Podcasts about The Virginians

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The Virginians

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Latest podcast episodes about The Virginians

Virginia Public Radio
For many across Virginia, dental health care is still out of reach—these programs are trying to bridge the gap

Virginia Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


Until last summer, nearly 5 million Virginians lacked dental insurance. Expansions to Medicaid in the past year have helped, but as Roxy Todd reports, there's still a shortage of dentists in parts of the Commonwealth who are willing to accept low-income patients.

The Retirement and IRA Show
Pensions, Social Security, RMDs, Sequential Risk, and Secure Income: Q&A #2232

The Retirement and IRA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 102:03 Very Popular


Jim and Chris discuss listeners questions relating to pension rollovers, Social Security benefits, RMDs, mitigating sequential risk, and secure income. (3:15) PSA; A listener from Alabama links to an article about Alabama not taxing pensions that are rolled into IRAs. (9:45) A Virginian listener wonders about the best way to find his estimated Social Security […] The post Pensions, Social Security, RMDs, Sequential Risk, and Secure Income: Q&A #2232 appeared first on The Retirement and IRA Show.

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Tim Matheson Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 65:43


If you look up “fun,” it'll take you right to this thing right here. Exceeding my high expectations, Tim Matheson is even more gorgeous, charming, intelligent, animated, accessible, and fabulous than I could've imagined. Don't think I've ever had more fun at 11 in the morning. Squeezing us in on a busy day of meetings, and a table read for Netflix's #1 smash, Virgin River, which Tim both stars in, and oft directs, he was relaxed, gave us his full attention, energy, passion, and focus, and, what a treat it was after all these years of adoring him. We jumped into Animal House, how it went down, how he got it, what almost was, Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Peter Reigert, Karen Allen, Mark Metcalf, who, thanks to his extreme kindness, introduced me to Tim, making today possible. We circled back through this Burbank boys' start, My Three Sons, Leave it to Beaver, voicing Jonny Quest, the Western years, Bonanza, The Virginian, co-starring with Kurt Russell in The Quest, opposite Henry Fonda, and Lucille Ball in Yours, Mine and Ours, studying at every turn, including a year of Improv, leading to the big stretch, comedy and portraying the good bad boy, working with Landis and then Speilberg and again Belushi in 1941. All the while absorbing and honing his craft, whilst learning from the masters. We talked The West Wing, composer Snuffy Walden, our 2 degrees, Aaron Sorkin, Rob Lowe, Allison Janney, Bradley Whitford, Martin Sheen, Tommy Schlamme, the brilliance, professionalism, and frenetic pace. With our time swiftly waning we touched on This Is Us and landed on VIrgin River, currently readying to roll on Season 5, as I and many binge the just dropped Season 4. I could've talked with Tim all day and still have longed for more. What a great spirit! Such joie de vivre, not to mention ridiculously easy on the eyes, ears, and I suspect, all five senses. Put it all together- it was FUN! Two thumbs way up. Tim Matheson Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson *** Wednesday, 8/3/22, 11 am PT, 2 pm ET*** Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here:
https://bit.ly/3JsAJK5 All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best tressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ And, Blue Microphones

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 3, 2022: Throneburg challenges Good to a debate for Fifth District seat; Albemarle PC sees options to continue for growth management

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:18


There are many made-up holidays that somehow have found their way into being mentioned on this particular channel of programming as part the introduction. For some reason, today is Clean Your Floors Day, though it’s unclear who makes the money off of those greetings cards. But how clean are your floors? Are you a rebel without a broom, or are you a vacuum warrior? It’s a very good thing that none of the rest of this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement has anything to do with this particular topic. But I will have you know, I mopped mine yesterday in anticipation of this very important day. On today’s show:So far there are no debates scheduled in the contested Fifth Congressional District race but Democrat Josh Throneburg wants to change thatArea home sales volumes have decreased, though the cost to buy a place to live continues to increaseGreene County hires a water and sewer director to prepare to expand supplySeveral area organizations receive funding from Virginia Humanities, including a project to tell stories of PVCC students who have been or are in prisonAlbemarle County continues to review its Comprehensive Plan and the seven-member Planning Commission got their chance to review growth management options late last month First shout-out is for LEAP’s new Thermalize Virginia program In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Have you been thinking of converting your fossil-fuel appliances and furnaces into something that will help the community reduce its greenhouse gas emissions? Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP,  has launched a new program to guide you through the steps toward electrifying your home. Thermalize Virginia will help you understand electrification and connect you with vetted contractors to get the work done and help you find any rebates or discounts. Visit thermalizeva.org to learn more and to sign up!  Challenger Throneburg challenges Good to an in-person debateThe Democratic candidate in the Fifth District Congressional race has asked his opponent to agree to meet in person for a debate or other kind of candidate forum before the November 8 election. Josh Throneburg of Charlottesville became the candidate earlier this year before the primary when he was the only one to qualify for the ballot. “There’s one question I get asked more than any other and that is, when will the two of you debate?” Throneburg asked in a campaign video sent out this morning. Throneburg addressed his comments directly to Good and said there were at least three organizations that would hold a campaign event, and that he’s accepted all of them.“But you have either rejected or ignored those invitations and so I want to make things crystal clear. I, Josh Throneburg, challenge you, Representative Bob Good to an in-person debate sometime between now and November 8.”Good is seeking his second term in the U.S. House of Representatives having defeated Cameron Webb in the 2020 election. Candidate Good did participate in a September 9, 2020 virtual campaign forum put on by the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. You can take a listen to that whole event at the Charlottesville Podcasting Network. A request for comment or a response is out to the Bob Good for Congress campaign. CAAR: Charlottesville real estate market continues to cool as prices continue to increaseThe number of sales in the Charlottesville housing market continues to drop as the median sales price continues to climb. That’s according to the latest report from the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors. (view the report) “There were 1,380 homes sold in the CAAR area in the second quarter,” reads one of the bullet points in the CAAR Home Sales Report for the second quarter. “This is an eleven percent drop from the second quarter a year ago, which is 165 fewer sales.” CAAR’s jurisdictional area is the same as the Thomas Jefferson Planning District with the city of Charlottesville as well as the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson. The median sales price increased to $417,850, an eleven percent increase over the second quarter of 2021. Additionally, supply has increased with 741 active listings in the area, a 28 percent increase over the same period in 2021. To put the increase in perspective, consider that the median sales price for the second quarter of 2018 was $301,000. The report also covers recent economic trends such as steady job growth and low unemployment. “Several job sectors have fully recovered and have actually expanded since the start of the pandemic, including the Professional and Technical Services sector, and the Federal Government sector. The homeownership rate within these two job sectors tends to be relatively high, so growth in these sectors provides fuel for the housing market in Virginia.”However, the leisure and hospitality sector continues to show signs of recovery. Mortgage rates are higher than last year, but have shown a slight decline from the end of June when the average rate on a 30-year fixed was 5.7 percent. However, the report acknowledges the cooling effect of rates that have increased two percentage points so far this year. Sales volumes were down in all localities except Greene County where there was a 33 percent increase in sales. There were 122 homes sold in that jurisdiction between April and June of this year compared to 92 in the same period the year before. The median sales price increased in all of the jurisdictions, but Nelson County saw the biggest jump in values from $285,000 in second quarter of 2021 to $425,000 in the second quarter of 2022. Visit caar.com to download the report. What do you think? If you’re a property owner, how does this change your views on what you may do with your own place? What about if you want to own? Say something in the comments. New water and sewer director in GreeneGreene County is preparing for anticipated population growth by expanding its urban water supply. Now the locality has hired its first ever water and sewer director. “Mr. Greg Lunsford… will oversee the development of a team to operate Greene County Water and Sewer Department as Greene transitions out of the Rapidan Service Authority,” reads an announcement posted to the county’s Facebook page. Greene County recently left the RSA in order to build a reservoir that’s already received permission from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The idea is to impound White Run to create storage. (learn more on the Greene website)Lunsford recently served as the town manager of Elkton in Rockingham County where the release states he helped advance a water system upgrade. In Greene, he will lead the work to create a water and sewer ordinance to govern the new supply. Virginia Humanities awards grants to area nonprofitsThe state agency that serves as the official humanities council for Virginia has made its latest round of grants to nonprofit organizations that seek to tell new stories about the people who have lived in the Commonwealth. “We want Virginians to connect with their history and culture and, in doing that, we hope we’ll all get to know each other a little better,” reads the About section of the website for Virginia Humanities. In all, Virginia Humanities awarded $153,200 to eighteen organizations including several in this general area. The Catticus Corporation of Berkeley, California will get $10,000 for a project to build a website intended to tell the story of Barbara Johns and the 1951 student walk out in Prince Edward County to a larger audience across Virginia and the nation. James Madison University will get $5,400 toward a project called A Miserable Revenge: Recovering 19th-Century Black Literature from the Shenandoah Valley. This will transcribe a handwritten novel by George Newman around 1880. Newman was an African American educator from the Winchester area. The Louisa County Historical Society will get $7,000 for a project called Representing our Residents: African American History at the Louisa County Historical Society. This will be a series of oral history interviews and public outreach activities.The National D-Day Memorial in Bedford will get $8,000 for a project called Someone Talked! A Podcast of the National D-Day Memorial. This will include conversations between the prolific WWII historian John McManus and other scholars and is intended and designed to reach and engage new audiences now that the generation that lived through WWII has passed. A project to add two Louisa County churches to the National Register of Historic Places received $3,000.Piedmont Virginia Community College will receive $10,000 for the PVCC Prison Creative Arts Project. The idea is to collect original writing from incarcerated PVCC students and then create a theatrical production based on the stories. The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Museum will get $8,250 to make three videos to introduce the Monacan Nation as “custodians of the lands and waters in and around Charlottesville” to serve as land acknowledgments The Virginia Tech Foundation will receive $20,000 for a podcast to be called Tribal Truths on the histories and cultures of state and federally recognized Tribes in Virginia. To see the rest, visit the release at Virginia Humanities. Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting campalbemarleva.org/donate. Albemarle Planning Commission reviews seven options for growth management Is this the summer of 2022, or is it the Summer of AC44? AC44 is the name Albemarle County has given for the review of its Comprehensive Plan. That’s a document Virginia requires all localities to adopt and review every five years. Albemarle last updated its plan in 2015 and work got underway earlier this year. “We’re currently in phase one, plan for growth, where we are reviewing and evaluating the current growth management policy, using lenses of equity, climate action, and capacity projects,” said Tori Kannellopollous, a senior planner with Albemarle County.At the end of this phase, staff and hired consultants will have developed a draft vision for “growth and resilience” on which new policy objectives will be written.  The work so far has led to the development of seven growth management policies for the public to review. “We are planning having in-person and virtual roundtables and online opportunities in step three,” Kannellopollous saidThe Commission will then review the work in September followed by a review by the Board of Supervisors. Discussions about what changes might come in the rural area will come during phase two of the Comprehensive Plan Review. Several Commissioners wanted to know if survey responses have done enough to capture a diversity of opinion. “I did a deep dive on the last one that came out and when I look at the demographics, the demographics really trend white, upper class, middle-upper class, and extremely well-educated,” said Commission Julian Bivins. “What I’m nervous about is that those responses become the drivers for lots of decisions.” Charles Rapp, the deputy director of the Community Development Department, said he expected participation to increase when the plan review gets into specifics.“People are excited to get into the specific topics [and] into the details of this plan,” Rapp said. “At this point we’re still at such a high level trying to figure out which of those avenues we’re going to go down and which ideas we want to explore and what are those topics that we want to dive into.” The Commission also got an update on the buildout analysis of the county’s existing capacity for new homes and businesses. The firm Kimley Horn has been hired to conduct that work. Kannellopollous had several preliminary observations.“In mixed-use developments, the residential component tends to fill out first and the non-residential component may not build out until years later,” Kannellopollous said. “When factoring in site readiness and site-selection criteria, there appears to be sufficient capacity for commercial and retail uses but much less currently available for office and industrial uses.” Another finding is that new developments are not being approved at the maximum possible, and that by-right developments also do not use all of the potential building space recommended in the existing Comprehensive Plan.Seven growth management optionsThe firm EPR has been hired to help develop the growth management options. “These were developed by the consultants and the staff after the first round of public input,”  said Vlad Gavrilovic with EPR. “They’re not intended as picking one as the winner or the loser. They’re intended to initiate discussion.” Let’s go through them. Here’s option one:“Applying more density and more in-fill development within the existing development areas and retaining and enhancing green infrastructure,” Gavrilovic said. “Next option was looking in the development areas to adjust the densities and reduce the maximum densities to more closely align with what people have actually been building as.” The third option would be to develop criteria for which the growth area might be adjusted. “Looking at new criteria to identify when, where, and how growth areas should be expanded,” Gavrilovic said.  “The next option was opportunities for non-residential development around the interchanges on I-64 to support job growth and economic development.” Option five would explore the possibility of rural villages. “Rural villages where you would promote small scale commercial and service uses to nearby rural area residents,” Gavrilovic said. “Number six was looking at current service provisions and seeing if adjustments are needed to ensure equitable distribution of services, particularly health and safety services.” The final option is to “explore opportunities to promote forest retention and regenerative land uses in the Rural area that support climate action goals.” So those are the seven scenarios. A second round of community engagement went out with these results. “We heard that the three options that best support climate action were regenerative uses in the rural area, rural villages, and distribution of service provision,” Kannellopollous said. “The three options that best support equity were service provision, rural villages, and providing more density and infill in the development areas with green infrastructure.” For the “accommodating growth” lens, the top three options were rural villages, non-residential development at Interstate interchanges, and service provision. Commissioner feedbackCommissioner Karen Firehock said she saw the provision of infrastructure to support development areas as an equity issue.“People should be able to walk to a park or a trail or a healthy environment near to where they live and not have to get in the car and drive a really long way to find something green,” Firehock said. Firehock said the county is expanding some services into the rural area, such as the Southern Convenience Center in Keene. She said that will make it easier for people to meet other environmental goals. Commissioner Lonnie Murray lives in the rural area, and hopes the growth management strategy does not undo work to date. “I think it’s important to have a concept of ‘do no harm’ in the rural area,” Murray said.As an example, he said he wants the county to stop paving gravel roads in the rural area. Bivins urged the Commission to look ahead to the next redistricting after the 2030 Census, when he said the urban areas will continue to have more of the county’s expected population. “If we do not increase the development area, Samuel Miller [District] will end up in the near future as the largest land mass district in Albemarle County.” Bivins said “From an equity standpoint, one has to say ‘is that where we want to go as a county?’” The Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service currently projects Albemarle’s population as increasing to 124,016 by 2030, up from 112,395 in the U.S. Census of 2020. Commissioner Fred Missel said he wanted to know more information about how capital infrastructure works together to support development.“How does the capital plan for infrastructure, how does that inform development and how are they linked together?” Missel asked. “Not to throw the [Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority] into the mix it’s just one that comes to mind. What is their capital plan and how does that support strategic density? How does it support sustainability?” Missel’s day job is as director of design and development at the University of Virginia Foundation. The Foundation is pursuing a rezoning at its North Fork Discovery Park for a potential mixed-use residential complex. If you’d like to learn more about capital projects in Albemarle County, click here.If you’d like to learn more about the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority’s Capital Improvement Program, download it here.Luis Carrazana’s day job is at the University of Virginia’s Office of the Architect. He said he wanted better metrics. “And a lot of times we focus on the big picture but we lose that option to say ‘we know we’re going in the right direction if we’re achieving A, B, C, and D,” Carrazana said. “So I would encourage everyone to think about that as well.” Planning Commissioner Corey Clayborne said density in the right place can help the county achieve certain goals, but he also acknowledged a tension with those who have pushed back. “That’s something we kind of have to wrestle to the ground and I’m not sure if that would be part of the final deliverable here as much as, is there an education sense in this process with the community as we step through this?” Clayborne asked. “Does that mean there are graphics or visuals? I’m not sure what that answer is yet but addressing it… if we can get our arms around and embrace strategic density, I think if you start talking about design importance, that could be a major key to affordable housing.” Commissioner Dan Bailey said one piece of data is experience that comes from what’s been approved and what’s actually been built. “I live in Belvedere and it has a concept that’s been there for nearly ten years of having centers in the community, but it’s been vacant for ten years,” Bailey said. “And we’ve done a lot of approving these novel neighborhood model density and other things where they should have this retail or office building. I would really love to know how many of them have actually been developed.” The next step will be a series of public engagement on the themes as well as the growth management options. Stay tuned. If you’re interested in this topic, invest an hour in the conversation to inform how you might participate. Housekeeping notes for 415 (Clean Floor edition)That’s the end of another installment of the program. Thank you so much for being here! I hope to have another one out tomorrow, followed by another on Friday. Then the Week Ahead and the Government Glance. The latter is the first publication of the new Fifth District Community Engagement.  That’s another service of Town Crier Productions, a company formed to keep you in the know. Contributions and payments to Town Crier Productions cover the cost of reporting. That includes a bill with the United States for the Public Access to Court Electronic Records. I use that service to stay up to date on federal lawsuits such the one former City Manager Tarron Richardson had filed against the city, or the two court cases that sought a House of Delegates race this year.  So, if you’re like to support this program which includes expenses like court reporting, consider a paid subscription through Substack. If do so, Ting will match your initial payment! And, if you sign up for their services through this link you’ll get a free standard install, your 2nd month free, and a $75 downtown mall gift card! Enter the promo code COMMUNITY for full effect. All of the funding goes to ensure I can keep doing the work, which two years ago included bringing the audio from a campaign forum to the public via the Charlottesville Podcasting Network. That’s also part of Town Crier Productions. There’s a lot, and your support will help me pull all of the pieces together into whatever it becomes. Music comes from the D.C. entity that currently goes by the name Wraki, selected randomly from a bin of basement-recorded cassette tapes. You can support that work by purchasing the album Regret Everything for whatever you would like to pay. Now. Off to go clean some floors. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

