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Latest podcast episodes about Shenandoah

HistoCast
HistoCast 243 - Jackson en el Valle de Shenandoah (Parte II)

HistoCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 274:19


Esto es HistoCast. No es Esparta pero casi. Regresamos al Valle de Shenandoah para continuar con la campaña homónima de la Guerra de Secesión estadounidense. Pertrechados para la acción están @LordCirencester, @tamtamveramendi y @goyix_salduero.Mapa de los movimientos tras Front RoyalSecciones Historia: - Recapitulación - 5:29 - Vuelven los movimientos - 20:52 - Front Royal - 1:29:39 - 24 de Mayo - 2:16:37 - Winchester - 3:37:10 - Caos tras la batalla - 4:02:33 - Bibliografía - 4:25:56

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 609 (12-27-21): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2021 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:31).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 27, 2021.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec That's the sound of a Belted Kingfisher at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., on December 21, 2021.  The year-end chattering of Virginia Water Radio's favorite bird sets the stage for our annual look-back on Water Radio's year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds and voices from six episodes in 2021.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see how many you recognize. SOUNDS – ~38 sec If you guessed all of most of those, you're a water-sound world champion! You heard Brimley's Chorus Frog;Virginia Tech graduate Maddy Grupper discussing her research on public trust in water systems;Virginia Tech's siren used for tornado warnings;names of some 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Canvasback ducks; andice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use the chorus frog sound; to Lang Elliott for the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Maddy Grupper for the episode on her research; and to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone name call-outs. We close out 2021 with a two-minute sample of music heard in episodes this year.  Here are excerpts of “Wade in the Water,” by Torrin Hallett; “Racing the Sun,” by the Faux Paws; “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann; “John Ashe's Spring,” by New Standard; “The Coming Spring,” by Andrew VanNorstand with vocalist Kailyn Wright; and “On a Ship,” by Kat Mills, with violinist Rachel Handman. Thanks to those musicians for permission to use their music. So long, soon, to 2021, and here's hoping for a safe, sound, and sufficiently hydrated 2022. MUSIC – ~105 sec From “Wade in the Water” - ~18 sec – instrumental. From “Racing the Sun” - ~20 sec – instrumental. From “All Creatures Were Meant to be Free” - ~10 sec – instrumental. From “John Ashe's Spring” - ~13 sec – instrumental. From “The Coming Spring” - ~20 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin' on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” From “On a Ship” - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., December 21, 2021. The sound of Brimley's Chorus Frog was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/.  This sound was used in Episode 563, 2-8-21. Virginia Tech 2020 graduate Maddy Grupper discussed her research on public trust in water systems in Episode 564, 2-15-21. The tornado-warning siren was recorded in Blacksburg, Va., in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  This sound was used in Episode 568, 3-15-21. The call-out of Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2021 season were recorded by Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio in June 2021.  The voices were sued in Episode 580, 6-7-21. The sounds of Canvasback ducks were sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, online at https://musicofnature.com/.  These sounds were used in Episode 604, 11-22-21. The Claytor Lake ice sound was recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. This sound was used in Episode 606, 12-6-21. Musical Selections Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 566, 3-1-21, water in U.S. civil rights history. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 561, 1-25-21, on the Northern Harrier. “John Ashe's Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used in Episode 576, 5-10-21, an introduction to springs. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/.  Information on accompanying artists on “The Coming Spring” is online at https://andrewvannorstrandmusic.bandcamp.com/track/the-coming-spring.  This music was used in Episode 572, 4-12-21, on warblers and spring bird migration. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanying artists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. IMAGESAn Image Sampler from Episodes in 2021 From Episode 561, 1-25-21: Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 12-27-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 563, 2-8-21: Brimley's Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 580, 6-7-21: Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.From Episode 602, 11-8-21: Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.From Episode 606, 12-6-21: Thin ice on a pond in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., December 9, 2021.SOURCES Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the individual episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance o

new york science bay university agency graphic guide music photo natural state audio game college english sound accent cd dark tech water web index rain pond research ocean government education racing ship sun spring ohio chesapeake snow environment images oberlin college va silver msonormal atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental frogs times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading predictions shenandoah bluegrass lyrics conservatory diagram oberlin colorful forest resources yale school signature thin listed accompanying manhattan school co2 watershed toads transcript brimley virginia tech social studies atlantic ocean natural resources name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table draper blacksburg msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot sections attribution noncommercial ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback national oceanic lang elliott environmental conservation policymakers bmp be free atmospheric administration heritage park new standard acknowledgment virginia department coming spring cumberland gap inaturalist sols tmdl henrico torrin inland fisheries water center pulaski county audio notes
Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
How to Survive In The Wild with The Star of The Discovery Channel Show "Naked and Afraid" Wes Harper

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 51:57


How to Survive In The Wild with The Star of The Discovery Channel show "Naked and Afraid" Wes Harper Devoted husband, father of 5 kids. Owner of an IT company in Raleigh for 25 years. Naked and Afraid survivalist  Wes Harper in his words:  I grew up in rural Northern Virginia (when that was a thing) and my parents had me camping before I was out of diapers. Trips to the Shenandoah mountains were frequent, as were fishing trips with my dad as soon as I could hold a cane pole. My brother (2 years younger) and I grew a strong love for the outdoors as a result. My parents created a strong family bond, complete with set dinner times and a dutiful sense of right and wrong. My dad worked at the Pentagon and preached to me and my brother, "don't ever do what I am doing." His desire was for us to be strong, independent men who wouldn't be trapped in an 8 to 5. Mom taught me how to cook, and Dad taught me how to be stubborn. I owe them both a debt of gratitude.

Lead Like a Woman
Forge Your Own Way

Lead Like a Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 35:28


Shenandoah Davis is the Co-founder and CEO of Adventure Nannies, a nationwide domestic staffing agency that has been helping progressive families find nannies, private educators, and newborn care specialists since 2012. Shenandoah grew up attached to the piano. Being homeschooled, she would spend each day racing through her lessons so she could have time to practice for as long as possible. After graduating from the University of Northern Colorado with a degree in opera performance, she packed up and moved to Seattle to pursue the music and art scene. Shenandoah has toured four continents as a singer, songwriter, and DIY musician performing in listening spaces and art galleries before taking a position at a large restaurant group in Seattle as a brand manager. She then joined Adventure Nannies as their COO in 2016. She serves on the board of several nonprofits and is committed to advancing the careers and dreams of women entrepreneurs through the realm of equitable domestic staffing in the US. In this episode… Being a successful female leader does not mean that you have to lead like someone else — or like a man. You only need to forge your own way. Every woman is different, and there is value in redefining what it means to lead like a woman. You don't have to stress yourself with a boss babe mentality, dress and act like a man, or have a big voice. However, by being authentic, you can be powerful and empower others as a leader. And if something doesn't work, learn from it and grow. In this episode of the Lead Like A Woman Show, Andrea Heuston is joined by Shenandoah Davis, the Co-founder and CEO of Adventure Nannies, to talk about leading a business like a woman, experiencing success, and the power of music. They also talk about recent changes at Adventure Nannies and the value of being an authentic and empowered female leader. Stay tuned.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 607 (12-13-21): A Winter Holidays History of Counting Birds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2015 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUNDS – 7 secThis week, the sound of Mallard ducks on a December day in Blacksburg, Va., is the call to explore the annual Christmas Bird Count, organized by the National Audubon Society.Since 1900, the Society has helped organize volunteers to hold local daylong bird counts between December 14 and January 5.  On any single day within that period, volunteer counters follow specific routes within a 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear.  The count provides a snapshot both of the species encountered and of the numbers of individuals within each species.  According to the Society, this effort is the “longest running community science bird project” in the United States, and it actually takes place now in over 20 countries in the Western Hemisphere.  The results of such a long-term inventory help show the status of bird populations and the impacts of changes in habitat, climate, and other environmental conditions. Of course, birds living around water and wetlands are part of the annual count; in fact, the Audubon Society's founding in the late 1800s was due largely to concerns over commercial use of plumes from egrets and other wading birds.  [Additional note, not in audio: This refers to the founding in 1896 of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, the first state-level affiliate of the National Audubon Society, founded in 1905.  For more information on this history, see the Extra Information section below.] So what kinds of water-related birds might Virginia Christmas bird counters find?  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to this sample of four possible species.SOUNDS - 23 secThe Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs are among the many water-related birds that inhabit parts of Virginia during winter, including shorebirds, ducks, herons, and lots of others.  Keeping track of these and other feathered Virginia winter residents is a holiday tradition for many Commonwealth citizens with patience, binoculars, and attentive eyes and ears.Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the eagle, kingfisher, gull, and yellowlegs sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs. Here's hoping that Virginia's Christmas bird counters find good variety and high numbers this year.  We close with a U.S. Fish and Wildfire Service recording of another Virginia water-related winter resident, the Common Loon, a species that some diligent coastalVirginia counter might spot or hear on a winter day or night. SOUNDS - ~6 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 294, 12-14-15. The Mallard sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg on December 10, 2015. The sounds of the Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern RegionCD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Common Loon sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific URL for the loons recording was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/57/rec/1, as of 12-13-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Mallards (several males, plus one female on right) on Virginia Tech Duck Pond, Blacksburg, December 10, 2015.Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 16, 2021.Canada Geese beside a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION On Bird Counts Another nationwide count is the Great Backyard Bird Count, held each February and organized by Audubon, the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, and Birds Canada.  This count calls on volunteers to watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over four days (February 18-21 in 2022), and record the species and numbers of all the birds seen or heard.  Its results also contribute to large-scale and long-term understanding of bird species distribution and health.  For more information, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/.On Audubon Society History and Waterbirds “Outrage over the slaughter of millions of waterbirds, particularly egrets and other waders, for the millinery trade led to the foundation, by Harriet Hemenway and Mina Hall, of the Massachusetts Audubon Society in 1896.  By 1898, state-level Audubon Societies had been established in Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, Maine, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, and California. ...In 1901, state-level Audubon groups joined together in a loose national organization....  In 1905, the National Audubon Society was founded, with the protection of gulls, terns, egrets, herons, and other waterbirds high on its conservation priority list.” – National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation, online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation.On Loon Calls in Winter“Generally loons are silent on the wintering grounds, but occasionally on a quiet winter night one will hear their primeval, tremulous yodel.” – Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006), p. 285.“All calls can be heard in migration and winter, but compared to the breeding season, they are uncommon.” – Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists' Union, “Birds of North America Online/Common Loon/Sounds,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comloo/cur/sounds (subscription required for access to this Web site). SOURCES Used in Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required for this site). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Audubon Society, online at http://www.audubon.org/. National Audubon Society, “Christmas Bird Count,” online at http://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count. Kathy Reshetiloff, “Listen for the haunting call of loons on Bay's frigid winter waters,” Bay Journal, 12/8/14, updated 3/31/20. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Bald Eagle entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040093&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Belted Kingfisher entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040220&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Ring-billed Gull entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040170&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Common Loon entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040001&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online athttps://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird.  Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes for Winter American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.&l

new york science society bay humans university agency california guide music ice broad indiana christmas natural relationships state audio game college history north america frost world change surviving modern illinois accent texas animals cd dark tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain united states pond press research ocean tennessee government education birds plants foundation maine pennsylvania ring chesapeake bay native rhode island connecticut baltimore new jersey ohio fish chesapeake snow wisconsin environment images green new hampshire va cambridge minnesota columbia outrage msonormal commonwealth generally stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens hawk environmental counting dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology union scientific teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript demonstrate ornithology mallard virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k populations name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes gull western hemisphere audubon zoology blacksburg minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources bay journal audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback bird conservation lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp acknowledgment virginia department christmas bird count michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press mallards cumberland gap winter holidays tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems canada geese virginia standards water center audio notes
Prospettive Musicali
Prospettive Musicali di dom 12/12/21

Prospettive Musicali

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 96:47


a cura di Alessandro Achilli. Musiche: Scritti Politti, Wyatt, Art Bears, Frith, Etron Fou, Material, Lounge Lizards, Dna, Berrocal, Fiori-Leddi, Comus, Bley-Haines, Linda Ronstadt, Cora, Slapp Happy, Pauvros, Elsa Birgé, Shenandoah...

