ratify Contract, Ending Strike” from, yep, The New York Times “Tunisia’s Ahmed Hafnaoui’s Olympic win sparks pride and joy at home” from The Washington Post “The Math Ph.D. Who Just Shocked Olympic Cycling” from The Wall Street Journal “Pop singer Pink supports Norwegian women’s beach handball team protest over fines for ‘very sexist’ uniform rules” from ESPN Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Global News Podcast
Tunisia: PM is sacked after violent Covid protests

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 27:52


President Kais Saied has sacked Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi and says he's taken over. This follows angry nationwide protests on Sunday over the government's handling of the pandemic. Also, civilian casualties in Afghanistan are at a record level, and a disturbing report on the treatment of women in Britain's armed forces.