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Here Come the Sequels
264 - Halloween (2018)

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Tyler, Alex, and Briton talk about many movies, one of which is Halloween (2018).Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 264 - Halloween (2018)

Small Town Dicks Podcast
Detective Dave's Favorite: "Interstate"

Small Town Dicks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 74:37


We take a time machine back to season 3 to hear Detective Dave's favorite case. It's called "Interstate". See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 44: CM Punk on Rampage Thoughts | "CTW is in for Major Changes" | Thoughts on TK and AEW | Full Gear Ready ?!? | Fiend still in WWE? | Battle for the Interstate Preview | BIG NEWS COMING SOON |

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 46:30


24 Hours away from the Battle for the Interstate for the CTW Championship live on The Daily Goat YouTube and TJ throws a curveball?!? The Provider has had enough and is shaking things up on The Cheapest Podcast In Wrestling. How will this effect tomorrows battle? CM Punk is rising in the numbers in both wins and in ratings. How long will this last and could this lead to a possible World Title Run in 2022?!? Bray Wyatt is getting close to his return to wrestling following his release, but could it be possible he's still with WWE? Is Cody Rhodes the face of the “TurnerVerse” ? The guys break down the possibilities of what we could be seeing at AEW Full Gear and the Intern gets a history lesson about AEW. Jam packed week for CTW Tuesday- Battle for the Interstate Live at 8PM on YouTube Wednesday- CTW Crown Jewel Preview Thursday- Special Guest Bobby C Friday- Special Guest Sebastian Cage