The Tragedy of Cinema
Episode 80: Shenandoah

The Tragedy of Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 52:54


Jimbo and Kyle tackle one of Jimbo's favorite movies in this great James Stewart masterpiece See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 605 (11-29-21): Preparing for the Season of Freezing Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:17).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-26-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 29, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental. That excerpt of “Mid-winter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens our annual episode on winter preparedness.  This coincides with Virginia Winter Weather Awareness Week, which is being observed this year from November 29 to December 3, according to the Wakefield, Va., National Weather Service office. In 2021, winter astronomically begins in Virginia on December 21 at 10:59 a.m.  That's the Eastern Standard time of the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, when that hemisphere is at its maximum annual tilt away from the sun. At its beginning, middle, or end, winter can bring cold temperatures, hazardous roads, power outages, and fire hazards.  To help you be prepared, here are 10 tips compiled from information provided by the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.1. Avoid traveling in winter-storm conditions if you can. If you must travel, get road conditions from the Virginia 511 telephone system, Web site, or app.   And have an emergency kit for your vehicle, including jumper cables, water, non-perishable food, blankets, a flashlight, and other items.2. Have battery-powered sources of lighting and information, particularly weather information, along with enough batteries to last through a power outage of several days.  Whenever possible, use flashlights and not candles during power outages.  If you do use candles, put them in safe holders away from anything combustible, and don't leave a burning candle unattended.3.  Make a family emergency plan that covers sheltering; evacuation from your area; escape from a home fire; emergency meeting places; communications; a supply of food, water, and medications; and other factors specific to your circumstances; and practice your plan. 4.  Get fireplaces, wood stoves, and chimneys inspected and cleaned.5.  Install a smoke detector in every bedroom and on every floor level, test them monthly, and replace the batteries at least annually. 6.  Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home and check or replace the battery every six months.7.  If you use space heaters, make sure they'll switch off automatically if the heater falls over; plug them into wall outlets, not extension cords; keep them at least three feet from combustible objects; don't leave heaters unattended; and check for cracked or damaged wires or plugs. 8.  Generators, camp stoves, and other devices that burn gasoline or charcoal should be used outdoors only.9.  Learn where to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. And 10.  Be careful of overexertion during snow shoveling. More information on preparing for winter weather, fires, and other emergencies is available online from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, at vaemergency.gov.Next time the forecast calls for snow, freezing rain, or other wintry weather, here's hoping that you can stay warm, dry, and safe.Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “Mid-winter Etude.”  MUSIC – ~28 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 561, 1-25-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGESSnow and ice on a seasonal pond at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Snow along Toms Creek at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Ice hanging from tree twigs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., February 20, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WINTER WEATHER PREPAREDNESS AND FIRE SAFETY On Winter Weather Preparedness The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Winter Weather,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/winter-weather/, accessed 11/29/21.Winter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days.  Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.  Before, during, and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable.  Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited.  Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. Overview for Dealing with a Winter Storm*During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary.  Always give snow plows the right of way. *Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. *Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks!  Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. *When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. *If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home.  Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. *Protect yourself from frostbite!  Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. *Keep dry!  Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. *Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing.Prepare Your Home *Make sure your home is properly insulated. *Check the weather stripping around your windows and doors. *Learn how to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. *Have additional heat sources on hand in case of a power outages. *Keep a fire extinguisher accessible. *Replace the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector annually. Prepare Your Car *Batteries lose power as temperatures drop, be sure to have yours tested. *Check your car's antifreeze level. *Have your radiator system serviced. *Replace your car's windshield wiper fluid with a wintertime mix. *Proactively replace your car's worn tires and wiper blades. *To help with visibility, clean [snow or ice] off your car entirely, including your trunk, roof, windows and headlights. Did You Know?*Dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.*If it's too cold for you, it's too cold for your pet!  Don't leave pets outside for prolonged periods of time and have plenty of fresh, unfrozen water on hand.*Each year, snow, sleet, slush and/or ice on the road leads to approximately, 537,000 crashes, 136,000 injuries, and 1,800 deaths.*It can snow at temperatures well above freezing*Temperatures do not have to be below zero degrees to cause harmOn Fire SafetyThe following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Fires,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/fires/, accessed 11/29/21. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening.  In just five minutes, a home can be engulfed in flames. Learn About Fires *Fire is FAST!  In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.*Fire is HOT!  Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.*Fire is DARK!  Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.*Fire is DEADLY!  Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio. Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan*In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared.  Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.*Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:*Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.*A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.*Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.*Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.*Teach children not to hide from firefighters.  Smoke Alarms*A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.*Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.*Test batteries monthly.*Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).*Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.*Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer's instructions.*Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake. Smoke Alarm Safety for People with Access or Functional Needs*Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.*Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.*Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available. During a Fire*Crawl low under any smoke to your exit – heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.*Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.*If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.*If you can't get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.*If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.*If you can't get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.*If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department. Fire Escape Planning for Older Adults and People with Access or Functional Needs*Live near an exit. You'll be safest on the ground floor if you live in an apartment building. If you live in a multi-story home, arrange to sleep on the ground floor, and near an exit.*If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure you get through the doorways.*Make any necessary accommodations, such as providing exit ramps and widening doorways, to facilitate an emergency escape.*Speak to your family members, building manager, or neighbors about your fire safety plan and practice it with them.*Contact your local fire department's non-emergency line and explain your special needs. Ask emergency providers to keep your special needs information on file.*Keep a phone near your bed and be ready to call 911 or your local emergency number if a fire occurs. After a Fire – The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.*Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.*If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.*Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.  The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.*Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.  Try to locate valuable documents and records.*Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.*Notify your mortgage company of the fire. Cooking*Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.*Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.*Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet around the stove.*Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. Smoking*Smoke outside and completely stub out butts in an ashtray or a can filled with sand.*Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.*Never smoke in a home where oxygen is used, even if it is turned off. Oxygen can be explosive and makes fire burn hotter and faster.*Be alert – don't smoke in bed! If you are sleepy, have been drinking, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy, put your cigarette out first. Electrical and Appliance Safety*Frayed wires can cause fires. Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately and do not run

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Coach Bandstra Podcasts
74:Air Raid Screens - Stan Hodgin - Shenandoah Univ.

Coach Bandstra Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 64:28


74:Air Raid Screens - Stan Hodgin - Shenandoah Univ. 0:50 Spring Season 6:00 Covid & The Playbook 8:20 Screens 9:40 Tunnel Screen 15:40 Practice Film 19:25 Game Film 34:45 Shallow Screen 38:10 Game Film 47:10 Draw Screen 48:55 Game Film 57:15 Read Screen 58:45 Game Film 1:01:10 Advice on Screen Stan Hodgin Offensive Coordinator Shenandoah Univ. Twitter: @S_Hodgin Coachtube: https://coachtube.com/users/stanhodgin 34:H Cross - Stan Hodgin - Shenandoah Univ.: https://youtu.be/sj53Om2CgE0 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nicholas-bandstra/support

Hometown History
Belle Boyd: Siren of the Shenandoah

Hometown History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 13:42


She was known by many names - the Siren of the Shenandoah, the Rebel Joan of Arc, the Cleopatra of Secession – but when the first shots were fired at Fort Sumter in April 1861, she was just seventeen-year-old Belle Boyd of Martinsburg. By the time the Civil War was over she would be one of the most dangerous women in America.Belle would use her beauty and charm for the cause of the Confederacy throughout the Civil War, seducing and betraying one Union man after another. Her intelligence would determine the outcome of battles, and while her cause was unjust, she remains one of the most memorable and dashing figures of the Civil WarVisit us online at: Itshometownhistory.comSupport our podcast by becoming a patron at: Patreon.com/itshometownhistoryEpisode Sponsor:Your weight doesn't reflect your willpower. Get back in control with Calibrate. Get $50 off the one year metabolic reset when you use promo code HOMETOWN at Joincalibrate.com.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast
S5E85: Arresting A Serial Rapist. Panic Gripped The City.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 39:50


Arresting A Serial Rapist. Panic Gripped The City. The suspect's victims ranged from 11 - 79 years-old. After his arrest, panic ensued again after he escaped from jail. From 2002 - 2003 the serial rapist preyed on females in Little Havana and the nearby Shenandoah neighborhood. His victims ranged from 11 - 79 years of age. The suspect was able to blend into the community and panic took hold in the City. After months and countless man hours a suspect was arrested, his DNA was matched to samples collected at crime scenes. The relief was short lived because the Shenandoah rapist escaped from jail and the manhunt was on again.  Wayne Cox is our guest. He is a detective in the Miami - Dade Police Department. He lived one of the most horrific traumas any law enforcement officer would ever wish to face. Being responsible for putting the public's fear at rest, Det. Cox was challenged with finding and arresting the Shenandoah Rapist in one of the country's largest cities. He talks about this and his book "Miami Panic: The Story of Wayne Cox and The Shenandoah Rapist". This episode is brought to you in part by Retalk.com "the new social network". Interested in being a guest, or sponsorship opportunities send an email to the host and producer of the show jay@lawenforcementtoday.com. Follow us on MeWe, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook,and on Retalk.com.  In the Clubhouse app look for and follow @LetRadioShow. Background song Hurricane is used with permission from the band Dark Horse Flyer. If you enjoy the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast, please tell a friend or two, or three about it. Never miss out on an episode of the Law Enforcement Today Podcast, AND be automatically entered in all future contests. Simply subscribe for our free email newsletter, never more than 2 issues a week sent out. Click here and scroll down about half way. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big Band and Swing Podcast
Big Band Birthdays - November 19: Tommy Dorsey

The Big Band and Swing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:47


In this Podcast Extra of "The Big Band and Swing Podcast" we celebrate the birthday of the Sentimental Gentleman of Swing himself - Tommy Dorsey.   Dorsey was born on November 19, 1905 in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania.  * All music in this podcast are Creative Commons.  Artists are credited within the podcast.

Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música
Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música - Keith Jarrett - 17/11/21

Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:55


El Jarrett más intimista en 'Be my love', 'Don´t ever leave me', 'Someone to watch over me', 'I loves you Porgy' y 'Shenandoah' -de su disco en solitario 'The melody at night with you'-, 'For all we know', 'No moon at all' y 'One day I´ll fly away' -del disco a dúo con Charlie Haden 'Jasmine'- y 'Answer me, my love' y 'It´s a lonesome old town' -del directo 'Munich 2016'-. Escuchar audio

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis
Episode #295 - Rebecca Brackbill (Savage)

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 70:16


When I went out to hike the AT in 2014, I met a breed of woman I'd hardly known existed. These were strong-willed, fiercely independent young women, many of who were vastly more impressive than a lot of the men I met out there. It has been a theme of the trail for this past decade. Women are hitting the AT, and other trails, with little or no backpacking experience and proving to be more than equal to the task. Rebecca Brackbill turned out to be one of those women this year. She turned up in 2020 with few overnights under her belt, yet, as you listen to her, you'll hear a steely determination to succeed, even though she considered quitting while in Shenandoah, of all places! Rebecca developed a habit of getting her picture taken doing a backbend at various spots on the trail, including one in front of the Katahdin sign, one on Mt Washington's cog railway, and even one on the top of Odie's bus! If you'd like to connect with Rebecca or follow her adventures, check her out on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/brackbill421/ With no Katie to catch up with this week, I brought back a friend of the show, JC Van Etten, or Catmando, to tell us about his observations on forming a tramily on the PCT after his epic experience with his tramily on the AT. Winton Porter's Passin' Though brings real life drama to Mountain Crossings, with a mystery boot. If you like what we're doing on the Hiking Radio Network, and want to see our shows continue, please consider supporting us with either a one-off or monthly donation. You'll find the donate button on each Hiking Radio Network page at https://www.hikingradionetwork.com If you prefer NOT to use PayPal, you can now support us via check by mailing it to Mighty Blue Publishing, PO Box 6161, Sun City Center, FL 35751. Any support is gratefully received. If you'd like to take advantage of Steve's Trail Days book offer (all three of his printed hiking books for $31, including postage to the United States) send a check payable to Mighty Blue Publishing at the address just above.

New Books in Literature
Julian Zabalbeascoa, "Igerilaria" The Common magazine (Fall, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 62:14


Julian Zabalbeascoa speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his story “Igerilara,” which appears in The Common's fall issue. In this conversation from San Sebastián, Julian talks about writing stories set in Spain during the Spanish Civil War and the Basque Conflict. He also discusses his love of travel and his experiences running study abroad programs for college students, and what it's like to teach The Common in his classes at UMass Lowell. Julian Zabalbeascoa's stories have been published or will appear in American Short Fiction, Copper Nickel, Electric Literature's The Commuter, The Gettysburg Review, Glimmer Train, Ploughshares, Ploughshares Solos, Shenandoah, and other publications. He is a visiting professor in the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and lives in Boston. Read his story in The Common at thecommononline.org/igerilaria. Read more about Julian and his work at julianzabalbeascoa.com. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 601 (10-31-21): Halloween, Water, and the Human Body

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for Halloween 2021.  Besides focusing on autumn's festival of fun and fright, this episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND – ~9 sec That eerie sound of a tree creaking in October wind sets a seasonal stage for a Halloween challenge: exploring how Halloween, water, and human biology all connect.  Sound like quite a trick?  Well, have a listen to some Halloween music for about 50 seconds, and then we'll treat you to some examples. MUSIC - ~50 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “A Little Fright Music,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  And here are six matches of Halloween creatures or images with water in the human body. 1.  Skeleton images rattle around everywhere for Halloween, and in living skeletons water is a significant component of bones and cartilage.  2.  Pretend blood covers many-a Halloween costume, and over half of the volume of blood is plasma, which in turn is over 90 percent water, and water is also a major component of blood cells. 3.  A muscular costume is part of pretending to be a super-strong character like Wonder Woman or Superman; and water plays a significant role in muscle structure and function; in turn, muscle is an important water-storage area for the body. 4.  The monster in movie versions of “Frankenstein” was brought to life by electricity, and the cells of our nervous system transmit messages though electrochemical impulses, using sodium and potassium ions in a water-based solution. 5.  If fiery or icy creatures need some temperature regulation, water's the body fluid that does it. And 6.  Flashing and watching from many creatures on Halloween night are eyes, either scary, suspenseful, or super-powered; and eyes have chambers containing aqueous humor and vitreous humour, two fluids that consist mostly of water and that maintain the shape of the eyes. This Halloween, imagine being a creature that's about 60 percent composed of an amazing substance with unique powers to dissolve other substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed.  What would you be?  Why, the water-based human being that you are! Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last few seconds of “A Little Fright Music.” MUSIC - ~13 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014.  “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was previously used in Episode 548, 10-26-20. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper – used in Episode 599, 10-28-21, on the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. SOURCES Used for Audio Peter Abrahams, ed., How the Body Works: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Encyclopedia of Anatomy, Metro Books, New York, 2007. American Red Cross, “Blood Components,” online at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html. Erin Blakemore, “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire ‘Frankenstein,'” Smithsonian Magazine, December 4, 2015, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-twitching-frog-legs-helped-inspire-frankenstein-180957457/. Fandom, “Monster Wiki/Frankenstein's Monster,” online at https://monster.fandom.com/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_Monster. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Science Direct:“Aqueous Humor,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/aqueous-humor;“Vitreous Humour,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour. University of Michigan Health, “Eye Anatomy and Function,” as of August 31, 2020, online at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw121946. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Composition of the Blood,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/leukemia/anatomy/composition.html;“Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. For More Information about Human Biology, Including Water Aspects American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics.Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic:“Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body;“Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html;“Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/;“Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology (much of the information in this week's episode was taken from these previous episodes). Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 393, 11-6-17.Disease: viruses – Episode 600, 10-25-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21.Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water (with a Halloween theme) – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Following are links to other Halloween-themed episodes. Episode 238, 10-31-14 – focusing on the plant Witch-hazel.Episode 548, 10-26-20 – focusing on water-related readings that are supernatural, mysterious, or imaginative. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals h

kids new york science bay university agency music natural halloween state audio college sound composition materials accent dark tech water frankenstein superman web cells index rain pond research ocean government education plants fandom wonder woman vol school illustration philadelphia netherlands chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow penn environment neuroscience skeleton heart witch oberlin college va disease anatomy amsterdam monster msonormal new year blood atlantic stream flashing normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology chemical conservatory grade nutrients oberlin colorful national institutes yale school signature bio wild turkey manhattan school human body watershed transcript nervous system virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k function pretend erin blakemore name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes medical science circulation smithsonian magazine textbooks bristol england blacksburg american red cross franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers elsevier human biology blood vessels bmp acknowledgment muscular virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl michigan health geological survey mayo clinic health system lymphatic system peter abrahams torrin circulatory blood cells living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
MFA Writers
Special Episode! Gregory Spatz — MFA Applications Faculty Edition

MFA Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 61:22


The annual MFA application episode is back! This year, Jared is joined by Gregory Spatz, Professor and Program Director of the MFA program at Eastern Washington University, who explains what the application process looks like from a faculty member's point of view. Answering listener questions, they discuss what to include (and avoid) in your personal statement, what makes a writing sample stand out, why to bother with an MFA at all, and more. Gregory Spatz is the author of the collection of linked stories and novellas, What Could Be Saved, and of the novels Inukshuk, Fiddler's Dream and No One But Us, and the short story collections Half As Happy and Wonderful Tricks. His stories have appeared in many publications, including The New Yorker, Glimmer Train Stories, Shenandoah, Epoch, Kenyon Review and New England Review. The recipient of a Michener Fellowship, an Iowa Arts Fellowship, a Washington State Book Award, and an NEA Fellowship in literature, he teaches at Eastern Washington University in Spokane. Spatz plays the fiddle in the twice Juno-nominated bluegrass band John Reischman and the Jaybirds. Find him at his website gregoryspatz.com. MFA Writers is hosted by Jared McCormack and produced by Jared McCormack and Hanamori Skoblow. New episodes are released every two weeks. You can find more MFA Writers at MFAwriters.com. BE PART OF THE SHOW — Leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts, Podchaser, or Podcast Addict. — Submit an episode request. If there's a program you'd like to learn more about, contact us and we'll do our very best to find a guest who can speak to their experience. STAY CONNECTED Twitter: @MFAwriterspod Instagram: @MFAwriterspodcast Facebook: MFA Writers Email: mfawriterspodcast@gmail.com

The Dark Pool
2.7: Olivia

The Dark Pool

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 20:57


Olivia returns to the cornfield to confront her double. Aubrey synchronizes the three points of her triangle. Jon arrives in Shenandoah.

The Gospel Jubilee
Chip and Denny Feature Singer Songwriter Kenna Turner West On the Gospel Jubilee

The Gospel Jubilee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 90:54


Kenna Turner West, recording artist, multi-Dove Award-winning songwriter, and five-time Songwriter of the Year, will be the featured artists this week on The Gospel Jubilee.Listen to the Gospel Jubilee on your Echo device by saying, Alexa, play the Gospel Jubilee on Apple podcast.Or go to: https://api.spreaker.com/v2/episodes/47103586/download.mp3ABOUT KENNA TURNER WESTKenna Turner West has co-written hit songs such as “Say Amen,” “Revival,” “Small Town Someone,” and “Even Me.”Her many successes have come as no surprise to her friends in the music industry; some might even say that it “runs in the family.Kenna's father is bass singer Ken Turner, who sang for many years with the legendary Blackwood Brothers Quartet. Her mother-in-law is country music icon Dottie West, who was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2018.With roots that are firmly planted in gospel music, Kenna's career began in 1983 as a vocalist. In time, however, God began to open a new facet of ministry for the singer.“I had been writing songs for years,” she recalls, “but it was more like journaling with rhyme. Yet there was a season of time around 1997 or 1998, when we were losing my grandmother to dementia and my mom was diagnosed with a tumor near her brain, that I began to see life intersecting with Scripture.The verses that God was using to bring me peace and comfort suddenly began to take on a melody, and I'd write it down. Then one night at church, a friend encouraged me to record some of the songs, so I did; then another friend who worked for a record company gave the songs to the publisher at thelabel, and within a week, the trajectory of my life had completely changed.”Kenna got her first cut shortly thereafter (“A Taste of Grace”), followed by her first radio single (“We're Not Gonna Bow”), which reached #1 on the national charts as well as earning the new songwriter her first of eleven Dove Award nominations.Twenty years later, Kenna has penned over a thousand songs and has garnered over 100 “Song of the Year” nominations, along with 25 “Song of the Year” winsand 8 BMI Awards. As a staff writer for Curb|Word Music Publishing in Nashville, her songs have appeared on GRAMMY® Award-winning projects by both JasonCrabb and Hillary Scott (of Lady A), as well as eight GRAMMY® nominated recordings.You can also find her work on projects by artists such as The Martins, The Isaacs, Michael English, The Crabb Family, Finding Favour, Charles Billingsley, Take 6, The Oak Ridge Boys, The Booth Brothers, Wes Hampton and AdamCrabb of the Gaither Vocal Band, Triumphant Quartet, Travis Cottrell, Jimmy Fortune (of The Statler Brothers), The Collingsworth Family, Brian Free & Assurance,Marty Raybon (of Shenandoah), Joseph Habedank, Karen Peck & New River, Jeff & Sheri Easter, The Nelons, Selah, The Blackwood Brothers, Mac Powell (of ThirdDay), and many more.Additionally, Kenna has created six musicals for the church, including Word Music's best-selling “We Are Witnesses,” along with the Dove Award-nominated projects, “Love Won” and “Christmas Is in The Heart.”In 2020, Kenna signed as an artist with Crossroads Music Group and released her long-awaited project, “A Reason for Hope,” in the summer of 2021.“I am so excited about this new chapter of life,” she shares. “It is as if everything that the Lord has allowed me to do for Him over the last 38 years has ledto this moment.”Kenna's career in gospel music has indeed come full circle. The author and board-certified Biblical counselor—who is currently pursuing a master's degreein theology—continues to blend music, devotional teaching, and humor into a ministry that reaches across the nation and around the world with the goodnews of the Gospel. Whether she is writing songs on Music Row or ministering alongside noted Christian leaders at venues ranging from The Pentagon to NASCARchapels to the local church, Kenna's life has a singular call: to creatively communicate the Living Hope found in Jesus Christ.“It's all I have wanted to do since I became a Believer,” she confesses, “and I feel so incredibly blessed that God is still allowing me to do just that.”For more information about Kenna's music and ministry, or to book her for an event, contact her office at kenna@kennaturnerwest.comYou can now catch The Gospel Jubilee Thursday afternoons at 4:00 PM and Sunday mornings at 9:30 AM EST on Southern Branch Bluegrass RadioGo to www.sbbradio.orgYou can also catch The Gospel Jubilee Saturday evenings at 7:00 and Wednesday afternoons at 4:00 CST on Radio For Life.Go to: www.RadioForLife.orgPlaylist: Artists | Song Title | Album01. Greater Vision - Never will I ever again - “As We Speak”02. Ernie Haase & Signature Sound - Make us one - “Keeping On”03. Barry Rowland & Deliverance - The Ark - “It Is Time”04. Kenna Turner West - Doubt the storm - "A Reason For Hope"05. Kenna Turner West - Calling all prodigals - "A Reason For Hope"06. The Chuck Wagon Gang - Love is the key - “Radio Days”07. The Bledsoes - I'm glad I'm saved - “Trusting”08. The Vaughn Family - All over again - “Closer”09. The Carr Family - Peace that covers all the pain - “For All He's Done”-10. Three Days Journey - Every knee shall bow - "Every Knee Shall Bow - Single"11. The Mark Trammell Quartet - The hem of His garment - "God Has Provided"12. Kenna Turner West - The center of it all - "A Reason For Hope"13. Kenna Turner West - We march on - "A Reason For Hope"14. Kenna Turner West A reason for hope - "A Reason For Hope"15. The Clark Family - I don't want to go back - “Satisfied”16. The Kingsmen - Called out - “Kingsmen Across America”17. The Goodman Revival - I don't want to get adjusted - “Songs In The Key Of Happy”18. Brian Free & Assurance - What the cross really is - “Looks Like Jesus EP”19. The Bowling Family - I know enough - “Safe…After The Storm”-20. The Old Paths - The fire still burns - “Decade”21. The Torchmen Quartet - Reach out to Jesus - “Hymns - Least We Forget”-22. The Williamsons - Jesus, what a wonderful name - “Give Them Jesus”23. The Taylors - The same - “Salvation's Song”24. Southern Raised - Wanna be - “Another World”Send your request to:request@gatewayfortheblind.com

