Podcasts about Blue Ridge

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Best podcasts about Blue Ridge

Latest podcast episodes about Blue Ridge

Florida Trail Runners Podcast
#28: Stories from the Cruel Jewel

Florida Trail Runners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 80:29


This year Mike Alberts, Courtney Joseph, Carmen Brockdorf, and Stephen Grieger were a few of the Floridians who took on the Cruel Jewel in the Chattahoochee National Forest of the North Georgia Mountains. This is a course that takes you on a wild ride through the Duncan Ridge from Vogel State Park to Blue Ridge and back. For Mike, Carmen, and Stephen… they all took on the “100” mile course that adds up to roughly 106 miles with 33,000 feet of gain and 33,000 feet of loss just to keep it interesting. Now for Courtney, she took on the 50 miler as her first ever 50 miler! The Cruel Jewel 50 is a point to point “50” miler that rounds up to roughly 56 total miles for 15,000 feet of gain and 15,000 feet of loss.

New Books in Literary Studies
Nathan Jordan Poole, "Idlewild," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:39


Nathan Jordan Poole speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his story “Idlewild,” which appears in The Common's new spring issue. In this conversation, Nathan talks about doing seasonal work at Christmas tree farms, the workers from all walks of life he met there, and how those experiences and those people helped to inspire this story. He also discusses his writing and revision process, his story collections and future projects, and why he chooses to write unromantically about rural life. Nathan Jordan Poole is the author of two books of fiction: Father Brother Keeper, a collection of stories selected by Edith Pearlman for the Mary McCarthy Prize, and Pathkiller as the Holy Ghost, selected by Benjamin Percy as the winner of the Quarterly West Novella Contest. He is a recipient of the Narrative Prize, a Milton Fellowship at Seattle Pacific University, a Joan Beebe Fellowship at Warren Wilson College, a Tennessee Williams Scholarship at Sewanee School of Letters, and a North Carolina Artist Fellowship. He lives with his wife and two daughters in Blue Ridge, South Carolina. Read Nathan's story “Idlewild” in The Common at thecommononline.org/idlewild. In this conversation, Nathan recommends The Art of Subtext by Charles Baxter, available here from Graywolf Press. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Literature
Nathan Jordan Poole, "Idlewild," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:39


Nathan Jordan Poole speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his story “Idlewild,” which appears in The Common's new spring issue. In this conversation, Nathan talks about doing seasonal work at Christmas tree farms, the workers from all walks of life he met there, and how those experiences and those people helped to inspire this story. He also discusses his writing and revision process, his story collections and future projects, and why he chooses to write unromantically about rural life. Nathan Jordan Poole is the author of two books of fiction: Father Brother Keeper, a collection of stories selected by Edith Pearlman for the Mary McCarthy Prize, and Pathkiller as the Holy Ghost, selected by Benjamin Percy as the winner of the Quarterly West Novella Contest. He is a recipient of the Narrative Prize, a Milton Fellowship at Seattle Pacific University, a Joan Beebe Fellowship at Warren Wilson College, a Tennessee Williams Scholarship at Sewanee School of Letters, and a North Carolina Artist Fellowship. He lives with his wife and two daughters in Blue Ridge, South Carolina. Read Nathan's story “Idlewild” in The Common at thecommononline.org/idlewild. In this conversation, Nathan recommends The Art of Subtext by Charles Baxter, available here from Graywolf Press. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Nathan Jordan Poole, "Idlewild," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:39


Nathan Jordan Poole speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his story “Idlewild,” which appears in The Common's new spring issue. In this conversation, Nathan talks about doing seasonal work at Christmas tree farms, the workers from all walks of life he met there, and how those experiences and those people helped to inspire this story. He also discusses his writing and revision process, his story collections and future projects, and why he chooses to write unromantically about rural life. Nathan Jordan Poole is the author of two books of fiction: Father Brother Keeper, a collection of stories selected by Edith Pearlman for the Mary McCarthy Prize, and Pathkiller as the Holy Ghost, selected by Benjamin Percy as the winner of the Quarterly West Novella Contest. He is a recipient of the Narrative Prize, a Milton Fellowship at Seattle Pacific University, a Joan Beebe Fellowship at Warren Wilson College, a Tennessee Williams Scholarship at Sewanee School of Letters, and a North Carolina Artist Fellowship. He lives with his wife and two daughters in Blue Ridge, South Carolina. Read Nathan's story “Idlewild” in The Common at thecommononline.org/idlewild. In this conversation, Nathan recommends The Art of Subtext by Charles Baxter, available here from Graywolf Press. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Truth 2 Ponder
Discernment in the Blue Ridge

Truth 2 Ponder

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 59:31


Today's edition of “Truth to Ponder” comes to you from the blue ridge Mountains in the extreme Southwest corner of Virginia. Bob and his wife are visiting family and trying to discern God's leading for the next chapter of their lives. Bob shares some of his observations on how we prepare in such a time as this.

MountainLore
The Blue Ridge Witch

MountainLore

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 8:37


About a hundred years ago or so a feud in an Appalachian community in north Georgia led to a curse being laid on all the unborn children there.  Today we tell the tale of the Blue Ridge Witch of Tilley's Bend. You can subscribe to the MountainLore podcast at Apple Podcasts, IHeart Radio, Stitcher, Spotify, … Continue reading "The Blue Ridge Witch"

St. Augustine's Chapel at Vanderbilt
Blue Ridge Service Corps

St. Augustine's Chapel at Vanderbilt

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 56:30


The return of Kelsey Davis, today representing Blue Ridge Service Corps, on behalf od the Diocese of Western North Carolina! Sermon begins at 16:22.

The Short Term Show
Managing Rentals While Managing Family with Ashley & Jered Guy

The Short Term Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:51


Ashley and Jered Guy are a married, real estate power duo with properties throughout the US in markets such as The Smokies, Gulf Shore, and Blue Ridge. They have rentals in more markets than anyone on the show so far. With a wide range of short-term rentals throughout the US, including some owned and operated in partnerships, they are shining examples that you can manage both a wide rental portfolio and a family. Avery speaks with the Guys about how they got into the real estate market and how they usually divide up the work between them. They also speak about the wide range of rentals they operate, and how they managed to make a profit off of a vacation home investment. They dig into strategies for finding partners, as well as techniques to find rentals that fit your budget, needs, and expectations. Rich Dad, Poor Dad The Big Leap Grant Cardone AirDNA The Short Term Shop University The Short Term Shop Facebook Group IGMS Your Porter Smart BnB OwnerRez Beyond Pricing Pricelabs

Fay It Forward - The Fay Kranz-Greene Podcast
A Pesach in the Blue Ridge mountains

Fay It Forward - The Fay Kranz-Greene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 4:00


A Pesach in the Blue Ridge mountains

Sarc Fighter: Living with Sarcoidosis and other rare diseases
Episode 60 | Jack Boepple's cardiac sarcoidosis hit him like a linebacker. And he would know.