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Waiving Goodbye to Telehealth Progress An interview with Dr. Ben Caldwell, LMFT about the impacts of rolling back the covid telehealth waivers. Curt and Katie talk with Ben about how the expiration of emergency orders will impact the profession. As a case study, we talk through how the California professional boards and associations are navigating these challenges, including looking at disciplinary action that has caused alarm (although we don't think it should). We also talk about calls to action to get involved now, so you can shape future policy on telehealth, tele-supervision, and remote work. It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Dr. Ben Caldwell, LMFT Dr. Benjamin Caldwell, PsyD is a California Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (#42723) and the Continuing Education Director for SimplePractice Learning. He currently serves as adjunct faculty for California State University Northridge in Los Angeles. He has taught at the graduate level for more than 15 years, primarily in Law and Ethics, and has written and trained extensively on ethical applications in mental health care. In addition to serving a three-year term on the AAMFT Ethics Committee, Dr. Caldwell served as the Chair of the Legislative and Advocacy Committee for AAMFT-California for 10 years. He served as Editor for the User's Guide to the 2015 AAMFT Code of Ethics and is the author for several books, including Saving Psychotherapy and Basics of California Law for LMFTS, LPCCs, and LCSWs. In this episode we talk about: As a case study: the California Board of Behavioral Sciences rolling back covid waivers and losing the progress made during the pandemic The emergency orders - covid waivers - that are expiring related to telehealth, tele-supervision The specifics of remote supervision when emergency orders are rescinded. Looking at permanent legislation concerns as well as the best-case timeline for when remote supervision can come back The concerns about moving backward and losing all progress made during the pandemic related to electronic and telehealth efforts The short-sightedness of requiring an in-person meeting when starting telehealth or tele-supervision Disciplinary action case regarding remote supervision and a prelicensed individual working from home – but there's so much more nuance than that Current legislation related to where mental health employees can work (which is actually quite flexible in CA) Equity and access issues related to not allowing clinicians to provide mental health from home On-going responsibilities for supervisors to ensure confidentiality and data security The requirements that supervisors have regardless of where supervisees are working Calls to Action to attend Board meetings for your licensing board, so you can be informed and help to shape future policy.   Our Generous Sponsor: Turning Point Turning Point is a financial planning firm that's focused exclusively on serving mental health professionals. They'll help you navigate all the important elements of your personal finances, like budgeting, investing, selecting retirement plans, managing student loan debt and evaluating big purchases, like your first home. And because they specialize in serving therapists in private practice, they'll help you navigate the finances of your practice, as well. They'll help you navigate bookkeeping, analyze the financial implications of changes like hiring clinicians or diversifying your income sources. They'll even help you consider strategies like the S-Corp tax election. Visit turningpointHQ.com to learn more and enter the promo code Modern Therapist for 30% off their Quick Start Coaching package. Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! SimplePractice Learning Motivo's tool regarding rules for tele-supervision in all 50 states CA Board of Behavioral Sciences Covid Information   Relevant Episodes: Covid-19 Legal and Ethical Updates Post Pandemic Practice Noteworthy Documentation Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of Modern Therapist's Survival Guide is brought to you by Turning Point   Katie Vernoy  00:03 Turning Point Financial Life Planning helps therapists confidently navigate every aspect of their financial life from practice financials and personal budgeting to investing Tax Management and student loans. Visit Turning Point hq.com. To learn more and enter the promo code modern therapist for 30% off their quickstart coaching package.   Curt Widhalm  00:24 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Announcer  00:27 You're listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Kurt Wilhelm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:43 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast about all things therapy therapists for therapists. by - I pause here because I don't know if we can call today's guest still a therapist he's but he is not.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  01:04 How dare you Curt!   Curt Widhalm  01:06 We are once again joined by Dr. Ben Caldwell, a longtime friend of the show and returning for like somewhere around his fourth appearance. But talking to us today about some stuff going on in the California Board of behavioral sciences and their attempts to go back to the Dark Ages, in some some legislation that they're crafting. This is important for all of our listeners, because in preparing for this episodes, I asked them is this just where licensing boards are creating solutions to problems that don't exist? But let's allow Ben to introduce himself.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  01:50 It's always good to be with you both. I'm Ben Caldwell, I'm the Education Director for simple practice learning and I am in point of fact a California licensed MFT.   Katie Vernoy  02:02 Yeah ....you two.   Curt Widhalm  02:06 So at the core of this is a subcommittee meeting which these are fantastic meetings, if you've ever seen TV shows like Parks and Rec, where they're open meetings for the government discusses things and people are allowed to show up. And many of these meetings are kind of lackluster as far as entertainment value. But important stuff happens at them. And recent telehealth subcommittee meeting of the California BBs happened here a couple of weeks ago. And Dr. Caldwell was there and relayed some information of some discussions as far as with COVID restrictions changing and some stories that we're going to share in this episode today that are going to illustrate why this is important enough for us to dedicate an episode to what should hopefully have been a rather boring meeting.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  03:06 Yeah, those those meetings are they are not compelling television. I'll put it that way. But it is important for us to be involved and aware of what's happening there. Because that that is how the proverbial sausage gets made when it comes to the policies that ultimately impact our work and can move us forward, backward or sideways kind of depending on what gets done. licensing boards generally around the country. They have open meetings and their their public meetings, anybody can show up anybody can be heard. And in general, I think boards are actually pretty responsive to the questions needs and desires of those people who do show up. It's just that very, very few people do. You know the BBS governs now more than 100,000, licensees and registrants across it's different license and registration types in California. And most of these meetings, there's five or 10, licensees are registered to actually show up, even if it means that the meetings are going to take longer, and there's going to be a little more argument on both sides. It's probably better for more people to be at those meetings and be heard and have some influence on the process.   Katie Vernoy  04:17 So I think this is a point of advocacy. And so I think one of the calls to action I'll just put it out right now is if you are a registrant or a licensee in a state, but especially California, since that's where we're talking about, like, go to some of these meetings or at least understand what's happening at these meetings so that if you want to make a statement you can but to frame this a little bit, I guess I am hearing that in this meeting that there are COVID waivers that were coming to a close that people have a response to There was also some ideas around telehealth and tele supervision. So So what is it actually that we're talking about? What should people be paying attention to right now as covered waivers are coming to a close.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  05:04 So, across the country, there have been emergency orders that were put into place around the beginning of the pandemic. That allowed for things like the increased use of Interstate practice, that allowed for increased use of telehealth with with less restriction. And that allowed for some other kinds of intended to be temporary changes that made it easier for us to engage in continuity of care, as everybody was stuck at home. Where we are now is that a lot of those emergency orders either have expired, or are going to be expiring in the relatively near term. Now California has hung on to a lot of those emergency orders and waivers longer than some other states have. But even in California, the waivers that have been issued by the Department of Consumer Affairs throughout the pandemic. Those are it sounds like it kind of in the process of winding down. And one of those waivers that has been really attention getting in California is the waiver that allows associates in private practice settings, to engage in online video supervision. If you go pre pandemic, can you look at sort of the the normal California law, video based supervision is only allowed for associates in nonprofit and other what the law calls exempt settings. Private Practice doesn't typically allow it. There was this waiver put into place at the beginning of COVID to allow for video based supervision in private practice. That waiver has been extended 60 days at a time throughout the pandemic. And the current extension of that waiver is set to expire at the end of October. I know that camped and others are continuing to advocate for additional extensions to that waiver. But the Department of Consumer Affairs ultimately makes the decision and they it sounds like had a meeting with some of their boards and bureaus. And what the BBs said in the most recent telehealth committee meeting was that it is and I wrote this down because it the language struck me quote, very highly unlikely, unquote, that there will be a further extension of that waiver.   Curt Widhalm  07:28 So I am aware of some efforts towards legislation to make that piece more permanent. And assuming that there's no substantial opposition to it. Like that would go into effect in 2023, based on at the earliest based on the way that California's legislative system works.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  07:50 Correct. That was one of the things that was actively discussed in that telehealth committee meeting. And they talked about kind of what the policy should be on an ongoing basis for allowing remote supervision across all work settings. I think there's general consensus that remote supervision should be allowed across all work settings. But there is this anxiety. And I keep asking folks for hard evidence to back it up. But I have yet to see any not say it doesn't exist. But I haven't seen any where some board members, some practitioners, some people are just weirdly nervous about allowing remote supervision across all work settings. And to the point where one of the proposals that the BBs was was weighing out in this committee meeting was a 5050 model, where remote supervision would be allowed across all work settings, but you'd have to do no more than 50% of supervision remotely. And the other half would have to be in person, which eliminates a lot of the prospective benefit of telehealth supervision or tele supervision. And thankfully of those people who did show up to the committee meeting, to a person almost universally, they all dragged the committee for even considering this concept because it doesn't make sense. It just wouldn't work. And where they landed, I think their proposal that they're going to carry forward is to allow tele supervision across all work settings, including private practice, conditioned upon there being at least one in person meeting between supervisor and supervisee within 60 days of the beginning of the supervision relationship, and that's kind of a parallel to the the current requirement for the supervisor to get SSI related to supervision you have to do that within 60 days at the beginning of supervision and that allows for people who are kind of pulled in in agency or hospital or other settings at the last minute so that you don't have to do a whole bunch of other stuff before you can supervise if you're needing to take over quickly. But there is a bunch of stuff you have to do within 60 days. I don't really know why that in person meeting is necessary. But I will take that long before a 5050 kind of approach.   Curt Widhalm  10:11 Now and in hearing this, this sounds like we've been through one pandemic, we've seen the world transformed. Have we learned nothing about the way that commerce and healthcare has transformed and that many consumers are expecting us to continue to be available?   Dr. Ben Caldwell  10:33 I don't know that we've learned nothing. I also don't know that we have taken all of the lessons that we potentially could have taken the BBs to their credit, they went out and they did a bunch of surveys about kind of how people felt about tele supervision specifically. And there is clearly not only demand but expectation that that the current telehealth status of our work is largely here to stay. And that the policies we have that govern our work should accommodate that, rather than moving us backward to how things were pre pandemic. And there is some, I guess there's conflicted opinion about that. But the hope among the majority of practitioners is that we're not going to have this weird back and forth of, you know, tele supervision was okay for a long time, and then it's going to be not okay for a little while, and that's going to be okay. Again, I don't know if there's a way to avoid that at this point, it seems kind of inevitable that the the waiver is not going to go all the way through 2023. But I don't know how we then avoid that kind of forward and back and forward again, kind of process.   Katie Vernoy  11:47 What, what are we seeing across the country? Because I actually right before we started recording, I saw something from motivo. And they had, you know, kind of all the tele supervision laws across 50 states. And I'll put that that tool in the show notes. But I was noticing that it's very variable across all 50 states and even across licensure types. I mean, yeah, maybe though. So maybe the question isn't what is everybody else doing? But but kind of digging more into this anxiety? I mean, to me the in the in person meeting, what is it supposed to accomplish, that you can accomplish? According to this theory, that maybe you don't agree with? But like, what is it supposed to accomplish? And how is it supposed to improve the supervision relationship?   Dr. Ben Caldwell  12:38 The theory goes, that if you meet with the supervisee, in person that provides an opportunity to most effectively gauge whether they are in fact appropriate for tele supervision. That's the theory. Again, I've seen no hard evidence to back that up. And I would even argue that that's kind of the same anxiety that we saw and heard at the beginning of the the use of telehealth in therapy, where you had a lot of practitioners saying, Well, you know, it's just not the same as face to face, there's this thing about the energy in the room, and I need to assess somebody in person to see their little micro expressions and, and pick up on their vibe, and et cetera, et cetera. And that just has not held up to research scrutiny. That telehealth provision of services seems to be every bit as effective as in person services, from the overwhelming majority of studies conducted to date. And I don't see any reason why supervision would be different in that regard that there's somehow something magical in an in person supervision meeting, that would require that process for supervision. But we don't need to do that in standard telehealth care. These are in many ways, parallel but not identical processes. It's just that in both of them, it seems like we can do our jobs effectively, remotely. And we have been doing that for a year and a half now. And so sometimes in these committee meetings, people will say things like, well, I don't want to open the floodgates. Well, that ship has sailed, the floodgates have been open for a year and a half. Yeah, and it's been fine. I've seen no evidence that this has created some kind of a massive problem in terms of supervisee misbehavior or treatment failure in therapy. You know, we've all been doing the best we can under really, really difficult circumstances. And it's been an interesting natural experiment. And the results of that experiment are that telehealth and tele supervision can be tremendously tremendously effective and don't appear to increase risks at least from the best information we have available. Now.   Curt Widhalm  15:00 Now, he brought up CAMFT. And CAMFT has a little bit different opinion in this or at least based on a disciplinary action case that has a lot of nuances to it, but seems to oversimplify it to be like, but there was this one discipline action. Actually two because both the supervisor and the supervisee were disciplined. This case largely was it This was actually all before the pandemic even happened when when these infractions occurred. But can you walk us through what happened and why this is pertinent in this discussion?   Dr. Ben Caldwell  15:45 Yeah, so the the disciplinary action that you're talking about, I'm familiar with it, it was finalized in 2020. And you're right that it was based on behavior that had occurred prior to the pandemic. But there is kind of separate from the rest of the the supervision rules in California, there is this one very specific section of the California Business and Professions Code that says, and I'm going to quoted here, because I knew we were going to be talking about it. A trainee associate or applicant for licensure, shall only perform mental health and related services at the places where their employer permits business to be conducted. That section of law is not further limited. There's no like clause after that, that says, except for x y&z so if you read that, if you take that language at face value, then as long as the employer allows, and as long as the services are otherwise legally and ethically compliant, so you're still maintaining data security, you're still protecting confidentiality, you're still doing all the stuff that you are normally required to do, then it appears to be fine under the law, for a supervisee to work from home. And that's in statute. That's not an emergency waiver, that that is the sort of normal case of the law as it exists right now. The disciplinary action that you're talking about, there were a lot of things going on in that case, beyond just the supervisor, you're working from home, that is one thing that was happening, but there were a lot of other shenanigans that were happening there. And when you look at the disciplinary action, it reflects this kind of kitchen sink approach to discipline that a lot of boards take where they unearth as many possible violations as they can find, because that gives them some leverage in negotiating what the ultimate discipline against the licensee is going to be. So they document all these different violations. They put them in front of the administrative law judge, if it gets that far if it gets to a hearing, and that becomes the basis for disciplinary action. In this particular case, the administrative law judge looked at the history of the law, the history of that clause that I just quoted, and basically came to the conclusion that well, the legislature didn't intend to say that you can work from just anywhere. that's problematic. Yeah, it is. Right? I mean, the the historical record lines up with this, that neither the BBs and in running that legislation, nor the legislature and making the change, really intended to allow for full time work from home. But you and I, and other people were not expected to be psychic about what the laws intent was, we're supposed to be able to read the law, make sense of it with kind of a plain language, good faith reading, and act accordingly. And the language here quite plainly reads as though it allows work from home, including full time work from home, if the employer allows it and if it is otherwise legally, and ethically compliant. So to your question, Kurt.   Curt Widhalm  19:17 Okay, and even even before you get to the question,   Dr. Ben Caldwell  19:20 yeah   Curt Widhalm  19:20 even before you get to the question. This would also be inconsistent with many licensing boards, definition of therapy taking place where the client is located, and would be completely irrelevant to where those services are being provided, as far as where the practitioner is located.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  19:43 Yeah, that's right. The licensing boards and ethics codes generally take the stance that therapy happens, where the client is physically located at the time of service, and that's reflected in our California telehealth laws that's reflected in professional ethics codes that quite often use that word located very intentionally and specifically. Now, that doesn't mean that boards can't restrict where the therapist is providing services from they have that authority if they choose to take it on. But the California standard right now is just what I read to you, if the employer allows it, it's permitted.   Katie Vernoy  20:20 What was the intent,   Dr. Ben Caldwell  20:23 The intent was to allow for supervisees to leave their agency settings to go do like home visits at client homes, to work in homeless outreach to go provide services at schools and other kind of third party locations, where the the super actually the employer allowed it and where they could again, take those steps to protect and preserve confidentiality, data, security, etc. There's nothing in the record of that law change that really contemplates full time work from home. Although there's a whole bunch of laws, where we could say that the current environment, the COVID, environment was not contemplated at the time that that law was created. We we didn't anticipate being in the middle of a pandemic. Yeah. And so the BBs has said, Well, we probably ought to go back and take a look at this language. Now in light of what we've seen since the pandemic of people working from home full time, but it's weird to me that they are looking at it with the potential impact of kind of walking back this allowance, when again, work from home seems to have largely been fine for a year and a half.   Katie Vernoy  21:38 What's interesting, because I remember when field based services was coming about, you know, I was working in community mental health at that time, and and there was a huge pushback from providers on how it wouldn't be as good as someone coming into the clinic. And so that has that same feel to it of, well, maybe it's not good enough. But I think honestly, you know, the pendulums keep swinging on what's the best and all of that stuff. But uh, but what I'm really hearing is that the law in itself, as is currently written provides the flexibility and creativity for employers to be adaptive and responsive to the clients they serve. And that also means they can be adaptive and responsive to the workforce, and allow for clinicians to live where they can afford to live and do services in areas that potentially have a different lineup. You know, it, to me, it just seems like walking it back would be hugely detrimental to quality of life and quality of work for clinicians, but also for access for meeting clients where they are I mean, it just it seems, it seems to me that there's a lot to be worried about if this gets walked back.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  22:57 I agree. And a couple of people brought up very eloquently the the point about access and equity in that recent telehealth committee meeting. You know, one of the great advantages of allowing work from home is that it allows clinicians to provide services, even if the clinician is working from a rural location. And if the clinician has some kind of medical or mental health issue that makes it difficult for them to leave their home. You know, are we just telling those folks well, tough, then you can't work in the mental health field? I don't think any of us intends that. And so the question then becomes really how much flexibility and accommodation are we supposed to? Or do we want to put into the law, and I like this statute as it is right now, I recognize that it does not line up with the historical intent. But I think the outcome is fantastic.   Katie Vernoy  23:53 My understanding of the best laws and policies are ones that are specific to what's most important, but don't get caught in the details of, you know, kind of current affairs, right, like so if we're, whether it's working in the field, whether it's working telehealth like this, the law itself provides enough guidance around it. And so to specify it becomes more time limited, it would it would date it, and it would make it so it would have to change again soon. Whereas as it's written, it actually does what it needs to do. At least that's what I'm hearing that you're saying.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  24:30 Yeah, I mean, the law is intended to be revised over time. It's a it's a living set of documents, right? And so we're always responding to what's happening in the larger world around us and hopefully learning more about how professionals work how we can best provide services. From the BBs perspective. They are fundamentally a Public Protection Agency. So they're most interested in developing laws and regulations that keep clients safe. And to that end, I think we've got Now a year and a half worth of data that suggests that when the therapist is working from home that does not seem to impede client safety. Now there is still a supervisor responsibility there in terms of making sure that that supervisee really can provide a confidential and data secure environment. But to your point, Katie, I think that the best laws are ones that both allow and enforce a level of appropriate professional responsibility and judgment. And so do we want to be really prescriptive in terms of how supervisors are supposed to ensure that? Or do we just want to say that supervisors have that responsibility of ensuring that their supervisors are providing data security, confidentiality, etc, and let supervisors kind of do their jobs?   Curt Widhalm  25:50 So I want to talk in generalities, that almost sounded like a real word. I want to talk generally about some of the disciplinary stuff that this seems to be based on because you talked about the administrative law judge, looking at the intention behind the law. But at face value, some of the concerns about oversight seems to be really the foundations of a lot of these anxieties, the the, some of the cardigan cartel pearl clutching seems to be based on here. Now, my understanding is this disciplinary action is already written into law as far as the kinds of oversights that a supervisor should be having over their supervisees. Anyway, am I correct in that?   Dr. Ben Caldwell  26:49 Yeah, so with the, the disciplinary action I was talking about earlier, there, there were so many problematic things happening in terms of the supervisee sort of acting independently, with the blessing of the supervisor, as best as can be read, they're to go out and get office space and set things up, like it was a supervisees own business, do independent billing, etc, etc, there's a there's a lot of stuff there in terms of the oversight that the supervisor was supposed to be providing that they were not providing, apparently.   Curt Widhalm  27:26 And that is already in the law as far as this kind of stuff. And so if I'm hearing and making up what I have not attended this meeting, making up what I imagined that the conversation is, well, if there's even less oversights by not having met them physically, one time that this is going to prevent all sorts of future bad supervisee behavior. When you know, I have a practice, I have supervisees, in my practice, they can do stuff off the clock anyway, that would do any of these things anyway, that are already against the law.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  28:08 Yeah, and that's one of the challenges, I think, from a from a regulatory framework, but also for for you and me and everybody else, as supervisors, you know, we do the best we can and ensuring that the behavior of our supervisees is legally and ethically compliant. And there are those situations where, you know, there may be a disciplinary action against a supervisee, but not their supervisor, because the supervisee did go off kind of on their own didn't tell the supervisor about stuff they were doing. And the supervisor was providing the kind of expected and intended level of supervision. I don't think there's any amount of in person requirement or any level of regulation that is going to effectively prevent every supervisee, who has sort of ill intent from going out and doing what they decide on their own to do. I think the question becomes this balance of how much regulation do you do? How prescriptive Do you get in telling supervisors how to do their jobs? And what what levers Do you want to pull to try to ensure that supervision happens in the way that you would like for it to happen, you know, one of the levers you can pull is requiring a certain level of in person supervision. But does that actually impact anything in terms of legal and ethical compliance beyond that? I don't know.   Curt Widhalm  29:35 It would seem with a lot of the waivers and stuff that have been in place across the country that we would not want to become overly restrictive for when and if there is a next pandemic or worldwide event. In your opinion here does the direction that these discussions are going at the at the licensing board and Possibly, and other licensing boards across the country seem to be ignoring some of that flexibility that would allow for a profession to need to respond in an event, like a pandemic, if it were to happen again.   Dr. Ben Caldwell  30:17 Yeah, I mean, as Katie said, the, the way that boards are moving and the sort of default states for boards across the country, it's all over the map. There are some that that really had flexible policies in place before the pandemic. There are some who I think I've taken lessons from the pandemic and are wanting to move in a direction of flexibility. And there are others who might say, once the pandemic is and take this with a giant grain of salt, more or less over, that they just want to go back to what the default state had been before that. It's, it's a reasonable thing to ask what should be sort of the the normal state of regulation for mental health work. And then what should be the exception, where we do things a little bit differently because an emergency demands it. I think that at least the preponderance of what I've seen in Policymaking around the country, boards are kind of moving in the direction of more allowance of telehealth more allowance of even temporary practice across state lines. Of course, all the professions are working hard on trying to improve license portability. And those are good changes. policy does appropriately, move slowly. You know, we don't want the law to be so reactive to current events, that you're getting constant whiplash, you're being pushed and pulled in different directions based on the events of the past few weeks or past few months. But I think we are going to see some lasting change, especially around telehealth regulation. What's going to be weird, not just in California, but in a bunch of places around the country, is that with putting into policy, what we've learned from the pandemic, we've got sort of this exceptional state right now, where where lots of places are still under some form of emergency authorizations, we're going to go back to the prior default state, at least for a little while, as new policies are being crafted run through state legislatures and implemented, and then we're going to step forward again, to a new normal, that better accounts for the flexibility that has been shown to be really effective during the pandemic. It's, it is a weird forward than back then forward again. And I don't think every state board is going to land in the same place in terms of the adaptations they want to make on an ongoing basis. But I do think the, the overall path is a good one. It's a path toward increased use of telehealth increased authorization for telehealth. It's a path toward better license portability. It's a path toward flexibility in the supervision process. But it's not a straight line to get there.   Curt Widhalm  33:18 If you've hung with us this late in the episode, the call to action here really is keep an eye on your licensing boards. And to know that there is a lot of stuff that you might have to sit through, but could drastically impact the way that you go about your business or the way that you go about your practice. And these are the kinds of mundane things that those of us who've been in the advocacy world for a while. We hear complaints 5678 years later of like, Well, why didn't anybody say anything. And that could have steered a direction, you know, that prevented some of this stuff from happening. And as Dr. Caldwell was pointing out here that for many states, this might be a forced return back to pre pandemic ways while the legislative process catches up with some of the actions that we've been able to do during this pandemic. But go and be a part of those conversations as that legislation is being crafted so that way, you can actually talk with licensing boards, law makers about how this has played out in the real world. And that is something that is tremendously impactful when talking with people like politicians who have no idea about what we do. So thank you for spending some time with us today. And where can people find out more about you and the stuff that you're working on?   Dr. Ben Caldwell  35:01 They can find out more about me and my stuff at simple practice learning.com. And just I want to thank you both as always, for having me on, these are really important conversations to have. And I couldn't have said that better for it. if folks want to know what policy changes are coming down the pike show up, come to these meetings. It's it's not unusual that we will hear from people to change takes effect saying, what How did this happen? I didn't know about this. Well, if you go to your board meetings, you can know about those changes a year or more ahead of time. And in fact, you can have real influence on what those changes are going to look like. I love it. When more folks come to these board meetings, it makes for better conversation and informed decision making for everybody.   Katie Vernoy  35:48 And it's probably a little less boring for you,   35:50 It is a lot less boring. Listen, like in parks and rec people sometimes will show up with the most off the wall. Wild comments that have nothing to do with anything. And if there is I'll admit this certain part of my heart that is it warmed when that happens.   Katie Vernoy  36:13 I've got my marching orders. I'll be there next time.   Curt Widhalm  36:17 Until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy and Dr. Ben Caldwell.   Katie Vernoy  36:22 Thanks again to our sponsor Turning Point   Curt Widhalm  36:25 we wanted to tell you a little bit more about our sponsor turning points. Turning Points is a financial planning firm that's focused exclusively on serving mental health professionals to help you navigate all the important elements of your personal finances like budgeting, investing, selecting retirement plans, managing student loan debt and evaluating big purchases, like your first home. And because they specialize in serving therapists and private practice, so help you navigate the finances of your practice as well. They'll help you navigate bookkeeping, analyze the financial implications of changes like hiring clinicians or diversifying your income sources. They'll even help you consider strategies like S corp tax collection,   Katie Vernoy  37:02 and for listeners of MTSG you'll receive 30% off the price of their quickstart coaching intensive just enter promo code modern therapist when signing up. And don't forget to visit Turning Point hq.com to download your free finance quickstart guide for therapists.   Announcer  37:19 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.    