O'Connor & Company
08.02.22: Sean Kennedy Interview

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 11:53


Sean Kennedy, president and chairman of Virginians for Safe Communities, joined WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" radio program on Tuesday about George Soros wiring an op-ed vowing that he won't stop backing woke DAs despite urban crime spikes. WEBSITE: http://safecommunitiesva.com/ NY POST: George Soros vows he won't stop backing woke DAs despite urban crime spikes https://nypost.com/2022/08/01/george-soros-vows-to-keep-backing-woke-das-despite-urban-crime-spikes/?utm_source=NYPTwitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow&utm_campaign=SocialFlow WSJ: GEORGE SOROS: Why I Support Reform Prosecutors https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-i-support-reform-prosecutors-law-enforces-jail-prison-crime-rate-justice-police-funding-11659277441 For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor,  @Jgunlock, and @patrickpinkfile.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

VPM Daily Newscast
07/29/22 - Richmond official breaks down methods behind city's universal pre-K study

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 7:58


Richmond is researching what it would take to provide free preschool to all 3 and 4 year olds in the city; More than a dozen public figures and LGBTQ advocacy groups want the Virginia Supreme Court to uphold a decision that says requiring teachers to use a student's preferred pronoun is not in violation of their rights; A new poll released on Thursday from VCU's Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs shows that about 50% of Virginians are satisfied with current abortion laws and that they shouldn't be changed; and other local news stories.

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff
From Establishing Wide Range Trading Practices To The Emergence Of A Rebel Rouser

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 58:49


Learn about Charles Calvert including whether his family was Protestant or Catholic. Discover how far back England went in terms of being a Protestant Nation. Learn what makes up a proprietary colony. Learn what Virginian was well connected to Eastern Shore Region upon his arrival onto mainland come 1675. Understand the functions behind Governor's Council aka Council Of State. Get an in depth analysis behind what first takes place on September 26, 1675 and how tensions lasted until November of that year. Learn if Virginia had an existing fort along Appomattox River dating back to 1640's. Learn how Nathaniel Bacon comes into play starting around 1674 in Virginia along with learning about his early years from England, home nation. Find out if there are those from High End British Society whom view Nathaniel Bacon with a handful of concerns. Learn where Bacon himself chooses to reside in Virginia including an incident during September 1675 where he took matters into his own hands without obtaining consent from leaders above. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/support

Virginia Public Radio
New tourism grants seek to keep Virginians in state for their vacations

Virginia Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


Communities across Virginia are about to launch new tourism initiatives. As Michael Pope reports, they’ll be encouraging people to drive to destinations in Virginia rather than flying out of state for vacations.

O'Connor & Company
07.25.22: Dave Kallman Interview

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 7:15


Dave Kallman, attorney for The Great Lakes Justice Center (GLJC), joined WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" radio program on Monday about Virginians fighting their religious vaccine exemption applications getting rejected.. Website: Great Lakes Justice Center https://www.greatlakesjc.org/ Va. AG ‘reviewing' complaint Inova rejected ‘multiple' religious vaccine exemption applications https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2022/jul/23/inova-health-unfairly-turns-down-religious-vaccine/ FLASHBACK: KALLMAN HAD WON A RELIGIOUS EXEMPTION CASE OCTOBER 2021: FOX Detroit: WMU athletes' attorney who defeated school's vax mandate in court, calls it a game-changer  https://www.fox2detroit.com/news/wmu-athletes-attorney-who-defeated-schools-vax-mandate-in-court-calls-it-a-game-changer For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock,and @patrickpinkfile. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Public Radio
State economy shows signs of growth, but many Virginians are still outside the labor force

Virginia Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022


The economy may be on the threshold of recession, depending on what metric you want to use to define recession. But, as Michael Pope tells us, Virginia’s economy is showing strong signs of growth.