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 599 (10-18-21): A Day to Weigh Water's Worth

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:00).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-15-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 18, 2021. SOUND – ~8 sec This week, those abrupt stops to the sounds of the Roanoke River, Gray Tree Frogs, and a household water faucet set the stage for an episode marking the observance of “Imagine a Day without Water,” to be held this year on October 21.  We start with some music designed to help you do such imagining.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds. MUSIC  - ~42 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “Flow Stopper,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  Besides flowing rivers, calling frogs, and household faucets, almost any aspect of life could be affected by a lack of water, including the biological structures and functions that make life possible.  Increasing the awareness of water uses and needs is a goal of the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.  According to the event's Web site, the effort is, quote, “a national education campaign that brings together diverse stakeholders to highlight how water is essential, invaluable, and in need of investment,” unquote.  The event is part of the “Value of Water Campaign,” focused on water infrastructure needs.  These campaigns are coordinated by the US Water Alliance, a non-profit organization made up of people from water utilities, government, business, other non-profits, communities, and research establishments. Worldwide, billions of people don't have to imagine lacking good water.  According to the United Nations, as of 2019 over 2 billion people lacked access to safely managed drinking water, and over 4 billion people lacked access to safely managed sanitation. In the United States, the American Society of Civil Engineers' water infrastructure “Report Card” for 2021 estimated over $1 trillion needed through 2029 for drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater, with $434 billion of that not yet funded. And in Virginia, the Department of Environmental Quality's 2020 “Water Resources Report” identified several water challenges, including maintaining groundwater availability over the next 50 years; coordinating water planning among localities; gauging the impact of unpermitted water withdrawals; understanding stream water quality and ecology; and investing in water-resources personnel, science, and education. Water is fundamental for energy, commerce, industry, agriculture, aquatic and terrestrial life, and human biology.  Imagining a day without water—and learning about where water's lacking—can help us envision and work toward well-watered future days. Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last 10 seconds of “Flow Stopper.” MUSIC  - 10 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds at the beginning of this episode, all recorded by Virginia Water Radio, are as follows:Roanoke River on from the Roanoke River Greenway between Franklin Road and Smith Park in Roanoke, Va., December 6, 2020;Gray Tree Frogs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., July 8, 2016;Household water faucet in a Blacksburg, Va., residence, November 17, 2013. “Flow Stopper” is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign logo, accessed online at  https://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/resources. Roanoke River, looking upstream from the Roanoke River Greenway between Franklin Road and Smith Park in Roanoke, Va., December 6, 2020.  This is the location where the river sound heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was recorded. SOURCES Used For Audio American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), “2021 Report Card for America's Infrastructure,” online at https://infrastructurereportcard.org/. United Nations, “Global Issues/Water,” online at https://www.un.org/en/global-issues/water. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “Water Use Data for Virginia,” online at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/water_use/. US Water Alliance, online at http://uswateralliance.org/. Value of Water Campaign, online at http://thevalueofwater.org/. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), “Status of Virginia's Water Resources: A Report on Virginia's Water Resources Management Activities,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000.  The section on”Water Resource Challenges and Priorities” starts of page 27. Value of Water Campaign, “Imagine a Day Without Water,” online at https://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/; this site is the source of the quote used in this episode's audio. World Health Organization (WHO), “Drinking Water,” June 14, 2019, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/drinking-water. For More Information on Current Water Infrastructure Needs and Funds PBS NewsHour, “How the infrastructure bill delivers on clean water—and how it falls short,” August 4, 2021 (7 min./2 sec. video, with online transcript). U.S. Department of Agriculture, “Biden-Harris Administration Invests $272 Million to Improve Rural Water Infrastructure for 270,000 People Living in Rural Communities Across the Country,” October 14, 2021, News Release. Virginia Governor's Office, “Governor Northam Announces Virginia to Reduce Water Pollution, Increase Access to Clean Water,” July 27, 2021, News Release. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance of Water” and “Water Quality, Waste Management, and Water/Wastewater Treatment” subject categories. Following are links to some previous episodes with information on water uses or needs. Episode 122, 8-6-12 – on worldwide water needs.Episode 372, 6-12-17 – on water infrastructure needs, including information from the American Society of Civil Engineers' “Report Card for America's Infrastructure” for 2017.Episode 592, 6-15-20 – on Virginia's biennial water-quality assessment in 2020. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties, Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; and that human actions can affect the availability of natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life, including that water chemistry has an influence on life processes.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources.WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and nati

new york office bay humans university agency america music national natural halloween relationships earth state audio college sound accent worldwide dark tech water web status index land rain united states pond research ocean government education public conservation chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment types images oberlin college cooperation agriculture united nations va msonormal new year atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental dynamic american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah water resources biology chemical conservatory civics grade oberlin colorful resource yale school signature bio priorities wild turkey manhattan school increasing govt watershed transcript infrastructure earth sciences waste management water quality household wg roanoke river freshwater virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources weigh grades k roanoke drinking water imagining environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table clean water blacksburg virginia governor funds cosgrove pbs newshour msohyperlink world health organization who runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp heritage park acknowledgment civil engineers virginia department cumberland gap news release sols people living tmdl report card torrin virginia standards water center space systems audio notes franklin road
No Ride Around
Shenandoah 100 Recap

No Ride Around

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 66:05


We all know Justin can win races, but what happens when he has to employ new tactics and duke it out with some really fast riders? Shenandoah 100 would be the last win he needs to wrap up the overall title for the NUE series, listen as we cover the most exciting race recap we've ever done.

The Dark Pool
2.5: Aubrey

The Dark Pool

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 19:55


Aubrey is searching for Autumn's portal in Shenandoah. Olivia is haunted by her double. Jon sees a strange figure in the woods.

The Mark White Show
Make A Difference Minute: Marty Raybon Shares Sgt. Nick Risner Fundraiser

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 2:28


On this MADM, Marty Raybon of Shenandoah is sharing about a fundraiser coming up on October 12th in Sheffield, Alabama, to support the family of Sheffield Police Sgt. Nick Risner. Listen, share, and find an opportunity to help. You can donate through smarturl.it/donaterisner. Sponsor: Visit North Alabama VisitNorthAlabama.com

The Mark White Show
Brain Injury Association of America, Marty Raybon of Shenandoah, & Cora's Corner

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 59:37


To start things off, we have Brain Injury Association of America President and Executive Director Susan Connors to bring awareness to brain injuries in honor of Mr. Bill Mealback. After that, we have Marty Raybon of Shenandoah to share about the upcoming concert fundraiser for the family of Sheffield Police Sgt. Nick Risner taking place in Sheffield next Tuesday. We're going to close out today's show with a brand new episode of Cora's Corner as she finishes The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter. I hope you will listen and share.

Hearing Voices with Scott Watson Podcast
Mike McGuire of Shenandoah

Hearing Voices with Scott Watson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 8:22


Scott talks with Mike McGuire of the country music super-group Shenandoah. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 597 (10-4-21): Anticipating Frost as Fall Settles In

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-1-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 4, 2021.  This week, we pause our series of episodes on water connections to the human body, to revisit an episode from fall 2017 that explores one of the hallmarks of the autumn season. MUSIC – ~ 11 sec – instrumental.Following the astronomical start of fall on September 22, this episode features a fiddle tune named for a water-related weather event that will mark a meteorological fall turning point when it occurs across the Commonwealth in October or November.  Have a listen to the music for about 25 more seconds. MUSIC - ~26 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to part of “Cold Frosty Morn',” performed here by the western Virginia band New Standard.  One of the consequences of fall's arrival is frost in the mornings and, eventually, a significant enough freeze to end of the growing season, when temperatures fall to about 28 degrees Fahrenheit or below.  That temperature typically occurs for the first time each fall in mid-to-late October in western Virginia, early-to-mid November east of the Blue Ridge, and mid-to-late November in some Virginia coastal areas.  Those predicted periods are based on historical records through 2010; the typical frost and freeze dates may be shifting as Virginia experiences climate change.Generally, frost forms when water vapor in the air contacts plants, windows, cars, or other solid surfaces that are at or below water's freezing point of 32 degrees Fahrenheit.  Some specific kinds of frost include radiationfrost, occurring when surface objects are cooled by radiating their heat; advection frost, occurring when surfaces are cooled by winds; and rime, a dense type of frost that forms when super-cooled liquid water in fog or clouds contacts solid surfaces, such as trees, radio towers, or ships on winter seas. Frost may seem far away on Virginia's often mild, early October days.   But to paraphrase a comment about truth from the poem “Birches,” by RobertFrost, frost-producing weather will soon break in with all of its matter-of-fact. Thanks to New Standard for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of “Cold Frosty Morn'.” MUSIC - ~12 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode repeats and replaces Episode 387, 9-25-17. The performance of “Cold Frosty Morn'” heard here is copyright by New Standard, from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” used with permission. More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 501, 12-2-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Maps showing frost/freeze dates in the continental United States, based on data from 1980 to 2010.  Upper map: ranges of earliest dates of first 32°F freeze; middle map: range of median dates of first 32°F freeze; lower map: range of median dates of first 28°F freeze.  Images from the National Weather Service/Northern Indiana Forecast Office, “Frost and Freeze Information,” online at http://www.weather.gov/iwx/fallfrostinfo, accessed 10-4-21. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Deborah Byrd, “Equinox Sun is Over Earth's Equator on September 22,” EarthSky, Sept. 22, 2021. Robert Frost, The Poetry of Robert Frost, Edward Connery Lathem, ed., Holt, Rineheart and Winston, New York, 1969.  The quote to which this episode refers, from “Birches” on page 121, is the following: “But I was going to say when Truth broke inWith all her matter of fact about the ice storm….” Kenneth G. Libbrecht, “Guide to Frost,” online at http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/frost/frost.htm. National Weather Service, “Ice Storms,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter-ice-frost.National Geographic Society, “Frost,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/frost/. National Geographic Society, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/rime-ancient-mariner/. National Weather Service, Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office, “Watch/Warning/Advisory Definitions,” online at https://www.weather.gov/lwx/WarningsDefined. Isaac W. Park et al., “Advancing frost dates have reduced frost risk among most North American angiosperms since 1980,” Global Change Biology 2021, 27: pages 165–176, accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15380. Sarah Vogelsong, “Autumn's first frost is falling later. For farmers, the consequences are wide-ranging,” Virginia Mercury, Nov. 3, 2020. WeatherOnline, “Rime,” online at http://www.weatheronline.co.uk/reports/wxfacts/Rime.htm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). See particularly the “Science” and “Weather” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes on frozen or freezing precipitation.Freezing rain, sleet, and snow – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Hail – Episode 362, 4-3-17.Ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18;  Episode 404, 1-22-18; Episode 406, 2-5-18; Episode 556, 12-21-20.Snow – Episode 300, 1-25-16; Episode 407, 2-12-18. Following are links to some other episodes related to fall. Fall migratory birds – Episode 183, 10-14-13; Episode 281, 9-14-15; Episode 335, 9-26-16.Tree colors and changes in fall – Episode 285, 10/9/15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.2.3 – Matter can exist in different phases. Grades K-5: Earth and Space SystemsK.9 – There are patterns in nature.1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes; including that changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans.2.6 – There are different types of weather on Earth.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.4.4 – Weather conditions and climate effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 66.3 – There is a relationship between the sun, Earth, and the moon. Key ideas include6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic. Life ScienceLS.8 – Change in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. Earth ScienceES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