Sarc Fighter: Living with Sarcoidosis and other rare diseases

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 66:56


Jack Boepple is a former Boston marathon runner.  A dedicated Cyclist and a fisherman who disappears into the wilderness for a week every year with his canoe and camping supplies.  But even all of that couldn't prevent sarcoidosis from attacking his heart.  In Episode 60 of the Sarc Fighter podcast, Jack shares the story of how sarcoidosis knocked him back more than a few steps -- and how he never saw it coming -- even when he was in the hospital beating most of the tests. Jack Cardioversion image     Show Notes: Learn about the clinical trial from Novartis: https://bit.ly/3o9LXKk Remember these hashtags for April!  #WhatIsSarcoidosis #MakeItVisible  Here is a link to all the activities for April ! https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/awareness-2022 Universal Barriers Podcast:  https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/sarc-fighter-podcast/ More on Universal Barriers https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/events/universal-barriers-in-dealing-with-a-chronic-disease-a-sarcoidosis-perspective/ Ignore No More https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/ignore-no-more-foundation-for-sarcoidosis-research-launches-african-american-women-sarcoidosis-campaign/ Sarcoidosis Awareness Film: https://www.purpledocumentary.com/ Nourish by Lindsey: https://www.nourishbylindsey.com/ Dr. Jinny Tavee's book, The Last Day of Suffering: https://www.amazon.com/Last-Day-Suffering-Health-Happiness/dp/0615542751 Read about the patient trial with aTyr 1923 https://investors.atyrpharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/atyr-pharma-announces-positive-data-phase-1b2a-clinical-trial Also -- Note that investors also believe in the promise of aTyr 1923: https://investors.atyrpharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/atyr-pharma-announces-closing-863-million-public-offering Yale University and sarcoidosis skin treatment | Dr. William Damsky: https://news.yale.edu/2018/12/26/yale-experts-treat-severe-disfiguring-sarcoidosis-novel-therapy Stanford University Clinical trial | Dr. Mathew Baker: https://med.stanford.edu/sarcoidosis/clinical-trial.html   MORE FROM JOHN Cycling with Sarcoidosis http://carlinthecyclist.com/category/cycling-with-sarcoidosis/ Watch the Prednisone Town Hall on YouTube https://youtu.be/dNwbcBIyQhE More on aTyr Pharma: https://www.atyrpharma.com/ Do you like the official song for the Sarc Fighter podcast?  It's also an FSR fundraiser! If you would like to donate in honor of Mark Steier and the song, Zombie, Here is a link to his KISS account.  (Kick In to Stop Sarcoidosis)  100-percent of the money goes to the Foundation.  https://stopsarcoidosis.rallybound.org/MarkSteier The Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/ Donate to my KISS (Kick In to Stop Sarcoidosis) fund for FSR  https://stopsarcoidosis.rallybound.org/JohnCarlinVsSarcoidosis?fbclid=IwAR1g2ap1i1NCp6bQOYEFwOELdNEeclFmmLLcQQOQX_Awub1oe9bcEjK9P1E My story on Television https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/news-anchor-sarcoidosis/ email me  carlinagency@gmail.com Below is a web generated text version of my interview with Jack Boepple.  Please excuse any spelling errors.  Welcome back to the Sark Fighter podcast. And joining me now is Jack Boepple Lives in Chicago and he's a fellow SARC fighter. Jack, welcome to the podcast. Thank you. Glad you to have me. So you reached out to me after listening a little bit because, • • uh, you have cardiac sarcoidosis. How did you first find out that something was not right with your heart? • • • • • • Um, actually, it was the event itself. So three years ago, March, • • um, I'm sitting on a couch • • • and I could feel • • some palpitations going on. And I put my hand on my chest and it felt like my heart was just rolling. • • So I asked my wife, can you just check my pulse? So she did, that looks fine. Then she put her hand on my chest and she's like, we got to go to the emergency room now because it was just doing all these flip flops. She could tell. She could tell there was something wrong. And I'm like, uh, • • I've had palpitations before. I'm fine. I'm just going to play through • • • • um. • • And so I didn't do anything. That was a Friday. • • And I woke up the next morning and I was still off. • • So I took a baby aspirin I sent a note to my primary, uh, provider, realizing through the portal, realizing she would not see it or address it until Monday. • • And then that day, we went for a long walk. We had friends over, smoked a cigar, had some wine, sundae, went for another long walk, came home, got on the rowing machine, rode for 45 minutes, and by rowing, actually felt better. Um, but I got a phone call on • • • • Monday morning from, um, the primary nurse. And she said • • everything you just described to me, you need to be in the emergency room right now. And I said, I don't want to go to the emergency room. So she made an appointment for to see the primary. And I saw her in the afternoon and, • • • um, she took an EKG • • and she used this very technical term • to tell me what she saw. It looks funky. I'm like, what does funky mean? Uh, so she's like, I think you need to go. I want you in the Ed. I mean, right now. • • And • • • • her office was like a 20 minutes ride from • • • • the, um, hospital. And I'm like, • I want to send you an ambulance. But you're not going to go, are you? I'm like, no, • • • • • I drove to the Ed, • • they checked me in, they did another EKG, and when I got to the Ed, they fast line me. Usually you have to wait forever. I got right in. They did another EKG, they said something's funky. Then they brought in a cardiac specialist. He said the same thing. So they kept me for observation. • • • And the next day, they • • • • • • • did an EKG and they said, based upon those results, we either going to send you to stress, uh, test, or we're going to do an angio on you, uh, angiogram. And I'm like, come on, • • • • • bring on the stress test, because, • • • • um, • I work out quite a bit. • • • • • • • Um, • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I'm losing the term, but all my blood numbers come back great. • I mean, there's nothing wrong with cholesterol. My cholesterol numbers are off the scale. Great. • • • • • • • • • • • I'm like, come on. There's nothing wrong. So then they • • • decided, um, they're working to do a stress test. They're going to do the angio. And I got someone asked me, are you ready to have stents put in your heart? Like, what are you talking about? • • And I'm like, sure, but you're not going to find anything. And so they, • • • • • um, • • • bring me in, I do the angio, and I come out of it, and they're like, yeah, you're right. There was no blockage. Nothing. I'm like, yeah, I told you that, right? But we still want to hold you. And now it's about 400 in the afternoon, and my wife's been there all day. And • • • • I say, go home. Go get some lunch, go take a shower, go feel better. • • And • • • • • in the room talking to a nurse, and next thing, there's four more nurses flying in the room, • and they're saying, we got to go to ICU. I'm like, what? We got to go to ICU now. Wait, you're feeling fine? They've done the angio. • • • • • • • • • I know, but the listeners don't know yet. • • • But you and I live, uh, in a parallel • • • • lifestyle, uh, with respect to the way we work out. You were biking 120 miles a week. You've done a half iron man. You are on, uh, your rower all the time. So you're not just, like, a kind of standard walking around fit guy. Fitness is your lifestyle. • • • Absolutely. • • • • • • • • Not only is it done for physically, but you probably can relate to this, that it's a mental release. And so when you're doing you're on your bike or you're working out, all of sudden a you're solving all the problems you're trying to work through. Yeah. So the nurses come rushing into the room, you're sitting up saying, okay, something's funky, but I'm killing it on all these tests. And they keep accelerating the level of care, • • • • • right? All these nurses are running around me, and I have one nurse just staring at me, and I'm staring at her, and she goes, hello. And I say, hello back. And she jumps backwards. • • So apparently I found out later that • • • • I think my heart rate is, like, • • • • 100 and $8200 something very high. • And apparently, when it's that high, um, you're coding. And so they're not used to anybody • • being conscious when this happens. And so • • • • they're willing me down to ICU. I'm fully conscious of what's going on. They get me in there, they hook me up, and, • • • • • • • um, • • • they're pumping me full of all these • • • drugs, um, to try to get the heart rate down, Amyotarone. They just give me an IV of it. They're just trying to do this. • • • And after about 8 hours of my heart at this elevated rate, they come in and say, • • we're going to have, uh, to shock you. I'm like, really? And • • • • • • • • • • • I'm like, in the morning now, • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • like, wow, this is real. All of a sudden, this is real. • • My wife is with me, and I'm like, I want her with me. But I'm like, that's selfish. I don't want her to see me be shocked. So I asked her, do you want to be here for this? And she's like, no. • So she leaves the room, and they give me, • • • um, a Twilight drug and said, you won't remember anything. • • Uh huh. So they hit me. I remembered, no way, • • • really. And this is to get your heart rhythm back into a normal range, right? It's a • • • reset. So they were trying to reset my heart. And it • • did. • • • • • • And, • um, they said most people, just after it happened, the nurse said, you did so well. I'm like, what does that • • • • mean? They said, you didn't swear. I'm • • • • • • • • • • • • • like, I got through that. • • • • • And, • • um, they described it like being hit by a truck. And I said, I don't know what that means, but I played football, and I feel like I just got hit by a professional linebacker, and I didn't have any pads on. I mean, it just wax the hell out of • • • • • • you. • • Uh, so the rest of the night and when you're nice to • you, you're watching your • • • monitors. • • • • • • • • • • And I said a prayer that • • • night, and I said I would never, ever talk about it to • • • anybody. • • And a few days later, we had someone visiting us, a good friend of ours, and she was on a spiritual journey long before I was. And she asked the one question where I had to tell what • happened. And she asked, how does this change your relationship with God? And I looked at her, and I'm like. I said, it didn't. I said, when I'm sitting there and I'm watching those monitors and I'm watching my heart, trying to get back to where it was, this abnormal • • • state. I said a prayer of thanks. I said, thank you for the great life I • • • had. Please watch my offer. My wife. Please watch over my • girls. I'm not the type of person to sit there and beg and plead. So I said a prayer of • • thanks, • • • mhm, because I've been thankful for all the great opportunities I've had. Sure. • • • So the thing I said I would never talk about. I talked about. • • • • • • And it's been a real journey since then. • So then the doctors are trying to figure out what caused all this. So they went down the Lyme disease • • route. • • • • They did, um, all these different things. I did a cardiac MRI. I don't know if you ever had to do one of those. That's not one of those MRIs where you can just put in the tube. I fall asleep in those things. Mri I do, too. That doesn't bother • • me. Yeah, so they put me in, but you got to hold your • • • • • breath throughout, um, the test so your chest isn't moving up and • • down. And so they can isolate what's going on the • • chest. And after that cardiac MRI, they sort, uh, of had an idea that maybe it was sarcodosis. So that was their working theory at that • • time. And they would not let me leave the hospital until I had an • • • • ICD and, um, pacemaker installed on my • chest. So from the time I entered the hospital, the time I left, it was eight • • days. Went through all these • • • tests. It wasn't • • • • • • • • • until several, um, weeks later that I actually did a Pet scan. And that was basically their • • confirmation • • • that it looks like sarcastosis. As you probably know, they never can say it is sarcodosis unless they do a • • biopsy and they can actually confirm it. Well, Pet is noninvasive, • • • so, • • • uh, they figured out it looks. • • • • • • • • • • • Like where in your heart, Jack, is it on a valve. • • • • • • • • • • • • Or the way it was described to me, it's both on the • • • inside and the external of the heart. And that's the tricky part is the external part of the • • heart. The internal part of the • • • • • • heart. • Um, you can eventually address through ablazion. But if it's also on the external part of the heart, the external ablaze procedure is much different. They have to go underneath your ribcage and • • • up and then break the sac around the heart, then try to do the blazing that way, which is a much more tricky operation. Yeah, but I went from being on no medications whatsoever to being on. I can't tell you how many • • • • • • pills. One of the reasons I reached out to you is a lot of the folks talk about how the sarcmens just beat them up. And I've been fortunate. • The methotrexate I'm • • • • on and, um, the pregnantone I'm • • on, they really didn't, um, beat me up too bad. But the cardiac meds just wailed on me. Amy odorone. One of the side effects of amioterone • • • • • • • is, • • um, sun. But if you get in the • • • • • • sun, you just start burning up rather quickly. Like I could literally, on a sunny day, walk across a sunny parking lot when my wife would pick me up from the train station and I'd be beat • red. So it turned me into a • • • • • vampire. And you're an outdoors guy, right? • • So, nine, 09:00 the morning to four, 04:00 the afternoon. I just stayed in the • • shadows, and it • • just killed me. Just. • • Absolutely. I wanted to be. • • • • • • • • • Outside. Are you retired • • • or what is your job? Were you not working? What was going on then? So I'm still working. Uh, • I work for, um, Blue Cross. Blue Shield of • • Illinois. I don't know if you've ever, um, heard of Lean or Six Sigma, but that's sort of my gig. Basically it's process improvement type of work. I go in and look at • • • • • • things. • • • • Um, yes, but in the summer months, I like to be outside. I love the • • • • • • • • fish and do all that stuff. So that was really a Downer trying to get addressed to those drugs. And there's other drugs that they keep on wanting to slow your heart down. So lisinopril is one of • • them. It just slows everything down. And I was being lethargic, and I'm like, this is not how I want to • • • • • • be. And so that sort of started the journey towards getting off. How do I get off? Uh, these cardiac meds. So they transitioned me about a year later to this drug called Soda • • • • • Law, which doesn't have any side effects. Amy, odorone, but it has different side effects, which is more • • lethargy. And I'm • like, I can't do • • • • • • • • • this. I started, um, exploring • • • Ablation and • • • • • my, • • • • • um, um, electrical cardiologist. He's done a bunch of Ablations, but the fact that it might have to be both internal and • external, he said, I want to give you • • to refer you to one of the experts in the field to do this, because if it's external, I don't have experience doing that. Tell us all what Ablazion actually • • • • is. So my understanding, I'm going to get this wrong, and you get people. Okay. I won't correct you, that's for sure. So it's basically the same approach as an angio. They come in • • • through the leg, • • and when they find a • • • • • • • • • • • spot, • • um, they believe is • • Sark, they try to poke it and figure out, is this causing the heart to go crazy or not? Yeah. And if it • does, then • • • • • they do, um, some type of cauterization or some type of way • • • to remove that tissue. The granuloma. Yes. Right. Okay. • • • • • • So I, um, talked to two different experts. • • • • One guy said, you just might have to live this way the rest of your life. And I talked to another guy like, you're too young to be living like • this. This is what we can do for you. And it • • • was considered a high risk procedure. But I'm like, I can't continue to live like • • • • this is like. You can't pass a couch without taking a nap. Right. With talking about the lethargy and all • • • that. It wasn't that, um, bad. • But for me not to be able to work • • • • • out, that was my • • • • release. I needed to be able to work out, • • • • and it • • just beat me to the point I couldn't do anything. Got it. So eventually actually did this • ablasian. And before you do the Ablasion, they stopped you on all cardiac meds because they want the SARC to be • • • active. So what does that mean? When the sarcas is active in the heart, that means you can go into V TAC. And • • so two • • days before the procedure, I'm off all cardiac meds. I'm sitting at my desk upstairs, my wife's downstairs, and my device • • • fires. And so I • scream and she comes running up and she finds me basically in a fetal • • • • • • • position, um, • • • because I wanted to be tack. And so the device did what it was supposed to do. They've called an insurance policy, and • • • it reset the heart. And • • • • • • so the guy doing the um, Ablaze like, yeah, we want your heart to be active so we can find it. And after he did the procedure, he came in and visited with me, and he • • • • • • said he was all amped up, all excited. He's like, we found five spots, and we got him. • • • • And he's like, no more um restrictions, no more cardiac men. You can start going back and doing your normal • • activities. • • And they were in there for five, 5 hours. And they said, we still see stuff on the external part of the heart. But you know what? We had you under for five, 5 hours, see what this • • • does. And here I am, a year later, I haven't had • • • • events, and I'm off cardiac meds, which is good. I'm working out again, but I always have to watch my heart rate because you don't want this little device to fire. And so you still have • • • • • the um, pacemaker. Is that essentially what it is? Pacemaker and ICD ICD, which is basically shocks your • • • • heart. So if that thing fires, that means you're • • • • • • having laypersons from heart • • • attack. Correct. And the technology in the ICD is nothing but amazing. They can set the levels as to when it goes into pacing • • • • • mode, when it, um, will fire a warning to your heart to say, Knock it off and then to the full • • • • • • • • • • • • • reset. It's just rather amazing. The other thing about the • Ablazion • is the device was pasted me, like, seventy, 70% of • • the. So instead of my heart working on its own device had to keep on helping it. And I'm like, that doesn't sound right to • • • me. And so after the um, Ablasian, I'm being paced less than one 1% of the which is just • • • • huge. My heart's • • • working by itself now, which is what I • wanted. You're still taking a very small amount of prednisone, right? Yeah. • • So when I did all this started, they had me at twenty, 20, and then they stepped it down. I'm at two, 2.5 • • now. • • • • • And • • the Maxwellsight, I'm on • • fifteen, 15 once a • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • week. I know that's • • • • low, • • • • but it's still a drug. Also, they throw in • • • the Alanronite and • • • • • the • • • um, looking for the other drug. I'm on folic acid. So the allndronate to try to help • • • alleviate bone loss. Um, I think the folic acid does something else to counter one of the side effects of the • • methotrexide. Okay. By Sark Dock, actually. Who's one of the docs has been on your • • podcast, Dr. • • • • • • Sparn. He's, uh, my Doc. • • • • • Wow. Listening to your podcast has started connecting a bunch of dots for • • me. I think one of the podcasts you talked about, what's the most important factor in dealing with Sarcodosis? I'm listening to this, and I'm trying to • guess, and I like health. And I was wrong. It was zip code. And I'm like, okay, I'm very fortunate to be where I • • am. One of the leading guys in Sark research is • • here. He's my Doc. So I got very lucky. • • • And my cardiologist, um, at Northwestern, have been nothing but outstanding. • • • • And the guy to do the Ablation, um, was out of the University of Chicago, who was considered a leading expert in doing Ablasians. • • • And I feel very fortunate. • • • • • • So I guess when I wrote you just like three years. • • • • • • Wow. I know a lot of this discussion on this is • • about the people that hits the most is the pulmonary people. • • • • • But there's a small population of cardiac people out here, too, • • that there's additional level of complexity that goes into it. And even rarer is those of us who are neurosark people. • • • • • • • • So, • • • um, it is a lot. So, uh, let's back up a little bit. Thank you for sharing the story of your • • incident, but you mentioned your wife and your daughters, and you are my age, so I'm assuming that your daughters are grown or nearly grown. So tell us about your family • • • • life. Yeah. So my wife and I, next year, will be married. Forty, 40. We were high school • • sweethearts. I was a football player. She was a • • cheerleader. Cute. You got me by a couple of years on the marriage. I think we were on thirty 38th year, but, yeah, go ahead. All right. • • • • • • • • And with, um, the Air Force Academy. So, uh, I was in the Air Force, and both daughters were born • • while we were in the Air Force. Uh, so the oldest, Christine, • is, • uh, thirty 35. The Madeline is thirty 31 • • • and is an occupational therapist. • • Uh, and she loves what she does. And she • • welcomed a son into