O'Connor & Company
07.25.22: Jenin Younes Interview

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 7:18


Jenin Younes, Litigation Counsel for The New Civil Liberties Alliance , joined WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" radio program on Monday to discuss Virginians fighting their religious vaccine exemptions getting rejected by their employers.  Twitter: https://twitter.com/Leftylockdowns1 Website: https://nclalegal.org/ Va. AG ‘reviewing' complaint Inova rejected ‘multiple' religious vaccine exemption applications https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2022/jul/23/inova-health-unfairly-turns-down-religious-vaccine/ FLASHBACK: JENIN HAD A VICTORY AT GEORGE MASON REGARDING THE MEDICAL EXEMPTION: George Mason relents, grants COVID-19 medical exemption to professor. Zywicki wins his case, but must still be tested on campus. https://universitybusiness.com/george-mason-relents-grants-covid-19-medical-exemption-to-professor/ For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock,and @patrickpinkfile. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

O'Connor & Company
07.21.22: [Hour 2 / 6 AM]: Sean Kennedy, Hans Von Spakovsky, AOC's Handcuffs Defense, Stuff Biden Says

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 32:40


In the second hour of the morning show, Larry O'Connor and guest co-host Liz Sheld talked to Sean Kennedy of Virginians for Safe Communities and elections expert Hans Von Spakovsky on sketchy missing flash drives in the Maryland Primary election. They also discussed how AOC defenede what she did at the Supreme Court protest. They also explored President Biden's climate and cancer comments. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock,and @patrickpinkfile. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Danger on Delmarva
Trouble in Paradise

Danger on Delmarva

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 69:39


Today we'll explore the murder of Tessa van Hart. She was murdered and Chincoteague Virginia, and was a delivery driver for a restaurant that my family and I would visit quite often. I wonder if I'd ever seen her leaving the restaurant with an order, or maybe saw her husband in the restaurant as he was a cook there. Tessa was a loving mother who was taken away from her family, her mother, siblings, husband, and children. This was all done because of the impulses and drives of a deranged man the only had violence and control on his mind.   Paypal  https://paypal.me/rondafjefferson?country.x=US&locale.x=en_US    Contact info DangerinDelaware@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/DangeronDelmarva  or search for @dangerondelmarva on Facebook https://twitter.com/DangeronD?s=09 Danger on Delmarva - YouTube   Podcast: Mystifyingly Missing, True Crime & Thought-provoking Events MystifyinglyMissing@gmail.com Mystifyingly Missing - YouTube Mystifyingly Missing? - Home | Facebook   Sources http://www.murderpedia.org/male.C/c1/cherrix-brian-lee.htm   https://caselaw.findlaw.com/va-supreme-court/1069716.html   https://thecinemaholic.com/tessa-van-hart-murder-how-did-brian-cherrix-die/   https://richmond.com/2004-brian-lee-cherrix/image_1aa19c7a-dd99-11e6-909a-fb05d25af3b8.html   Va. Executes Man Who Killed Pizza Delivery Woman in '94 - The Washington Post   https://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/va-supreme-court-records-vol257/33/   Eastern Shore man executed for 1994 murder of young mother Fredericksburg.com   Virginians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty     ProDeathPenalty.Com   Judge Orders DNA Testing For Inmate On Death Row By Brooke Masters - Washington Post/Truth in Justice   Man executed for mom's 1994 murder CNN.com March 19, 2004 VUAC - Virginians United Against Crime  TheDeathHouse.com http://vscc.virginia.gov/2020/Virginia%20Post-Conviction%20DNA.pdf

O'Connor & Company
07.21.22: Sean Kennedy Interview

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 14:00


Sean Kennedy, president of Virginians for Safe Communities, joined WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" radio program on Thursday to discuss how the soft-on-crime Arlington/Falls Church prosecutor Parisa Dehghani-Tafti dropped drug and gun possession charges against career criminal Francis Rose last year and then this weekend, Rose murdered two innocent men in Alexandria. Website: https://safecommunitiesva.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/VA4SafeComm Recall petition: https://fireparisa.com/ Link to story: https://twitter.com/jgunlock/status/1549723618048884742?s=12&t=Qu26FJWz15dDYFBMpQsZjw For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock,and @patrickpinkfile. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 7/18/22

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 8:24


The number of Virginians in prison is shrinking, and we take a look at the numbers… Governor Youngkin relaxes COVID guidelines for kids… We analyze some claims the governor made about same-sex marriage protections in Virginia….

Charlottesville Community Engagement
July 16, 2022: Laufer outraises Squire and Price for 55th House race; Charlottesville Planning Commission seeks safer school routes

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 18:43


Saturday’s all right for writing! That is, writing information about land use, transportation, economic development, elections, and more! This is Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast intended to let you know about a few things you didn’t know before, and intended to keep an eye on a great deal of things. I’m your host Sean Tubbs, exploring and exploiting my curiosity hopefully for your benefit. But please: No fighting! In today’s newsletter:The first campaign finance report is in for the race of the 55th House District, even if it’s still unclear when the election will be held Charlottesville Planning Commissioners seek action on safer streets in advance of the school A former Charlottesville school superintendent becomes Governor Youngkin’s permanent chief diversity officerThere’s one day left to fill out the latest questionnaire on Albemarle County’s growth management policy The head of the area’s aging services agency is elected to lead a statewide group First shout-out: Join me for a Cvillepedia training session - Brand styleIn today’s house-fueled public service announcement, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society wants you to know about an upcoming exhibit at the Center at Belvedere featuring portraits of several historical figures active in the Charlottesville area in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Frances Brand was a folk artist who painted nearly 150 portraits of what she considered “firsts” including first Black Charlottesville Mayor Charles Barbour and Nancy O’Brien, the first woman to be Charlottesville Mayor. Brand’s work will be on display from July 5 to August 31 in the first public exhibit since 2004. And, if you’d like to help conduct community research into who some of the portraits are, cvillepedia is looking for volunteers! I will be leading three more Cvillepedia 101 training sessions at the Center July 18 at 2 p.m. Sign up at the Center’s website.Laufer outraises fellow Democrats in 55th District There is still a possibility that Virginia will have an election this year for the 100 seat House of Delegates. A second federal lawsuit arguing that legislators elected last November are in unconstitutional seats still awaits a final ruling and November 8 is 115 days away from today. That makes yesterday’s deadline for active candidates for the House of Delegates that much more compelling. There are currently three people seeking the Democratic nomination in the new 55th District, which includes most of Albemarle’s geography, as well as northeast Nelson County and western Louisa County. The Virginia Public Access Project has pulled together all of the filings, and former Charlottesville School Board member Amy Laufer outraised her opponents with a total of $61,731 raised in June. Fifty-seven donors contributed more than $100, requiring their identification. That includes a transfer of $7,327 from Laufer’s previous campaign for the Virginia Senate in 2019. There is one $10,000 gift from Hunter Bourne, and a pair of $5,000 gifts from Clean VA and the Morrill Family Investment. There were 68 contributions below the $100 limit. Emergency room nurse Kellen Squire raised $41,531 from March 8 to June 30. Thirty-four contributions were in excess of $100 with 406 below that threshold. There is one $20,000 contribution from Kay Ferguson.Albemarle County Supervisor Donna Price raised $11,798 with ten contributions above the $100 threshold and thirty below. Republican Rob Bell is the presumptive incumbent, currently representing the former 58th District. Bell began the year with a balance of $76,253 and has raised $5,250 so far this year. More on the status of the lawsuit in the next installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement. One days left to fill out Albemarle’s growth management surveyAs mentioned in the last program, a survey is about to close for Albemarle County’s growth management survey. The county is in the midst of updating their Comprehensive Plan, and this is the second questionnaire. Here’s more from a video produced by the office of Communications and Public Engagement (CAPE). “New development proposals that require a change in zoning or a rezoning are evaluated by recommendations in the Comprehensive Plan, including the growth management policy,” states the narrator. “As part of growth management, the Albemarle County Service Authority establishes a jurisdictional area where public water and sewer will be provided. This jurisdictional area mainly corresponds with the development area.” If  you’re interested in hearing more, the Albemarle CAPE has posted the latest episode of their Let’s Talk Albemarle podcast. The guest is Rachel Falkenstein, a manager in the Community Development department who oversees long-range planning.“Usually we look out 20 years and that number comes from the state of Virginia,” Falkenstein said. “They require localities to have a Comprehensive Plan that plans for 20 years out into the future so we use that for most of our planning documents.” As of Friday afternoon, 270 people had taken the survey, according to CAPE director Emily Kilroy. The Albemarle Planning Commission will have a work session on the Comprehensive Plan on July 26. To catch up on previous stories on land use issues in Albemarle, check out Information Charlottesville through this link. And if you’re in the mood to fill in another survey, the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission wants your input on the Regional Transit Vision Plan.. To catch up on all kinds of transit related stories, check out Information Charlottesville through this link. Youngkin appoints Atkins as chief diversity officerGovernor Glenn Youngkin has appointed former Charlottesville Superintendent Rosa Atkins to serve as Virginia’s Chief Diversity, Opportunity, and Inclusion Officer. Atkins has been serving in the position on an interim basis following the departure of his first appointee, Angela Sailor. According to the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Sailor left in April for a family matter. Atkins served as Charlottesville’s superintendent for 15 years before retiring. Earlier this year, former Governor Ralph Northam appointed her to serve as the acting superintendent of public instruction for the Virginia Department of Education. In the Northam administration, Atkins’ position was known as the Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer, but Youngkin changed the name in Executive Order #10 when he appointed Sailor. “We must strengthen and focus the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (ODEI) by including in its mission the promotion of entrepreneurship and economic opportunity for all Virginians — including Virginians with disabilities — as well as the promotion of free speech and civil discourse,” reads that order.Sailor’s name is still on the website for the office. In other appointments of note, a University of Virginia official has been named to the Virginia Economic Development Partnership. Pace Lochte is the assistant vice president for economic development. Youngkin also appointed Rob Rutherford of Nelson County to the Virginia Manufactured Housing Board. Rutherford is a manager with Pro Tech Builder, a maker of modular homes.JABA leader elected to Virginia aging services associationThe chief executive officer of the area’s aging services association has been elected as president of the state entity that represents all 24 such agencies across the Commonwealth. Marta Keane of JABA will begin a two-year term as president of the Virginia Association of Area Agencies on Aging (V4A).Keane has been CEO of JABA since 2013. According to a release, during that time she helped form the Charlottesville Area Alliance as an umbrella organization for various entities that work with senior services in the community. “With this comes challenges to meet their increasing and changing needs, and opportunities to identify and maximize the strengths that seniors bring to our communities,” Keane is quoted in the release. “During the next two years, I hope to continue our efforts with demographic services to better identify areas that have unmet needs, work with networks to identify new ways to meet the needs, and identify new funding sources to allow us to grow and sustain critical services."JABA was formed in 1975 as the Jefferson Area Board for Aging. In today’s other two shout-outs: Local media and Code for CvilleCode for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. The final comes from another Patreon supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Charlottesville Planning Commissioners seek Council action on safer streets on school routesAs of today, there are 39 days left until the first day of school in the City of Charlottesville. Yesterday, the school system held a Transportation Talk and Walk Session to discuss a recent alert from Superintendent Royal Gurley that the bus driver shortage has worsened and walk zones will be expanded. This past Tuesday, the city Planning Commission was briefed on a request from one of its members that city government take steps to make routes to school. They got an update from Missy Creasy, Charlottesville’s assistant director of the Neighborhood Development Services office (NDS). “The city has a pretty robust program that they’re putting together to address how they are addressing the shortage at this point in time and some pretty innovative things on there,” Creasy said. These include encouraging older students to take Charlottesville Area Transit routes, hiring more crossing guards or finding more volunteers, and buying smaller buses that don’t require drivers to have commercial licenses. NDS director James Freas said the shortage provides an opportunity to apply goals of the recently adopted Comprehensive Plan to a real life problem. “Wrapped up in this challenge is an opportunity to explore those options,” Freas said. “The flip side of that is that it’s a little early for us right now in that we are in the process of building out a transportation planning program.” In May, Council was briefed by Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders on a series of problems with how the city has run its transportation planning program. For instance, transportation planners have had too high of a workload, and the city has been unable to move some projects forward. There’s also a vacancy in the position of bike pedestrian coordinator after the last person left the job at the end of 2021 to work for a consultant. “We expect that position to post very soon and see that position as really being able to take a lead role in doing exactly this type of work and that is coming up with innovative, innovative, and low-cost ways of improving pedestrians, particularly children’s safety, in the neighborhoods around our schools,” Freas said. Creasy said that the traffic engineer and the Safe Routes to School coordinator no longer work in NDS. Instead they work for the Public Works department, a decision made by former City Manager Tarron Richardson. Creasy said NDS does coordinate with public works, but more people are needed to implement what’s in the Comprehensive Plan. “We do have really good support for continuing to move forward in this direction,” Creasy said. “We have tools in place but we just need to fill them with humans so that we can keep the work going.” Creasy said she is aware of grassroots efforts to make things better, but coordination with the city is needed. Freas said that one remedy would be to paint bump-outs at curbs to provide more space for people. “It’s a significant safety improvement and you can do that with paint and potentially flex-posts, but even to do just that, you do have to do some engineering design, you do need to coordinate with public works street folks,” Freas said. Freas said that there’s a possibility of maybe having something done within six weeks, but he cautioned that it will be hard to do in that time frame. “I think, A, the school department’s plans are really good, I think they have some good solutions in place, and B, I think we can build towards that and start contributing the safety improvements we need to make as we go forward,” Freas said. Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg said he supported the idea of an official letter to City Council, but also said funding needed to be in place to implement the solutions.  “Is it safe to assume there is not within the currently allocated budget enough money to really address the things that staff would potentially want to address?” Stolzenberg asked. “Or potentially to hire outside traffic engineers to take some of the load of our in-house resources?” Freas said he would need to have a scope of work before answering that question. “We don’t have an identified line item for that right now so we would be cobbling together money from other sources,” Freas said. Stolzenberg said he would like the Planning Commission to recommend identifying money in the current fiscal year so incremental improvements can be made throughout the school year. He pointed out that Council voted in late June to purchase property for parking.“Council just spent $1.65 million on a parking lot with 40 spaces,” Stolzenberg said. “It seems to me that we can find money within the currently allocated [Capital Improvement Program] that could be reallocated to make sure that kids don’t get run over by cars on their way to school.” Stolzenberg also asked if the city has explored the ability to install cameras in school zones to capture people who speed. Freas and Creasy said they did not know if the city has done that research. The Commission agreed to send a letter to Council seeking support for the work. Stolzenberg said he would draft that document. The discussion took place just before the Commission’s joint public hearing with City Council. Vice Mayor Juandiego Wade said he heard the message.“It doesn’t have to be a war and peace type of document,” Wade said. “We understand the issues and we’re hearing a lot of from the citizens now.” Two more Talk and Walk sessions are scheduled this month. Do you have a specific concern? Drop me a line and I’d like to hear about it. Housekeeping notes for the conclusion of today’s newsletter:Thanks for reading! Today’s show is a rare Saturday show. Coming up next is the Week Ahead for July 18, as well as the Government Glance at the Fifth Congressional District. That’s a separate Substack. Music in the podcast version is composed by an entity currently going by the name Wraki. You can purchase the latest tracks on Bandcamp in an album called regret everything.  I certainly hope you will check it out! Finally, I can’t say enough positive things about Ting’s generous sponsorship. If you sign-up for Ting service, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here!Charlottesville Community Engagement is free to receive, but supported by paid subscriptions. If you subscribe, Ting will match your initial contribution! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