new york science bay university agency truth guide music ice robert frost natural earth state poetry audio college frost change accent dark north american tech water web air index fall rain united states pond research maps ocean weather government education park tree chesapeake snow environment images rime ancient mariner msonormal commonwealth generally stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading hail fahrenheit shenandoah bluegrass upper holt grade colorful signature national weather service blue ridge freezing watershed transcript earth sciences virginia tech ls anticipating atlantic ocean natural resources equator grades k national geographic society name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table cosgrove msohyperlink advancing birches earthsky sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp new standard acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl virginia standards settles water center kenneth g space systems audio notes
ESPN Harrisonburg
9/30 - Scott Lemn - Bridgewater Football

ESPN Harrisonburg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:20


Coach Lemn looks back at the Eagles' game vs. Emory & Henry and looks ahead to their matchup at Shenandoah.

Foodie and the Beast
Foodie and the Beast - Sept. 25, 2021

Foodie and the Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 53:57


Hosted by David and Nycci Nellis. On today's show: • Jenay Dougany is the beverage director and general manager at Dupont's ala, previously Ankara. Ala, which translates in Turkish as “multi-colored,” recently went through a revamp and now offers cuisine – and some very creative cocktails - melding the flavors of the Levant region, which includes Turkey, Syria, Israel, Lebanon and beyond; • Now's the perfect time to experience the Shenandoah region's vibrant fall colors. Pam Wrightman, general manager of Big Meadow in Shenandoah National Park, joins us to talk great hiking, horseback riding and more, about 50 minutes outside the Beltway; • Dust off your lederhosen! D.C.'s Park View bar at Hook Hall hosts Das Bier Bash, with the Queen of Oktoberfest, Manuela Horn, as headliner. The America's Got Talent yodeling, dancing and comedy act finalist brings her variety show for a twelve-day run, Sept. 22 through Oct. 3. Manuela and Hook Hall owner Anna Valero, also reputed to be a world-class yodeler, join us; • And this could be cat-a-clysmic! Kachan Singh, founder & CEO of Crumbs & Whiskers, will be with us to throw a spotlight on his kitten and cat café, where people can come in and drink coffee, play with kittens, cuddle with kittens, and if they fall in love with a kitten or cat they can adopt it and take it home.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 190: 17190 Shall We Gather

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 63:32


Works on the album include Gene Scheer's American Anthem; “Song of the Deathless Voice” from Arthur Farwell's Three Indian Songs; William Grant Still's Grief; “Beat! Beat! Drums!” from Kurt Weill's Four Walt Whitman Songs; “Litany” from John Musto's Shadow of the Blues with text by Langston Hughes; Richard Hageman's The Rich Man; Florence Price's Night; “That Moment On” from Jake Heggie's Pieces of 9/11, as we near the 20th anniversary of the attacks; Irina Meachem and Steve White's arrangement of Carrie Jacob-Bonds' A Perfect Day; traditional American folk song Oh, Shenandoah; Charles Ives' arrangement of In The Mornin'; Ricky Ian Gordon's We Will Always Walk Together; Stephen Foster's Hard Times Come Again No More; and “The Boatman's Dance” and “At The River” from Aaron Copland's Old American Songs.Purchase the music (without talk) at:http://www.classicalsavings.com/store/p1397/Shall_We_Gather.htmlYour purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @khedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com This album is broadcasted with the permission of Katy Solomon from Morahana Arts and Media.

This Date in Weather History
1989: Hurricane Hugo (Part 2)

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 3:25


Hugo was still at hurricane strength as the storm advanced quickly north-northwest across central SC and into western NC during the early morning hours of September 22, 1989. Considerable damage occurred in Sumter, SC where winds gusted over 100 mph. Winds gusted to 90 mph in the Charlotte/Mecklenburg County, NC area, which was declared a disaster area. 90% of Charlotte was without power. Tornado touchdowns were reported in Burke and Caldwell counties in NC. Charlotte airport recorded 3.16" of rain. Hickory recorded an 82-mph wind gust, while Greensboro had a 54-mph gust. Hugo was downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical storm while crossing western NC during the mid-morning hours of the 22nd. Tropical Storm Hugo advanced rapidly northward at about 50 mph during the afternoon, moving across southwest VA and western WV. By 6:00 PM EDT, Hugo was downgraded and was located just east of Youngstown, OH. Storm reports during the day included Shenandoah, VA - gust to 67 mph; Snow Shoe, WV -gust to 60 mph. 6" of rain at Poor Mountain, VA. 1.5-3" of rain across Dickenson, Russell, Tazewell and Buchanan counties of VA in a 3-hour time period. Hugo turned out to be the costliest hurricane to hit the U.S. mainland until Andrew in 1992, with damage totaling over $7 billion dollars. 82 deaths were attributed to Hugo, 27 were in SC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

WTOP Entertainment Reporter Jason Fraley chats with Shenandoah lead singer Marty Raybon ahead of Saturday's concert at the Great Frederick Fair in Frederick, Maryland. They spoke about the band's biggest hits, including "The Church on Cumberland," "Two Dozen Roses," "Next to You, Next to Me" and "I Wanna Be Loved Like That."

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 595 (9-20-21): Water and the Human Skeleton

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:40).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-15-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 20, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2015 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. MUSIC – 16 sec – Instrumental That's part of “Halloween,” by John McCutcheon on his 1998 album “Autumnsongs.”  In this first week of autumn, with Halloween merchandise already in stores and on some people's minds, that organ music sets the stage for exploring a vital human organ system that's also one of Halloween's most familiar spectres.  Have a listen for about 15 second to some mystery sounds, and see if you can guess that organ system.  And here's a hint: we couldn't move at all, much less rattle around, without this remarkable framework. SOUNDS  - 13 sec If you guessed the skeleton or skeletal system, you're right!  The rattling you heard was from a plastic Halloween skeleton, accompanied by some creepy laughter from a talking skull decoration.  Since ancient times, human skeletons have been used in art, literature, and culture as symbols of danger, death, and dryness. In fact, the word “skeleton” comes from Latin and Greek words meaning “dried up.”  But there's nothing dead nor dry about a functioning human skeleton.  Our 206 bones contain active cells and tissues that continually take in and release calcium and phosphorus while producing new bone, blood, and fat cells. Bone is about 25 to 30 percent water by weight, with the rest consisting of minerals plus connective protein fibers called collagen.  Water is the main component of cartilage, the relatively flexible tissue in our nose and ears and between bones, including in the disks between the vertebrae in our spine.  In those spinal disks, cartilage fibers enclose a watery core, and this water's resistance to being compressed helps vertebrae move while not being pushed together. Ligaments and tendons join bone and cartilage in the complex, multi-purpose skeletal system.  Aided by water, the skeleton supports the body; protects internal organs; produces cells; and provides levers, pivot points, and cushions to the forces acting on and within the body.  All that, and it's also a classic Halloween image! Thanks to John McCutcheon and Appalseed Productions for permission to use this week's music, and we get the jump on the season of scary skeletons with about 25 more seconds of “Halloween.” MUSIC – 28 sec – Lyrics: “For just one night, I'm allowed to fantasize.  Halloween, here we go.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 287, 10-26-15. “Halloween,” from the 1998 album “Four Seasons: Autumnsongs” on Rounder Records, is copyright by John McCutcheon/Appalsongs and Si Kahn/Joe Hill Music, used with permission of John McCutcheon.  More information about John McCutcheon is available online at http://www.folkmusic.com/.  Thanks to Eric Grace Deedy of Appalseed Productions for her help in acquiring permission to use this music.  More information about Appalseed Productions is available online at https://appalseed-productions-2.square.site/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Structure of human long bones (bones that are longer than they are wide).  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System/Classification of Bones,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.  Skeleton-themed items, including those shown in the two photos above, were part of the Halloween merchandise for sale at a Blacksburg, Va., store on September 15, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN SKELETON The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. “Humans are vertebrates, animals having a vertebral column or backbone.  They rely on a sturdy internal frame that is centered on a prominent spine.  The human skeletal system consists of bones, cartilage, ligaments and tendons and accounts for about 20 percent of the body weight. “The living bones in our bodies use oxygen and give off waste products in metabolism.  They contain active tissues that consume nutrients, require a blood supply, and change shape or remodel in response to variations in mechanical stress. “Bones provide a rigid framework, known as the skeleton, that supports and protects the soft organs of the body. “The skeleton supports the body against the pull of gravity.  The large bones of the lower limbs support the trunk when standing. “The skeleton also protects the soft body parts.  The fused bones of the cranium surround the brain to make it less vulnerable to injury.  Vertebrae surround and protect the spinal cord and bones of the rib cage help protect the heart and lungs of the thorax. “Bones work together with muscles as simple mechanical lever systems to produce body movement. “Bones contain more calcium than any other organ.  The intercellular matrix of bone contains large amounts of calcium salts, the most important being calcium phosphate. “When blood calcium levels decrease below normal, calcium is released from the bones so that there will be an adequate supply for metabolic needs.  When blood calcium levels are increased, the excess calcium is stored in the bone matrix.  The dynamic process of releasing and storing calcium goes on almost continuously. “Hematopoiesis, the formation of blood cells, mostly takes place in the red marrow of the bones. “In infants, red marrow is found in the bone cavities.  With age, it is largely replaced by yellow marrow for fat storage.  In adults, red marrow is limited to the spongy bone in the skull, ribs, sternum, clavicles, vertebrae and pelvis.  Red marrow functions in the formation of red blood cells, white blood cells and blood platelets. SOURCES Used for Audio Joseph Hammill and Kathleen M. Knutzen, Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement—Third Edition, Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, Md., and Philadelphia, Penn., 2009. Harry N. Herkowitz et al., The Spine—Fourth Edition (Vol. I), W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1999.W. Henry Hollinshead and Cornelius Rosse, Textbook of Anatomy—Fourth Edition, Harper and Row Publishers, Inc., 1985.Evelyn Kelly, The Skeletal System, Greenwood Press, Westport, Conn., 2004. Lakeland Community College, “The Skull and Skeleton in Art: Folk Art to Pop Culture,” https://www.facebook.com/events/1633218576961435/. Merriam-Webster Dictionary, “Skeleton,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/skeleton. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. Icy Sedgwick, “Skeleton Folklore,” published by Folklore Thursday, October 26, 2017, online at https://folklorethursday.com/halloween/i-can-feel-it-in-my-bones-skeletons-in-folklore/. Walt Disney Animation Studies, “The Skeleton Dance,” 1929, online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOGhAV-84iI&t=27s.For More Information about Water and the Human Body Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects.RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.3 – There are levels of structural organization in living things.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Physical SciencePS.8 – Work, force, and motion are related. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20