the, uh, world a year ago. So it's our first grandchild. And my daughter Madeline is in marketing, um, living downtown Chicago, having a blast. • • • • • • • • • • So it's been a lot of fun with the girls raising them. They're, uh, both University of Iowa grads, and they had a lot of fun • there and learned a lot, and they made a lot of friends. In • • • fact, my wife's, um, husband is also she met him at the University of • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Iowa. Again, both of, um, them are very close to us. • • So we're staying here for a while. Yeah. Your daughter's husband, I • • • believe. Yeah. • • Right. Well, that's, um, • • • • • • • • • • • cool. So you've led an active life. You were a football • • • • • • • • • player. I've got to talk a little bit about the bicycling and so • • • • forth. So you, uh, were riding one 120 miles • • • a prior to this. And I consider myself pretty avid cyclists. But for me, one 100 miles a week is a week that I put a star next to in my logs. Like, this was a really good week. And you were doing that • • regularly. Yeah. That was several years ago when I was really, just really into • • • • • it. And, • • • um, my baseline is jogging. So that's where I started. And I've • done four • • • • marathons, including the Boston Marathon, which was joy to Drew. Congrats. Thank you. • • • • • • And three of the four marathons, um, I did under four, 4 hours was my goal. And • • • • so I was training for this, um, one • marathon. And I usually never signed up in advance • • because if the weather was bad in Chicago, I didn't want to be running in nasty weather. And so I went to sign up the day before, and they were like, • • • no, it's, um, all full. I'm like, But I trained for a marathon. I'm ready to go. So someone then told me about triathlons. And I swam in high school, too. So I'm like, okay, I can do the swimming part. So I got on a bike and it was one of these old swim • bikes. And I realized, all right, I got to do something better than this. And so I started upgrading the • • bikes. • • And my very first Triathlon, um, I did was a half Iron Man because I trained • • • for a marathon. I'm like, uh, I can do this stuff. And I'm like, after I did it, I'm like, oh, I can do a full Iron Man. And my wife's • • like, not happening. • • Uh, so a full Iron Man for people that don't know is you start out with • • • • a two, 2.4 miles, I • • • • • think. And then you ride your bike. One 112 miles, you run a marathon, correct. All back to back to back, correct? Yeah. So I did a half version of. • • • • • • • • • • That. So we • • • host an Ironman event here, uh, in Roanoke, Virginia, where I live, and it's a half. And I just did the bike part last • • • year. Not as part of the event, uh, but just to do it. And of course, here we live in the mountains, • • • • • so it's a very • • difficult. Fifty 50 it is. • • • Fifty, 56 miles. • • Uh, • • right. I can't imagine doing, um, all those other things on either side of it yet. Lots of. Lots of people do. Or to double it. That's. • • • • • • • • • Crazy. But it's something I really enjoyed. I just enjoyed the feeling of being outside and in • • • • • shape again. That's part, uh, of the journey. I'm trying to what's my • • new exercise normal. So last • • • • • • • • summer I was only, um, able to get forty, 40 miles a on the • • • • • • • • • • • bike. I think I even wrote this to you. I'm pedaling, I'm pedaling. I'm like, I know I'm going fast. And I look down the speedometer and I'm like, no, you're • • • • • • • • • • • not. That's part of getting older, too. I understand that. • • • • But just the energy doesn't seem to be close to what I've expected on the trajectory of getting • • • • • older. Now, the ablation that you had done, uh, when was that? That was March of last year. So you're still basically recovering from that, would you • • • • • • • • • • • • say? • • • • • • Um, • • • • • again, I don't think so. • • • • • Because it's a year out and I had no cardiac events. So should I start having cardiac events • • • • again then? Maybe I need to go back and get another • • one. And I've heard there's been people that have to go back and get repeated ablations, but I think if I go back again, they're going to play with the external part of the heart because there's still the scarring there on • that. • • • • • • • But otherwise, I, um, feel pretty good. So you're walking around feeling good, • • but your fitness level hasn't returned to the fitness level that you had pre ablaze and • precise. No, not even close, right? It might not. • • Right. I will never run seven and a half miles every other day ever again. It just won't happen. Right. So I now do • • intervals. I was told that's mhm even better for me. So I get my heart rate to a certain, um, • • point, and then I walk until it gets to a certain point. And I keep on bouncing up, back and forth. Right? Because • • • • • • • • • again, I don't want this device to. • • • • • • • • • • Fire. Um, it seems to me like you're living right on the edge. So you're doing intervals, which is where you run really hard and you watch your heart rate get jacked up. And then when it gets to a certain point, you walk until it comes back down. And then you do it • again. And, uh, then you walk until it comes back down. Then you do it again. And I've done this on the bike, and I've done it running as • • • • well. And the word, um, when you're running is, • • • • uh, Norwegian word • • • • • fartlek, which is not what it is. I think it's F-A-R-T-L-E-K. • Fartlek. It's named after the guy that developed. So, um, you're doing that. So you're really pushing the boundaries, right? Yeah, I'm trying to get back to feeling fit. So I guess to answer your early • • • question, I'm better than where I was before the Ablaze, but I'm not preparedak event. Uh, so not even • • • close. So how have you reimagined your life now since you've had to go through. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Sarcodosis? • • • • • • • Um, I think I take things more in stride now. • • • • • • Maybe it's just, um, everything I just look at, • • like, thankful for every moment I have now. Because, again, I thought this could have been it. I can't tell you how many times my wife and I have been told that if I had not been in • • • shape, no way. There's just no way I would have made it. So the fact • • • • • • • • • that I just, um, did a stress test, and the nurse looked at my record and she's like, I've never seen anyone be in V tag that long and come out of it. • Okay. • • • • • • So I feel very blessed. Um, so I try to look at that. I do a lot of volunteer • • • • work. I refocused my energies, um, and doing volunteer work again with the skill set I have, it's very specialized. • • • So I work with a group called Catch a Fire, which • • is basically a clearing house for, um, nonprofits to find volunteers. So over the last three years, I've done about over ninety 90 with • them, ranging • • • • • • • from, um, helping do Mission Vision value statements to Excel training, • • to doing data analysis to doing all these different • • things. And I've met all these different non profits across the United States. I've actually worked with some guy in Australia, worked with a couple of folks in • • • • • • Africa. It • • really seemed to be focusing more on • • that, hoping to get to retirement, um, at some point. Right. Because I think that • • • • will keep my mind • • active. Right. And when you go outside and so you ride your bicycle • • • • • • now on the trails and paths, um, around Chicago, trying to stay off the road so you don't have to fight with the cars. Right. So they converted old rail lines around here a long time ago. So there's a whole network. The one near me is called the Prairie Path. • And it's limestone paved • • • • • • and it's just a much safer • • ride. Back in my heyday, when I was really, um, going at it, I would ride on the streets, but I usually drive a half hour west of where I am to get more towards the countryside where there is less • • • • traffic. All it takes is one guy not paying attention • • and you're in a world of hurt. Yeah, no, it's • • true. I'm riding more and more offroad myself, but I still do get out on the roads. We're very fortunate • • • that you can be rural very quickly when you're outside Roanoke, Virginia, as opposed to Chicago. • • • • Right. We're a small • • • • city. Virginia's Blue Ridge is how, um, we're now marketing this. • • • • • • • • Region. And you've got a grandchild. • • • • • • • • • • Um, four years ago I had none. Now I have six. Holy cow. So, grandchildren changed the way I, uh, look at • • • • life, that's for • • sure. And, um, I'm sure that that's the same for • • • you. • • • • • Absolutely. He just turned one. And so, • • • • • • • • • • • • um, we've actually, uh, made going over the last three weekends. We're looking around, it's snowing outside. Let's see if our daughter wants to visit her. So we go over • • • • there, we eat lunch, and then we play for a couple hours until he's ready for a nap. So that's just really refocus what's going on. • • • • And he's at an age • • • where he's very active, like my oldest daughter was. And • • so it's like playing with my daughter again. He wants to fly around the room. And so it's just a lot of fun doing that. • • So it's the point. Now he recognizes me and as soon as he sees me again, he wants to start flying around the room. So it's a lot of fun. But I will tell you, making that little kid fly around the room, I'm gassed after it's over. Right. • • • So I think again, that's part • of dealing with how my body reacts to stuff. Now, before I could do anything, • • • • and I'd be • • • • • • fine. • • • • • Yeah, it's frustrating. You, uh, can't do what you once did. So they call sarcaidosis the Snowflake disease because it impacts each of us • • • • differently. I've also run the Boston Marathon. Um, Congratulations. Thank • • • • you. I just always thought of myself as, uh, the guy that would always be fit and would always be healthier • • • • • than a certain large percentage of the people walking around beside me. • • • And I guess now I think I was arrogant to think that because sarcodosis just knocks you back a step. Two steps, three steps. • And it's hard to realize that • • • • • while playing with my grandchild tires me • • • • out. Yeah, • • • • • • • • • • absolutely. Again, your form of, um, it is • • • much. I think each form is so unique, and I was so lucky to have my aspect of it addressed through the Ablasian. So it's sort of like. But every time I go out, I am looking at that watch going, Is my heart gonna play nice today or not? So it's always in the back of your mind, is what's going to • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • happen? To answer, I think, your earlier • • • • • question, it's always there in being thought of. So your doctor, Dr. • • Spoon, said that your sarcoidosis is not active, but he described it as simmering. Can you tell us what that is? Because I hadn't heard that before, but I think there are times when that's been my • • case. Right. So the last Pet scan I • • • • • • • had, he said, um, great • • • • • • news. There's no stark activity, uh, in the • • heart. There's no stark activity in the • • lungs. But as I look at your lymph nodes, they're • • glowing. And he said, it's not • • active. So let's just call simmering. It's • • there. • And let's not mess with your current medication • • regime, because ideally, they would love to taper you off. But I've had more than a few doctors tell me that if • • • you let the Sark flare again as you taper your meds, it comes back with a vengeance. And I really don't want vengeance, because vengeance, in my case, means I get more scarring on my • • heart. And then I got to rinse and repeat the medications, the ablaze again. So if I have to live with the • • medication regime I live on right • • now, so be it. And I think I've heard a couple of people on your • • • • podcast. I've just got to learn to live with what's being done. But in my choice with the cardiac Mans, I had another alternative, which was the ablasian. • Right. But you don't want to have to do another ablaze, • • • • • because even if that works, your heart will never • • be what it once. • • • • • • • • • Was. Every time they do that, it hurts your heart a little bit more. Right. And every flare you get hurt your heart a little bit more • • • permanently. • • And the phrase heart transplant has been used in front of me before, and that • • • • just scares me. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • And again, I don't want to ever get there, • • • • but it's out • • • • • • • there so whenever they do an Echo cardiogram, they're looking to ejection fraction. And I'm like, • • • • • • borderline. Okay. And they're like, if it drops to a certain point, then, • • uh, the next consideration • • • • • is heart transplant. I'm like, let's not go there • • • • • • yet. Let's see what we can do without before we get there. • • • Right. So you get up in the morning • • • • • • and do you work from • • • • home? What do you do? Do you go to work? I'm in a hybrid schedule. So two days at home, three • • • • • • • • • days at work. • Um, and, • um, three days are downtown Chicago. Uh, so if you ever been to • • • • Chicago, the Blue Cross building is right across from Millennium Park. If you ever went and saw the • • bean. I can see that from my office. Wow. • • • • • • • • • • • And the Metro, which is the, um, commuter training. You take that in • • • • there. We actually have a bus that runs from this train station, um, to the building. But I walk. I walk every time. So it's about twenty, 25 minutes. And again, I like being • outside. Yeah, I love the bean. The bean is so • • • • • • • cool. It's a sculpture that's shaped like a bean, and it's about the size of a small house. Is that fair? Yeah, that's fair. And it's just you see a mirror reflection no matter where you walk around it or under it or • • • • • • whatever. I love the bean. That's so cool. Um, and so you're, uh, walking twenty, • • • • • • 25, um, three days a week, and you're feeling fine, right? Yeah, they're back. So I'm walking fifty, 50 • • • • • • minutes. It's feeling okay. • • Um, • • • • • • • • • • • • • • awesome. You mentioned your relationship with God before we were talking, and other people have brought that up. Have you become more or less religious, or do you look at things in a more philosophical way? • • • • • • • • Now I'm going to go • • • towards no. But I also will say I continued, I'm continuing my spiritual journey. I'm continuing to try to • • • • • • • • • • • understand my faith, • • • um, about that. So right now I'm reading something • • that's • • where there was a group • • • • • • • • of priests, um, that actually did a critical evaluation of, • um, the four Gospels, trying, uh, to say, is this something that Jesus really would have said? And it's • • • • • really in depth. So I keep on exploring things. They might not be popular topics to talk about, but I'm just trying to • • • explore my • • • • • • • • • • faith. If you think about the volunteer work, I • • • • • • do think Christianity, a lot of it is about giving • • • • • • • • • • back. So, yes, I've been doing more and more and more of • • • • • • that. • • • • • But, • • • um, it's something I continue to explore, and it's just to • • me, it's fascinating. I think the underlying • • message • • • of Jesus, • • • • again, • • • • uh, love your • • neighbors • • • • • and love God above all. I think that's a great message, and it's hard to practice it sometimes loving your neighbors, but it's great to aspire to that. • • • • So I'm really interested in understanding about • • • that. Got you, Jack. Is there anything else you want to add at this. • • • • • • • • • • • Point. • • So this is an um aside. • • • • • • • • So after I had this cardiac • • • • • • • • • event every year since, two, um, thousand and one, I've gone on a canoe • • • trip. I don't know if you heard of • • • • • • • • • • • • Quetico. Yes, I've been there three times. Okay. • So for the • • • • • listeners, if you've heard of Boundary Waters in • • Minnesota, it's a place where there's no motor boats. It's canoes only quadico is the Canadian version of that. It has bigger in • • size and it may allow fewer people • • in. So I've been doing quadico trips, eight day, seven night trips since two 2001. And when nine • • • 911, we were in the • • • • • • • field. Nine 911, I what happened • • • on • • Tuesday? And, • • uh, uh, we were in the field. We had no • • idea. And when we came out of the field, we were • • • • • • • • • • told they like playing jokes. And you come back like, there's something like the camp ran out of hot water and the guy that picks us up • • • • says they • • • bombed the towers in the Twin Cities. • • • Um, I'm like, who's going to bomb Minneapolis St. Paul, right? Yeah. And so we thought it was a joke. We didn't believe it. And it took a phone call • • • home and for my seven year old daughter at that time to say, yes, they bombed New York to make it • • • • • real. • • Anyway, I go up to quitaco every year. And after this cardiac event, I said, I'm going. And my wife is like, you're not. I'm going. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • And two months before a • • trip, I got a blood clot. So with • • • • • this device, the ICD pacemaker, um, they run wires, uh, through your veins, down to your • • • heart. And typically, if a blood clot shows, it shows up • • • early. But mine showed up late. So now I'm on blood • • thinners. And if you know about the credit • • • • • • • code, there is no seven 711, no emergency care. You're all by yourself. There's no communication. Correct. Unless you have a • • • cell phone, right? Yeah. When we went, there were no cell phones, no walkie talkies, • • nothing. And • • so I'm going. Even with this heart condition • • • • • • • • • • and my reaction to Amy odorone • • • • • and the blood thinners, I'm going, which • • is • • • fairly not smartly, dangerous. A month before I went, I'm owing the grass • • • • • and come in and take a shower. And I'm washing myself. I'm, um, like, what's • • • this? I had a • • • • • hernia. • • And so I'm like, come • • • • on. So I bought one of those • • • • girdles that pushed it in. So I, um, went to Quidico that year with. You • • did? Yes. With all that going on. And my wife was not pleased, but I'm like, I got to go. This is sort of, um, like my annual • • • release. So I thought you would appreciate that • • story. It goes back to what I need to, um, be. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Outside. One of my bucket list things is to get back • • • • • • there. It's been over twenty 20 since I went, but I went three years in a row with a local group of guys and the fishing is the best fishing I've ever had in my • • life. But it's rigorous because we would paddle, I think, about one 110 miles where they dropped us off. Then we would sort of paddle back to a pickup • • • point in the canoe. And then you Portage between the Lakes. So you're carrying your canoe, you're carrying your backpack, you're looking out for • • • • bears, and you just basically fished your way to the, um, next campsite. Is that how you guys did it? Absolutely. • • And there's • • something people like. It's just canoeing. Well, the portagne is what kills people. So I brought a couple of newbies this year, • • • and the portages just kick their butt. Yeah, well, they can be a mile • • • • long. Some of them are very short. You hop for there's four, 400 within the Quittico Wilderness. Right. And only, as I recall, only two, 200 of even have names, and the rest of them are just regarded as large puddles. They're not worthy. But you go • • • • from body of water to body of water to body of • • • • • • water, and you follow your map and, • • um, hope you don't get lost. I had some scary moments, but I can't believe you're able to do that with • • • Sarcardosis. Yeah. So I'm still doing it • • • • • • • • • and made it through that trip. Uh, okay. But, • • um, that's what I want to • • • • • • do. And you've talked about it, I think, on your podcast several times • • about you got to get back • to what feels right. Your body might not be one 100% the way you want it, but you got to get back to what you want to • • do • is make the effort. So I just keep on making the • • • • • effort. Do you carry the canoe yourself when it's your, um, turn on the. • • • • • • • Portage? This year I did, yes. This year I, um, canoe because I had a solo canoe, and I did • • • a solo paddle because I was with two other guys, two new guys, and I couldn't find a four fourth. I • • • • sold. Okay. Call me. What month do you go? • • • Typically, I typically go after Labor Day just because the mosquitoes are down. Okay. And that's a good time to go. And again, if you're going back there at some point and you want a suggested • • • route, I've been through all the entry points in quadico, and I've hit most of the major paths, so I definitely have suggestions or, uh, tell you where it would be fun to go. Okay. Yeah, we'll have to talk. We'll start boring people really fast if we get into a deep dive into this remote Canadian • • • • • wilderness. • • • • • But, yeah, I can't believe that I'm, um, talking to somebody else who's actually been there, because when I bring it up, • • everybody, they have no idea what I'm talking about. Sometimes boundary waters mean something to people. Right. But critico, you fly in on a float plane, they drop you, uh, off, and • • then it's fantastic. I love it. Well, Jack, thank you so much good luck at the critico this year. If you're planning, uh, to go in September again. • • Absolutely. Okay. All • right. And I wish you all the luck in the world with fighting sarcodosis. • • • And thanks, uh, for fighting the good • • fight. Alright. Uh, thanks and I appreciate you let me tell my. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •  