VPM Daily Newscast
07/15/22 - New study shows most Virginians in prisons and jails come from small communities

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 8:08


A new report shows exactly where people in Virginia prisons and jails come from; Attorney General Jason Miyares called the people who vandalized a pregnancy center in Lynchburg quote “cowards” who carried out an act of “political violence"; Last month was Norfolk International Airport's busiest month in its 80 year history; and other local news stories.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Alan K. Rode 7/13/2022

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 63:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/BLsdG8P4N10 Alan K. Rode's affinity for classic cinema is part of his DNA. His mother grew up in Hollywood and was an extra in Our Gang comedy shorts and studied acting at Ben Bard Drama. His grandfather was a silent film violinist who went from bit actor to Universal Studios house composer and eventually founded Corelli-Jacobs Recording Inc. A great-uncle doubled Gary Cooper in The Virginian (1929) and fought Jack Dempsey. Yet another grandfather promoted rodeos with cowboy star Hoot Gibson at Gilmore Stadium. Before the advent of classic films on cable, video or streaming, Alan incessantly watched and catalogued movies on television. He is the author of a pair of notable cinema biographies. Charles McGraw: Film Noir Tough Guy is a critically acclaimed saga of the rough-hewn actor's life and times. Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film is the first comprehensive biography of the director of Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, Yankee Doodle Dandy and The Adventures of Robin Hood among other classic films. The Curtiz book has received enthusiastic reviews from the New York Review of Books (David Thomson), the Wall Street Journal (Scott Eyman), the Los Angeles Times (Kenneth Turan) and Leonard Maltin. Alan has been the producer and host of the annual Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival in Palm Springs, California since 2008.  Alan is also charter director and treasurer of the Film Noir Foundation. With FNF president Eddie Muller, Alan has spearheaded the preservation and restoration of “lost” films and co-programs and co-hosts several of the annual NOIR CITY film festivals. Alan has produced, written and appeared in documentaries for many classic film releases on Blu ray physical media.  

WHRO Reports
Newport News veterans want to build monument to Virginians who died in Iraq

WHRO Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 0:54


Local veterans formed a nonprofit for a memorial in Huntington Park. They hope to build similar monuments for casualties of Afghanistan and other modern wars.

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast
Katherine Byrd - Virginian, former movie theater manager & retired waiting for a tour!

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 53:50


Katherine Byrd @katherinebyrd grew up watching American Bandstand, loving music and has made connections from all over the world via Backstreets & Bruce's music.  She shares her Jungleland story to Jesse @jessejacksonDFW & shares stories of drinking with Tinker and Mad Dog. Please download and share! 

The Daily Gardener
July 7, 2022 Henry Compton, Miroslav Krleža, Herbert Rappaport, Manny Steward, The Gardener's Palette by Jo Thompson, and Robert Heinlein

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 16:34


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1713 Death of Henry Compton, Bishop of London from 1675 to 1713. Although Henry played an important role in English political and religious circles, his main passion was plants — especially scarce and exotic plants. It was said that Henry relished staying on the fringes of Charles II's court because it gave him more time to devote to his plants and gardens. One of his closest friends was one of the earliest English parson-naturalists, John Ray, who published the first account of North American flora in his Historia Plantarum (1688). Since Henry's role overseeing the Church extended to the American Colonies, Henry was able to get his hands on all the new plant discoveries from the new world. Henry even personally sent a man named John Banister to collect plants for him in Virginia. John is most remembered for sending Henry the Magnolia virginiana and Dodecatheon media. Tragically, John died at 38 after falling from a cliff while exploring the area above James River.  Between his involvement with the top plant explorers and nurseries of his day and his special relationship with the Tradescant family, Henry was able to fully stock his garden at Fulham Palace. This Tudor country house was home to England's clergy for over a millennium. When he was alive, Henry's garden was reputed to have a greater variety of plants than any other garden in England. It featured over 1,000 exotic plants and tropicals, making it one of his time's most popular, envied, and essential gardens. Henry's kitchen garden always grew a great crop of his favorite vegetable: kidney beans. In 1686, even William Penn's Pennsylvania gardener was keen to swap seeds and plants with Henry Compton. History records that Henry felt guilt about the amount of church money he had invested in plants. His collection of trees was also particularly exciting. Henry grew the first Liriodendron tulipifera (the tulip tree), Liquidambar (American Sweetgum) used as a veneer or satinwood in furniture, Acacia, Mahogany, and Maple trees in England. The garden designer Capability Brown found a special inspiration after touring Fulham, and it was there that he first saw the cluster-pin, the ash-maple, the cork oak, the black Virginian walnut, and the honey locust. Henry also grew the first American azalea grown in England, Rhododendron viscosum. Henry even managed to grow the first coffee tree in England with the help of his heated "stove.". In 1698, the Governor of Virginia personally sent Henry a Magnolia virginiana for "his paradise at Fulham." Three hundred years after Henry planted the first Magnolia virginiana grown in Europe at St. Anne's Church, a new tree was planted in the exact same spot to honor the botanical work of Bishop Henry Compton. The Arnold Arboretum at Harvard propagated the Magnolia sapling, and it was hand-delivered by Vi Lort Phillips, a member of the International Dendrology Society. The tree was planted on the 19th of May in 1992 and is already forty years old this year (2022).  St. Anne's Church was special to Henry. He consecrated the grounds in honor of Queen Anne because he had tutored both Princesses Mary and Anne when they were young.   1893 Birth of Miroslav Krleža, Yugoslav and Croatian writer, poet, and cultural influencer. Miroslav's nickname was Fritz, and he is often credited as the greatest Croatian writer of the 20th century. Miroslav believed that Serbs and Croats were one people suffering from two national consciences, which inevitably pitted them against each other. Today three hours west of his hometown of Zagreb, a celebrated statue of Miroslav stands in Opatija above the city's famous Slatina Beach. During WWI, Miroslav wrote in his diary at the Croatian Botanical Garden in Zagreb. The relaxing gardens edge the city railroad tracks before blending into the native grass and forestlands that feather the countryside. Although Miroslav found the garden suitable for writing, he dismissed its beauty and criticized it as a "boring second-rate cemetery."  Miroslav served in the same regiment as Yugoslavian communist dictator Tito during the war, but the two men didn't become lifelong friends until 1937. Tito protected Krleža from pressures in his party. Tito once told him, I know you're an old liberal and that you disagree with me on many things, but I wouldn't want to lose you.   In 1938, Miroslav wrote On the Edge of Reason - an instant classic about human nature, hypocrisy, conformism, and stupidity. Miroslav once wrote, There is no justice even among flowers.   1908 Birth of Herbert Rappaport, Austrian-Soviet screenwriter, and film director. Born in Vienna, Herbert first studied law before finding work in the movie business. In 1936, he was invited to help internationalize Soviet Cinema, and he spent the next four decades working as a filmmaker in Russia. Herbert once wrote, I hope that while so many people are out smelling the flowers, someone is taking the time to plant some.   1944 Birth of Manny Steward, American boxer, trainer, and commentator for HBO Boxing. He was known as The Godfather of Detroit Boxing and trained 41 world champion fighters during his long career, including Thomas Hearns, Lennox Lewis, and Wladimir Klitschko. He once wrote, My favorite hobby is being alone. I like to be alone. I also like dancing, fishing, playing poker sometimes and vegetable gardening – corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, I have a big garden every year.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Gardener's Palette by Jo Thompson This book came out in 2022, and the subtitle is Creating Colour Harmony in the garden. Jo Thompson is one of Britain's leading garden designers, and this is her second book, which was written in conjunction with the Royal Horticultural Society. Well, the title of this book says it all - palettes - masterfully proven gorgeous color combinations for your garden. I've found that the most challenging job about palettes is not picking them but sticking to them. And it's usually when we get into times of color droughts in our garden or hit an excellent garden sale that we break with our palette, and then the garden can slowly devolve into something a little wild and wooly.  That said, if you feel you're ready to make a change and take a more disciplined approach to what you plant in your flower garden, then Jo's book will be a fantastic resource. Jo is a color master - a purveyor of color palettes. She serves up 100 palette options and then identifies the plants you should be scouting to make your palette a reality. The photos in this book are incredibly inspiring and beautifully illustrate why the colors work so well together in a garden. Garden's Illustrated recently shared Jo's top five favorite color combos. Her picks included the following: Tutti Fruitti is bright magentas, and fizzing oranges delight as they catch the eye. Sherberts offers mouthwatering sherbet colors work softly with each other to create a feel that at the same time both look backward and forwards, bringing with their soft tones both familiarity and excitement. Wine, peach, and coral is a combination of colors that work together and create surprising harmony due to the surprising tones that they share deep within their petals. Pink is a garden classic. This shade resonates in the memory. Soft and pretty, elegant, a color that stops us in our tracks. Green & White: Green and white is the freshness of morning light, the elegance of midday light, and the serenity of the light in the evening. A gentle palette that is timeless in its appeal.   This book is 388-pages of 100 different palette options for your garden, along with beautifully inspiring images, plant selections, and Jo's personal design preferences and tips. You can get a copy of The Gardener's Palette by Jo Thompson and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $40.   Botanic Spark 1907 Birth of Robert Heinlein, American science-fiction writer. Robert is remembered for his classic book, Stranger in a Strange Land (1961). Robert wrote many wonderful euphemisms, like this humorous quote, Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.   But Robert also appreciated the power and beauty of nature. In Time Enough for Love (1979), Robert wrote, Money is a powerful aphrodisiac. But flowers work almost as well.   In The Cat Who Walks Through Walls (1988), Robert wrote, “Butterflies are not insects," Captain John Sterling said soberly. "They are self-propelled flowers."   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Bold Dominion
64 - What is the "Best State for Business" like for workers?