Here Come the Sequels
263 - Halloween II (2009)

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


The movie is bad.Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels.  Here Come the Sequels · 263 - Halloween II (2009)

AccuWeather Daily
Trucker opens up about being stranded on interstate in big snowstorm

AccuWeather Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:43


AccuWeather Daily brings you the top trending weather story of the day - every day.

The Capitol Pressroom
Syracuse's evolving traffic plan

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:29


October 13, 2021 - The state's evolving plan to overhaul a portion of Interstate-81 in Syracuse is broadly championed by the New York Civil Liberties Union, but the organization says more can be done to limit potential public health problems and promote local opportunities for people of color. NYCLU Education Policy Center Assistant Director Lanessa Chaplin joins the show to discuss the best path forward, last-second objections to a community grid and what this process could mean for other upstate cities.

Proven and Probable
SILVER HAMMER MINING - The Next Pure Silver Play in the U.S.

Proven and Probable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 11:50


Silver Hammer Mining | CSE: HAMR | OTCQX: HAMRF) Website: https://silverhammermining.com/ Silver Strand: https://silverhammermining.com/silver-strand/ Corporate Presentation: https://silverhammermining.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Silver-Hammer-Mining-Investor-Presentation-Fall-2021-Oc.pdfPresentation-August-2021-FINAL-.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/silverhmr Contact: 604.908.1695 Silver Hammer Mining is focused on building a multi mine silver production company. Its growing asset portfolio includes the recently acquired past-producing Silver Strand and Burnt Cabin mines located in the renowned Coeur d'Alene mining district in Idaho, USA, one of the most prolific silver districts in the world and the earlier stage Lacy Gold-Silver project in British Columbia, Canada. The Silver Strand Project - The Silver Strand Mine has a 5.5km strike length in the Coeur d' Alene mining district in Idaho. - Located in North Idaho's Silver Valley along Interstate 90. - The district is known for its depth potential with numerous deposits and has produced over 1.2 billion ounces of silver. Lakewood Exploration is partner and we are shareholders. Website| www.provenandprobable.com Call me directly at 855.505.1900 or email: Maurice@MilesFranklin.com Precious Metals FAQ - https://www.milesfranklin.com/faq-mau...​ Proven and Probable Where we deliver Mining Insights & Bullion Sales. I'm a licensed broker for Miles Franklin Precious Metals Investments (https://www.milesfranklin.com/contact/​) Where we provide unlimited options to expand your precious metals portfolio, from physical delivery, offshore depositories, and precious metals IRA's. Call me directly at (855) 505-1900 or you may email maurice@milesfranklin.com. Proven and Probable provides insights on mining companies, junior miners, gold mining stocks, uranium, silver, platinum, zinc & copper mining stocks, silver and gold bullion in Canada, the US, Australia, and beyond. We cannot confirm if Eric Sprott or Rick Rule are shareholders.

Here Come the Sequels
262 - Halloween (2007)

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


In which Briton levels a strong accusation against Big Mouse.Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 262 - Halloween 2007

News Updates from The Oregonian
Portland Commissioner Dan Ryan falsely claimed UO shuttered downtown campus due to safety concerns.

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 3:19


3 former Trail Blazers, 1 current assistant coach, indicted in alleged defrauding scheme for NBA benefits. Oregon Ducks star running back is out for the season. Interstate 84 will close this weekend as crews install bike and pedestrian bridge. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Murder Murder News - The Listen Edition
The Texas Killing Fields

Murder Murder News - The Listen Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 48:49


During this week in true crime history, Suzanne Rene Richerson was reported missing after she disappeared while working at a Galveston resort in October of 1988. Authorities associate Richerson's presumed murder with a number of unsolved cases connected to the Texas Killing Fields, for which police suspect several serial killers are responsible. Angelina and Aurora examine the disappearances and murders that took place near Interstate 45 between 1971 and 2006, the 30 bodies that have been found in the so-called Killing Fields, and the suspects investigators have indicated over the years.Writing and research by Angelina Villeseche.Original music and audio production by Louis Levesque.For inquiries: louis14levesque@gmail.comF O L L O W  U S ! ! !I N S T A G R A M -- @murdermurdernewsT W I T T E R --  @mmurdernewsF A C E B O O K -- https://www.facebook.com/mmntruecrime/T I K T O K -- @murdermurdernewsY O U T U B E -- MurderMurder NewsJoin our Facebook Group | to chat about true crime, and to join our virtual book club!Check out MurderMurder.news for the latest breaking true crime news!For business inquiries: murdermurdernews@gmail.comSubmit a  spooky story: https://murdermurder.news/story-submission-form/-------------LINKS + SOURCES:https://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field-officeshttps://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/seeking-information-in-unsolved-killing-fields-murders-091819https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/suspect-mark-roland-stallings.155533/https://www.chron.com/neighborhood/bayarea/crime-courts/amp/Guilty-verdict-in-decades-old-Galveston-murder-5350818.phphttps://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/is-robert-abel-getting-away-with-murder/amp/https://www.news9.com/story/611e6b02469fb80bf6a104bf/selfproclaimed-serial-killer-william-reece-formally-sentenced-to-death-in-oklahomahttps://dentoncountyhistoryandculture.wordpress.com/2020/02/22/victim-of-a-serial-killer-the-story-of-kelli-cox/amp/https://www.voa.org/moral-injury-stories/the-disappearance-of-my-world-as-i-knew-ithttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jun/12/tim-miller-can-find-almost-anyone-can-he-find-his-daughters-killerhttps://www.click2houston.com/news/investigates/2020/05/27/investigation-sheds-new-light-on-decades-old-mix-up-of-killing-fields-victims-remains/https://charleyproject.org/case/suzanne-rene-richersonhttps://www.khou.com/mobile/article/news/investigations/confessed-killer-details-murder-of-texas-killing-fields-victim/285-65314101https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2017/10/18/243184/investigators-think-they-know-who-killed-eleven-girls-around-galveston-in-the-1970s-2/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Killing_Fields_(location)https://www.news.com.au/world/north-america/the-texas-killing-fields-and-the-highway-of-death/news-story/12c001543eb44b971863200b44ca06d4?amphttps://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/04/17/bodies-found-killing-fields-haunted-southeast-texas-decades-will-new-clues-lead-suspect/https://link.medium.com/6eua6ERqVjbSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/murdermurdernews)

East to West
Oct. 08, 2021: Allegations of Misconduct Against Orientation Director Shiney James, StuGov Approves Diversity Equity and Inclusion Act, Plans for I-90 Renovation

East to West

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:19


Three day weekend! Today on East to West, we cover allegations against BU Orientation Director Shiney James, StuGov's approval of a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Act, plans for Interstate 90's renovation and more.FEATURING: Mia Parker, Taylor Hawthorne WRITTEN BY: Sophie Jin, Veronica ThompsonEDITED BY: Veronica ThompsonBASED ON DFP PIECES BY: Cameron Morsberger, Colbi Edmonds, Anna Vidergar, Phil London, and Taylor Brokesh MUSIC:Acid Trumpet by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3340-acid-trumpet License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Backbay Lounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3408-backbay-lounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Ultralounge by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5010-ultralounge License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/  

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Breaking Down the 3-Tier System w/ Tom Wark, National Association of Wine Retailers

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 55:46


Instituted in a different time, post Prohibition, the 3-Tier system of alcohol distribution and sales in the US creates inefficiencies in matching inventory with demand.  Tom Wark, Executive Director of the National Association of Wine Retailers (“NAWR”), founder of Wark Communications, and writer of Fermentation -  the Daily Wine Blog educates us on the history, key issues, and challenges of navigating the 3-Tier system for wine consumers to get the wines they want.  The NAWR is on a mission to modernize the regulatory landscape for alcohol and bring choice to consumers. Listen in to Tom's decades of war stories on wine regulation! Detailed Show Notes: Tom's backgroundHe grew up in Northern California and got interested in wine at an early ageHe got a Masters in HistoryWorked in wine PR, then started his firm - Wark CommunicationsStarted Fermentation -  the Daily Wine Blog, in 2004 - wrote a lot about regulation, was pro-DTC (direct-to-consumer)Approached by the board of National Association of Wine Retailers (“NAWR”) to be Executive Director (2008)NAWRMembers all independent fine wine retailers (e.g., K&L, Zachy's, Grapes, the Wine Company)>100 members nationwideEstimate ~500 retailers actively doing e-commerce and interstate shipping~400,000 alcohol licenses nationallyWine Retail SpaceGrocery stores, convenience stores, drug stores, big-box retailers - mostly focus of NAWRMulti-state retailers (e.g., Total Wine, BevMo)DTC from wineriesKey issues for fine wine retailersPrimary - want to serve customers where they areAmazon could get into the wine space w/ Whole Foods alcohol licenses and ship to anyone locally -> The only way for independent retailers to compete is to do interstate shipping16 states currently allow interstate shippingWine.com has retail licenses in many states to ship to most statesSecondary issue - procurement of inventoryRetailers must buy from in-state wholesalers who have a limited selectionRetailers desire to purchase directly from importers or wineries no matter where they are to broaden their selectionNAWR mission - to modernize the regulatory landscape for alcoholMost regulations  were written in the 1930s-1950sAlcohol is more regulated than tobaccoE.g., if a brewery wants to sell direct to consumer, it needs to sell to a wholesaler and then repurchase it to sell to the consumerFranchise laws - binds producer to a wholesaler for life, even if the wholesaler is no longer supporting the brandAdvocate litigation for change - e.g., states that allow their own retailers to ship to other states but don't allow out-of-state retailers to ship in, believes that violates the dormant commerce clause of the ConstitutionLobbying, education of retailers, cultivation of allies (very few - consumers and media; most against - distributors, non-online retailers (believe it will create more competition), wineries (indifferent), importers (were not active supporters))The 3-Tier system in the US1930's - post-prohibition (1933) - each state had to regulate alcohol, and each did it a bit differentlyTwo main concerns - prevent tied house laws and organized crimeTied house - producers controlled retailers => got bars to do sketchy things and promote high alcohol consumption3-tiers - producer, wholesaler, retailerRetailers must buy from wholesalersStopping tied house - wineries can't own retailersHistorically - lots of wholesalers competing to represent producersToday - 10,000+ wineries, fewer wholesalers -> wholesalers act as gatekeepers, not required to bring producers in and shut out small producers who aren't worth the time and effort to represent themCA producers and importers can sell direct to retailers/restaurantsWholesalers are very powerful - contribute meaningfully ($10M+/year) to state political campaigns, 10x more than wineries and retailers combinedEach state has different 3-tier regulation, creates an enormous compliance burdenIL - wineries can sell directly to retailers only if they produce

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 42: WWE Draft | “1-800-CHEAP-BASTARD” | Sammy Guevara TNT Champ | WWE Women's Universal Champion

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 56:55


☎️Please call Toll Free 1-800-CHEAP-BASTARD “Welcome back to Roughing it Cheap” Cheap Talk Wrestling this episode is all about those RANTS!!! TJ and the Current CTW Champion Carr break down the WWE Draft. Get a rant counter ready because it's about to go down. TJ explains why there is no logic in drafting Raw or Smack Down Labeled Champions (Example being the WWE Raw or Smack Down Women's Championships). This then sparks an idea to have a Women's Universal Championship! The guys then break down the recent return to the King and new Queen Of The Ring Tournament that will begin on the “Season Premiere” of Smack Down and will conclude at Crown Jewel. Who will win the Crown? The guys give there predictions! Bobby Fish is first in line at the New TNT Champion Sammy Guevara, Does it really only take one Tweet to get a title shot? Is Austin Theory the next BreakOut Star in WWE? For the guys of CTW they all want that CTW Championship we officially find out the date of the Battle for the Interstate in what will be one of many things to happen that week in a CTW Takeover week find out why in this all new episode of CTW!!! Make sure to check out the most recent Interview with Jay Vara!! NAW Champion BD Cruz joins CTW This Thursday!!!