BUZZ's Inside the Hive: Marketing Tips That Give Nonprofits More Buzz

In honor of Earth Day, today's show features nonprofits whose mission is environmental conservation and outdoor recreation – along with a for-profit business that's helping support their work. BUZZ creator Michael Hemphill talks with:New River Land Trust, which helps landowners preserve the rural character of their property in perpetuity.LEAP (Local Environmental Agricultural Project), which manages farmer's markets, mobile markets, community gardens and a community kitchen in support of local growers and low-income consumers.Southwest Native, which is donating a portion of proceeds in April 2022 to support the environmental work of FRIENDS of the Blue Ridge.Clean Valley Council, which promotes conservation and sustainability.And AAF Roanoke president Carrie Cousins brings the "buzz" with a free Earth Day-themed marketing tip for nonprofits.Are you a nonprofit with an event that we could help promote? Or a marketing problem we could help fix? Contact us and we'll share on an upcoming episode.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FOLLOW US:F A C E B O O K ➜ http://facebook.com/buzz4good​​I N S T A G R A M ➜ http://instagram.com/buzz4good​​L I N K E D I N ➜ https://www.linkedin.com/company/buzz...T W I T T E R ➜ http://twitter.com/buzz4good​​W E B S I T E ➜ http://buzz4good.com​​- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The United States has more than 1.5 million nonprofits — from homeless shelters, food banks and rescue squads to children's choirs, science museums and animal refuges — that employ one out of every 10 Americans. Like any company, nonprofits have salaries and bills to pay, a budget to balance. They require money. And if enough people don't know about them, don't believe in them, don't support them — in short, if they lack BUZZ — they suffer and die.