Bold Dominion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022


Episode Notes Business news media company CNBC does annual rankings of the best state for business. And Virginia has come out on top as the Best State for Business two years in a row. ``` On this episode of Bold Dominion, we explore what this title means, and how ask how it affects working Virginians. ```

Richmond's Morning News
Glenn Youngkin: June 21, 2022

Richmond's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 10:38


Virginia's Governor Glenn Youngkin joined RMN to talk to John Reid about the new state budget and what it means for Virginians. 

Artist with Brian
50. Musician, Michael Burt

Artist with Brian

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 74:04


Michael is an inspiration. Invite him into your life. Donate a private orchestra lesson to a NM public school student: https://gofund.me/cd4597e5 Follow Michael on Instagram.

Mornings on the Mall
6.17.22 - Hour 2: Rise in black gun ownership, Challenge to Commonwealth Attorney's law license

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 34:13


In the second hour of The Vince Coglianese Show, Vince speaks with Maj Toure, founder of Black Guns Matter about the increase in black ownership in America and Republicans failing to protect the second amendment.  Sean Kennedy, President of Virginians for Safe Communities joins the program to discuss his organization's misconduct complaint against Commonwealth Attorney Buta Biberaj. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
061622 @107wchv #podcast @RepBobGood on Hearings, Inflation & Gas

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 9:49


Representative for Virginia's 5th Congressional District is on w/ Joe too get into the made-for-tv event called the January 6th Hearings and trying to reverse the impact of inflation and gas prices on Virginians. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bold Dominion
63 - How can Virginia get quality healthcare to everyone?

Bold Dominion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 29:10


Today on Bold Dominion, we're talking with two experts who have been on the ground working to find ways to expand access to healthcare services. Almost half a million Virginians are covered by Medicaid. But the number of uninsured Virginians is expected to increase. We have many more steps to go to ensure that all Virginians have access to the resources they need to lead flourishing, meaningful lives.

Mornings on the Mall
Sean Kennedy Interview

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 14:25


Vince Coglianese speaks with Sean Kennedy, President of Virginians for Safe Communities, about George Soros' involvement in financing liberal prosecutors. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mornings on the Mall
6.7.22 - Hour 2: Soros' grip on American politics and law enforcement

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 34:52


In the second hour of The Vince Coglianese Show, Vince speaks with Mercedes Schlapp, Host of CPAC now: America Uncancelled about Soros financing 18 hispanic radio stations in an effort to reverse the polling trend of Hispanics.  Vince speaks with Sean Kennedy, President of Virginians for Safe Communities about Soros' involvement in financing liberal prosecutors. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
June 4, 2022: Laufer to enter 55th District House race; UVA to build 440 housing units for Darden students

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 17:15


The first Saturday in June has arrived, just as it did 364 days ago. This particular day goes by the name June 4, 2022, but it may also answer to Day 155. This particular episode of Charlottesville Community Engagement may be referred to as number 391, a fact whose significance is suspect. If this show were a mystery, I, Sean Tubbs, would be the suspect for host. This newsletter and podcast is free, but Ting will match your initial payment to help keep this brand of community journalist in style! On today’s show:A third Democrat is seeking the nomination for the new 55th House of Delegates The General Assembly takes the next step towards adoption of a Virginia budget for the next two fiscal years The spring 2022 COVID surge continues The University of Virginia’s land use committee reviews the $2.8 billion capital plan, including a 1,000 space parking garage and 440 units of student housing at DardenFirst shout-out goes to a Livable Cville eventIn today’s first subscriber supported shout-out, Livable Cville wants you to know about an online presentation coming up on June 7. The Community Climate Collaborative and Livable Cville are presenting a talk on what they consider Climate-Smart Zoning. Executive Director Susan Kruse and Director of Climate Policy Caetano de Campos Lopes will be the presenters. This is happening on Tuesday, June 7, from 5:30 p.m to 6:30 p.m. Sign up for the free event on EventBrite. Laufer seeking Democratic nomination for 55th District A third Democrat has filed paperwork with the Virginia Department of Elections to be a candidate in the new 55th House District in the next election cycle, according to the Virginia Public Access Project. Amy Laufer is the current chair of the Albemarle County Democratic Committee and was twice elected to the Charlottesville School Board in 2011 and 2015.In 2017, Laufer was one of two Democrats on the ballot for Charlottesville City Council and placed a close third behind Independent Nikuyah Walker and Democrat Heather Hill.  In 2019, she resigned from the School Board when she moved to Albemarle County. Soon after, she ran in the 17th Virginia Senate District against Republican Bryce Reeves. Reeves won with 51.6 percent of the vote with Laufer receiving 48.1 percent.Laufer joins Albemarle Supervisor Donna Price and emergency room nurse Kellen Squire in the nomination race, which could still take place this year pending a federal lawsuit. No new orders have been issued in the Goldman V. Brink case since May 5. The incumbent, Republican Rob Bell, has not announced whether he will seek a new term in the new district, which now includes most of Albemarle County and parts of Nelson and Louisa Counties. General Assembly moves forward with state budgetBoth Houses of the General Assembly have adopted the conference reports that represent compromises in the state budget. It’s now up to Governor Glenn Youngkin to determine whether to sign the bills as presented or make further amendments. He has up until the end of the month to take action. Delegate Barry Knight (R-81) served on the House Conference Committee for both HB29 and HB30, the bills that technically carried the budgets for the current biennium and for the next two years. “It’s been a long haul but I believe the result is a fiscally sound, bi-partisan budget we can all be proud of,” Knight said. Knight said a record growth in state revenue has enabled the General Assembly to invest in core government services.“At the same time, the extraordinary revenue situation has enabled us to protect for the future by using one-time revenues to address long-lingering, one-time investment needs, prepay upcoming commitments, fund capital projects with cash and not bond, and remove the account gimmicks we used to balance our budget during the Great Recession,” Knight said. Those investments include $400 million for public school system capital projects already constructed with each locality getting at least a million, as well as another $450 million for new school construction. Knight said that includes a $750 million payment into the Virginia Retirement Services as well as an additional $250 million if the state hits a certain revenue target. Additional funds will go into the “rainy day fund” to have that balance hit what Knight said was a record-setting $3.4 billion. There’s another $2.5 billion from surpluses that will go to previously committed projects. “In addition, the conference report reflects $4 billion in tax relief for Virginia’s families including an increase in the standard deduction including from $4,500 to $8,000 for individuals, double that for joint filers [and] the full elimination of the state’s sales tax on food,” Knight said. There’s also to be a $250 tax rebate for individuals and $500 for households. HB29 passed the House of Delegates on a 93 to 2 vote and the Senate on a 35 to 1 vote. There was no comment about HB29 in the House, but several Democrats had concerns about some of what was in HB30. Delegate Dawn Adams (D-68) had three reasons why she voted no, but one was a lack of transparency during the conference process. “I haven’t seen this lack of transparency in the process since I’ve been here and there’s a fair amount of policy being written through the budget that I think is really, really concerning and has not involved legislators which is so important in making good laws,” Adams said. Delegate Danica Roem (D-13) said she was concerned that revenue cuts to transportation will take away dozens of millions that she said are required to maintain Virginia’s crumbling system. Others were concerned about changes made to marijuana possession that were made in the budget. Others said there was not enough money being put toward affordable housing, with one Delegate citing a 2020 study by the Joint Legislative Audit Review Committee (JLARC). “We have got billions in surplus revenue,” said Delegate Alfonso Lopez. “Now is the time for Virginia to be forward thinking, to invest in housing. Housing trust dollars are the critical layers of debt and equity needed to develop quality affordable housing.” The vote on HB30 was 88 to 7, with dissenters coming from both parties. Republican Delegates Nick Freitas (R-30) and Phil Scott (R-88) joined Adams and four other Democrats in voting against. The Virginia Senate approved HB30 on a 32 to 4 vote. After the votes, Delegate Terry Kilgore explained the next steps. “The Speaker [of the House Todd Gilbert] and the Lieutenant Governor [Winsome Earle-Sears] have three days to sign and enroll the bill or get it to the Governor,” Kilgore said. “The Governor then has seven days to act on any amendments and then we would need to come back prior to July 1 to act on those amendments so what we can make sure we have a budget for Virginians.” Spring 2022 COVID surge continuesOn Friday, the Virginia Department of Health reported 4,057 new cases as detected through PCR tests, the highest one day total in several weeks but consistent with a growing trend. The seven day average is 2,841, though the actual number of cases is likely much higher due to the number of home tests. The Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association reports 87 patients in intensive care units with 30 COVID patients on ventilators. The proliferation of the second Omicron strain has led to many people contracting COVID for a second time. “We are seeing second infections occurring particularly in people that had infections in December and January and in early February and now we’re three months out from that and because of the strain differences and that time lag and difference, we are seeing breakthrough infections,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, director of hospital epidemiology for the University of Virginia Health System. Dr. Sifri said at least some patients do have lingering symptoms associated with long COVID such as fatigue and brain fog. This is still an active area of investigation. “There is still much to be understood about long COVID, what its pathophysiology is, what are the biologic mechanisms that lead to it,” Dr. Sifri said. “That’s still being an active area of investigation trying to understand that and perhaps at some point better be able to predict who may be more susceptible to it.” Dr. Sifri said it can be expected that additional variants will emerge, but that the outlook is not bleak.“What we’re also seeing is that as this occurs, the relative proportion of people that are needing medical care, that are coming into the hospital because of severe COVID, coming into our intensive care units, and importantly, the proportion of people that are dying of COVID, those are going down,” Dr. Sifri said.However, Dr. Sifri said the public should be mindful of the potential for a more deadly strain to emerge. On Thursday, the White House announced that authorization for vaccines for children under the age of five may come sometime this month. The Blue Ridge Health District said in their weekly newsletter they would be ready to distribute and administer the vaccines when the time comes. Today’s second shout-also goes to WTJUIn today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out:  This year, WTJU 91.1 FM turns 65 and to mark the occasion, there’s a new micro-museum exhibition this summer! Radio Relics traces WTJU’s storied history of broadcasting for our community. As part of our 65th anniversary celebrations, WTJU has curated photos, artifacts, and t-shirts – so many t-shirts! – spanning more than six decades.The exhibition is free and will be open Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from June 3 through July 29. The museum space is a renovated, vintage camper parked behind WTJU’s studios at 2244 Ivy Road in Charlottesville. WTJU’s Radio Relics exhibition shows off some of the artifacts collected over the years, many contributed by former WTJU General Manager Chuck Taylor.  In fact, there’s even a new initiative to raise money through the Chuck Taylor Fund for WTJU History. Contact General Manager Nathan Moore to learn more. Or donate today!UVA committee briefed on new capital projects The Buildings and Grounds Committee of the University of Virginia’s Board of Visitors met on Thursday and got an update on capital projects and the next master plan. Colette Sheehy is the executive vice president and chief operating officer at UVA. “So this is the time of year when we ask for approval of the newly revised Major Capital Plan,” Sheehy said. “You’ll recall that we reviewed it with you in March.” The last Major Capital Plan adopted last year was for $3.1 billion worth of projects and several of those have been completed since then such as the University Hospital Expansion, the orthopedic center on Ivy Road, and the student health and wellness center on Brandon Avenue. “We have a lot going on,” Sheehy said. “Thirty-one percent of the value of the entire capital program represents projects under construction and we are going to have a very busy 24 months coming up as many of these projects reach conclusion.” The landscaping and the infrastructure for the Emmet-Ivy Corridor should be completed by next spring. Renovations of Alderman Library and construction of the Contemplative Commons should be completed in the fall of 2023.“The School of Data Science will follow on the heels in December of 2023 and then the following spring, late spring, early summer, the Brandon Avenue undergraduate residence hall,” Sheehy said. Sheehy said the next plan will include several design studies as well as eight new projects, four of which were not on the list in March. One of them would be for student housing at the Darden School of Business. “They are proposing to build about 440 beds that would house two-thirds of their residential MBA students,” Sheehy said. “It is something that competitor business schools do.” There is no cost estimate for that project, which would offer a range of options for students and their families. (read a fact sheet) Sheehy said another project is to construct a 1,000 space parking garage, but she did not elaborate on its location. A fact sheet states the cost estimate is $54 million and would replace parking in the existing Emmet Ivy Parking Garage that will be dedicated to uses such as the future hotel, the Karsh Institute of Democracy, and the School of Data Science. “The current parking inventory displaced by the Ivy Corridor redevelopment must be met in a location that serves multiple constituencies and links effectively to transit,” reads the fact sheet. Other new projects are renovations to the physics building as well as Pinn Hall. After that presentation, UVA Architect Alice Raucher updated the committee on the creation of the 2030 Grounds Framework Plan, which updates a master plan adopted in 2008. The pandemic delayed the work slightly and the end of this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement will delay my reporting on it. I’ll cover that in a future edition. Sound permitting. Town Crier Productions has a sponsorship thing with Ting!For over a year one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Charlottesville Community Engagement
June 1, 2022: General Assembly to meet today on budget; Albemarle Supervisors to talk transit, appointing a Planning Commissioner