science pop culture work bay humans university agency music natural halloween state audio college accent animals greek dark tech water web cells index rain bones pond research ocean government education bone illustration philadelphia baltimore chesapeake snow penn westport environment skull images skeleton va latin adaptations msonormal stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens instrumental arial environmental structure times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology chemical grade colorful md national institutes ps physical sciences signature bio human body watershed transcript rounder records aided conn virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean wilkins natural resources grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes skeleton dance textbooks merriam webster dictionary blacksburg cosgrove msohyperlink sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp john mccutcheon acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl geological survey mayo clinic health system greenwood press circulatory hematopoiesis ligaments vertebrae living systems virginia standards water center audio notes covid-19 kathleen m
The Better Behavior Show with Dr. Nicole Beurkens
Episode 155: Why You Might Want To Consider Homeschooling For 90 Minutes A Day

The Better Behavior Show with Dr. Nicole Beurkens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 56:51


My guest this week is Kelly Edwards, She's the creator of the 90-Minute School Day, a lifestyle approach to education. The 90-Minute School Day method connects children with learning in their natural environment: At home with their family. It's designed for kids at an educational level of Pre-K through sixth grade. Kelly is passionate about home education, connecting families through attachment, learning as a lifestyle and helping children and parents identify their purpose. Kelly's entering her seventh year as a homeschool mom. She lives in the Shenandoah valley of West Virginia with her husband and three girls ages, 13, 6, and 3. Nice spread of ages there. She's a licensed foster parent, successful entrepreneur and community citizen. She uses her personal and professional experiences to guide the homeschooling parent with a framework and system to overcome the overwhelm that affects each of us. In this episode, Kelly and I discuss some amazing benefits of homeschooling. Before you run away after being traumatized from schooling at home during the pandemic, know that this is completely different. That was crisis schooling NOT homeschooling. We're talking 90 minutes a day about 4 days per week max. I have found both as a parent with my own kids, as well as a professional working with kids with lots of different types of needs, homeschooling really can be the best, most supportive educational option for some kids. It lowers the stress around education and schooling significantly for some kids and parents, but you really need to have the intel on what homeschooling actually is, how it works best, the different ways to do it, how to make it work for you in a way that doesn't add to the stress of your life which is why I invited Kelly Edwards on the podcast today to tell us all about it. Learn more about Kelly Edwards here.

Essah's Way
Episode 103 | Bridging Generational Gaps

Essah's Way

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 23:05


Episode 103. Ariana Benson reveals the importance of storytelling through poetry, memory, and nature while giving thanks to Black institutions that have developed her voice. Ariana Benson is a poet-storyteller from Chesapeake, Virginia. She holds a BA in Psychology from Spelman College, where she graduated as Valedictorian, and an MA in Poetic Practice from Royal Holloway, University of London, where she studied as a 2019 Marshall Scholar. She was a finalist in the 2019 Auburn Witness Poetry Prize and received the 2021 Graybeal-Gowen Poetry Prize. Her poems can be found in ANOMALY, Lunch Ticket, Southern Humanities Review and Auburn Avenue, where she serves as Nonfiction Editor, and are forthcoming in Shenandoah and an upcoming Diode Editions Anthology. Through her poems, she strives to fashion a tapestry of Blackness that stitches together histories and memories across space and time, speaking to the infinite richness and depth of our existence.

Foster Care: An Unparalleled Journey
How to Overcome Trauma Using the Little Things with Shenandoah Chefalo

Foster Care: An Unparalleled Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 71:14


Shenandoah Chefalo is a graduate of Michigan State University, holding a Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Science, a Core Essentials Graduate from Coach U, and a member of the Foster Leaders Movement. She is a sought after speaker on topics surrounding youth in foster care and the science and impact of trauma and resilience on various social issues; and a trainer/consultant that helps private, governmental and public organizations implement sustainable trauma informed strategies that are focused on learning new skills as well as organizational culture changes and shifts.  She has been featured as a consultant and trainer nationally and internationally.   After spending nearly 20 years as a Law Office Administrator, Shenandoah became unsettled by the ever revolving door of people into the criminal justice system and set out to find a way to change it.   A survivor and alumni of the foster care system, Shenandoah Chefalo is also the co-founder of the #4600andCounting, a grass-roots movement to bring awareness and change to the missing youth of foster care.  She is also a faculty member and trainer at The Center for Trauma Resilient Communities a new initiative by the Crossnore School and Children's Home to help organization translate the science of trauma and adversity.   In additional to her multiple award winning book, Garbage Bag Suitcase, she also wrote an e-book entitled Setting Your Vision and Defining Your Goals, and is also working on her next manuscript, Hiking for Stillness.   Foster Care: An Unparalleled Journey Find All Our Links Here https://linktr.ee/fostercarenation Foster Care 101 Free webinar with NO sales pitch! Support Our Mission https://www.buymeacoffee.com/fostercare https://patreon.com/fostercarenation Website https://fostercarenation.com Connect with us on our Facebook Page https://facebook.com/7timedad Connect on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/fostercarenation/

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 593 (9-6-21): Water's at the Heart of Blood

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:19).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 6, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND - ~3 secHow is a human heartbeat part of a water story?  Have a listen for about 25 seconds to the following mystery sounds, and see if you can guess the heart-and-water connections they represent.  And here's a hint: if you have the energy, you could follow many branches to this solution.SOUNDS - ~21 secYou've been listening to sounds from a platelets donation at the American Red Cross' New River Valley Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia.  The sounds—a blood-pressure measurement, a needle stick into an arm vein, and the machine separating blood components and recirculating fluid to the patient—illustrate three connections between the human circulatory system and water.First, the heart provides a force—measured by blood pressure—to keep blood circulating around the body, like the sun's energy powers evaporation and winds that help keep water circulating around the earth.  Second, arm veins are part of an intricately branched system of arteries, veins, and capillaries, resembling a watershed's branching pattern as one travels uphill from ocean to river to headwater streams.   Humans have an estimated 60,000 to 100,000 miles of blood vessels, compared to Virginia's approximately 100,000 miles of rivers and streams.  Finally, blood's components are mostly water: blood plasma is a solution of water and many biochemicals, mixed with water-based red and white blood cells and with platelets.  As a result, blood in the human system has water's physical and chemical properties for transporting materials and regulating heat.Cells and transported substances make blood “thicker” than water, just as the saying goes.  But the water we borrow temporarily from the global water cycle is at the chemical and physical heart of blood and the circulatory system's vital functions.Thanks to staff at the New River Valley Donor Center for participating in this episode, and thanks to Soundbible.com for the heartbeat sound. We close with some music inspired by the action of the human heart.  Here's about 20 seconds of “Heartbeat,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~23 sec –Lyrics - “Feel my heartbeat comin' in next to you; heartbeat, yes you do.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 392, 10-30-17, and Episode 236, 10-20-14. The human heartbeat sound was recorded by Mike Koenig and made available (9/14/09 upload) online at the Soundbible.com Web site, http://soundbible.com/1001-Heartbeat.html, for public use under the Creative Commons license “Attribution 3.0”; for more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. Other sounds heard in this episode were recorded at the American Red Cross New River Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia, during an October 19, 2014, platelet donation by Virginia Water Radio host Alan Raflo.  Thanks to the staff at the Donor Center for their help and for allowing the sound recording.  For information about blood and platelet donations, please visit the American Red Cross' “Donating Blood” Web site at http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood.

science bay humans university agency music photo natural earth heartbeat state audio college sound england accent dark shape steel wheels tech water web cells index nature rain dracula pond research ocean government education medicine prevention philadelphia chesapeake snow penn westport environment images skeleton heart va cambridge msonormal blood stream gilbert normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental structure american society times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology engineering chemical grade colorful national institutes signature bio watershed mike koenig soundbible transcript centers disease control conn virginia tech neurological atlantic ocean natural resources attribution grades k environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table circulation harrisonburg ar sa blacksburg american red cross cambridge university press franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology sections ben cosgrove stormwater cleveland clinic policymakers msobodytext blood vessels bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl greenwood press circulatory blood cells virginia standards circulatory system water center space systems audio notes covid-19
Talk of Iowa
Steinway International Artist Byron 'BK' Davis And Remembering The Everly Brothers

Talk of Iowa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021


Charity Nebbe meets Byron "BK" Davis, a Steinway International Artist, pianist and composer from Davenport. Davis has traveled the world, worked with artists like BB King, Billy Preston and plans to have more performances here in Iowa. Nebbe also speaks with two Shenandoah natives about the legacy of Don and Phil Everly of The Everly Brothers.