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UNPACKED

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 59:07


In the season 3 finale, Micah is joined by three current Americorps and City Year New Hampshire Service Leaders - Abby Watson, Elinor Bragaw, and Kailey Johnson. Abbey Watson is from Kalamazoo, Michigan. There she attended school and graduated with a Master's of Social Work degree. After studying in El Salvador and Guatemala, she realized that she wanted to explore educational systems outside of her own experiences. Abbey was introduced to City Year at a job fair and realized the organization would give her that opportunity. During her first year of service, she fell in love with the Manchester community and decided to return to serve another year. She credits this to the amazing students and teachers that she served alongside. The relationships she built and the energy, passion, empathy, and laughter shared by the students made her realize that she did not want her time in Manchester to be over so quickly. Elinor Bragaw is from Crozet, Virginia, a little town between Charlottesville and the Blue Ridge mountains. She lived in the same house all her life with her parents and three younger siblings up until she moved away to college in Washington, D.C. College was a rollercoaster. She took time off in the middle, worked as a camp counselor out in California, applied to transfer to other schools, and changed her major a few times, but she made it to the other side and graduated from American University in December 2019 with a degree in art history and a minor in political science. When she considered her next steps after college, she chose to serve with City Year, and her experience last year taught her that she is an educator. Her eyes were opened to the realities of the public education system and she believes it is a calling to dedicate her time to helping children have the best shot they can. Kailey Johnson grew up in Londonderry, New Hampshire. She graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 2020 and majored in psychology and justice studies. She also spent a very formative semester completing an internship through The Washington Center. During college, Kailey was also involved with the Kappa Delta sorority where they supported the philanthropies Prevent Child Abuse America and the Girl Scouts of America. The work of these organizations inspired her to advocate for children to have happy and healthy childhoods. This belief led her to join City Year after graduation. She was inspired by City Year's model of supporting kids through tutoring, and building communities within their schools. Kailey chose to serve in Manchester because it gave her the opportunity to learn and grow in a community that had been next door to her throughout her whole life. She decided to return for another year because she truly believes in the impact City Year can have on students and the community. To read more about their ongoing journeys, check out this post.

Built HOW
Chad Lariscy - Gaining 10% Market Share

Built HOW

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 24:21


In this episode, Lucas Sherraden talks with the CEO of The Mountain Life Real Estate Team, Chad Lariscy. Chad was born and raised in Blue Ridge and has been residing in Blairsville now for over 20 years, and he is definitely no stranger to life in the North Georgia mountains. His knowledge of the area, as well as his background in real estate, make him an excellent team owner, leader, and motivator of The Mountain Life Team. ---------- Visit www.builthow.com to sign up for our next live or virtual event. Part of the Win Make Give Podcast Network.

Ballmetto State Podcast
Richie Stevens, Blue Ridge High School

Ballmetto State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 33:09


In this episode of the Ballmetto State Podcast we talking with the head basketball coach of the 2022 3A State Champions Blue Ridge Tigers, Richie Stevens.  

SBB Radio
The Blue Ridge Gospel Showcase with Donna, Ben & Greg BRGS #133

SBB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 57:50


Donna -My son Ben was born in 1994 to a Mom who was an insulin dependent diabetic and had already lost another child at 12 weeks ….1 1/2 prior to Ben’s birth. When Ben was born he was perfectly healthy and mine and Greg’s bundle of Joy. As he grew of course as a Mom and a teacher I watched and monitored his growth and milestones. At age one he was babbling and saying Mama and Dada and then all of a sudden that just stopped and he stopped giving us eye contact and started pushing us away. Red flags started going off in my mind and I talked to his pediatrician and he said not to worry that it would come. Well… it continued to get worse and by age 2 1/2 our baby was diagnosed with moderate-severe Autism. Our whole world felt like it had crumbled around us. The hopes and plans and dreams we had dreamed for Ben were shattered. After a major pitty party and questioning God, Greg and I both prayed for the Lords strength and for God to use our test as a testimony. As we watched Ben grow we noticed that he loved music and was fascinated with guitars. We bought every kind of toy musical instrument he would even act like he was interested in. When he was 8 years old we bought him his first real child size guitar. He would strum it and try to chord it and absolutely loved it! I told him as he grew that if he would learn to play I would get him a nice guitar. As he grew all our Christmases became musical. He asked for different instruments each Christmas and his Granny, his Aunt Vickie and other members of our family would always get Ben something musical for his gift. Some friends of ours got Ben a DVD that had several lessons for beginners on how to play the guitar. Ben would go in his room and go through each lesson until he had it and then move on to the next lesson. By age 14 Ben had mastered all lessons and was playing on his own. A dear friend of our, Barry Scott helped him with his timing and rhythm. In the meantime I had showed Ben some chords on the piano and he began playing piano as well. So in 2012 after not being on the road singing for almost 9 years, I felt God calling us back into a ministry. We formed The Journeys. I sing, Ben plays, and my husband Greg speaks about raising a child with Autism. Ben is amazing and has been a blessing to so many. Without God nothing is possible but with God all things are possible. We thank God for our blessings every day!

Speaking of Travel®
The Joy Of Riding Is Reason Enough To Own A Motorcycle

Speaking of Travel®

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 47:04


I've heard from many people over the years that riding a motorcycle gives you the total blending of your mind and body and you can actually have a meditative and somewhat spiritual experience. Michael Gouge, editor of Blue Ridge Motorcycling Magazine and senior lecturer of mass communication at UNC Asheville, shares how motorcycling is a stress reliever and a confidence builder and helps boost your wellbeing. Also Kyle Ellison, founder of Wai Mauna SUP Tours, explains how paddle boarding lets you feel grounded in the moment and more alive. And offers so many ways to feel more connected to nature.And discover how the Asheville Regional  Airport's long-term design project will culminate in  a new, modernized airport to meet the needs of the region for decades to come.   

BUZZ's Inside the Hive: Marketing Tips That Give Nonprofits More Buzz
April 2, 2022 - People We Serve: Featuring your clients at your next nonprofit fundraiser

BUZZ's Inside the Hive: Marketing Tips That Give Nonprofits More Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 60:00


On today's show, BUZZ creator Michael Hemphill praises a recent fundraiser he attended in support of Virginia Children's Theatre, which made its clients, rather than its leadership, the stars of the show.Plus:FRIENDS of the Blue Ridge executive director Julie Whalen shares her nonprofit's 2021 pivot to embrace our entire region, which included an inspiring partnership with Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM).We talk up the Blue Ridge Marathon, and its impact on local nonprofits.And AAF Roanoke president Carrie Cousins shares her latest installment of "No Budget Marketing Minute."Are you a nonprofit with an event that we could help promote? Or a marketing problem we could help fix? Contact us and we'll share on an upcoming episode.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FOLLOW US:F A C E B O O K ➜ http://facebook.com/buzz4good​​I N S T A G R A M ➜ http://instagram.com/buzz4good​​L I N K E D I N ➜ https://www.linkedin.com/company/buzz...T W I T T E R ➜ http://twitter.com/buzz4good​​W E B S I T E ➜ http://buzz4good.com​​- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The United States has more than 1.5 million nonprofits — from homeless shelters, food banks and rescue squads to children's choirs, science museums and animal refuges — that employ one out of every 10 Americans. Like any company, nonprofits have salaries and bills to pay, a budget to balance. They require money. And if enough people don't know about them, don't believe in them, don't support them — in short, if they lack BUZZ — they suffer and die.

#TEAMrabbithole | A place to
#TEAMrabbithole 276 | Ashtyn Monea - Evolutionary Architecting - April 1, 2022

#TEAMrabbithole | A place to "find the others" - FURTHER UP AND FURTHER IN!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 131:50


Gridworker. Multidimensional educator. New Earth anchor. Energetic warrior. Join the team as we get to know Ashtyn; a Capricorn stellium chilling in the Blue Ridge making the shifts and doing the work. https://trueselfembodied.com/ ~~ https://www.teamrabbithole.com Original Image: Bryan Lahr (http://WyzardOfOdd.com) Intro/Outro: Ghost Hour - Rabbithole Broadcast via https://www.okitalk.online/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/teamrabbithole/message

Thinking Outside The Bud
Rick & Monique Fitzgerald, Co-founder, InnDica

Thinking Outside The Bud

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 29:22


Rick & Monique Fitzgerald, Co-founder, InnDica Monique Jackson-Fitzgerald Monique Jackson-Fitzgerald is an attorney and the co-founder of both InnDica.com, an online cannabis travel platform and Lazy Turtle Group, LLC, a creative agency. With a vision to modernize and destigmatize the public perception of plant medicines, and their use as part of an active lifestyle InnDica.com was launched in 2018. InnDica is an online resource catering to plant medicine and cannabis enthusiasts. The website features a curated list of cannabis-friendly hotels, retreats, consumption lounges, event venues, and activities. InnDica.com aims to nurture and provide a sanctuary for the bright community of cannabis enthusiasts to discover new experiences and share valued insight from their travels. As “InnDica Explorers,” visitors are invited to submit stories about their cannabis travel adventures for inclusion in the “Travelogue” digital magazine. Through her work as an attorney and business consultant with Lazy Turtle Group, Monique focuses on regulations involved with social consumption as well as cannabis tourism and events. With a passion for growing a conscious, sustainable cannabis industry and refreshing the public perception of cannabis, Monique's firm also provides consulting, branding, and packaging design services for licensed cannabis brands. They also assist ancillary businesses in strengthening their relationships with cannabis partners. Rick Fitzgerald, Co-founder, InnDica Rick is a Blue Ridge born artist and the co-founder of Lazy Turtle Group. As Director of Imagination, Rick has over 25 years of experience in brand identity, packaging, and digital design. He has launched and managed creative departments for global corporations including Shorewood Packaging, International Paper, and MPS. His designs have appeared across many consumer market segments including cannabis, hemp, music, liquor, cosmetics, HBA, and fashion. His focus on sustainability and innovation in packaging is at the forefront of all of our award-winning collaborations. Rick has an endless curiosity about the creative process and design mediums, which drives our agency. His “down-to-earth” nature and artistic approach are what turns our clients into our friends. https://inndica.com -https://lazyturtlegroup.com -@inndica420 (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest) -https://www.linkedin.com/company/inndica/?viewAsMember=true (InnDica LinkedIn) -www.linkedin.com/in/rickjamesfitzgerald (Rick's LinkedIn) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Conscious Millionaire  J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week
2330: Best of Corky Kaericher: Build Fast with Less Risk!

Conscious Millionaire J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 33:19


Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Today's featured episode... Corky Kaericher: Build Fast with Less Risk! Corky Kaericher works with his global services team to help companies achieve their business and technology goals from his off-grid, mountain top office in the beautiful Blue Ridge mountains of western North Carolina. He owns cats, dogs, chickens, horses and mules and lives life firmly on his own terms. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster! 

Conscious Millionaire Show
2330: Best of Corky Kaericher: Build Fast with Less Risk!

Conscious Millionaire Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 33:19


Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Today's featured episode... Corky Kaericher: Build Fast with Less Risk! Corky Kaericher works with his global services team to help companies achieve their business and technology goals from his off-grid, mountain top office in the beautiful Blue Ridge mountains of western North Carolina. He owns cats, dogs, chickens, horses and mules and lives life firmly on his own terms. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster! 

Becker’s Women’s Leadership
Kathy Bailey, President and Chief Executive Officer at UNC Health Blue Ridge

Becker’s Women’s Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 10:28


This episode features Kathy Bailey, President and Chief Executive Officer at UNC Health Blue Ridge. Here, she discusses her pride in her organization, her career journey, COVID-19 in her community, and more.