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 16:25


Fans of longer days in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States of America have three weeks to go until the world begins turning back to the other way. The solstice will mark the official start of summer, but many would argue it is already here. I’m not here to argue, and neither is Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast that seeks to document as much as it can. The I mentioned above is me, Sean Tubbs. Sign up for free to make sure you get every installment. But if you do pay to support the work, Ting will match your initial payment! On today’s program:Details on what’s in the compromise budget that the General Assembly will vote on todayAlbemarle Supervisors have a full meeting including a vote for a new Planning CommissionerTwo plans for a future Regional Transit Authority are presented to area leaders and both have hefty price tags First shout-out is for LEAP’s new Thermalize Virginia program In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Have you been thinking of converting your fossil-fuel appliances and furnaces into something that will help the community reduce its greenhouse gas emissions? Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP,  has launched a new program to guide you through the steps toward electrifying your home. Thermalize Virginia will help you understand electrification and connect you with vetted contractors to get the work done and help you find any rebates or discounts. Visit thermalizeva.org to learn more and to sign up!  General Assembly returns today to consider conference reportBoth chambers of the Virginia General Assembly will convene at 10 a.m. to finish work on several bills left over the regular session. The major item left waiting to be finalized is the state budget and conference reports were made public over the weekend. There are 370 pages in the conference report for HB30, the technical name for the bill that carries the two year state budget that begins on July 1. A team of six Delegates and eight Senators were appointed to come up with compromises. One running theme is the reduction of funding that is now required because of elimination of the sales tax on foods for human consumption and personal hygiene products. The standard deduction for Virginia income taxes has also been increased from $4,500 to $8,000 for single filers and $9,000 to $16,000 for married couples. There’s a lot in it, and here are some highlights. Let’s start with education. A $400 million competitive fund will be set up for local school boards to apply for funding for “construction, expansion, or modernization, of public school buildings.” The grants would cover up to 30 percent of the project cost. There is a separate $400 million for the School Construction Grant program “for debt service payments on school projects that have been completed or initiated during the last ten years.” School systems across Virginia will get $104.1 million in FY23 and $257.2 million in FY24 in “hold harmless” payments to represent the loss of revenue from the suspension of the grocery A hundred million dollars will go into a College Partnership Laboratory Schools Fund which would be for the creation of “public, nonsectarian, nonreligious schools in the Commonwealth established by a baccalaureate public institution of higher education.”The Secretary of Education is directed to study the practice of collecting student debts for public institutions of higher education. The RISE Foundation of Waynesboro is allocated $250,000 for preventive services for at-risk youth. Around $9.5 million over two years will go to support the implementation of the Virginia Literacy ActChesterfield County Public Schools would get $1.364 million over two years to help establish a recovery high school for students in “early stages of recovery from substance use disorder or dependency.”Here are some economic development and tourism items:There’s $66.7 million in funding over two years to support biotechnology in Virginia, including up to $18 million for the University of Virginia Institute of Biotechnology “to accelerate biotechnology commercialization, genomics and gene therapies, drug delivery technologies and biomanufacturing facilities in the Commonwealth over the next five fiscal years through incentives designed to attract 150 research scientists.”The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will be allocated $125,000 to the Virginia Wine Board to breeding vinifera-style wine groups “with a specified focus on combining vinifera fruit quality with downy mildew resistance, with an objective of commercializing the resulting variety within 10 to 15 years.”There’s $700,000 to hire seven inspectors for regulating hemp products and investigating possible violations. This is related to changes in the already adopted rules for hemp and marijuana.Nine million would be spent over the next two years for the Governor’s Motion Picture Opportunity Fund.The Frederick County Economic Development Authority will get $5 million to help develop sites that can “support the growth of small aerospace, avionics, and unmanned systems companies in Planning District 7.”  Matching funds would need to be provided within a year. Virginia Tech would receive $2.5 million to “create a unique, world-class future truck research and development center in Southwest Virginia.”Nelson County would get $250,000 to support the planning of a Vietnam War and Foreign Conflicts Museum. The Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library in Staunton would get a $250,000 grant for renovations. Thirty million in funding for a new Solar Loan and Rebate program has been eliminated. The Virginia Economic Development Partnership Authority would get $2.5 million in FY24 for a grant program to spur development in the offshore wind industry. There’s $200,000 for a feasibility study whether a new inland port should be built in either southwest Virginia or the Lynchburg area. There’s $2 million for an international sailing event called OpSail250. Environmental items:There’s $575,000 in new funding for an invasive species detection program.The Department of Conservation and Recreation would get $350,000 for creation of an environmental literacy plan. The Dam Safety, Flood Prevention and Protection Assistance Fund would get an additional $10 million, matching a $10 million appropriation from the state’s share of the American Rescue Plan Act. DCR would also get $1 million to study of harmful algae blooms on Lake Anna. The phased ban on polystyrene containers would be delayed five years until July 1, 2028Another $320,000 would go to monitor groundwater for the presence of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).The Department of Wildlife Resources gets $400,000 over two years for a program to restore freshwater mussels across Virginia.Here are some land use items:The Department of Housing and Community Development is directed to develop a model lease for manufactured home parks in collaboration with a wide variety of stakeholders, and to conduct a feasibility study of these parks as a “source of affordable housing for Virginians.” Just over $11 million for planning for a Center for the Arts at the University of Virginia has been deferred. For more on how we got to here, some other articles: After months of wrangling, Virginia has a budget deal. What’s in it?, Virginia MercuryLawmakers to vote on budget, won’t take up stadium bill, Associated PressVirginia budget proposal includes new marijuana crime, WUSA 9Supervisors to appoint Planning Commissioner for White Hall DistrictThree candidates are awaiting to see if they will be the one selected to represent the White Hall District on the Albemarle Planning Commission. Jennie More resigned in April before the end of her second term.Supervisors will meet today at 1 p.m. and will make their appointments at 6 p.m. after a closed session. They will also select a new non-voting member to represent the University of Virginia. The previous holder of that position, Luis Carazana, was elevated to be the at-large commissioner. Unlike the Board of the Supervisors, there are seven members of the Planning Commission. The applicants for the White Hall seat are Marc McKenney, Lonnie Murray, and Elizabeth Wachtneister. Murray is an elected member of the Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation Board.Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s getting close to the end of springtime, and one Patreon subscriber wants you to know the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign is a grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. Did you know that National Pollinator Week is June 20th-26th this year? There are many ways to celebrate and learn more about our native pollinators, and here's a great one to start with: Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is hosting an in-person/virtual Pollinator Power Symposium on June 23rd, and there is an excellent line up of speakers scheduled for the day! There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more! Partnership briefed on potential vision for regional transitWork is nearing completion on a conceptual study for how public transport  might work better across the entirety of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District. Today the Board of Supervisors will get an up close look at the $350,000 Regional Transit Vision.Last week, an appointed body consisting of elected officials and transit officials got an update on the Regional Transit Vision. “The project is a collaborative effort to evaluate and establish a clear long term vision for transit service in the region, and not just the urbanized area but also the rural areas surrounding Charlottesville and Albemarle County,”  said Tim Brulle of AECOM is the project manager for the vision plan. If you’re unfamiliar with planning, you should know that any plan needs a vision statement to provide an overarching purpose. “To develop, design, and provide transit in the Charlottesville area in a manner that reflects a collaborative, inclusive, and equitable process representing needs in both rural and urban areas,” Brulle said. The purpose is to reduce reliance on personal vehicles for multiple reasons and outcomes, and to provide a way to get around for people without access to one. But how to make that work? Scudder Wagg with Jarrett Walker + Associates presented one vision concept that assumed the region had access to new revenues from a transportation authority similar to one in the Richmond area. This is known the “constrained “ vision. “So basically if you applied a similar funding structure there to your region, how many dollars and if you put most of those dollars to transit, what could it produce?” Wagg asked. “It’s about $26 million a year.”Such an authority would take enabling authority from the General Assembly and would build off of existing services. Wagg also presented a vision that assumed no limits on transit funding. For instance, that would allow for expansion of demand responsive service to seven days a week, as well as fixed-route transit to places that currently don’t have it such as Scottsville, Ruckersville, Lovingston, and Palmyra. This “unconstrained” vision would come with a hefty price tag. “So there’s no defined limit when we were designing a network that we collectively with staff and others at the table felt would help you achieve those goals and the total annual estimate of that network is about $70 million a year to give you some sense of scale,” Wagg said. Most of that cost is in personnel with drivers and mechanics, as well as a additional vehicles. It takes people to run a transit system, and another way to measure one is through service hours. Wag said Charlottesville Area Transit has about 94,000 service hours a year, Jaunt operates 37,000 for a total of 131,000 service hours for the general public. The unconstrained vision includes potential collaboration with the University of Virginia whereas the constrained vision does not their role into account. The partnership isn’t in charge of the purse strings, so today’s conversation before the Board of Supervisors will yield more of a sense of whether there’s an appetite to pursue additional funding and if so, where to direct it. Jarrett Walker + Associates helped redraw the bus system in the Greater Richmond area, and CAT Director Garland Williams was there at the time.“The majority of the emphasis was actually put on frequency and our ridership jumped 22 percent,” Williams said. “Then the second piece was to look at once the frequent service is in, how can you readjust networks to adjust travel times.” Williams said that the same model could be applied here. A microtransit pilot in Albemarle is a year away from happening and depends on award of funding from the Commonwealth Transportation Board.“It will be awarded and the starting of it will be acquisition, development of the program, software acquisition, things that have to happen before the actual buses are on the ground,” said Trevor Henry, the assistant county executive. The regional transit study is separate from a $150,000 governance study about that will suggest how to actually move forward with setting up new structures to actually run the enhanced service, be they constrained or unconstrained visions.Watch the Regional Transit Vision presentation here: This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