AJC
10/4/21: Woman found fatally shot along Clayton County interstate...and more news

AJC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 3:13


Woman found fatally shot along Clayton County interstate; Georgia again named top business state by trade publication; AJC Decatur Book Festival marks single-day celebration amid pandemic; More than 700 apartments, townhouses pitched near Gas South District

Arkansas Democrat Gazette
10/1/21: Arkansas cannot enforce its ban on mask mandates...and more news

Arkansas Democrat Gazette

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 4:08


Arkansas cannot enforce its ban on mask mandates; Arkansas' covid-19 hospitalizations have fallen for a tenth straight day; The new Interstate 49 Bella Vista Bypass opens to the public; Simmons Bank is expanding its presence in west Little Rock; Marble Falls Nature Park will replace the abandoned Dogpatch U-S-A theme park

Here Come the Sequels
261 - Halloween: Resurrection

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


It's poetry. - Tyler Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 261 - Halloween: Resurrection

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: Glenwood Springs businesses eligible for disaster loans; The River of Lost Souls in Purgatory

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:45


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Tuesday September 28th,   Today - Glenwood Springs has had a challenging year … between the Grizzly Creek Fire, and mudslides. But businesses have largely stayed afloat thanks to federal aid. And now, they have access to federal disaster loans.   But before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today, we take you back to September 28th, 1719, when a massive expedition of Spaniards, Puebloans, and Apaches endured an early winter storm and feared for whether they had enough food. It's little wonder that this beleaguered company at its camp near present day Trinidad Colorado, referred to a nearby river as the River of Lost Souls in Purgatory.    Now, our feature story.   Glenwood Springs has had a rough year … the Grizzly Creek Fire in August 2020 forced a two-week shutdown of Interstate 70 in Glenwood Canyon, just as the tourist destination was emerging from COVID lockdown …. in August this year the hot-springed resort town again endured a two-week closure of the canyon as mudslides buried the interstate below the burn scar … Glenwood businesses have been able to stay afloat for most of 2021 thanks to COVID relief  from the federal government … and now those businesses have access to low interest federal disaster loans approved earlier this month.   Colorado Sun reporter David Gilbert looked into what he called Glenwood's “cavalcade of hardships,” and how this new round of federal assistance is helping the town's economy …   To read more of David's reporting on Glenwood Springs, go to coloradosun.com     And Before we go, here are a few stories that you should know about today:   Nonprofit river conservation group American Whitewater is exploring a plan to adjust Colorado water law so communities can protect recreational river flows without building whitewater parks. The proposed changes to Colorado's Recreational In-Channel Diversion water rights regulations faces stiff opposition from Western Slope water users. The Denver Public Schools board has expanded its conflict-of-interest policy to ban employees of independent charter schools and innovation zones from serving on the board. The district's policy already barred school district employees from serving on the seven-member school board. Last week the board unanimously approved the new rules without public discussion. The board's next election is set for Nov. 2. Fewer than 5,000 students — that's less than 1% of Colorado's K-through-12 students — have signed up for a weekly coronavirus testing program.  That is not enough kids, says Colorado Governor Jared Polis, who launched the testing plan as a way to track cases and prevent outbreaks.    Schools need to test at least one in five students to make a difference, the governor says. The testing program, which is backed by $173 million in federal funding, is testing about one-in-25 kids at 200 Colorado schools. And Colorado students are catching COVID, with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment last week tracking 156 active coronavirus outbreaks in K-12 schools. For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. And don't forget to tune in again tomorrow.   The Colorado Sun is non-partisan and completely independent. We're always dedicated to telling the in-depth stories we need today more than ever. And The Sun is supported by readers and listeners like you.   Right now, you can head to ColoradoSun.com and become a member. Starting at $5 per month for a basic membership and if you bump it up to $20 per month, you'll get access to our exclusive politics and outdoors newsletters. Thanks for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again tomorrow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Qld mandates vaccination for truck drivers after seven cases since July

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 7:28


Interstate truck drivers entering Queensland will be required to have had at least one dose of a covid vaccine by October 15.

Here Come the Sequels
260 - Halloween H20: 20 Years Later

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021


Should you judge this movie by its very bad title? Tyler, Alex, and Briton investigate.Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 260 - Halloween H20: 20 Years Later

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 40: “Kiss My A$$ Club” | Update-The Battle For The Interstate | Owen Hart Tournament |

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 56:33


The wait is over and The Intern is here to stay on CTW and it's time for him to face the consequences. This is an episode you have to hear it to believe it as tensions are running wild as Battle For The Interstate is looming closer and we find out the next element being added thanks to “The Provider” TJ Albin.

Advisory Opinions
How to Get Away with Interstate Mail Fraud

Advisory Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 63:32


On today's podcast, David and Sarah discuss a host of thorny legal issues starting with an indictment against a lawyer who lied to the FBI when he alleged communications between the Trump Organization and a Russian bank. They then dig into a Second Amendment amici brief, a defamation case, and the issue of misleading headlines. Listen to the end to hear Sarah explain how to get away with murder (or somewhat less sensationally, how to get away with interstate mail fraud). SHOW NOTES Indictment: U.S. v. Michael A. Sussmann Second Amendment Amici brief regarding New York gun laws  Rep. Devin Nunes' suit against Ryan Lizza and Hearst Magazine Media The Writer of This Article Also Wrote This Headline and That's Rare “The Perfect Crime,” Georgetown Law Review article by Brian C. Kalt  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Shockoe Artspeak
098. Damage & Debris

Shockoe Artspeak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 113:40


Last week folks all across the country got hit with some intense rain. Here in Richmond, it rained so hard that an entire side of the Interstate flooded! Schools were closed, businesses were damaged, and people were swimming in the streets. For us, that meant a small bit of roof damage in our recording studio ...

Here Come the Sequels
259 - Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021


Tyler, Alex, and Briton discuss the end of the Loomis Saga.Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 259 - Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 39: “Battle for the Interstate?!” | PWI 500 for 2021 | BIG E CASHES IN | “Final Words Intern” |

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 66:53


This week the guys cover the Pro Wrestling Illustrated top 500 and they give their Top 5 for 2021. They also break down Big E's huge win this past Monday in Boston and how the crowd reacted to his change for the red brand. TJ in the Main Event of the pod talks about his Creation for 3 Way Dance for the CTW Championship!!!!

The Remote Real Estate Investor
How to be the G.O.A.T. real estate investor with James Wilcox