Positively West Virginia
Episode 183 – Amanda McDaniel – Shenandoah Planing Mill

Positively West Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 33:03


Amanda McDaniel is a stay-at-home mom turned Lumber Lady! She and her father have built their business together as a combined retirement project and entrepreneurial dream. Shenandoah Planing Mill is a full-service lumber mill offering dimensional hardwoods, flooring, trims, moulding, and interior finishes.They act as a hub for woodworkers and consumers to network, get supplies, and […]

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 591 (8-23-21): Water Symbolism in African American Civil Rights History (Episode Two of the Series “Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History”)

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:32).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 23, 2021.  This episode, the second in a series of episodes on water in U.S. civil rights history, explores water as symbolism in African American civil rights history.  [The first episode in the series--the series overview--is Episode 566, 3-1-21.]  We start with about 50 seconds of music. MUSIC – ~53 sec – Lyrics: “Well the river ends between two hills; follow the drinkin' gourd.  There's another river on the other side; follow the drinkin' gourd.  Follow the drinkin' gourd; follow the drinkin' gourd.  For the ol' man is a'waiting for the carry you to freedom; follow the drinkin' gourd.” You've been listening to part of “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” recorded by Eric Bibb in 2013.  The song is believed to have been used prior to the Civil War as a code to help enslaved people escape on the Underground Railroad.  In that interpretation, the verses gave information about the route, and the drinking gourd referred to the Big Dipper, setting the direction to go by pointing towards the North Star.  Another water-related spiritual song, “Wade in the Water,” is also believed to have been used as Underground Railroad code.  Both songs became popular hymns within African American churches and, by the mid-1900s, were closely associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement. In a 2018 post entitled “The Role of Water in African American History,” Tyler Parry stated that, “water's culturally symbolic importance resonated across generations….” Following are four other examples of water symbolism connected to the African American movement for civil rights. Number 1: “Parting the waters.”  This phrase refers to the account in the Bible Book of Exodus, in which God parted the waters of the Red Sea so that the Israelites could escape from Egyptian slavery.  It's been used as a metaphor for the enormous challenges that African Americans have faced in acquiring and asserting their civil rights.  For instance, it's the title of the first volume in Taylor Branch's trilogy on the modern civil rights era, America in the King Years.  That trilogy is the source for the next two examples. Number 2. “Until justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”  Martin Luther King, Jr., frequently used this phrase, taken from the Bible Book of Amos, to describe how long the U.S. civil rights movement would need to continue. Number 3: “Springs of racial poison.”  At the signing of the federal Civil Rights Act in July 1964, President Lyndon Johnson said, “We must not fail.  Let us close the springs of racial poison.” And number 4. “A fire no water could put out.”  Dr. King used this phrase in his final public sermon in Memphis.  Recalling demonstrations in Birmingham, Alabama, when Birmingham Commissioner of Public Safety “Bull” Connor ordered fire hoses turned on demonstrators, Dr. King said that Connor didn't realize “that there was a certain kind of fire that no water could put out.” These examples are only a small piece of a much larger story.  I invite listeners to offer Virginia Water Radio other examples of water metaphors and symbolism in U.S. civil rights history. Thanks to Eric Bibb, his manager Heather Taylor, and Riddle Films for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of Mr. Bibb performing “Follow the Drinking Gourd.” MUSIC – ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “For the ol' man is a'waitin' for to carry you to freedom; follow the drinkin' gourd.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Eric Bibb performance of “Follow the Drinking Gourd” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was taken from a video recording dated March 19, 2013, and posted by Riddle Films online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjBZEMkmwYA.  Audio for this recording is used with permission of Eric Bibb, via his manager Heather Taylor; and of Liam Romalis at Riddle Films.  More information about Eric Bibb is available online at https://www.ericbibb.com/.  More information about Riddle Films is available online at http://riddlefilms.com/.An excellent version of “Wade in the Water” (the other song mentioned in this week's audio), performed by Deeper Dimension, is available online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NQvOFTioJg. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Image of the relation of the constellation known as the Big Dipper and as the Drinking Gourd to the North Star.  Image from the National Park Service, “North Star to Freedom,” accessed online at https://www.nps.gov/articles/drinkinggourd.htm, 8/23/21.Map of escape routes for enslaved people prior to the U.S. Civil War.  Map by National Park Service, “What is the Underground Railroad?”  Image accessed online at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/undergroundrailroad/what-is-the-underground-railroad.htm, 8/23/21.Sculpture in Birmingham, Alabama's, Kelly Ingram Park, recalling fire hoses being used on civil rights protestors in the 1960s.  Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, March 3, 2010.  Accessed from the Library of Congress, online at https://www.loc.gov/item/2010636978/, 8/23/21.SOURCES Used for Audio Kenyatta D. Berry, “Singing in Slavery: Songs of Survival, Songs of Freedom,” PBS “Mercy Street Revealed Blog,” 1/23/17, online at http://www.pbs.org/mercy-street/blogs/mercy-street-revealed/songs-of-survival-and-songs-of-freedom-during-slavery/. Taylor Branch:At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-68, Simon & Schuster, New York, 2007;Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1988; Personal Communication, March 16, 2021;Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1998. Joel Bressler, “Follow the Drinking Gourd: A Cultural History,” online at http://www.followthedrinkinggourd.org/. Encyclopedia Britannica, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers – Poem by Langston Hughes,” online at https://www.britannica.com/topic/The-Negro-Speaks-of-Rivers. C. Michael Hawn, “History of Hymns: ‘Wade in the Water,'” 2/1/16, Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church, online at https://www.mississippi-umc.org/newsdetail/2576866. High Museum of Art (Atlanta, Ga.), “'A Fire That No Water Could Put Out': Civil Rights Photography” (exhibit November 4, 2017—April 29, 2018), online at https://high.org/exhibition/a-fire-that-no-water-could-put-out-civil-rights-photography/. Martin Luther King, Jr.:August 28, 1963, speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (“I have a dream” speech), as published by American Rhetoric, online at https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkihaveadream.htm;April 3, 1968, speech in Memphis, Tenn. (“I've been to the mountaintop” speech), as published by American Rhetoric, online at https://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkivebeentothemountaintop.htm. LearntheBible.org, “Parting of the Waters,” online at http://www.learnthebible.org/parting-of-the-waters.html.Bruce McClure, “Here's How To Find The Big Dipper and Little Dipper,” EarthSky, March 7, 2021, online at https://earthsky.org/favorite-star-patterns/big-and-little-dippers-highlight-northern-sky/. Merriam-Webster Dictionary, “Symbolism,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/symbolism. National Center for Civil and Human Rights (Atlanta, Ga.), “Rolls Down Like Water: U.S. Civil Rights Movement” (exhibit), online at https://www.civilandhumanrights.org/exhibition/us-civil-rights/. National Park Service:“Kelly Ingram Park” [Birmingham, Ala.], online at https://www.nps.gov/places/kelly-ingram-park.htm;“North Star to Freedom,” online at https://www.nps.gov/articles/drinkinggourd.htm;“Theophilus Eugene ‘Bull' Connor (1897-1973),” online at https://www.nps.gov/people/bull-connor.htm;“Underground Railroad,” online at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/undergroundrailroad/index.htm. NPR (National Public Radio) and Smithsonian Institution, “Wade in the Water” (26-part series produced in 1994 on the history of American gospel music), online at https://www.npr.org/series/726103231/wade-in-the-water.Tyler Parry, “The Role of Water in African American History,” Black Perspectives blog (African American Intellectual History Society), May 4, 2018, online at https://www.aaihs.org/the-role-of-water-in-african-american-history/.PBS (Public Broadcasting System) “American Experience/Soundtrack for a Revolution,” online at https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/soundtrack/. Walter Rhett, “Decoding ‘Wade in the Water,'” Black History 360*, February 18, 2011, online at https://blackhistory360.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/decoding-wade-in-the-water/. Selma [Alabama] Times-Journal, The drinking gourd and the Underground Railroad, January 26, 2004. Smithsonian Folkways, “Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: Black American Freedom Songs 1960-1966,” online at https://folkways.si.edu/voices-of-the-civil-rights-movement-black-american-freedom-songs-1960-1966/african-american-music-documentary-struggle-protest/album/smithsonian. Tellers Untold, “How Harriet Tubman used ‘Wade in the Water' to help slaves escape,” February 15, 2021, online at https://www.tellersuntold.com/2021/02/15/how-harriet-tubman-used-the-song-wade-in-the-water-to-help-slaves-escape-to-the-north/. For More Information about Civil Rights in the United States British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), “The Civil Rights Movement in America,” online at https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zcpcwmn/revision/1. Georgetown Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/civilrights. Howard University Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://library.law.howard.edu/civilrightshistory/intro. University of Maryland School of Law/Thurgood Marshall Law Library, “Historical Publications of the United States Commission on Civil Rights,” online at https://law.umaryland.libguides.com/commission_civil_rights. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, online at https://www.usccr.gov/. U.S. House of Representatives, “Constitutional Amendments and Major Civil Rights Acts of Congress Referenced in Black Americans in Congress,” online at https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Data/Constitutional-Amendments-and-Legislation/. U.S. National Archives, “The Constitution of the United States,” online at https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. This episode is part of the series Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History.  As of August 23, 2021, other episodes is the series are as follows:Episode 566, 3-1-21 – series overview. Following are links to some previous episodes on the history of African Americans in Virginia. Episode 459, 2-11-19 – on Abraham Lincoln's arrival in Richmond at the end of the Civil War.Episode 128, 9-17-12 – on Chesapeake Bay Menhaden fishing crews and music.Episode 458, 2-4-19 – on Nonesuch and Rocketts Landing in Richmond.  FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sourc

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National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler: News From Across The National Park System

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 55:10


A lot is happening around the National Park System, from the nomination of a permanent director for the National Park Service and higher user fees in the parks to wildfires and ongoing crowds in some corners of the park system. National Parks Traveler's Kurt Repanshek, Kim O'Connell, and Lynn Riddick discuss those and other issues from around the park system.

Ohio Mysteries
Ep. 144 - The crash of the USS Shenandoah

Ohio Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 25:47


In 1925, The US Navy's first zeppelin - the USS Shenandoah - was ripped apart by turbulence over Noble County. The 14 crew killed included her Ohio-born captain, Zachary Lansdowne. But after area residents stripped the crash site of its wreckage, investigators had little physical evidence to explain the spectacular disaster. www.ohiomysteries.com feedback@ohiomysteries.com www.patreon.com/ohiomysteries www.twitter.com/mysteriesohio www.facebook.com/ohiomysteries Music: The Wreck of the Shenandoah, by Vernon Dalhart. Audionautix- The Great Unknown The Great Phospher- Daniel Birch

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Susan Hickman

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 25:14


We had the pleasure of interviewing Susan Hickman over Zoom video! Determination and passion paint the walls of country artist Susan Hickman‘s life, causing fans to recognize these vibrant traits undeniably inspire the way she crafts her music. While these are characteristics most acquire as they mature, they seem to be inherent in Hickman's ethereal essence. At only the age of five she began playing piano and added violin lessons as well a few short years later. As if two instruments wasn't enough for a young Hickman to handle, at the age of twenty-one, she began teaching herself to play guitar in the living room of her family home in Atascocita, Texas. Hickman finds a unique way to connect her own voice with the instruments she surrounds herself with and has the ability to create melodies which are very much “Louder Than Words”. At only 12 with no previous experience other than playing and singing in church, Hickman scoured the Yellow Pages for every talent agency in the Houston area and then went on to travel across the country to pursue her dreams. Upon recollecting her journey the first few years Hickman is quick to refer to her mother as a saint from the long business trips to sitting at her shows in the honky-tonks during the early hours of the morning. In 2010, Susan was named CMA Close Up Who New To Watch In 2010 and has mastered the art of live performances. Hickman's energy, can-do attitude, and not to mention her music has allowed her to captivate audiences with various large scale acts such as Miranda Lambert, Jo Dee Messina, Shenandoah, Dean Dillon, Robert Earl Keen & Daryle Singletary. While 2010 was a pivotal year for Hickman it also proved to be a difficult one as well, she relied heavily upon her determination and positive attitude. Because she was playing guitar and singing nearly 10 hours a day between rehearsals and shows, Hickman was left having to get two surgeries. But if you've learned one thing about this performance powerhouse, it's that nothing will stop her mind from taking her where she needs to go, not even her own body. Her injuries did not stop her from developing quite a following in the U.S. and Europe. Susan has played through her pain and entertained audiences at Nashville's renowned CMA Music Festival and even at France's 23rd Annual Country Rendez-Vous Festival. Not to mention winning Texas CMA Female Vocalist of The Year 2015.As Hickman reflects on her gypsy lifestyle she shares she has done a lot of soul searching. She has taken time to discover herself as a person and then as an artist, though she cleverly mentions they often fight with one another. Only in her thirties, Hickman seems wise beyond her years and has a bright career ahead of her. She is a strong role model for women everywhere, showing them anything is possible when you live out your story with a strong will and a big heart.We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #SusanHickman #zoom #aspn #americansongwriter #americansongwriterpodcastnetworkListen & Subscribe to BiBFollow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! 