Rabbi Kalish’s Shiur
Nothing is Ever out of Control Blue Ridge Mishmar

Rabbi Kalish’s Shiur

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 44:44


“Best shuir of the year” - HaRav Ezi Wartelsky --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rabbikalish/support

Over A Pint Marketing Podcast
How To Market A Destination With David Aldridge

Over A Pint Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 56:27


#37 David Aldridge is the Director of Marketing at Visit Virginia's Blue Ridge. For those not familiar with this part of the world. Well, it's amazing. And a great place for a metro-mountain vacation.    David goes in-depth about what it takes to market a destination during the time of COVID. Spoiler alert it's not easy. In addition, we cover:    ✔ The current state of the industry ✔ The key metric everyone should look at  ✔ Why you need to spend time educating your internal audience ✔ The role of the website in the leisure travel space   David does a great job of blending both the strategic and tactical elements of marketing. Lots of great value in this episode.    Plus if you would like to learn more about destination marketing we have a couple of killer episodes for you.    Here's one. Marketing Nebraska Here's another. The State of Travel    Reach out to David on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidmaldridge/     ✅ Connect with Kurt at: Kurtl@celticinc.com ✅ Connect with Pat at: pmcgovern@ascedia.com ✅ Connect with Brian at: BrianM@celticinc.com  

The Viti+Culture Podcast
S2 EP0036 - Ethan Brown of Shelton Vineyards in the Yadkin Valley- Dobson, North Carolina

The Viti+Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 42:26


We conclude our Yadkin Valley, North Carolina wine series with Ethan Brown, a member of the next generation of Yadkin Valley winemakers, and winemaker at Shelton Vineyards - a pioneer in North Carolina fine wine. If you like this podcast, please be sure to rate us 5 stars in Apple podcasts and like our videos on YouTube. Check out Shelton Vineyards at:https://sheltonvineyards.com/Visit our website at www.VitiCulturePodcast.com, and don’t forget to share with your friends via all major social media platforms @VitiCULTUREPodVisit Bellangelo Winery and Missick Cellars at www.Bellangelo.com and www.MissickCellars.com.In this interview, we’re speaking with Ethan Brown, winemaker at Shelton Vineyards in Dobson North Carolina.  As pioneers of the Yadkin Valley AVA, Shelton Vineyards is the largest estate vinifera winery in the state of North Carolina, and one of the oldest in this young wine region.  Ethan carries a heavy responsibility for building on a tradition of winemaking excellence, and charting a new path with new product lines for Shelton.  Ethan was kind enough to take me around the  tasting room, the winemaking facility,  and the impressive grounds of this vineyard.  With the Blue Ridge mountains an ever present shadow on the horizon, the gentle rolling hills of Shelton inspire a sense of awe at the beauty of the place.  The winery is built into a hillside, allowing much of the production and aging areas to be entirely underground.  This impressive feature was compounded by exceedingly high ceilings, and a first rate design for the placement of everything from tanks to the bottling line.  This winery is in a transition, as the baton has been passed from the founders to their children.  This, combined with Ethan’s youth and professionalism, have set the stage for a renaissance at Shelton Vineyards, which I have the sense is about to explode with life and an even further elevation of their reputation. Get full access to The Viti+Culture Podcast Newsletter at viticulturepodcast.substack.com/subscribe

PMI Success Profiles Podcast
Interview with Corey Prince of PMI Blue Ridge in Hendersonville, North Carolina

PMI Success Profiles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 35:12


In this interview, we talk with Corey Prince of PMI Blue Ridge in Hendersonville, North Carolina about his experience in joining the PMI franchise and attending workshop in June of 2020. He and his father Richard currently operate in three pillars (residential, commercial, and short-term). He shares his story about how he got started part time, grew his business to a full time venture, and his plans for the future with his PMI business.

Carolina Outdoors
Get Your Hat On – Jesse Brown’s Outdoors

Carolina Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 11:45


(From 02.12.22, Segment 1) Hats are a must in the outdoors! They shade your eyes and keep debris, bugs, and more off of your head. At Jesse Brown's Outdoors, we have a large selection of headwear, including the classic Richardson trucker with JB logos! Whether you are hiking the Blue Ridge, fly fishing in a mountain stream, or simply heading to the brewery, the Jesse Brown's trucker has your back!

Haunt Jaunts
S4 Ep1: Get Swept Off Your Feet at These Bigfoot Museums

Haunt Jaunts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 21:29


In this episode we polka with the Skunk Ape in the Everglades, check out a Bigfoot butt print in Georgia, and visit the Bigfoot Handicapped Accessible Garden in Nebraska. And that's just scratching the surface of the booty-shaking fun we have getting swept off our feet in Bigfoot museums! Do you know which state officially declared one of its citizens their official Bigfoot Lady and issued an official proclamation designating October 20th the state's official Bigfoot day?  And would you believe me if I told you there's a Bigfoot beauty pageant where one lucky contestant is crowned Miss Skunk Ape?  If you answered no to any of the above, this episode has the answers!  All is revealed as we explore these 7 Bigfoot museums: Willow Creek-China Flat Museum in Willow Creek, CA Skunk Ape Research Headquarters in Ochopee, FL Bigfoot Discovery Museum in Felton, CA Sasquatch Outpost in Bailey, CO Expedition: Bigfoot! The Sasquatch Museum in Blue Ridge, GA Bigfoot Crossroads of America Museum and Research Center in Hastings, NE West Virginia Bigfoot Museum in Sutton, WV Want more Haunt Jaunts? Jaunt with us online anytime at HauntJaunts.net. Jaunt with Us Socially Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HauntJaunts Twitter: https://twitter.com/HauntJaunts Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hauntjaunts/?hl=en Host & Guide Courtney Mroch Music Danse Macabre - Violin Hook by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/3599-danse-macabre---violin-hook License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license No Spam Polka by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4139-no-spam-polka License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler: How To Expand Eastern Parks

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2022 50:15


With the great rush to the outdoors that we've seen since the Covid pandemic erupted, there have been many calls for more space in the National Park System. While there are places in the West that seem to be logical additions to the parks there, that's not the case in the East. So, if we want more park lands east of the Mississippi, how could we gain them?

Lander University Department of History and Philosophy Podcast
Interview with JD Whitt, District Executive of Blue Ridge Council, BSA

Lander University Department of History and Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 22:48


In this episode I interview Mr. JD Whitt who serves as District Executive of Blue Ridge Council for the Boy Scouts of America. In this interview, Mr. Whitt tells us about his job and how being a history major has helped with it. In addition, if you listen to the end you'll be treated to a ghost story!

Echo Tips
Episode 178 Blue Ridge Reading Skill and Similar Services

Echo Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 13:58


The Blue Ridge Reading skill serves Virginians who are blind, visually impaired or otherwise can't access print reading materials by reading local newspapers, magazines and other publications. Use this skill to access the live stream, hear the daily schedule or listen to recent programs or podcasts. The Blue Ridge Reading Service Alexa Skill is provided by WVTF and New Vision at Goodwill®. WVTF is a non-profit that relies on volunteers and financial donations. New Vision at Goodwill® is proud to aid WVTF in supplying this service. Goodwill Industries of the Valleys is a non-profit organization serving Central, Southwest, and Southside Virginia. New Vision at Goodwill seeks to promote independence and equality for people who are blind and visually impaired. We educate, inform, and provide resources, so people with visual impairments can live their fullest lives. To learn more about our other services see the website.www.goodwillvalleys.com/newvision

Mesivta of Waterbury
Rabbi Kalish - From It's All Me to it's All Hashem (Blue Ridge Mishmar)

Mesivta of Waterbury

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 39:55


L'Zechus Refuah Shelaima דוד יוסף אלימלך בן אלישבע הינדא

Vibe Radio Network
Night Visions Returns -The Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel

Vibe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 55:00


Night Visions Returns -The Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel

Faith Pest Control North Georgia Podcast
North Georgia Jasper Pantry Have Pests! What To Do

Faith Pest Control North Georgia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 11:17


Michael Stewart Hello again, it's the Faith Pest Control Podcast. I'm Mike Stewart, and we're here today to talk about those bugs in your pantry. You know if you live in Jasper, Georgia, if you live in Blue Ridge, Georgia, The post North Georgia Jasper Pantry Have Pests! What To Do first appeared on Faith Pest Control.

Virginia Outdoor Adventures
22. Hiking McAfee Knob and Virginia's Triple Crown with Diana Christopulos, Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club

Virginia Outdoor Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 44:58


“The actual day-to-day maintenance of the trail is almost 100% done by volunteers. We need to take good care of it for ourselves and for future generations.” -Diana ChristopulosOften referred to as “one of the most spectacular hikes in the US,” McAfee Knob attracts hikers from across the world and is one of the most photographed spots on the entire Appalachian Trail. Former Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club President, Diana Christopulos, shares everything you need to know before hitting the trail in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, including where to gear up, what to do while you're in town, and where to find the best local brew at the end of the day. Diana also gives us insight into what it takes to maintain and preserve a trail that receives 70,000 visitors a year. Let's Go!Follow VAOA Podcast:Website I Facebook I Instagram I TwitterVAOA Podcast is Sponsored by: Virginia Department of Wildlife ResourcesShop DWREnter "VIRGINIA10" at checkout for 10% off at Appalachian Gear CompanyLinks:Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club Website I Facebook I Meetup I Store I Specialty License Plate Diana's BlogVirginia's Triple CrownMcAfee Knob HikeBlue Ridge Outdoors MagazineBlue Ridge MarathonCox Conserves Blue Ridge Land ConservancyRoanoke Outside Olde Salem Brewing CompanyParkway Brewery Roanoke Brew Pubs Roanoke Wineries Walkabout Outfitters Hotel RoanokeSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JessicaBowser )

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends
The Year in Review: A Listen Back at Your Favorite Episodes of 2021 — Episode 105

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:12


It's so hard to believe that we're coming to the end of another year. And, with all the hope we had going into 2021 after a traumatic 2020, I think it's safe to say that this was also a very difficult year. That's not to say there weren't a lot of positive things to happen this year, but I just wanted to start by acknowledging the fact that 2021 was hard — for me, for a lot of you, for us. But, if you're still showing up, whatever that looks like at the moment, I see you and I applaud you. It's not easy — and especially not in the work that many of you do. But, we made it through the year together. It's rare that I get on the podcast to just do a monologue — and honestly, it feels kind of strange not having a conversation with someone else for this episode — but I wanted to end the year with a huge thank you to you, our listeners, for going through this year with me and all of the wonderful guests who have shared their stories on the show this year. It was a year of some of the best conversations I've ever had the privilege of being a part of, a year of milestones, and also a bit of a bittersweet year as we said goodbye to my longtime cohost, colleague and friend, Roxanne Sutton, as she moved on from NRPA to, well, be the boss that she is! We still miss her endless wisdom on the podcast, though. This year we released our 100th official episode, we surpassed 100,000 downloads of the show – which, I can't thank you enough for continuing to listen that many times. We were also nominated by Blue Ridge Magazine for the Best of the Blue Ridge awards, which we'll be finding out the results of in February – so another thank you to everyone who voted for the podcast! All of those milestones are due to your continued support and the amazing individuals who have been open to sharing their experiences. So, today we're listening back at some of the most popular episodes from this year. The things these folks shared on the podcast taught me so much this year on a deeply personal level, and I hope you feel the same. Tune in to the full episode below as I reflect on each of these 13 most-downloaded episodes from 2021 and share inspiring messages from guests of each episode: Creating Opportunities for Underserved Youth in Louisville — Episode 084 Creating a Space for Women in Parks and Recreation — Episode 085 One Year Later: COVID-19 and Parks and Recreation — Episode 086 The Importance of Amplifying Contemporary Indigenous Voices — April Bonus Episode What Inclusion and Accessibility Mean to a Special Olympian — Episode 088 Creating a Culture of Transgender Inclusion in Sports — Episode 092 Fostering an LGBTQ+ Inclusive Environment in Parks and Recreation — Episode 094 Our Park and Recreation Story: How One Family Finds Peace in Parks — July Bonus Episode The Genesis Project: How a Mother Is Keeping Her Son's Spirit Alive — Episode 095 Leaving a Lasting Legacy in The Big Apple Through a Culture of Care — Episode 098 On a Mission to End Playspace Inequity for Good — Episode 099 Inspiring Others to Experience the Fullness of Their Humanity — Episode 102 How Unlikely Hikers Is Creating Community and Belonging Outside — Episode 103

The Journey to an ESOP
EP42 - Third Party Administrator's role in the ESOP ...discussion. With Carla Klingler at Blue Ridge and Associates.