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 29:09


James Wilcox is a Real estate investor out of Central Kentucky, a Stessa power-user, and host of the YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/REIJames In this episode, James shares his investment journey, his strategy, an insider's view of the Central Kentucky market, and some tips on being an effective real estate investor. --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Tom: Greetings, and welcome to The Remote Real Estate Investor. On this episode, I'm joined by James Wilcox, who has been investing since 2012. James is a buy and hold investor in Kentucky. And he is a power user on the stessa platform. Alright, let's get into it.   James, thank you so much for joining us.   James: Yeah, thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here and share a little bit of my real estate investing knowledge and journey with all your listeners.   Tom: Awesome. I'd love to go back to the beginning. But before we do that, let's start with one of your best days as a real estate investor. So can you think of a day that stood out like, Wow, it's so awesome being a real estate investor XYZ happened? That'll be my opener, upper question.   James: Yeah. So I mean, that's a really great question. And, actually, I've had a lot of great days, but I really want to focus on like, my best day was also probably my worst day possible, during my whole journey. So a little bit kind of background on that I purchased my first property back in late 2012. And through that process, you know, everybody's got to work with contractors and kind of get the property back up to snuff, so to speak, this one had a lot of deferred maintenance on it.   So I did some of the work myself, but I had to call in a GC to do like some more of the heavy lifting. And like we redid the foundation and stuff like that things that I couldn't personally do. And I'm not really a big, super good handyman, I might know how to do it, but making it go from my brain   Tom: Know enough to be dangerous   James: for my brain to the hand, you know, it gets mixed up a little bit. But so I had hired someone to come in and do some of those things. And whenever we got toward the end of the project in 2013, they had kind of basically skipped out on a lot of the punch list items. So I was left with a property that was you know, probably like 80% done of where I wanted it to be. And so I work a full time job. And at that time, you know, like I said, I'm not super skilled at handyman type stuff. And so I'm going over there, you know, after five at night, and also working when I can on the weekends and stuff to try and get this property back up and back on the market at the time we had wanted to sell it ended up becoming a rental. And that's kind of how the journey got started.   But I'm over there and had no power on at the house, and no lights or anything. So I'm sitting there basically, like late at night trying to get things done, I'm sweating, because there's no HVAC on anything like that. And I just just Yeah, really, really frustrated because I had this giant punch list of things to do. And it just seemed extremely overwhelming.   So I just took them in and just sat down. I won't say that I shed a few tears. But it definitely got very emotional because it just felt so overwhelming have so many things to do. But right then and there is when I decided that I wasn't going to give up. And then I was going to get this across the finish line. It did take a little bit longer. But that's when I decided that real estate investing was for me because of the challenge of it. And that's why I ended up being my best day because that's the day that I chose not to give up.   Tom: I love it. So you kind of came into it, you know, and then really kind of got put in the burner and tough situation with the property need a lot of work and just committed to it.   James: Yeah, trial by fire is definitely how I've succeeded.   Tom: I love it. So now kind of going a little bit backward. What How did you initially get into real estate was it? Did you have friends or family or I'd love to hear about how your initially got going into the into the space?   James: Yeah, so I had no real estate background or no real direct family that was involved in real estate. my story's a little bit on the sadder side. I had had my father passed away when I was a senior in college. And we had always lived with my grandmother. And she ended up going downhill soon right after that. And so she had passed away that put me next in line for her home. And even though there was, you know, some debt to pay off and things like that some medical bills and things such I did end up sharing half the house with my uncle.   My uncle has also had health problems at the time too. So I just felt like at the time it was such a burden on him to try to figure out what to do with this house that had just seen a lot of deferred maintenance. My grandmother did not like people coming over and fixing things you know and stuff and that was the house the first property. And so I ended up buying out him we agreed on a price and since I own half I gave him you know, a portion to buy out his house, so I did own a home, you know, free and clear, but it wasn't exactly the best quality home by any means.   So whenever I started doing that he did some napkin math, you watch HGTV, oh, it's fine, you know, throw some paint, you know, rip up these nice gold, shag carpets, you know, and do all that and just put it up on the market and I'll make some money. Well, that didn't, you know, obviously pan out really well. And you heard a little bit of that background of that story with some GC problems and the project taking way longer than I needed to, you know, the yard got so high that I was getting letters from the city, you know, and I had to go over there and mow it and is basically up to my shoulders and things like that and, you know,   Tom: Just grow a corn maze.   James: Yeah, yeah, it ended up being just, you know, a big long process. But because of that trial by fire, I ended up keeping pushing forward with it. And I did get the property back up into a shape that I was happy with. And once I did the actual numbers on it, and had someone a real estate agent, come look at it and stuff. At the end of the day, it looked like I was gonna maybe breakeven on it, and probably lose a little bit as well. And someone else had come up to me and was like, well, you should rent it out. Because the market over here, there's always demand for rental properties and stuff. And he's like, okay, yeah, well, that kind of maybe kind of fits more my personality anyway, because we don't really do a whole lot of flipping, you know, it just makes my stomach turn, trying to figure out what first time homebuyers want, you know, and paint colors and tile and all these types of things, you know, I like clean and functional, but still looking nice and stuff.   So I was like, well, I'll try that for a little bit. And I ended up managing that property from a distance, since it was in a different city than I lived in for a little while. And when I got that first rent check for my first renter in the mail, because that's how we did it back then. And it was just amazing feeling it was just like, man, I didn't do anything this month, and I actually got a check. You know, I own the property at this point, you know, free and clear and everything like that. So it was really great. And it just took off from there.   Tom: That Mailbox money. So that's a that's incredible. So you you inherit this property and buy it out. And you know, it's great with real estate, you now have options, having options to either sell or to buy or sell or to keep it as a rental and just identify that as a better hold property. How quickly Are you know, what was your kind of next step after getting that initial property check in the mail? Was it oh, you know, this is pretty awesome, I want to add some more properties. I'd love to hear how it evolved from you kind of strategy and all that good stuff.   James: Yeah, so that first property is always going to be your hardest. And that one took, you know, several years to pretty much get lined out from the actual purchase to the rehab to actually even getting it rented out. And I had kept that same tenant for a little while. And then they ended up leaving and I gotten another tenant and kind of did on my own more or less for that for a little while a couple of years. And during that time, I consider that kind of more when I started to delve into more the background and the education trying to work out to improve my processes and things. And I'd really dug into it a little bit when I first purchased the property. But whenever it was me being on the front lines, being the property manager, I knew I really needed to step up my game, then, but I had always been a fan of bigger pockets. And I've been on that website for a very long time. And I've been a permanent member for a very long time as well.   And So basically, during those couple of years of me being the property manager, I really took the time to read a bunch of books. I mean, I've read probably every single one of them out there, or listen to them through audible and stuff. And then I browse the forums, you know, on bigger pockets, you know, anything, I can find YouTube and stuff to make myself a better real estate investor. And then so once those couple of years have passed, and I felt a little more confident that I knew a little bit more, that's when I pulled some money out of the properties or that property and then went on to buy a lot of more small multifamily. And that's really what we focus on right now. You know, duplexes, triplexes four-plexes type stuff?   Tom: That's fantastic. Yeah, love the BiggerPockets communities is a great resource for for folks. I'd love to hear about your use of Stessa. So having a couple of properties. When did you first hear about it? You know, how do you use it? Why do you use it love to hear you just kind of talk about your relationship with that software?   James: Yeah, Stessa has been great. Back when everybody first get started, you have no accounting whatsoever.   Tom: Back of the napkin Yeah,   James: So I just started out, you know, just like everybody else with no accounting whatsoever. I did switch over to kind of using Excel a little bit for a while trying to keep track of you know, the rental coming in expenses, stuff like that. But I'm a very data driven visual type person. So I love charts and graphs, and everything and tracking everything possible. So then at that time, I had switched over to an online software that was much better at tracking metrics, and kept me a lot more organized. I'm not in actually a very organized person, my wife will definitely tell you that I have a bunch of paperwork, I keep tons of paperwork on stuff just because I like having the, the physical and the data but…   So that property management software, it had property management and kind of the accounting built in. It's called rentec. Direct. And back then it was very, they've had a refresh since then. But there was very old school feeling like it provided you with a lot of tools and bells and whistles, but it just just looked really old. I did, I did like it, it was something I paid for, you know, a small bid monthly for. But I did want something a little bit more visual, something that I can also import the data into, like using Excel. And I was spending a lot of time still in that program. Typing all the transactions in manually. And I didn't like that, because it was taken a lot of time to do that. And back in 2017 is probably when I switched over to Stessa and started, you know, importing the data and more trying to automate things a lot more. And it's been great ever since then for that.   Tom: Awesome. That's great. I'd love to you know, you talked a little about doing property management yourself. Are you still managing your properties? Or have you you pulled in some some third party property management lift that burden?   James: Yeah. So that very first property is the only one that I actually property managed myself. Once we had graduated up and started buying those small multi families that we do now. I immediately switched over to third party property management, and the fun story of how I actually decided to do that. So I Live in Lexington, Kentucky, which is central Kentucky, and that property was in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, and that's about a 45 minute drive one way it was, you know, where I grew up and everything like that, but well out of the way whenever there was, yeah,   Tom: Little out of the way.   James: Little out of the way 45 minutes, you know, mostly Interstate, but to get there door to door. And with you being the property manager, sometimes you're the one going over your boots on the ground, you know, you're solving problems and fixing things. So I had had a tenant call me in the winter, and they said we can't get the heat to work. So anybody who's been in property management knows that. If the heats not working, and it's cold outside, that is the number one red flag priority you need to address that.   Tom: Yeah safety.   James: Yeah absolutely. So like 100%. Let me go come over. I'll be over there. 45 minutes, drive all the way over there. I look at the thermostat. It's that cold.   Tom: Oh, geez.   James: So I went over there, flip the switch to heat, it turned on immediately start heating up the house, so and then. So I was like, Oh, man. So I got back in the car. And I'm driving all the way back 45 minutes, you know, cold outside snow and all that type of stuff. And it was just like, yeah, I need to get property management. That was the moment that I decided that because I like that is not worth my time. And I ended up getting another tenant and they had called me, you know about that? Around the same time, too. And I told them, I was like, yeah, that thermostats a little tricky. Like, you just need to switch it from cold heat. And that'll solve it. And sure enough, it was at least I learned my lesson, you know, but it did take me a little while to find a property manager that I felt like I could trust over there. And I went through even a couple property managers throughout our career in real estate investing, but the ones that we have now, I'm super happy with. Tom: Yeah, I think that's something you know, in in using third party property managers, oftentimes, you know, at some point, you know, it might make sense to look around. If it's not, you know, meeting what you're looking for. Would you give any advice in selecting a property manager in your, you know, experience and having interviewed and selected and then re selected property managers?   James: Yeah, absolutely. your property manager is going to be by far, I think, the best key person on your team. So you really need to have a great property manager, whether you're investing out of state or investing locally, having the good boots on the ground, and someone who's got great systems in place, is definitely going to be a key to finding a great property manager. I think probably one of the best things that when the interview in property managers is to really see how many properties they do manage, and what various types of properties that they do manage. Are they mostly A class single family, or are they large multifamily, maybe they only do apartment complexes and find the one that's going to fit best with you.   Really a good property manager is going to have great communication with your tenants and with you being the owner. And anybody who's got great systems in place, you know, we're going to do a counting, we can send it to you PDF, Excel, you know, you're going to get it this time of the month. You're going to get your deposits this time of the month. You know, ask them about everything that they do on the day to day, and if they got good answers to those questions, they're probably going to beright for you.   Tom: I love that in just in wrapping up the same type of properties that you have and making sure that they can they have experienced them, you don't want to be the the test dummy into it. Kind of a related question. I'd love to. I'd love to give your hear your feedback. Looking back. What's one thing that you wish you had known when you first started investing in real estate?   James: Yeah, so my number one   Tom: What's a tip that you would give the 2012 version of yourself, but what would be the tip?   James: Yeah, so whenever I first got that property, as working on it, and stuff, I really treated it more as a hobby. So it was just kind of like, Oh, yeah, I'll go over there, you know, knock out a few things are, I'll work on it on the weekend, it's like, that was a mistake, I needed to treat it like a business from day one. And I needed to know that, with that property being vacant, it's costing me money, you know, and I need to really get the ball moving on that. And if it means me not being the person doing the boots on the ground, doing the work, you know, changing out the light switch covers, doing electrical, or cleaning, and all that type of stuff, and just paying the extra money and hire someone else out to do it, if they can get it done that much faster, is gonna be better on your profit margin.   You know, like, it's, especially with single family, it's a lot of feast or famine. So if that property's rented out, and there's no problems, no repairs, things like that, you're good, once it's vacant, and your vacancy rate, you know, is 100% on that. So it's like, you really need to get those turned over quickly and get them re rented back out and where I'd kind of him hauled around about on it and treated it more as a hobby and just like something I did in my spare time, which is fine. I think everybody needs a side hustle and things like that to motivate them. But if I treated it like a business, from day one, I would be so much better off and actually having, you know, better accounting, being a great part of that too, you know, and not just having horrible accounting.   I, tax time was always horrible for me. And only recently, in probably the last five years or so do I feel like I've gotten in a really good space? And stessa? You know, would be definitely big key to that. But I would spend tax time, you know, always file for extensions to get more time. And then you know, it's been just hours and hours and hours of going through receipts and   Tom: Digging it up.   James: Yeah, yeah, I tried to go through it all. And it just was not not good experience and even West. So like how you are there's other programs too, that do that where you can take a picture of the receipt, and it scans it in. Like that's so he, I feel because like a lot of those papers and receipts and stuff after a year like the inks disappeared on it. Good luck going back trying to figure out what that was, or which property it went to, or even how much it was or anything like that. So definitely treat it like a business from day one.   Tom: James, how important would you say the the social aspect and what I mean by that of real estate investing is like mentorship, mentoring, I don't know that you're a part of any masterminds. But I'd love to hear kind of your thoughts on I know, the general the importance of having a community as an investor.   James: Yeah, I think community is super important. And that's why I'm so actively involved here in central Kentucky, and developing other real estate investors. I help run a local organization here, that meets through Facebook and doing local meetings. And we do try to do them once a month. You know, this is COVID time. So some of the in person meetings, you know, aren't happening. But I have done a lot of live streams throughout 2020, especially over different topics to help educate people on various topics with real estate investing.   I'm also president of a nonprofit landlord organization back in Mount Sterling, Kentucky as well. So with being so involved in local community, I cannot stress how important it is for you to surround yourself by those that are like minded and those that are willing to help you.   I had a mentor when I first started, he was a local commercial broker. And they were the large commercial broker here in Lexington. And I started working with him back when I was thinking about buying into the small multifamily and stuff. And he really told me that whenever we were successful, that we needed to pass that on to others. And I've definitely tried to keep that close to heart and tried to stick with that. And that's why we're so involved in trying to help others teach them how to be successful in real estate investing as well. But I think just if you can find anyone locally, that is a real estate investor, they will definitely talk your ear off and be more than happy to share information with you and try to educate you because we all feel pretty much in this community that real estate investing. And buying properties are what's going to help set you up long term. And especially it's going to be great for your own retirement and personal wealth generation.   So we're just having an abundance mindset, especially here in central Kentucky and in our group. So we're more than happy to share with you, anything to help you to be successful and I guarantee there's so One near where you are locally anywhere, that would be more than happy to do that as well. So you need to go find those people.   Tom: That's fantastic. And I, you know, I think one of the being involved in some mastermind and mentorship groups, I think it's, that's one of the best ways is to learn it is to teach it, you know, and talking about it and thinking through and it's a, it's a sanity check. It's an accountability aspect. On some of the meetups. I'd be curious, like, what are some of the topics that you guys discuss at the real estate investing meetups?   James: Yeah, so our group is definitely the core of it is for networking. So a lot of the Facebook group example is contractors, local vendors, things like that real estate agents, wholesalers, real estate investors that are buy & holds like myself, short term rental property managers, you know, short term rental investors, things like that. So we cover various topics, it can be anything from having the police department come out or fire department and give you you know, public safety type things that you can do in your properties.   We do like a short term rental one every year that I have a panel, I usually try to get several people from various types of short term rentals, whether they be building their own homesteads, you know, and glamping, and tree houses. And then we have Red River Gorge nearby here that has a lot of cabin rentals, but I do some myself. So I do urban rentals, mostly like city focused ones. We've had wholesaler meetings, we've had real estate agents on home inspectors, you insurance. And basically anything that you can think of that has to do with real estate in any way, shape, or form, probably at least covered at once.   Tom: That's awesome. That sounds like an awesome community that you have in central Kentucky. I'd love to hear you kind of speak to the central Kentucky market. As you know, this is a kind of a national audience. You know, what would be your you know, Top Reasons to invest in central Kentucky.   James: So I'm in Lexington specifically. And I think Lexington can be a really great market, I work with a lot of out of state investors, you know, just given them advice as well. So I'm glad that you brought that up. I think Lexington in particular, and central Kentucky in general, can be a great market just because our price points are a lot lower. I know some people are probably listening here from California and stuff. So like your your dollar can go a lot further here in general.   Also, with us being the intersection between 75 and 64 split. Lexington itself is a good place for businesses to start up, because they can get on the interstate and go north to south, east to west very easily. And Lexington in particular, I think is a very strong market. We do have we are a college town. We're a foodie town, we're actually voted as one of the best entrepreneur cities in the country. Easy for startups and things like that. So I think that Lexington it has something very unique about it that you don't find in any other city really in the US and that we have what's called an urban service boundary, which is basically the area outside of a circle of the city cannot be developed without consent from the city.   So basically, if anybody that's familiar with Kentucky, and Lexington, there's probably a couple of things that come to mind. And it's basketball, bourbon and horses. So in a way for us to protect our natural resource of the land for the horses, for the city boundaries itself to expand, they have to get authorization to do that. And they only look at that every five years. So land becomes a little more crucial here in Lexington.   So it's kind of got built in appreciation in a way. So right now we're not looking at expanding the city boundaries. So the city is working itself on what's called infill, so basically vacant land and stuff that's within that city sector and they're looking to develop and stuff so if you own any basically a home anywhere in Lexington, since land is at a premium, you're going to have some built in appreciation just right on top of there much less the market itself.   Lexington if anybody's familiar with Kentucky in general, most of the jobs are in Northern Kentucky near Louisville, Cincinnati area or in central Kentucky and then you'll have some out west and kind of the Bowling Green Viduka area. But Eastern Kentucky itself doesn't provide a lot of opportunities for a lot of people. It can be like a lot of one stoplight towns are kind of poor town. So a lot of the younger people do tend to want to kind of move away from those areas and they usually end up kind of in that first stop in the central Kentucky area.   Georgetown itself is this Sitting next to Lexington is the fastest growing city in Kentucky by far, population wise. It holds a Toyota being a big manufacturing job there. Basically every Toyota that's coming off the line is coming right here from Central Kentucky, to Lexington, Georgetown Frankfurt, Louisville area, they're kind of all on a strip, you know, going to the interstate there. And with Lexington being right next to Georgetown. You know, Central Kentucky is just hot as can be.   Tom: Yeah, I mean, universities, blue chip companies. Would you say Kentucky is fairly investor friendly? You know, I don't know, it's a term that's thrown around. But as it relates to, you know, landlording laws and taxes and all that.   James: Yeah, I would say Kentucky definitely in general is very landlord friendly. It's very investor friendly as well, you know, our taxes aren't near as high as places like New York, New Jersey, California. So we're definitely very positive on that. So Lexington itself got a great diversity in the job market as well. We got high amount of jobs and health care education with UK and a lot of the universities that are around to you. And high tech jobs to like we have Lexmark headquarters here. We got Valvoline headquarters here. And then Toyota, like I said in Georgetown as well, and we have tons of manufacturing and stuff jobs. And then you also have the farming jobs too, as well with when it comes to the horse industry means that it like a king land or on the horse farms themselves.   So I think that makes Lexington and central Kentucky just in general, just a strong market, just from the job perspective, either.   Tom: Awesome.   James: I want to give like one more tip, just for anybody out there. So I think there's four things for you to be successful in life. And that could be in real estate, investing your work or anything like that. And so I call it so you want to be the GOAT, right? The greatest of all time, everybody knows that. So there's those four things and those four letters there that I really want to drive home. So G, you got to have grit you got to power through whenever times are tough. And that's something that I've learned about that that best worst day ever, you know, that grit   Tom: In the dark with a big punch list?   James: Yep. Yeah, you just gotta power through sometimes. And sometimes life's gonna hand you just a bad hand, and you just got a pat on the through. So that's the one key thing that you need to keep going, you know. O, you got to have opportunity recognition. Whenever there's opportunity that's presented to you, you got to really know your numbers, and know exactly when Lady Luck is kind of smiling down on you. So being able to know for real estate, knowing your market, knowing your price points that you need to hit. Just that opportunity recognition is so key for you to be successful.   And then A, you got to take action. One of these days, you can even read as many books as you want to read as many forums, but in the day, you got to jump in the deep end. You know, you got to crack some eggs to be successful and you got to take that action.   And T,  you got to do training. You always got to be re educating yourself. Keep learning something new, and keep training yourself to be better.   Tom: James, I love that. Did you come did you come up with that acronym?   James: I did. I did.   Tom: That's really good. We're totally gonna reference you but like, give the James James Wilcox. GOAT acronym. That's fantastic.   James: Appreciate it.   Tom: Yeah. Awesome. And one last time where can people reach out to you watch on YouTube, all that good stuff.   James: Yeah, so I have a YouTube channel. It's called REI James. So basically the acronym real estate investing James, and you can also reach out to me on Instagram at ReiJamesWilcox.   Tom: Awesome. Thanks, James.   James: Hey, thanks very much. Thanks for having me.   Tom: Thanks again to James for joining us today and telling us about Central Kentucky, his story, how he uses Stessa. If you enjoyed this episode, please like subscribe, all that good stuff and as always, happy investing.