This Day in Esoteric Political History
The Randolph Freedpeople (1846)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 15:11 Very Popular


It's May 29th. This day in 1846, 13 years after being granted their freedom, a group of formerly-enslaved Virginians arrive in Ohio to settle on land that they'd secured in a long court battle. Jody, Niki, and Kellie discuss the plight of the “Randolph Freedpeople,” why their former owner John Randolph willed them their freedom, and the legacy of this group in Ohio today. Sign up for our newsletter! Find out more at thisdaypod.com And don't forget about Oprahdemics, hosted by Kellie, out now from Radiotopia. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro and Audrey Mardavich, Executive Producers at Radiotopia

With Good Reason
REPLAY Celebrating American Freedom

With Good Reason

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 52:00


In 2019, Virginia joined just three other states in making Juneteenth a paid state holiday, recognizing it as a holiday for all Virginians. Lauranett Lee says in this country we have parallel histories, with Black and white Americans knowing about and acknowledging different pasts. But community efforts and local activists are elevating the stories of African Americans so that those parallel histories are brought together. One of those local historians is Wilma Jones, who grew up in the mostly Black community of Halls Hill in Arlington, Virginia. Now the neighborhood is rapidly gentrifying and Black families like hers have been pushed out. Today, Jones says it's too late to save Grandma's house, but it's not too late to save her history. Later in the show: Much has been said about the golden age of gospel in the 1940s and 50s. But what about the gospel music that came later when hip-hop and soul were dominant? Claudrena Harold's in her book, When Sunday Comes, takes us to the Black record shops, churches, and businesses that transformed gospel after the Civil Rights era and nurtured the music that was an essential cultural and political expression for African Americans.

Bold Dominion
62 - How will post-Roe v. Wade unfold in Virginia?

Bold Dominion

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 29:48


Episode Notes Today on Bold Dominion, we're talking with several women about how things could unfold in Virginia after Roe v Wade is overturned. Earlier this month, an anonymous source leaked a draft opinion written by Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito. It showed that a majority of Justices intend to strike down the landmark 1973 decision that protects the legality of abortion. Here in Virginia, state law protects the legality of abortion… for now. But laws can change. And Governor Glenn Youngkin and the Republican-majority House of Delegates are showing interest in exactly that. This shift in legal precedent presents new challenges for Virginians. Notes go here

Consumer Tech Update
Washington is holding Big Tech CEOs accountable

Consumer Tech Update

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 1:15


Should Big Tech CEOs be personally responsible when their company breaks the law? Virginian lawmakers seem to think so. Here's their plan, in 60 seconds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

JACK ARUTE'S WIND TUNNEL PRESENTED BY ADVANCE AUTO PARTS
DRIVE FOR FIVE – CHASING A CHAMPIONSHIP

JACK ARUTE'S WIND TUNNEL PRESENTED BY ADVANCE AUTO PARTS

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 57:57


In 2001 a young Brazilian driver name Helio Castroneves arrived at the corner of 16th St and Georgetown Rd. in Speedway Indiana. Twenty years later, Helio Castroneves joined racing's most exclusive Club becoming the only the 4th driver in IndyCar history to win the Greatest Spectacle in racing FOUR times.And this week Castroneves is at the precipice of joining another club….a club of one. As he chases a 5th 500 win.In this week's Wind Tunnel Episode Jack and Helio trace the energetic divers IndyCar career from the beginning. It is a career that is marked by success casted from happenstance, tragedy and indictment.You'll learn how all that has changed  the driver known as "SPIDER MAN" and how he believes that it will fuel his drive for five.You'll also meet a 2nd generation driver who hopes to go one better than his dad. Scott Riggs is a Virginian late Model Legend. His winning performances played a role in his son Layne Riggs's decision to follow his dad onto the short track late model scene.Layne is already a proven winner on the circuit including a pair of late Model wins at the South Boston Speedway last weekend, but his goal this season is a NASCAR Advance Auto Parts Weekly Racing Series National Championship. Something that his father never accomplished.He and Jack unpack Layne's approach to racing, his goals and the impact  of following a father.   

VPM Daily Newscast
05/13/22 - Richmond-area feeling the impact of Islamophobia again

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 11:52


Experts say recent events in Virginia show the commonwealth still struggles to address hate crimes against Muslims; Governor Glenn Youngkin's administration is adding religious concepts to its mandatory diversity training for state employees; Virginians will have a difficult time challenging any new state laws that would restrict abortion, if the U.S. Supreme Court decides to overturn Roe v. Wade; and other local news stories.

The Smart City Podcast
Learn About JBG Smith and the Nation's First 5G Smart City at Scale in National Landing

The Smart City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:35


Listen to an insightful discussion about JBG Smith's Digital Infrastructure Platform being deployed at National Landing , VA directly from JBGS' Vardahn Chaudhry, Vice President Smart Cities & Digital Infrastructure and Adam Rashid, Senior Vice President .U.S. Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-VA) said “I am thrilled to see this collaboration of leading private sector organizations to promote 5G deployment. American competitiveness in the deployment of 5G networks – and innovation in the emerging technologies 5G unlocks – remain key to our national and economic security interest.  As a proud Virginian, I am excited to see National Landing emerge as our first 5G community – and I look forward to wider deployment across the Commonwealth. This collaboration can be a blueprint for how digital infrastructure is deployed, and I am heartened by the prospects of the innovation this may unlock to advance our country's competitiveness globally.” National Landing is a submarket nearly the size of Williamsburg Brooklyn, and an existing office density greater than downtown Austin, TX.  The submarket is in Arlington, VA and is home to Amazon's HQ2 and Virginia Tech's $1 billion STEM innovation campus. At full build-out National Landing will consist of over 30 million SF of mixed-use real estate, including office, residential, retail, public parks, and multi-modal transportation options. JBGS owns or controls nearly 70% of the existing and developable real estate in this submarket. JBGS is deploying a robust digital infrastructure platform across National Landing that is purpose-built to stimulate innovation.National Landing digital infrastructure platform will be the first of its kind in the nation and will be a blueprint for innovation districts across the globe going forward. The component parts of the platform include:Fiber – Redundant/ubiquitous fiber with pre-wired fiber connections to nearly all buildings, public areas, and street furniture.Edge Data Centers – Two urban edge data centers, acting as easy on-ramps to the cloud, locations for edge computing, and hubs for carriers & data aggregation.Ubiquitous outdoor & Indoor 5G (MmWave and Mid-band) – True 5G at the mid and high band, allowing for Massive IoT Connection, Multi-gigabit speeds, and ultra-reliable low latency across the submarket.Private Licensed Spectrum – JBGS controls 70MHz of private CBRS mid-band spectrum and will offer it to innovative users to enable private 5G networks for testing and scaling products on private secure cellular wireless networks.Taken together, the JBGS digital infrastructure platform enables and unlocks the potential of the 4th Industrial Revolution and industries including Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence, Cyber Security, and Cloud/Edge computing.While other innovation districts have focused on building clusters for traditional “placed-based” innovation, in National Landing we are combining traditional place-based innovation with the digital infrastructure required for the industries that are at the forefront of our nation's economic growth, competitiveness, and national security.With JBGS' digital infrastructure platform as the foundation for innovation for industry 4.0, JBGS is inviting, creating, and curating partnerships with key technology ecosystem participants to accelerate innovation in this city of the future. 