The Journey to an ESOP

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 46:25


In this episode Carla and I discuss the planning needed for a company on a journey to an esop dealing with 404, 415, and 409(p) requirements, limitations and application of the rules to make sure your company is ESOP feasible.   Carla has a really cool background - and actually worked with Louis Kelso economist who is notably the inventor and founder of ESOPs.

The Ground Shots Podcast
#65: Wild Tending Series / Janet Kent and Dave Meesters of the Terra Sylva School of Botanical Medicine on disempowering the engines of disruption through intentional land-tending

The Ground Shots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 173:09


Episode #65 of the Ground Shots Podcast is a conversation with Dave Meesters and Janet Kent of the Terra Sylva School of Botanical Medicine out of Madison County, North Carolina. https://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com/podcastblog/terrasylvaschool After trying to get together for a conversation all summer, we finally met up in the early fall at Dave and Janet's herbalism school classroom at the Marshall High Studios, in Marshall, North Carolina. It was a frigid fall day and when I arrived, they had tea going and snacks out on a table in their beautifully lit and decorated studio space. It was obviously curated and inhabited by herbalists. Dave and Janet run the Terra Sylva School of Botanical Medicine with Jen Stovall, and have a clinical herbalism practice in the rural area where they live and the nearby city of Asheville, NC. Dave Meesters grew up in Miami, Florida and attended college at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He moved to Asheville, North Carolina in the winter of 1998. In 2003, his formal herbal training began with an apprenticeship with CoreyPine Shane at the Blue Ridge School of Herbal Medicine, and since then his experience has included organizing and staffing a free clinic in New Orleans in the months after hurricane Katrina, and starting and practicing at a free clinic in Asheville's homeless day shelter. Dave has plans to be involved with another herbal free or low-cost clinic in the future, but until then he sees clients privately and provides care to the mountain folks in his rural Appalachian neighborhood, most of whom would rather see an herbalist than a doctor. From 2013 to 2016, Dave was, with Janet, the director and primary instructor at the Terra Sylva School's summer apprenticeship program, which was held on the communal mountain land where he resides before the school moved to Marshall. He and Janet are the founders of Medicine County Herbs, an herb apothecary, medicinal plant nursery, and blog. Dave sees herbalism as a way to provide a more appropriate, accessible, pleasurable, and effective form of health care than the dominant model, and as a means to bond and integrate ourselves with plants, the garden, and the wilds. His herbalism is wedded to a life-long resistance to the forces of domination and alienation, especially domination of and alienation from Nature. His practice and his teaching reflect a deep evolving holism attained by listening to, honoring, embracing, and collaborating with the whole of Nature, and by his study of the threads connecting holistic physiology, energetics, ecology, gardening, systems theory, magic, alchemy and permaculture.   Janet Kent is a clinical and community herbalist, educator, gardener and writer. The child of two naturalists, Janet grew up in the foothills of the Blue Ridge mountains, learning the amazing diversity of regional wild flowers at an early age. She began studying the medicinal uses of plants when she moved to a rich Appalachian cove high in the mountains of Madison county, North Carolina fifteen years ago. She did not set out to become an herbalist, but as she learned over the years in her forest home, if we are open, we do not change the land we inhabit as much as it changes us. The transformative healing power of the plants around her turned an interest into a calling. The vast power to heal through reconnection is the medicine she most seeks to share. Whenever possible, she encourages her students and clients to grow their own herbs, to make their own medicine, and most of all, to experience the more-than-human world first hand. Here is where deep, foundational healing is most profound. Janet views herbal medicine as a means of reconnecting to the long tradition of plant medicine in rural Appalachia. This tradition has become more relevant with the ailing state of the dominant health care system and the rising cost of herbal medicine. Janet considers herbalism the best option for addressing injustice in health care. Herbalists, being outside the biomedical system, can avoid its inequalities. Affordable care, medicine and education are central to this paradigm. In addition to being co-founder and a core faculty member at the Terra Sylva School of Botanical Medicine, Janet also runs a medicinal and native plant nursery, apothecary and blog, Medicine County Herbs with Dave. Terra Sylva combines the experience of herbalists who've done their work in very different regions: rural Appalachia and the city of New Orleans. Dave Meesters and Janet Kent founded and run Medicine County Herbs in the mountains of North Carolina and publish the Radical Vitalism blog, while Jen Stovall is one of the herbalists behind the Crescent City's Maypop Community Herb Shop. Despite the geographical separation, this team have been partners in herbalism for over a decade, going back to the first herb classes Jen & Dave taught together in New Orleans in 2004. The Terra Sylva School fulfills a dream we've nurtured for a long time, to meld our diverse strengths and perspectives to create a comprehensive, dynamic program well-suited to equip and inspire the next generation of herbalists to practice in the 21st century. Our teaching reflects both Janet & Dave's land-based herbalism practiced in a rural setting and Jen's experience caring for folks in the big city.   In this conversation with Dave and Janet, we talk about:   some of the culture of the holler Dave and Janet live in deep in southern Appalachia pros and cons of living remotely in Appalachia how herbalism tied them to the land they live on and kept them there when other folks involved in the land project didn't stay teaching herbalism online vs. in person the magic of tuning into one small piece of land year after year Dave and Janet's wild-tending and land-tending work over 20 years in Madison county the problem with human misanthropy in punk culture or the ‘humans suck' mentality the importance of human tending on land and Appalachia specifically the effects of capitalism on wild harvest of medicinal plants and the complex nuances of this, and effects Michael Moore's books and teachings had on wild plant populations like Yerba Mansa we geek out on Pedicularis as an example of a plant that is tricky to wildcraft because of its inability to be cultivated some of Dave and Janet's views on ‘invasive plants' and land-tending and the responsibility of human engagement why it is important to ask where the garden begins and ends? how land-tending and restoration can't be about going back to a past that is impossible to recreate due to loss of topsoil and keystone species (think Chestnuts in the east) but about working with a compass of creating diversity and resilience in a rapidly changing world, tending to baselines of the past and ever-shifting baselines of present What can disempowering the engines of disruption with other disruption look like? some thoughts on changes in ‘western' herbalism from a focus on the individual to a focus on the collective and cultural mending using ‘biomedicine' vs. ‘allopathic' to describe mainstream western medicine and some history around the use of these words Dave and Janet's podcast ‘The Book on Fire,' what it focuses on and why they facilitate it we do a mini overview of the book ‘The Caliban and the Witch,' a book they review and deconstruct on their podcast (book linked in Link list below)   Links: Terra Sylva School of Botanical Medicine Radical Vitalism essay by Janet and Dave on their underlying philosophy To Fulfill the Promise of Herbalism Dave's piece on the power and potential for grassroots herbalism Uncontrollable Night: Herbs for Grief Janet's piece on working with herbs to ease the phases of grief The Book on Fire podcast “The Caliban and the Witch: Women, the Body and Primitive Accumulation” book by Silvia Federici mentioned on the podcast, reviewed in detail by Dave and Janet on their podcast ‘The Book on Fire' “Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World” by Emma Marris, briefly mentioned in the podcast, also mentioned in GSP Episode #53 :  Wild Tending Series / Gabe and Kelly on ecological history, anthropogenic landscapes and the negative side of conservation Mountain Gardens, a regional Appalachian botanical sanctuary run by Joe Hollis mentioned on the podcast Mountain Gardens Youtube Channel, mentioned on the podcast Donna Haraway “Staying with the Trouble”, mentioned in the podcast, a book Dave and Janet review on their podcast ‘The Book on Fire'       Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute monthly to our grassroots self-funding of this project  For one time donations to support this podcast: Paypal : paypal.me/petitfawn VENMO: @kelly-moody-6 Cashapp: cash.app/$groundshotsproject   Our website with an archive of podcast episodes, educational resources, past travelogues and more: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com  Our Instagram pages: @goldenberries / @groundshotspodcast Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Guest music: Little Wind and Sea by Village of Spaces This episode hosted by: Kelly Moody Produced by: Kelly Moody

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.
2021 End of the Year Recap with Beth and Marcy

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 21:51


Wine Road Podcast Episode 140 Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery Episode 140 | End of the Year Recap with Beth and Marcy As the year draws to a close, Beth and Marcy recap what went down on the Wine Road in 2021 and what's on the horizon for 2022. Wine of the Day – Orsi Vineyards Sparkling Brut Wine Word of the Day – Legs /Tears Podcast Sponsor – Ron Rubin Winery SHOW NOTES 1:15 Wine of the Day-- Orsi Family Sparkling Brut 3:15 Wine and Food Affair recap. 4:35 Tickets on sale now for Winter Wineland in January15 & 16th, 2022 and plans are in the works for Barrel Tasting which will be March 3,4,5,6 2022. 6:16 Our highlight of the year—Wine Road Podcast was inducted into the Taste Awards Hall of Fame and we won best Regional Podcast. Our medal count is now at three! 7:00 But the real highlight is getting email form you, our listeners! So keep those cards and letters coming! 7:50 Word of the Day-- Beth's found a few new words—Awewalk & Thirsty. Our wine word: Legs. 11:18 This year we rebooted our Varietal of the Month feature and you can find them al on the Wine Road website. 11:44 New Members-- Ehert, Baldarssai, and Mengler wines all joined the Wine Road in 2021. Other news stuff-- New coffee shop in Geyserville, the Montage hotel, and wine Road member Coyote Sonoma doing music and trivia nights. Also new in Occidental --Altamont General Store. 14:40 Geyserville Inn has been newly remodeled and it's surrounded by vineyards and next door is the Geyserville Grill 15:28 New in Sebastopol Sonoma Burger, and Blue Ridge in the Barlow 16:08 More things to check out--Sonoma Canopy Tours is happening and the Armstrong Woods have reopened! Check out Sonoma County Parks for links to all types of activities. Green Music Center at Sonoma State. 18:00 Order a Wine Road map to plan your visit. Things are popping again! Links Orsi Sparkling Wine https://orsifamilyvineyards.com/index.html Ehert https://www.ehretwinery.com/ Baldassari https://www.bfwwine.com/ Mengler https://www.menglerwine.com/ Coyote Sonoma https://www.coyotesonoma.com/ Geyserville Inn   https://geyservilleinn.com/ Altamont General Store https://www.altamontgeneralstore.com/ Sonoma Burger   https://www.sonomaburger.com/ Blue Ridge Kitchen https://brkitchen.com/ Podcast Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery -- https://ronrubinwinery.com/ Wine Road https://www.wineroad.com Wine Road Podcast Instagram -- @wineroadpodcast Credits: The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA. http://thresholdstudios.info/

Virginia's Blue Ridge Podcast - Tourism NEWS for Roanoke, Salem, Franklin County and Botetourt County
Visit Virginia‘s Blue Ridge Episode 29 - Score With The Roanoke Rail Yard Dawgs

Virginia's Blue Ridge Podcast - Tourism NEWS for Roanoke, Salem, Franklin County and Botetourt County

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 27:58


The Roanoke Rail Yard Dawgs play from October to April every year! Head to https://www.railyarddawgs.com/ for tickets and more info

Sis & Tell Podcast
"The Root of Evil"

Sis & Tell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 31:59


The sisters talk about Amanda‘s tooth troubles, their Bigfoot encounters and the right answer to the upside down pineapple story. Sis & Tell, an award-winning weekly comedy podcast, is hosted by southern Jewish sisters Alison Goldstein Lebovitz from PBS' The A List and comedian Amanda Goldstein Marks.