Succotash, The Comedy Soundcast Soundcast
Succotash, Epi270: Playin' Some Clips n' Bits

Succotash, The Comedy Soundcast Soundcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 36:53


Welcome. Marc Hershon here, your every-other-weekly host for Succotash, the Comedy Soundcast Soundcast. This is Episode 270 of the show that knows how…knows how to play clips of comedy soundcasts – a sort of Whitman's Sampler of audio treats, if you will – that gives you a chance to slip a taste of various soundcasts into your ears, take a nibble, and see if you don't want to go find the whole show and pig out, listening-wise. I had a week off from my day job for vacation last week and headed down to Los Angeles for some R&R. And I got a chance to hang out with some pals and chums, a few of them having been past visits to Succotash, including Travis Clark, Francis Cronin, Jon Manfrellotti, Matt Weinhold, Rick Overton, and Dana Carvey. It was a lot of fun, got a lot of nothing done, and feel rested up and ready to clip! Last week in this feed, for Epi269, my classy, crafty, and cogent co-host Tyson Saner not only served up some crispy clips from soundcasts Gluten Free Gaming, The Spawn Chunks, and Coffee With Butterscotch, but he also shared a big chunk an interview with the very funny Andy Kindler that he conducted over on his other soundcast, Anti Social Show, along with his co-host there, Hunter Block. If you missed it somewhow, check out any of the usual soundcast distribution points like Spotify, Apple and Google Podcasts, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, Audible.com, and more – or just visit our homesite, SuccotashShow.com, where you can find every damn episode of Succotash dating back 10 years to when we started. Which leads me to what I have in store for your auditory senses today. I have clips from The Ajumma Show, Geto Boys Reloaded, and Household Faces. In addition, I came across this funny musical clip comedian, actor, and perhaps future guest on this show, Patton Oswalt, found by Nick Lutsko, who took a bunch of whackadoodle rants by ultra rightwing nutball Alex Jones and turn them into a folk song. And we have a couple of calls on the Succotash Not-So-Hotline, including a new Runaway Truck Ramp report that came in over the weekend from…me. Yes, me, recorded as I was driving north on Interstate 5 on my way home through the stretch commonly called the Grapevine. And, of course, we're sponsored by Henderson's Pants brand new Toddler Trow. Before we get into the rest of this episode, I have to admit that I'm a little late recording this installment and posting it, but that's given me the chance to get a word in here about the passing of great comedian Norm MacDonald. He was secretly battling cancer for 9 years and lost that fight this week. He was one prominent comedian on the scene I never got to meet personally, but we had a lot of mutual friends in common and everyone has told me, over the years, what a great, crazy, funny guy Norm was. Germane to our show, he hosted an audio and video soundcast, Norm MacDonald Live, from 2013 to 2016, where he was interview guests – mostly friends from the comedy and acting world. Here's a clip I featured back in Succotash Episode 89 – two comedy greats we will never hear or see perform live again – Norm MacDonald interviewing Carl Reiner. CLIPS The Ajumma ShowOur first clip comes from The Ajumma Show, featuring a pair of queer – their words, no mine - Chicago comedians, Peter Kim & Eunji Kim. Peter actually started out as a San Francisco improvisor and took classes from me at the San Francisco Comedy College before helping to found the Endgames improv company. He then went on to Chicago. The Ajumma Show is a weekly soundcast examining love, politics, culture, personal victories, failures and sage advice through the judgmental glare of an ajumma. What's an ajumma? It's a Korean word for a married or middle-aged woman, which seems a little “judgy” itself.  I get the feeling it's someone who enjoys throwing shade on pretty much anything she doesn't like. In this clip, the Kims (who are not related) chat about racially specific activities. Geto Boys ReloadedI'm not exactly what you'd call a hip hop guy – I know, I know, hard to believe – and this next clip comes from a show that isn't exactly comedy, but when I saw that comedian Mike Epps was visiting hip hop legends Scarface and Willie D on their Geto Boys Reloaded soundcast, I figured it would be an excuse to bring a little culture into the room here. These guys tend to get a little deep, which is okay with me, as they converse about music, entertainment, social issues and awareness, among other topics. In our clip, the hosts and Mike get into their guest's story of leaving home for the first time and moving to Atlanta to start a career. Household FacesI just reviewed the show our next clip is from, Household Faces, for Vulture.com's This Week in Comedy Podcasts. (Obviously, Vulture hasn't gotten the memo on calling them “soundcasts”.) Hosted by charcter actor and improv comedian John Ross Bowie, he interviews other characters actors – those men and women with familiar faces that I am always pointing out to my wife when we're watching TV or movies and shouting, “I know that guy!” John got pretty well known from his appearances on The Big Bang Theory, and he recently spent three seasons as the dad on Speechless on ABC. The clip I grabbed is from the episode I reviewed featuring Xander Berkeley. Now, you may be saying, “I don't know from Xander Berkeley,” but you, sir or madam, would be wrong. This guy's been in over 200 movies and TV shows, including 24, The Walking Dead and, as they get into here, Terminator 2. That's what's in store for you in the latest installement of Succotash. If you stick around this feed next week, you'll catch Epi271 with co-host Tyson bringing you a swell collection of comedy soundcast clips and may some other surprises. Who knows? That's why they're called surprises! In the meantime, treat each other like humman beings, wash those hands, masks those faces, vax up and, if anyone asks if you've heard anything good lately, won't you please pass the Succotash? — Marc Hershon

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 4: Push to Let Teens Drive Trucks Interstate Divides the Industry

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 30:07


6PM - Eastlake High school cancels 9/11 tribute, says it could offend some students // George W. Bush warns of danger from domestic terrorists on 9/11 anniversary // Dozens of Washington State Patrol troopers, corrections workers and others sue Inslee over COVID vaccine mandate // Facebook Says Its Rules Apply to All. Company Documents Reveal a Secret Elite That's Exempt // Push to Let Teens Drive Trucks Interstate Divides the Industry See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

8Teen Will'n Podcast
From The $treez 2 The Interstate w/ Don Fernnadze

8Teen Will'n Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 40:50


A Conversation with Derek Williams jr & Don Fernnadze about overcoming obstacles and beating the odds

Catch my Killer
Episode 99: Theresa Corley

Catch my Killer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 49:19


Theresa Corley, 19, left a local bar called the Train Stop, in Franklin, Massachusetts, during the late evening of December 4, 1978. After getting into an argument with her boyfriend, Theresa walked out of the bar alone. After leaving the Train Stop, she was picked up by some men and taken to the Presidential Arms Apartments on West Central Street. She was last seen walking along West Central Street after leaving the apartment. At least two truck drivers reported seeing Theresa after she left the apartment. Her body was later found on Interstate 495 by a man who had stopped off the highway to relieve himself. Someone had brutally murdered Theresa and left her nude body along the highway. Today, Theresa's murder remains unsolved. Do you know who killed Theresa? If you have any tips about the case of Theresa Corley, please contact the Bellingham Police Tip line @ 508-657-2863 or the Franklin Police Tip line @ 508-440-2780 or you can also contact the Norfolk County District Attorney's Tip line @ 617-593-8840. And if you would like to report a tip to Gerry or learn more about this case, please visit the Justice for Theresa Corley Bellingham MA 1978 Facebook page.***Opening audio courtesy of Boston 25 News https://www.boston25news.com/Please also visit my website for more information about my true crime and paranormal newspaper columns at www.themarcabe.com. You can also help support my podcast by joining my true crime coffee club for $5 per month where you can read true crime stories. To join, please visit https://www.buymeacoffee.com/catchmykiller. If you would like to contact me about this podcast, please email me at catchmykiller@gmail.com.

The Dana & Parks Podcast
Trucker shortage: Should 18 y/o's drive interstate? Hour 1 9/10/2021

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 40:54


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KOIN PODCAST NETWORK
The Daily 6: 9/10/2021

KOIN PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 3:19


Fire season heats up again, President Biden's patience wears thin ,and the future of Interstate 5 through Portland

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
9/10 4-2 Innards on the Interstate

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 22:06


Ewwwwww.....See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

This Date in Weather History
1976: Hurricane Kathleen

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 4:14


Tropical systems do not typically bring high winds or heavy rain to the southwestern United States. Most Pacific Tropical storms and Hurricanes are embedded in easterly winds, and move westward—away from large land masses—until they dissipate over cold waters. Rare is the tropical system to impact Los Angeles. A large area of thunderstorms, with a diameter of about 500 miles formed 270 miles southwest of Acapulco in early September, 1976. Moving rapidly west-northwest, the formed into tropical depression on September 7. While turning and moving toward the east,  the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Kathleen. On September 9, Tropical Storm Kathleen was barely a tropical storm. Shortly thereafter, Kathleen turned north-northeast into warmer waters and the tropical storm began to re-strengthen. Despite moving rapidly north, it strengthened into Hurricane Kathleen. Kathleen's forward motion accelerated to speeds of 35 mph on September 10, 1976. Unlike the few tropical systems that make it as far as California, Kathleen weakened only slowly as it moved northward over the state. It moved across Death Valley and on September 11, entered western Nevada. Its impacts were significant and, in some places, devastating. In a region not prone to heavy rain and especially not accompanied by strong winds the damage was severe. On September 10–11, gale-force winds caused considerable damage to the city of Yuma. For a time, the sustained winds exceeded 50 mph. California received record rainfall, with almost 15” falling in the mountains of Southern California. Officials evacuated 175 people from the flooded area of Ocotillo and the nearby communities that surround the Salton Sea; the sea rose 8 feet in 3 hours.  A quarter mile of Interstate 8 and a 60-foot bridge were destroyed by the flood, which also washed away mobile homes, trucks, and cars. In Los Angles, two people died of injuries suffered from slippery roads. Palm Desert received more than a year's worth of rainfall in a matter of days. Flash flood warnings were also issued for parts of California, as well as nearby states Nevada and Arizona. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Here Come the Sequels
258 - Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021


Tyler, Alex, and Briton continue their quest to discover the true meaning of Halloween.Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 258 - Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers

Triple M Rocks Footy AFL
The Bump SA | Roo Predicts Port Dominance over Dogs | Interstate Defender in Crows Sights | Ollie Wines snubbed by the AFLPA?

Triple M Rocks Footy AFL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 24:29


0.00 - Opener 01.50 - One of Jars players won the comp medal and didn't thank him! 03.20 - Roo Predicts Port Dominance over Dogs 07.30 - Who comes out for Georgiades? 11.40 - Is there an AFL Umpiring Conspiracy!? 13.10 - Why is the crowd so low at Adelaide oval this weekend!? 14.25 - Ditts is the new King of Podcasts 15.15 - Ollie Wines snubbed by the AFLPA? 17.50 - Was Re-Signing Matt Crouch the Right Call by the Crows? 18.45 - Matt Rendell says Crows should go hard on a Sydney Duo 20.15 - How Hard will Crows go for Lukosius & Rankine Next Season? 22.30 - Influencers have Mad Monday's As Well! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Vacation Mavens
197 Crossing the Canadian Border & A Road Trip to Buffalo