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 7, 2022: Greene County Commissioner of Revenue resigns after pleading guilty in witness tampering case; Squire launches campaign for 55th House District

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 13:51


Welcome to Mother’s Day Eve, a holiday that may not exist, but is certainly a possibility in a world that seems to have an occasion for everything. While we wait for Mommoween to be invented, we’ll just have to settle for another installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast that is most certainly not funded by Big Greeting Card. Find the info worthwhile? Send it on to others! On today’s program:Greene County’s Commissioner of Revenue resigns after pleading guilty to federal charges of witness tampering Kellen Squire officially launches his race to the Democratic nominee for the 55th House District Dr. Denise Bonds is stepping down as director of the Blue Ridge Health DistrictAnother surge of COVID appears to be in the making, but it’s too early to tell how severe it might be And the City of Charlottesville is taking donations to help cover unpaid utility bills Today’s first shout-out goes to WTJUAlgorithms know how to put songs and artists together based on genre or beats per minute. But only people can make connections that engage your mind and warm your heart. The music on WTJU 91.1 FM is chosen by dozens and dozens of volunteer hosts -- music lovers like you who live right here in the Charlottesville area. Listener donations keep WTJU alive and thriving. In this era of algorithm-driven everything, go against the grain. This week is the annual Rock Marathon, so tune in and support freeform community radio on WTJU Consider a donation at wtju.net/donate.Snow resigns as Greene County Commissioner of RevenueLarry Snow has resigned as the Commissioner of Revenue in Greene County after pleading guilty in federal court to tampering with a witness. Snow appeared in the Western District Court in Charlottesville Friday to answer to charges that stemmed from a federal investigation, along with his son who pleaded guilty to a charge of heroin distribution. The elder Snow was caught trying to harass and intimidate a confidential informant involved with the investigation.“Elected officials should hold themselves to a higher standard and serve their community responsibly,” said Stanley M. Meador, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Richmond Division in a release sent out by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Virginia. “Mr. Snow violated the faith entrusted to him, and with his son criminally used personal information of community members for their own gain,” Snow was first elected to the position in 1987 and was reelected in 2019 while under indictment with three quarters of the vote. In November 2017, Bryant Snow was arrested on two state counts of distribution after selling methamphetamine and heroin to an informant. He plead guilty to the meth charge in April 2018 and was imprisoned at Central Virginia Regional Jail. While there, the father and son discussed ways to intimidate someone referred to as Person A. At one point, the elder Snow sent out over 12,000 pamphlets to Greene County residents describing how the Sheriff’s Department uses informants in an attempt to dissuade Person A. Larry Snow will be sentenced on July 25 and Bryant Snow will be sentenced on August 1 before Senior Judge Norman K. Moon. Bonds stepping down as director of the Blue Ridge Health DistrictA search will soon get underway for a new director of the Blue Ridge Health District now that Dr. Denise Bonds has announced she’ll step down from the position at the end of this month. She’s been the health director since 2015 and led the agency during the COVID-19 pandemic and during a name change. “Under Dr. Bonds’ leadership, BRHD expanded its HIV testing and prevention services, increased access to testing for sexually transmitted diseases, and broadened the size and reach of the Population Health Division, including launching a robust Community Health Worker program,” reads an announcement from the Blue Ridge Health District sent out yesterday afternoon. Dr. Bonds also served as interim director of the Rappahannock Area Health District from August 2020 to April 2021. The Blue Ridge Health District is also closing down its COVID-19 case investigation team. According to the release, they followed 47,274 cases since March 2020. After this weekend, the Mobile Health Unit created during the pandemic has held 200 events at which over 5,000 COVID vaccinations were administered. A memorial to those lost during the COVID-19 pandemic will be held on May 24, 2022 at the Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital Amphitheater.COVID-19 update A spring surge of COVID-19 continues to rise with the Virginia Department of Health reporting 2,677 new cases on Friday, with a seven-day average for positive tests at 11 percent. That’s about where things were in late February when the Omicron surge was waning. “And that’s up from around three percent, three and a half percent in March, so we have seen an increase in test positivity,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology at the University of Virginia Health System. “This is occurring in a background where we’re having less testing in general because of the growth of at-home testing and I would say the vast majority of the people who are testing positive at home through a rapid antigen test are not going on to get a PCR test somewhere else.” The dashboard for the Blue Ridge Health District hasn’t been updated since May 1, and the Virginia Department of Health no longer provides that information in an easily-consumable fashion. The dataset is available here.  The increasing number of cases are not leading to increased hospitalizations. Today the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association reports 30 COVID-positive people in intensive care units and 11 on respirators. At the height of the Omicron surge in late January of this year, that number climbed over 400. Dr. Sifri said the numbers are expected to rise as more people forgo wearing masks indoors and as people move further away from their vaccinations or boosters. “There is some progressive loss of some immune response,” said Dr. Sifri. “And finally, in this background is new subvariants of Omicron.” Dr. Sifri points people to the weekly models produced by the University of Virginia's Biocomplexity Institute. The latest from April 29 predicts a further surge this summer, though with lower death rates due to treatments that are now available, more than two years after the pandemic began. “The open question is how much of an impact will that have on health systems?” Dr. Sifri asked. “Is that going to lead to more hospitalizations? Is that going to lead to more [intensive care unit] hospitalizations and deaths? That’s our concern.”Dr. Sifri said vaccinations may not prevent infection but do limit the severity. City taking donations to cover unpaid utility billsIt’s been nearly a month since the City of Charlottesville announced it would resume the practice of shutting down service for unpaid utility bills. There was a statewide moratorium on such disconnects that expired last September. In all, the city used $557,000 in various federal assistance programs to help some customers.However, they announced in April disconnects would resume. “To date, six accounts have been disconnected and remain out of service,” said Chris Cullinan, the city’s finance director, in an email to Charlottesville Community Engagement. However, the city is taking donations to help prevent further disconnects. Cullinan said that as of Thursday, the city had received $800 from concerned community members. He said checks marked with “Water/WW Assistance” in the memo can be sent to:City of Charlottesville Utility Billing OfficePO Box 911Attn: Water and Wastewater AssistanceCharlottesville, VA  22902Second shout-out goes to a Charlottesville Jazz Society event this weekendIn today’s second subscriber-supported shout-out, the Charlottesville Jazz Society and WTJU are pleased to bring bassist Joe Fonda back to town with his long-standing group the Nu Band. They’ll be appearing Tuesday May 10 at the Bridge at 209 Monticello Road. The Nu Band is a dynamic jazz ensemble from New York City, featuring some of the most unique, compelling and in-demand voices in creative music today. The band was formed in 1999, and since then has released 10 recordings, completed 9 European and several US tours, bringing forward-leaning, provocative and evocative music to the world. All tickets for The Nu Band at The Bridge, May 10th at 7 pm will be $10 at the door. For more information visit cvillejazz.org, Squire launches campaign with ad releaseThere’s still no firm resolution on whether Virginia will elect the next set of members of the next House of Delegates this November or the next, but there are two active candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for the newly drawn 55th District. On Friday, Kellen Squire released a video to launch a campaign for which he filed earlier this spring. He’s an emergency room nurse who ran in the 58th District in 2017 against incumbent Rob Bell. “Just as I believe there’s hope for me when I come home to my family,” Squire narrates in the two-minute video that depicts him driving home from a shift, concluding with him getting out of his vehicle. “I’m Kellen Squire and I’m running for the House of Delegates because as an emergency department nurse, I know that we all do better when we all do better,” Squire continues. “I’ll fight unapologetically for rural Virginia. I’ll put people before party. And I’ll make sure no Virginian gets left behind.” Squire joins Albemarle Supervisor Donna Price in the race for the Democratic nomination, a race in which the winner could take on Republican Rob Bell, who has represented the 58th District since 2002. He’s not yet made an announcement about the next election. The 55th District is geographically different and will consist of most of Albemarle County, western Louisa County, and northeast Nelson County. Price made her announcement on Facebook on Tuesday, a day after someone leaked a draft Supreme Court ruling purporting to overturn Roe v. Wade. (read the story)There is a chance that an election could be held this year due to a federal lawsuit filed by Richmond attorney Paul Goldman arguing that legislators elected in 2021 are in unconstitutional districts. Judge David Novak of the Eastern District of Virginia is expected to rule on whether Goldman has the legal standing to file the case.On Thursday, Novak admonished Goldman for filing a motion to ask the court to consider the draft ruling as evidence for why a House of Delegates race should be run this year. “The Court hereby STRIKES this Motion at patently inappropriate and completely irrelevant to this case,” Novak wrote in an order. “Neither draft opinions nor press reports have any impact on the decisions of this Court.” Novak told Goldman to stop filing additional motions. Help support Town Crier Productions with a paid subscription to this newsletter!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has a promo with Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

With Good Reason
Legacies Of WWII

With Good Reason

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 52:00


In recent years, the incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII has gotten more attention. But most of that attention focuses on the West Coast, California in particular. Emma Ito studied the racism and incarceration that Virginians and other East Coast Japanese Americans faced during the war. And: Japanese Americans weren't the only immigrants persecuted during WWII–many German and Italian immigrants were also sent to incarceration camps and repatriated. John Schmitz's own family were German Americans who lived for three years in the Crystal City camp. Later in the show: When you think of archeology what comes to mind? Maybe paper maps and pickaxes in dusty places? Instead imagine precise instruments delicately probing what's below the surface to prevent destruction to sacred spaces. Richard Freund uses this less invasive archeology to help tell the stories of Jewish resistance in WWII. Plus: There are some well-known violent plots by Germans designed to overthrow the Nazi regime. But what about the quieter acts of resistance? Donald Sunnen studies some of the Germans whose brave, but more conservative resistance saved lives during WWII.

Monticello Podcasts
“Half Virginian, Half French”: Food at Monticello

Monticello Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 8:50


At Monticello, food culture and dining were significant parts of daily life. Though Jefferson's desire for French style food and his interest in gastronomical cultures influenced how food was prepared at Monticello, it was enslaved African Americans who were chiefly responsible for the "rich" and "elegant" cuisine, literally from farm to table.

Henrico News Minute
Henrico News Minute – April 21, 2022

Henrico News Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 6:51


Good news about the air quality in Metro Richmond; the CVTA seeks public input about funding for a number of proposed transportation projects, including eight in Henrico; VDOT seeks input about the Fall Line Trail; Henrico CASA hosting a spring fundraiser April 23; Virginians say they are more likely to be traveling this summer; a Lakeside quilting shop is raffling off two quilts to benefit Ukraine.Support the show (http://www.henricocitizen.com/contribute)

Radio ITVT
Televisionation: Screen Culture: Documentarian, Clay Tweel, in Conversation with Lisa Crawford

Radio ITVT

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 43:03


A native Virginian living in LA, Clay Tweel is a documentary director/producer/editor with a passion for telling great character-based stories. His works include Make Believe, Print the Legend, Finders Keepers, Out of Omaha, The Innocent Man and Gleason—the last of which was shortlisted for an Academy Award and named one of the 5 best documentaries of 2016 by the National Board of Review. His features have been distributed by Showtime, Netflix, and Amazon Studios while working closely with companies that include Open Road, The Orchard and Exhibit A. Most recently, Clay executive-produced and directed all four episodes of Heaven's Gate: The Cult of Cults, an examination of the UFO cult through the eyes of its former members and their loved ones. He is currently directing a feature documentary and producing numerous projects under his banner Parkside Films.Since this interview was recorded, at the end of 2021, it has been announced that Clay is co-directing a feature documentary about uncovering corruption in soccer organization FIFA. Told through the lens of the late investigative journalist Andrew Jennings, it's presumably another example of Clay's emphasis on "singular viewpoints of characters and their experience.”Clay and Lisa also cover:His career evolution, starting as assistant editor on Seth Gordon's arcade game competition documentary The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters, leading into the acclaimed Gleason and beyondHis desire “to figure out why people do what they do,” and the compassionate portrayal of complex human experience in the Heaven's Gate docuseriesWorking in “the golden age of nonfiction,” the future of true crime unscripted content, and Clay's thought that Liz Garbus's outstanding I'll Be Gone in the Dark so powerfully explored the genre that we're now “potentially in a post-true crime world”(Televisionation: Screen Culture features Lisa Crawford—a cultural commentator and expert on the evolving relationship between fans and television creators—in conversation with prominent content creators and producers. She focuses on how television content impacts our culture.)

Blackletter
Virginia Decriminalizes Swearing in Public

Blackletter