This Podcast Doesn't Exist
Ep. 58: Hapless Millennials: The Beale Ciphers

This Podcast Doesn't Exist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 72:06


A treasure in the Blue Ridge? Almost a billion dollars? Uncrackable ciphers and a story that's a bit too good? This week, Emma gifts Shannon with a very Shannon-y episode about The Beale Ciphers, a set of codes printed in the 1880s that continue to draw people in. If you find the treasure the codes lead you to, you could get your own McNugget of gold! Join us and find out if we can really dig up this treasure! Or if it's just another movie Shannon wrote on the fly (she's getting really good at it, you guys). Sources: The Mother Source The Museum of Unnatural Mystery reprint of the pamphlet “Discovered: The Secret of Beale's Treasure” by Joe Nickell, found on JSTOR Northern Virginia Magazine Mental Floss Virginia Living Magazine The NSA's stash of copies

No, I Know
EP#95 Jewel of The Blue Ridge

No, I Know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 60:01


A new series begins! Travel with us on "Episode from the Road". First stop: Jewel of the Blue Ridge in Marshall, NC. We parked the little teardrop trailer we traveled with and our host Chuck Blethen took James and I on a tour of his spectacular property called Jewel of the Blue Ridge. Over his lifetime, Chuck Blethen has been an Engineer, he studied geophysics, a businessman, inventor, entrepreneur, author, and lecturer, Chuck has 40 years' experience traveling and drinking wines. He has been a guest lecturer at various colleges and universities, in 68 countries and he speaks four languages. In addition to being the quintessential resource on muscadine grapes and growing them, Blethen has presented two TED talks on viticulture, is the author of two books on wine etiquette and entertaining, is a guest lecturer on wine aboard several cruise lines, trains judges for North Carolina wine competitions, plus he makes grape wines, country wines, Meade, cider, beer, grappa, raises Scottish highland cows and chickens, operates an RV campground, he enjoys his ham radio and so much more, are you ready? Here we go. All Music and Lyrics by James Harrell and Ilyana Kadushin.

Exploration Local
Virginia's Blue Ridge: A Premier Destination For Outdoor Recreation, Unique Attractions, Diverse Culture & Culinary Experiences

Exploration Local

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 53:55


Virginia's Blue Ridge is made up of the City of Roanoke at its heart and surrounding communities within an hour radius, including the City of Salem, Botetourt County, Franklin County, and Roanoke County.The region offers a refined, authentic, Metro Mountain adventure nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains. It's a premier destination for outdoor recreation offering over 1,000 miles of trails for adventure. Roanoke is the largest city along the Appalachian Trail, and the region is home to the Virginia Triple Crown, showcasing three of the best hiking trails in the Commonwealth of Virginia - Dragon's Tooth, McAfee Knob, and Tinker Cliffs.In this episode, I sit down with Kristine McCormick, Outdoor Experiences Manager at Visit Virginia's Blue Ridge, and we talk about many of the things that have earned Roanoke the distinct honor of being nominated as the top “Place to Raise An Outdoor Family.”We talk about the Farmers Market that dates back to 1882, museums, restaurants & craft breweries, festivals, and an interpretive greenway that allows visitors and locals alike to explore from downtown to the summit of Mill Mountain, Roanoke's highest point. We also talk about multi-purpose trails, southern hospitality, fine arts, and the fact that you don't have to leave the City of Roanoke to experience outdoor adventures. But we also talk about the surrounding areas that are close by too; where you can experience trails, rivers, lakes, and easy access to the Blue Ridge Parkway.I'm excited to branch out of my beautiful area here in western NC and return to the state where I first fell in love with the Blue Ridge Mountains. I truly hope you enjoy this episode. Kristine McCormickOutdoors Experience ManagerVisit Virginia's Blue Ridge101 Shenandoah Avenue, NERoanoke, VA  24016www.visitVBR.comPhone: (540) 342-6025 Ext. 125MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODETriple CrownRoanoke, Virginia GO FESTHiking in RoanokeMill Mountain ParkBe A #TrailsetterMike Andress, HostExploration Local PodcastEmail: mike@explorationlocal.comWebsite LinkInstagram: explorationlocalFacebook: https://m.facebook.com/explorationlocal/ 

Dulcimerica with Bing Futch
Episode 572 - “Blue Ridge Breakdown”

Dulcimerica with Bing Futch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


 Direct DownloadThe final of four improvisational pieces recorded next to Wolfpit Branch in Black Mountain, North Carolina. Bing plays “Blue Ridge Breakdown” on the mountain dulcimer. Bing Futch is endorsed by Folkcraft Instruments, V-Picks and Zither Stands.Enjoy "Dulcimerica"? Consider supporting the program by becoming a patron!

Becker’s Healthcare -- Spine and Orthopedic Podcast
Mark Schwartz, CEO of Blue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center

Becker’s Healthcare -- Spine and Orthopedic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:45


Mark Schwartz, CEO of Blue Ridge Orthopaedic & Spine Center, joined the podcast to talk about how policy changes affect ASCs and outlook for future growth.

Virginia's Blue Ridge Podcast - Tourism NEWS for Roanoke, Salem, Franklin County and Botetourt County
Visit Virginia‘s Blue Ridge Episode 27 Return to the Stage at Mill Mountain Theatre

Virginia's Blue Ridge Podcast - Tourism NEWS for Roanoke, Salem, Franklin County and Botetourt County

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 42:36


Thanks so much to Ginger Poole for coming and telling us all about the great shows coming up on the Trinkle Main Stage at Mill Mountain Theatre For more information and tickets head to www.millmountain.org 

The Rock and Roll Geek Show
The Lonely Mushroom Hunter.

The Rock and Roll Geek Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


I'm in Blue Ridge, Georgia, fishing and hunting for mushrooms  Also , Chris Capelle , the Rock and Roll Copywriter and ladies man, calls in with a Rolling Stones show review Music by Alice Cooper Listen to all of these bands on Amazon Music and I get a kickback. Donate to the show – Rock […]

The Canyons Are Calling
Cascading in GA with Hill Belfi.

The Canyons Are Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 57:08


I chat with Georgia Tech Outdoor Rec Cascading expert Hill Belfi. I had wondered why GA tech ordered so much canyoneering gear from Imlay. Hill reached out when she found out about the podcast to let me know about what they call Cascading. It sounds so fun I my have to talk my husband into going there. Hill Belfi is a 22 year old resident of Atlanta, Georgia and a senior at the Georgia Institute of Technology studying biomedical engineering. The name Hill is her mother's maiden name… the mountain sports are just coincidence! She grew up in Atlanta and spent her weekends as a kid solving scavenger hunts, playing soccer, reading every adventure story she could get her hands on, and in the Blue Ridge mountains kayaking, rock hopping, and hiking. Once at Georgia Tech, she signed on as student staff in the great sport of Cascading for Outdoor Recreation Georgia Tech (ORGT, pronounced O-R-G-T or or-git), a department of Georgia Tech's rec center that offers outdoor adventure trips in 9 different sports. She leads cascading trips for Georgia Tech all over the southeast, everything from teaching beginners to scouting new locations. Before COVID-19, she was interning with Johnson and Johnson's medical device division working to manufacture needles and sutures. When she's not rappelling waterfalls, you can find her working in a machine shop on campus, scouting out new taco places in Atlanta, playing guitar, or watching the Bachelorette with her roommates. Hill is an biomedical engineering student, a wilderness first responder, an avid houseplant parent, the president of one of the biggest college outdoor programs in the country, an enthusiastic member of the natural-anchors club, and a proud cascader – a canyoneer in a place without canyons. If you you like more information from Hill about Cascading In Ga email her at hbelfi@gmail.com If you have an idea for the show please email me at thecanyonsarecalling@gmail.com Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/489678298671354 Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/canyonsarecalling Back ground music is by Chris Zollinger: Chris Zollinger is a Professional Handpan player, Drummer/Percussionist, Environmental Activist, Eagle Scout, and Florida Master Naturalist. He recently relocated to southern Utah from Sarasota, Florida where he played music and guided kayaking tours in gator filled waters as a master naturalist. You can find out more about Chris and buy his CD at https://www.zthehandpanman.com Intro Music is by Tig Booth. You can reach out to him by email nathaniel.booth@gmail.com or on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/nathaniel.booth.9 To keep me busy at work and to read more about canyoneering you can go the Imlay Canyon Gear Website. https://www.canyoneeringusa.com Our cover photo was taken by Eric Beard. Your can follow him on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/desert_rat75/ See ya in a couple weeks, the canyons are calling, I gotta go! Sponsorships: off for this episode --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shirlz-rox/message

Behind the Book
Grace Greene on the Importance of Being True to Yourself

Behind the Book

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 74:03


In the first episode of Behind the Book, co-hosts Karen McQuestion and Tess Thompson interview bestselling Women's Fiction author Grace Greene. Grace discusses her process for writing novels, how she got her start in publishing, and gives inspiring advice for aspiring authors.  About Grace Greene:Grace Greene writes women's fiction and contemporary romance with suspense ~ Stories of heart and hope ~ from the Outer Banks to the Blue Ridge. A Virginia native, Grace has family ties to North Carolina. She writes books set in both locations ~ and in those beautiful landscapes in-between.The Emerald Isle books, BEACH RENTAL, BEACH WINDS, and BEACH WEDDING (as well as the novellas BEACH CHRISTMAS, BEACH WALK, and the short story, BEACH TOWER) are set in North Carolina where "It's always a good time for a love story and a trip to the beach."Or travel down Virginia Country Roads for Women's Fiction with Suspense in KINCAID'S HOPE, A STRANGER IN WYNNEDOWER, and CUB CREEK and "Take a trip to love, mystery and suspense." LEAVING CUB CREEK, is the sequel to CUB CREEK.BEACH RENTAL, her debut novel, won the Booksellers Best award in both the Traditional and Best First Book categories. BEACH RENTAL and BEACH WINDS were each awarded 4.5 stars, Top Pick by RT Book Reviews magazine. KINCAID'S HOPE received a 4 star review from that same magazine.Grace began writing for Lake Union, an Amazon Publishing Imprint in 2017, with the release of THE HAPPINESS IN BETWEEN on January 31st and THE MEMORY OF BUTTERFLIES, released on September 5th. WILDFLOWER HEART, the first novel in THE WILDFLOWER HOUSE Series, published in January 2019 and WILDFLOWER HOPE followed in September. The third in the series, a Christmas novella, WILDFLOWER CHRISTMAS, arrived in November of that same year.​A LIGHT LAST SEEN ~ another Cub Creek novel (a single tile) ~ released in February 2020. Grace is currently working on a return to the beach with her next novel.Grace lives in central Virginia. Stay current with Grace's releases and appearances at www.GraceGreene.com and sign up for her newsletter. Grace loves to hear from readers. You'll also find Grace here:Twitter: @Grace_GreeneFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/GraceGreeneBooksGoodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/Grace_GreenePinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/gracegreeneauth/Amazon's Author Central: amazon.com/author/gracegreene