Inside West Virginia Politics
Shawnee Sports Complex, COVID-19, Paid Family Leave, and WV State Fair on this week's Inside West Virginia Politics

Inside West Virginia Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 21:53


The Shawnee Sports Complex estimated to bring more than $100M after first 4 yearsIn Segment 1, Ben Salango (D), Kanawha County Commissioner, discusses his contributions around the county, including his involvement in the Shawnee Sports Complex. Salango says the sports complex will bring in more than $100 million in its first four years — money he says is going back to employees, businesses and workers throughout the valley, not just the county.Salango has also announced his candidacy for the Kanawha County Commission in 2022.Revamping COVID-19 testing and vaccination efforts in West VirginiaIn Segment 2, Dr. Sherri Young from the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department discusses ramping up COVID-19 testing and vaccinations as the latest COVID-19 spike spreads statewide in West Virginia. She discusses the Delta variant and the concerns with the spread as the first day of school is on Monday, Aug. 9. The Delta variant can spread quickly, is more aggressive and affect kids more.The importance of Paid Family and Medical Leave in West VirginiaIn Segment 3, Kelly Allen, the Executive Direct of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, talks about the importance of Paid Family and Medical Leave is being considered in Congress.According to Allen, 1 in 5 people have paid medical leave with a higher-paying job. With lower-wage workers, 1 in 20 people have paid medical leave.The West Virginia State Fair returns this AugustIn Segment 4, Kent Leonhardt, the West Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture, discusses the 96th annual West Virginia State Fair.Leonhardt says masks are not required for patrons, but vendors who are inside will be wearing masks. “You can see the smiles on people's faces,” said Leonhardt.The West Virginia State Fair will take place from Aug. 12th-21st.Officials at the State Fair of West Virginia are happy to announce the concert series for the 96th annual event set for August 12-21, 2021, featuring Nelly (8/12), Whiskey Myers with special guest the Steel Woods (8/13), for KING & COUNTRY with special guest Rebecca St. James (8/14), STYX (8/15), Tracy Lawrence and Tracy Byrd (8/19), Brantley Gilbert (8/20), and the Buckin'B Bull Ride (8/21).Mac Powell & The Family Reunion and Shenandoah will play as free shows on August 16 and 17, respectively.ArtistDate of PerformanceNELLYAug. 8thWhiskey Myers with special guest the Steel WoodsAug. 13thKING & COUNTRY with special guest Rebecca St. JamesAug. 14thSTYXAug. 15thTracy Lawrence and Tracy ByrdAug. 19thBrantley GilbertAug. 20thYou can buy tickets for the fair by following this link.

Small Town Murder
#235 - Night Stalker Training Program - Shenandoah, Iowa

Small Town Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 157:19


This week, in Shenandoah, Iowa, a horrifyingly cruel murder leaves very few clues, other than the large serving fork, protruding from the victim's neck. Obvious factors take investigators down a road that seems to have an arrest, at the end, but they are blocked at every pass. Finally, an unlikely source comes forward with information that takes everyone by surprise, and shifts the focus somewhere completely different. To someone calling themselves "Night Stalker"! Along the way, we find out that everything is fertile in Iowa, that no one has ever fallen on on to a serving fork & impaled themselves, and that some books not only shouldn't be judged by their covers, but maybe not the first 50 pages, either! Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman  New episodes every Thursday!  Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com & use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com  Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!  Follow us on...  twitter.com/@murdersmall  facebook.com/smalltownpod  instagram.com/smalltownmurder  Also, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts

Rattlecast
ep. 104 - Roy Bentley

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 131:18


Rattlecast 104 features Roy Bentley and his new book, Hillbilly Guilt. Roy Glenn Bentley is an Appalachian-American poet and university creative writing professor. The lives of the poor in America are the primary focus of his work. He has been published in poetry journals as well as in four books of poetry and ten chapbooks. He currently resides in Pataskala, Ohio, in the USA. Roy Bentley's poems have appeared in Blackbird, Shenandoah, Rattle, The Southern Review, and Prairie Schooner--as well as many other notable journals and magazines. He is the recipient of a Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and fellowships from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs and the Ohio Arts Council. Hillbilly Guilt is the winner of the Willow Run Poetry Book Award. Find the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Hillbilly-Guilt-Roy-Bentley/dp/0999491563/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A nonce form is one you make up yourself. Make up your own nonce form and write a poem using it. Be sure to include a short explanation of the rules. Next Week's Prompt: At the library. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Behavioral Grooves Podcast
[INTERVIEW] Does Money Really Make You Happy? The Research with Johannes Haushofer

Behavioral Grooves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 51:34


What link is there between happiness and income? Does winning the lottery make you happier? What does the research say about poverty and our mental health?  Our guest on this episode has researched the psychological effects money has on our wellbeing and on our society. Johannes Haushofer is the Assistant Professor of Economics at Stockholm University and has taught at Princeton University for the past six years.  Johannes realized that not enough research on these topics has been conducted outside of the Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic countries (WEIRD countries). So he founded the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Nairobi, Kenya: https://busaracenter.org/. We talk with him about how he founded the center and what research he has been able to do there. A few years ago, in an effort to make a friend feel better Johannes published his ‘CV of Failures' that detailed every degree program that had rejected him and all the research funding he didn't get. It went viral as people lapped up the counterintuitive idea of celebrating failure.   Despite having a well published list of failures, Johannes has a multitude of successes. One of which is that he is a serious vocalist with access to a deeper range in his lower voice known as the vocal fry register. We have a great discussion about the central role that music has played in his life. Topics We Discuss with Johannes (2:21) Welcome and speed round questions. (4:06) What is the relationship between income and happiness? (12:24) How spending changes when people are given one lump sum of money vs. monthly payments. (15:51) What research is there about Universal Basic Income? (17:43) What effect does winning the lottery have on us? (21:17) Why Johannes' “CV of Failures” that went viral. (26:00) Johannes' views on the replication crisis in psychology. (29:21) How Johannes founded the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Kenya. (33:20) The link between mental health and poverty. (35:07) How stress impacts choices. (36:16) Johannes' experience of singing in Swedish Choirs. Listen next to our Grooving Session (episode #243) where Kurt and Tim discuss the insight from our interview with Johannes. If you are a regular listener to Behavioral Grooves, please consider donating to our work through Patreon https://www.patreon.com/behavioralgrooves. We also love reading your reviews on the podcast, which gives other listeners social proof that we're worth listening to! © 2021 Behavioral Grooves  Links Johannes Haushofer site: https://haushofer.ne.su.se/  Busara Center for Behavioral Economics: https://busaracenter.org/    TEDMED Talk: "Johannes Haushofer, The Psychological Consequences of Poverty" https://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=621424  Vocal Fry Register: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocal_fry_register  Johannes Haushofer, CV of Failures: https://www.uni-goettingen.de/de/document/download/bed2706fd34e29822004dbe29cd00bb5.pdf/Johannes_Haushofer_CV_of_Failures[1].pdf  Episode 41: Michael Hallsworth: From MINDSPACE to EAST: https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/michael-hallsworth-from-mindspace-to-east/ Melanie Stefan “Keeping a visible record of your rejected applications can help others to deal with setbacks”: https://www.nature.com/articles/nj7322-467a  Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers, “Subjective Well-Being and Income: Is There Any Evidence of Satiation?”: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/aer.103.3.598  Episode 176: Annie Duke on How to Decide: https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/annie-duke-on-how-to-decide/ Episode 202: How Chaning Jang Works Around Not Being WEIRD: https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/how-chaning-jang-works-around-not-being-weird/ Behavioral Grooves Patreon https://www.patreon.com/behavioralgrooves Musical Links Johannes singing a Sea Shanty: https://twitter.com/jhaushofer/status/1351267627461734402?s=20   Johannes singing on the streets of Stockholm:   https://twitter.com/jhaushofer/status/851066608109924352?s=20   Johannes' Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/16NMYSIfdiaz7K81AFGPtJ?si=gdqJ7xQSRQObxsJaN7r1Og Joan Baez “Diamonds and Rust”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrVD0bP_ybg  St Olaf Choir, “Shenandoah”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBiP_kDI-Ak  Alex Dmitrieff (Basso Profondo) - Alliluia - Russian Orthodox Male Choir of Australia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gv0nuACLqJE&ab_channel=TheOktavismChannel  Simon & Garfunkel "The Boxer": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3LFML_pxlY&ab_channel=SimonGarfunkelVEVO 

Travel Squad Podcast
Wild Adventures in Shenandoah & New River Gorge National Parks

Travel Squad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 64:40


Episode 94 is a fun one! We're exploring Shenandoah National Park and New River Gorge National Park - the newest national park in the United States. This east coast adventure features wild white water rafting, hiking, gorgeous overlooks, and road tripping through two states during a gasoline shortage. Thanks to our sponsor MANSCAPED! Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping with promo code TRAVELSQUAD at MANSCAPED.com Travel Itineraries on Sale Now! We now have six 20+ page PDF trip and national park itineraries that plan the entire trip for you. Get yours now for just $30 on our website:https://travelsquadpodcast.com/travelitinerary Connect with us on Social Media: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3_gxT16uimZ2Vrl9gnjk2g? Instagram: @travelsquadpodcast Co-hosts: Jamal: @jamal_marrush Brittanie: @brittanieharbick Kim: @lushdeez Get in touch! Email us at travelsquadpodcast@gmail.com to discuss: Being a guest on our podcast or having the squad on yours Ask a travel question for Question of the Week Inquire about brand advertising --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/travel-squad-podcast/support

HistoCast
HistoCast 232 - Jackson en el Valle de Shenandoah (Parte I)

HistoCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 463:34


Esto es HistoCast. No es Esparta pero casi. Terminamos la temporada con un la legendaria campaña de la Guerra de Secesión estadounidense en el Valle de Shenandoah... bueno la primera parte de la misma. Y dispuestos a marchar valle arriba y valle abajo se encuentran @LordCirencester, @tamtamveramendi y @goyix_salduero.Secciones Historia: - El Valle y los generales - 8:22 - Jackson en acción - 2:02:51 - Kernstown - 4:36:11 - Venganza y ofensiva - 5:38:20 - McDowell - 7:04:02 - Bibliografía - 7:34:58

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis
Episode #274 - Kera Passante and Bill Welch (Sunny and Always)

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 85:01


We've got a couple of overachievers on the show today. Kera and Bill decided that an Appalachian Trail thru-hike wasn't sufficient to scratch their adventure itch, so they went straight from their 2200-mile walk to a 5000-mile bike trip, crossing the country from Bar Harbor to San Diego–taking a fairly circuitous route, it must be said! The two of them had such a blast on the trail–and this was in 2020, Covid Year–that they regarded their journey as not a case of stepping away from their previous lives but more towards their future lives. Going forward, Kera and Bill will be sharing their knowledge of the trail, plus their knowledge of bikepacking, so I urge you to visit their various social media sites below, as well as look out for their website coming soon. Always & Sunny on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlwaysSunnyAT Always & Sunny on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Always_Sunny_AT/ Our Website (coming soon): https://www.adventurememories.life/ Katie has been learning valuable lessons on the trail, but her hike is back on and she shares with Steve her last few days in Shenandoah, with reflections upon those lessons. At last, we've come to the concluding chapter of Larry Luxenburg's Walking the Appalachian Trail, with Larry summing up the trail afterlife so beautifully and so topically, even though this was written nearly 30 years ago. Some things on the trail never change. If you like what we're doing on the Hiking Radio Network, and want to see our shows continue, please consider supporting us with either a one-off or monthly donation. You'll find the donate button on each Hiking Radio Network page at https://www.hikingradionetwork.com Any support is gratefully received.