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 43:42


This week Kim and Tamara are catching up on their respective August travels. Kim shares what it is like to cross the land border between Canada and the USA right now, plus what you need to know before you go. Meanwhile, Tamara almost made it to the Canadian border on her Western New York road trip, but not quite. She tells us about her eating adventures along the Upstate Eats Trail in Syracuse, Rochester, and Buffalo, New York. ABOUT OUR SPONSOR: ROOM STEALS Today's episode is sponsored by Room Steals.  Listeners may remember Room Steals from our discussion on finding hotel deals in Episode 185, but Room Steals is a Chrome browser extension that works alongside existing booking sites to show you what the wholesale price is for that room. Just install the browser extension and search for a hotel as you usually would on Hotels.com, Booking.com, Expedia, or Google. Once you've done your initial search, Room Steals will show you in a pop-up if that same room is available for less. If it is, you can click on that pop-up and book it directly through Room Steals. Downloading and using Room Steals is free; however, if you want to book a discounted room you have to pay an annual membership fee. Listeners can save 20% off the annual membership fee with promo code vacationmavens.  If you travel multiple times in a year, the subscription will quickly pay for itself. One listener already saved $400 using Room Steals on her first booking!  To learn more, visit roomsteals.com. That's roomsteals.com and use promo code vacationmavens to save 20% off your membership to Room Steals, and we thank them for their support. Crossing the Canadian Border The land border is still currently closed for Canadians looking to enter the USA, but US citizens are permitted to visit Canada. To cross the border, US citizens need to show a negative COVID test result taken within 72 hours of crossing (note 72 hours NOT 3 days so test timing matters). Tests need to be PCR tests done through a lab (not an at-home test). Anyone age-eligible needs to be fully vaccinated to enter Canada and be prepared to show your vaccination card. Children under 12 crossing with a vaccinated parent may need to be tested again at the border crossing. You also need to have a quarantine plan (identify a hotel where you would stay if you needed to quarantine in Canada.) Canada can also do random COVID testing at the border. You currently do NOT need a negative COVID test to return from Canada to the United States if you are crossing via a land border (anyone arriving into the US by air still needs to have a negative COVID test taken within 72 hours of boarding the plane.) You can upload all your documents into the Arrive CAN app prior to travel. Keep in mind that if you are driving through Western Canada you will want to pay close attention to any wildfires and road closures when planning your route. Be sure to check the Canadian government website for the latest updates. Upstate Eats Trail Road Trip Stops The Upstate Eats Trail runs from Binghampton to Buffalo to Rochester to Syracuse, New York with local food stops along the way This area also has a lot of history with the Erie Canal, suffrage movement, and Underground Railroad See Tamara's full blog post about the Upstate Eats Trail In Syracuse, Green Lakes State Park is home to a glacial lake with a beautiful blue color like you see in the some of the lakes up in Canada. In Downtown Syracuse, Dinosaur BBQ is a popular restaurant with excellent barbecue. Salt City Market is a food hall in Downtown Buffalo with many different types of cuisine from Burmese to Jamaican, Thai, and more. The Marriott in Downtown Syracuse is a beautiful historic hotel and has a great location for exploring downtown. On the way from Syracuse to Rochester, stop in Auburn, New York at the Harriet Tubman House National Historic Site and the New York State Equal Rights Center. In Rochester, stop at Bill Gray's for their red and white hot dogs with meat sauce. One location is right on Lake Ontario. Nearby you can grab a soft serve frozen custard Abbott's. Rochester is famous for the garbage plate, which was invented at Nick Tahou Hots. A garbage plate has potatoes (usually fries), macaroni salad, and is topped with either hamburgers or hot dogs and covered with meat sauce, onions, and other toppings. If you are visiting Rochester with kids, be sure to visit the Strong Museum of Play. This interactive museum focuses on play and has areas with interactive play as well as a Toy Hall of Fame and toys from different decades. High Falls is another spot to check out in Rochester, which is a 90' waterfall in the center of town. There is a nice bridge and viewing point overlooking the falls. Genessee Brew House is located right near the falls. Famous for Genessee Cream Ale, they now have a craft brewery and restaurant. Buffalo is known for a wide selection of food beyond wings, 35 craft breweries, 5 distilleries, street art, history and a revitalized waterfront. Tamara stayed at the Downtown Marriott in Buffalo in the Canalside district, which is where the boat tours leave and where you can rent kayaks, paddleboards, and water bikes. Buffalo River History Tours runs boat tours that explain the history of the river and the grain silos that line the banks. River Works is another entertainment district along the river that is home to ice hockey/roller derby rinks, a ropes course, a brewery, restaurant, tiki bar, entertainment venue and soon a Ferris wheel and zip lining. Silo City is home to a large number of grain silos and elevators that are being converted into lofts and commercial / exhibition space. Duende is a fun bar in Silo City that features live music on some evenings, outdoor space, and fun cocktails or local craft beers. General Mills still has a plant in Buffalo that manufactures Cheerios and Lucky Charms, and the area around it smells like cereal. There are many breweries in Buffalo and one favorite is Resurgence Brewing. Ted's Hot Dogs is famous for its spicy meat sauce. Anchor Bar is home to the original buffalo wings. Other local Buffalo foods to try include beef on weck, sponge candy, and Buffalo-style pizza. If you enjoy architecture, be sure to visit Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House. See more things to do on a Buffalo girls' trip. Full Episode Transcript [00:00:00.000] - Kim Tate We're saying goodbye to summer. Here's the latest of what we've been up to.   [00:00:15.440] - Announcer Welcome to Vacation Mavens, a family travel podcast with ideas for your next vacation and tips to get you out the door. Here are your hosts, Kim from Stuffed Suitcase and Tamara from We3Travel.   [00:00:29.940] - Kim Tate Today's episode is brought to us by our continuing sponsor, Room Steals. Room Steals is an extension that you can add to your browser. And while you're shopping for your next hotel room, you can see if you're getting the very best rate.   [00:00:43.230] - Tamara Gruber I don't know if I had mentioned to you, but my family is planning on doing a Thanksgiving get away this year with all of Glenn's family. It is a multi generational trip, hopefully to Aruba. It was something that was supposed to happen a couple of years ago and was cancelled. I don't know if it's going to happen, but right now that's what our plan is. And so I was like, you know what? It's Thanksgiving week. I don't think that there would be any deals on Room Steals, but let me just give it a quick look.   [00:01:08.730] - Tamara Gruber So I looked and we were going to do the Ritz Carlton in Aruba, and it looks like we could save almost $900 if we use Room Steals because it depends on what room types. Some would be like $400. Some would be 600 or would be $800. So now I need to go and tell my father in law, but he's going to pay for quite a few rooms. So if you think about if that's like $800 per room, you know, when you're doing, like, five rooms, that's a lot of money.   [00:01:37.110] - Kim Tate That's a lot of money.   [00:01:37.930] - Tamara Gruber It's a lot of money. So anyway, if anyone is thinking of planning some travel, I definitely suggest checking out Room Steals. As we mentioned, it's a Chrome browser extension that works alongside all of these different booking sites, like hotels or Booking or Expedia or even Google. And the nice thing is, you can see what the rate would be for free. And then if you want to book that rate, that's when you can sign up for Room Steals membership. And they are offering our listeners 20% off the annual membership fee with the promotion code, vacationmavens. It is Vacation Mavens. All one word, all lower case. Go ahead and check it out at Room Steals dot com.   [00:02:18.200] - Tamara Gruber So, Kim, I was hoping to use this episode to talk about our big announcement of a big trip that we're doing that we're going to see each other on for the first time in how long? I know. I don't know. I don't think we have an announcement to make.   [00:02:33.330] - Kim Tate I don't think we can announce it yet, but I can at least say what we're crossing our fingers for. We are crossing our fingers that Tamara and I will be going to Portugal in October. So I'm still hoping I'm crossing my fingers and my heart.   [00:02:49.080] - Tamara Gruber I think anyone that's trying to plan any trips right now is very much in this state of is it happening? Is it not happening? Especially if it's international. We're all trying to make the best decisions and look at the most recent information. And just recently we've gone through, do we do this or not? And we're like, okay, Portugal has the second best vaccination rate in Europe. Their cases are flattening out. They've got all these great measures in place.   [00:03:18.380] - Tamara Gruber Everything was coming together, all getting organized. We're ready to go. And it's like one of those things where just when you're about to pull the trigger, it's like because Europe announces that they are taking the US off of their safe list of countries that they're accepting into the European Union. So at first that's like, what is that going to mean? You read into it a little bit more. It looks like it probably will be mostly targeted towards unvaccinated travelers, but it's really up to each individual country now to determine what they're going to decide to do.   [00:03:55.110] - Tamara Gruber And so I think probably a lot of them will do is that you need to be both vaccinated and have a negative test for arrival and then implementing that vaccine passport that they're using throughout Europe to be able to check into hotels and go to restaurants and things like that. So it is definitely something to keep your eye on very closely as it can change at anytime.   [00:04:18.380] - Kim Tate I mean, we're over a year into this, so hopefully we've all learned to keep things fluid, but it's definitely a a situation that's up in the air. And like Tamara said, we're just trying to really follow all the rules and regulations, make sure. And the thing is, you have to make sure you're doing the research yourself because I saw someone recently. They showed up to the airport and they had done their own research and knew that they had to get a test and all this stuff. But people were at the airport and being denied their flight because they didn't have a test to show the airport check in, and they were complaining.   [00:04:52.500] - Kim Tate Well, the airline never sent us this information. They never told us this was needed, so you can't rely on getting your information from one source. You have to really kind of do the leg work yourself.   [00:05:03.120] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I think there's a lot of that, like, just not understanding what needs to happen. And I think sometimes I pay a little too much attention to the news, but you need to definitely follow all that information. I just put up a little Instagram story the other day just with some steps to take, make sure that you register for the Smart Traveler enrollment program, the Step program through the State Department, make sure you are following and read through everything on the embassy page to understand what the rules are and following those kind of resources, especially on social media, is that probably gets updated more quickly.   [00:05:39.220] - Tamara Gruber So you definitely need to get some information. But things are always changing even here in the US, right. We were just kind of talking about how difficult it is even to plan a travel podcast, because some of the things that we wanted to talk to you guys about this fall. Now it's probably not the best time to visit those destinations. So between fires and storms and other things, travel is continued to be fluid. But road trips tend to still be good. And you and I both made a road trip recently, right.   [00:06:09.540] - Kim Tate We did.   [00:06:10.360] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:06:10.890] - Kim Tate I think it's hopefully still in our ability. However, there's some interesting stuff, even with road tripping, it we had experience when we were in Canada, but yeah, I think that things right now. I mean, just as we've always said, things, you have to really pack your patience and do your research and be flexible and fluid.   [00:06:29.340] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So you got to finally visit Paul's family, which I'm so glad you were able to do that. So what was it like driving across the border? I guess both ways, especially since we're a little bit unequal partners in that. We are now allowed into Canada. But Canadians are not allowed to cross our border. So there's all these different rules to sort out. We talked about it a little bit last time, but now that you've been through it, maybe you could just talk about that would like, yeah, definitely.   [00:06:53.880] - Kim Tate So it's probably good to let everyone know what the experience was. In actuality, we got up to the border. We made good time. We were the only car at the border crossing where we went, and we were using one of the border crossings. That's not as busy up here. We have three that we well, actually, there's four that we can use kind of across the Washington, our side of the border that we do when we're traveling up to Edmonton, we normally pick ones that are a little bit further east than the traditional Vancouver ones.   [00:07:22.280] - Kim Tate So we passed at a slower location, and it was we were the only people there. We got up there and they wanted to see our passports. And then I had put our vaccine cards in my passport and it dropped, of course. And he's like, I just want your passports now. So he didn't want to see my card, but he saw that we had it. I'm guessing. So he gave that to us and looked at our passport, scan them and everything. And then he wanted to see our negative COVID test.   [00:07:52.420] - Kim Tate And so I pulled mine up on my phone. But the girls, they don't have digital ones because they're minors, so they don't have the digital account. So we had gotten print outs in advance, and he looked because I know that mine. We actually we got tested separately and mine and Mia was exactly three days before. And whereas Paul and Lizzy there was two days before, but early in the morning and he looked at his watch because he was looking for the 72 hours. So I was curious how that would work if they really hold to the 72 hours or it would be just kind of like three days before.   [00:08:28.270] - Kim Tate But he looked at his watch because ours got processed at 05:00 p.m.. And he wanted to make sure that the time that you got the test or the time that the results came for us. It was the time that the test was administered. So what happened, though, is we collected. We gave our sample probably around 1:20, but the test results said sample process at 05:00 p.m.. So there was like a holding period before they actually ran our sample. But our results didn't come in for two days after that.   [00:08:58.220] - Kim Tate But it's not based on when you're basically, I would say, is have your sample collected no sooner than 72 hours before you think you're going to pass that, you know, that border. And I know there's different rulings on if you're originating in one place and then connecting somewhere. And I think there's some stuff with that as well.   [00:09:20.230] - Tamara Gruber Well, you really have to account for traffic there, too, just yet.   [00:09:23.610] - Kim Tate I know that's what I was saying. So that's where we were, because it's like, okay, well, we want to leave the house at this time, but knowing my family, we're probably going to know we give it that time. So I want to give myself an hour cushion. But then we had, like I said, we had quite a bit of a cushion from just when the processing was when the test was processed. It was a few hours after we'd given our samples.   [00:09:48.540] - Tamara Gruber Did you do that through like, a standard state testing site. We did pharmacy or anything.   [00:09:54.690] - Kim Tate We did it through our normal clinic site. So our hospital, like our doctor's clinic has a drive through clinic set up for all the patients. And so we were able to just drive through there and do our little swabs and stick and imagine it has to be PCR. It has to be PCR. And Canada does not allow those Abbott ones.   [00:10:19.370] - Tamara Gruber Unless they've started self administered one.   [00:10:21.800] - Kim Tate Yeah, it has to be through a lab and stuff in there. They have different rules. So you just need to really make sure you're doing it the right way and stuff. So we got them and no problem. So he checked that. Now we had used the app that was the arrive can app, and I had it pulled up and in there. And again, I wonder how much they noticed this and don't ask for it then, because he didn't ask us for vaccination cards, and he didn't ask to see the app.   [00:10:46.760] - Kim Tate But I had it already, like in the hand on my lap. So then we got through. It's kind of funny how we did this because we drove separately. So Paul and Mia were right behind us, and they got up there and he wanted to see their arrive can, and he wanted to see their vaccination cards in addition to everything else. So I don't know how that worked, but yeah, so we had everything in order. So we had the arrived can filled out. The tricky thing about the arrive can is they actually make you create a quarantine, not create, but tell them what your quarantine plan is because because they can spontaneously request a test at the border.   [00:11:24.150] - Kim Tate And I'm guessing this is done more when you're flying. But I did have a friend recently say that it happened to their kids because they weren't able to get vaccinated. But those tests don't come through for three days or can be three days. And so when they give you the results, they've already let you into the country. But when they give you the results, if you're positive, you have to go into quarantine immediately at that point, and you have to follow that plan that you input into this app.   [00:11:52.290] - Kim Tate So we just put that we would stay at a residence in that was near his family. So that's just something to be mindful of that you do have to know what your arrangements will be. And you can't just say, oh, we'll just stay with family because it has to be in a situation where you can not touch or be around anyone else. So you have to be able to get your own food. You have to be able to not be with anyone who is not part of your traveling party.   [00:12:18.500] - Tamara Gruber Well, that's challenging. But you didn't have to make a reservation just in case.   [00:12:23.220] - Kim Tate No, I did not have to make a reservation. They just wanted to know what you would do. And I thought for some people who were going to Vancouver, I wondered if you could just put your home address in there and say, hey, I just turn around and go right back home.   [00:12:35.540] - Tamara Gruber Right.   [00:12:36.050] - Kim Tate But I don't know if the US. So that was the other. So then we get to the other flip side of it, which was once. The reason we drove up separately is because we actually parked one car at the airport, and we were driving up to together to visit Paul's family. And then we were able to me and I flew back early on our own to at an airport and picked up the car and drove home because she had a camp that started the day. And normally we do that drive in two days.   [00:13:00.300] - Kim Tate It's a little long for a one day drive. So we had that experience when we were ready to cross back in the border, we went through the same again, very small border crossing, and it was closed off. And so I was a little worried because I was like, okay, I didn't check the hours. But it was like, 10:00 a.m.. I was like, sure, truly, it's open at 10:00 a.m.. Maybe it's a weekend. And there was a border patrol agent there and got out of his car and it was like, pull forward.   [00:13:25.670] - Kim Tate And I was like, okay. And I rolled down the line. I'm like, Is this crossing not open? And he's like, Well, the border has been closed since March of 2020. Don't you know that? And I was like, no we are Americans. And so he's like, sdo you have American passports? And I was like. Yes, here they are.   [00:13:42.030] - Kim Tate And so he looked at him and he took them. And I was like, we're just visiting my husband's family, my in laws. And we're just coming back home. And he's like, okay, and move the thing. And he's like, drive forward to the booth. So we drove forward. I went through the process. And that was so like, they didn't want to test. They didn't want anything. They were just like, welcome home. Then we went through.   [00:14:02.340] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was listening to the Miles to Go podcast. And he also recently had gone up to Canada, I think, to visit family. And apparently you don't need a test to come back into the US when you are at a land crossing. Yes, you only do for a flight. Which seems so odd. I don't know why you wouldn't just have the same rule. But did you know that ahead of time, I had you gotten tested, just in case.   [00:14:27.690] - Kim Tate When I recorded the previous podcast, I had mentioned that we were going to buy those Abbott Binax and just do a testing. But then I had two friends who had both crossed recently. One had been crossing regularly to visit her family, and then the other one had just gone up to visit his family. But both of them said they've never been. There's nothing with testing required when you're crossing at the land border. So we did not buy those Abbott tests. And we just took it at words at the word.   [00:14:56.040] - Kim Tate And sure enough, they did not ask for any kind of test. So interesting. Yeah, it is kind of interesting. I don't know how that works, but we're thankfully lucky enough that we didn't have to do that extra step and expense.   [00:15:07.050] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Glad everything worked out and that you have a family.   [00:15:10.620] - Kim Tate It was so nice. I'm so glad we went. And it was good to be around my, you know, one niece, she had a new baby. So we were able to see him. And it was great.   [00:15:22.310] - Tamara Gruber It was nice.   [00:15:23.400] - Kim Tate We went to West Edmonton Mall. So for those people are curious, we didn't do it. We did mostly just hang out with family. But we did go out to eat a couple of times. They had some patio seating. And with it being summer, it was actually really nice to be in Edmonton and we went to West Edmonton mall, and the girls got some back to school shopping done. And we happened to be during a big hockey tournament. So there's a bunch of kids playing. They have a big ice rink in the middle of their West Edmonton wall.   [00:15:53.520] - Tamara Gruber As they do in Edmonton.   [00:15:54.990] - Kim Tate Yeah, exactly. It's like, is anyone surprised that they have a big hockey rink? If anyone doesn't know West Edmonton mall, I used to be kind of the largest mall in North America, and it and Mall of America, which is in Minnesota. I think they used to go back and forth. I don't know who's the current reigning champion because they would add on and do different things. But anyways, while the girls were shopping, we kind of stood and watched the kids play a hockey tournament. And it was a fun, very Canadian that.   [00:16:27.300] - Kim Tate Yeah, it was. And we got Tim Hortons coffee. So Tim Bits, it was a very Canadian esque situation. My sister in law is actually a pilot, a small plane pilot. She's working up her. She just got commercial pilots, but she's working up her hours and stuff. But she took Paul and the girls up in her little four seater plane up for a flight one day. So that was another fun thing they got to do. And they loved that. It's neat. Yeah. I stayed on the ground.   [00:16:56.350] - Kim Tate I did not go.   [00:16:57.540] - Tamara Gruber I'd be in after my one experience with the glider plane. I'm okay on small planes.   [00:17:04.130] - Kim Tate I remember when you and I have that chance to go on the helicopter in Ireland.   [00:17:09.170] - Tamara Gruber And we both were like.   [00:17:10.250] - Kim Tate No, maybe not a good idea.   [00:17:11.750] - Tamara Gruber See the helicopter for me is more about the motion sickness.   [00:17:15.560] - Kim Tate Yeah, that's what I was worried about.   [00:17:17.180] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was little planes. I'm just not a fan of the little plane inside.   [00:17:20.680] - Kim Tate Yeah. For me, I was pretty sure that I just know I'm not a calm flyer. Like I have fear flying. I used to have it really bad. And then as I flew more, I've gotten over it. But turbulence and stuff is just a problem. But I also know on the smaller planes, the motion sickness would really get to me if I couldn't be looking out continually and stuff.   [00:17:42.110] - Tamara Gruber Especially when they're like, oh, let's Zoom in to see the scenery. I really enjoyed our float plane that we did in Alaska when we went to see the bears and stuff, but it was short. So I did get to the motion sickness wasn't too bad, but yeah, well, I was up right near the Canadian border. I thought of you.   [00:18:01.870] - Kim Tate Exactly. You didn't quite cross. Yeah. Had you considered it?   [00:18:04.910] Initially, I was tempted. But it's funny because a friend of mine met me in Buffalo, and I'll explain the trip in a minute. But she's from New Jersey, and she actually never had Tim Hortons, which here in New England. There are some Tim Hortons around okay. So it's not like a brand new thing, but she was like, oh, what is that? I've never heard of it. And we're like, what have you never heard? It's important. So anyway, we're very used to our Dunkin Donuts here.   [00:18:29.570] - Kim Tate And, yeah, that's something. I don't even know if I've ever had a Dunkin Donuts. I can't think if I ever have.   [00:18:37.360] - Tamara Gruber Well, you know, I'm not a coffee person, so I don't get into that hole to be all I can evaluate the Donuts.   [00:18:43.490] - Kim Tate Yeah, I have to say that Tim Hortons, I like Tim Hortons more than McDonald's, but that's about where the level is at. So for people who are wondering, it's not like, you know, in Seattle, I'm so spoiled because we have a coffee stand booth of, you know, like, small source coffees at every corner. So it's a little different. So it's definitely like, drive through coffee. So I don't know if I could compare honestly what Duncan ones versus McDonald's versus Tim Hortons. I don't know if I could do any justice to that in there.   [00:19:13.740] - Kim Tate Yeah, but, yeah, I want to hear all about because I know you went up to Buffalo to do a big foodie trail. So what was that like?   [00:19:20.150] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I had talked to the tourism board from Visit Buffalo back in January. So this is a trip that they hosted me on because what intrigued me about Buffalo is it kind of has some similarities to where I live here in Providence. They talked about a big revitalization of their waterfront, a good foodie scene, craft breweries, things like that. So I thought, you know what that sounds like a fun summer getaway summer or fall. I didn't really want to go up to Buffalo in the winter. And so they've put together this entire Upstate Eats trail.   [00:19:55.190] - Tamara Gruber So it's really more Western New York. You could hit Binghamton, which is down more like Upstate, but a little closer to where the Finger Lakes and then cut through the Finger Lakes up to Buffalo. What I did, though, since I'm coming from Rhode Island, is I went right across Interstate 90, and I stopped first in Syracuse and spent a night there, and then one night in Rochester and then three nights in Buffalo. So I got to experience three stops along the Upstate Eats Trail and kind of got to see the unique foods of that area, which I just have so much fun discovering what foods are really unique and special.   [00:20:34.050] - Tamara Gruber And sometimes it's just like a twist on something like a hot dog. But it's just the thing that they have up there. So I found that when I moved to Rhode Island, so many people that live in Rhode Island have lived there all their lives, and they may not recognize that these things are not everywhere. But when I moved to Rhode Island, I'm like, oh, there's so many very unique foods. And I remember writing a post about the must try foods in Rhode Island. So it's become my thing to really discover those unique foods that you only find in certain places.   [00:21:04.500] - Tamara Gruber And I found a lot of other things along the way because that area just has so much history between the suffrage movement, the Underground Railroad, just overall industrialism and stuff. There's just so much history to explore there, too. So there were a lot of places in between those cities that I wanted to stop at. That I didn't always have a chance to. So I did a few on the way back. I'm working on a whole blog post that I'll link to in our show notes when this comes out about the different stops along the way.   [00:21:35.150] - Tamara Gruber But, yeah, my first surprise was that when I got to Syracuse, they have a glacial Lake there. That is that beautiful color that you see, like in Canada. I'm like, wait, I didn't know that we had this in New York, but then Syracuse, downtown. Syracuse is big for the University, Syracuse University, but it has a good downtown. There's a lot of diversity there. I didn't have. I didn't get a chance to do some of the things I would have liked to have done because it was a Monday in museums and some other things were closed.   [00:22:08.220] - Tamara Gruber But it's also that area is because of the Great Lakes. You see so much distribution and things. So the Erie Canal was a huge deal in terms of getting goods from the Great Lakes down into other parts of the state. So they have an Erie Canal Museum. And there's also stops along the Underground Railroad. They're in Syracuse. So the thing that I got to do, of course, was eat. I asked people, where should I eat? And certain places always came up in Syracuse. It was dinosaur barbecue.   [00:22:44.720] - Tamara Gruber So it was just like a big, famous place for barbecue. Which is funny. I was actually in my grocery store yesterday, and I had to buy a barbecue sauce, and I saw that they have dinosaur barbecue sauce. I'm like, either I've never noticed that before or I just didn't know where it came from. Right.   [00:22:59.330] - Kim Tate Right. Yeah.   [00:23:00.260] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:23:01.080] - Kim Tate Like the sauce, right.   [00:23:02.610] - Tamara Gruber I didn't realize that that was a restaurant. So I did that. And then kind of just spent my time walking around town. And then in the evening, I went to they have a food hall.   [00:23:12.710] - Kim Tate I love those.   [00:23:13.800] - Tamara Gruber So this food Hall, Salt City Market, was right next to the hotel where I was staying at, which was like a Marriott, which was beautiful. It was an old historic hotel that had been renovated and changed into a Marriott. And the food hall had all kinds of different cuisine. I had, like, I think I got a Jamaican meat pie. And then they had another place they made, like, homemade, I think, a peach pie, different things. They had Vietnamese and Burmese and Cambodian. So tons of different cuisines that you could try and sample.   [00:23:44.870] - Tamara Gruber So that was the cool thing. I always like when I see these kind of interesting food experiences. Yeah. Definitely.   [00:23:51.200] - Kim Tate We were talking about that when I was in Irvine. It's neat because we get so stuck in kind of the standard stuff. And maybe when you're traveling far away, you think of it. But yeah, that's nice.   [00:24:00.980] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. And then in Rochester, I went up. Well, first I stopped like an Auburn, and I stopped the Harriet Tubman house and did a tour there, just trying to take in a little bit more of the history. I've been through this area a couple of times and stopped at a few historic sites. And we're trying to put it all together at some point that I've seen a lot of it and also in Auburn, and they have an equal rights. It's like a New York State equal rights center.   [00:24:24.520] - Tamara Gruber So it deals with women's rights, civil rights and LGBTQ rights. So it's like this whole kind of all of the luminaries within New York who have fought for equal rights of some type. So that was an interesting little stop, too. Then in Rochester, I went to a place called Bill Grays, and they're famous for their red hots. So the red hot and their white hot. So apparently it's like you're talking about.   [00:24:52.000] - Kim Tate Like, the candy, right? No.   [00:24:53.610] - Tamara Gruber Exactly.   [00:24:54.210] - Kim Tate Oh, sorry.   [00:24:55.140] - Tamara Gruber I'm talking about hot dogs. Okay.   [00:24:57.600] - Kim Tate Sorry.   [00:24:58.410] - Tamara Gruber It's confusing, right?   [00:25:00.280] - Kim Tate That's what I thought.   [00:25:01.210] - Tamara Gruber Too, when I saw the red hots listed. So there's just all these different hot dog joints. They use specific hot dogs that are produced there. And this particular place, Bill Grays, has a white one. So it's like a white hot dog. Kind of looks like a sausage or something or what. But it's not those bright red hot dogs that you've seen. And sometimes in Maine, those are just kind of crazy from outer space. Hot dogs. There's kind of like a regular hot dog or a white hot dog.   [00:25:31.170] - Tamara Gruber But they put a meat sauce and onion and a bunch of other stuff on it. I'm kind of used to usually and onions. Yeah. But it's not chilly. It's kind of close. So that's kind of what makes it unique, like, where you go. And I know how there's always like, oh, I like this one because they do something in their particular style. I think everyone develops a style that they like. So anyway, I try to wait one just to see what it was like. And it's fine.   [00:25:59.910] - Tamara Gruber So I did that. And then I was right on Lake Ontario there. So I took a little to walk on the Lake. And every time I'm on the Great Lakes, I'm just amazed by, of course, how big they are. But you and the beach also felt like it was a nice, soft sand beach. And this is actually really nice.   [00:26:15.840] - Kim Tate You know, that's an area I've never been to or discovered. So that's nice. I think it's I'm sure it feels like it's overlooked by a lot of people. But I'm sure there's a lot of people who know about it. Probably it's probably got a great tourism industry.   [00:26:29.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. But I don't think when you think of New York, you think generally, of course, New York City, you think maybe the catskills, the other index, the finger likes things that we've talked about. And I think this section of Western New York isn't thought of as a tourist destination unless it's Niagara. But I will say Buffalo is only like half an hour from Niagara Falls, so it's easy to add in a few days there and expand what you can do in that area. It's also there's a lot of great ice cream stand.   [00:26:59.900] - Tamara Gruber It's a lot of this kind of, like, fast casual types of food. It definitely brought my tum along, but it was fun to explore the different styles. But one thing that they have in Rochester that is just so cool is the Museum of Play. And I've heard about this for a long time. Everyone always says it's something you have to do when you go to Rochester. So even though I wasn't going with a kid, I was by myself. I still went to the Strong. It's the National Museum of Play, and it has this whole reading area where it's focused on different genre or characters from books.   [00:27:38.710] - Tamara Gruber And it's like an amazing children's Museum, but with a real focus on play. So there's an area where it has toys from different generations. There's a Toy Hall of Fame. So it kind of reminds me of a place that you and I went to in Kansas City.   [00:27:55.550] - Kim Tate Where in Kansas City.   [00:27:57.130] - Tamara Gruber Where you look back and you're like, oh, I remember light bright. Remember that. Remember all this kind of different toys? So there's, like, the nostalgia factor. But then there's also an area where there's a whole Sesame Street thing or like a movement thing where you're building paper airplanes and learning, trying to see how far you can make them fly. There's a Wegman, which is like the big grocery store chain up there. So it's like the little like you would go to at a children's Museum where you're pretending to shop and pretending to check out.   [00:28:27.820] - Tamara Gruber And I imagine if I lived up there, I would have had a membership and been taking my kid there all the time. So much fun. They had a whole butterfly garden. There were, like a pinball arcade, like another type of arcade, just so much to do. That's very interactive. You could easily spend hours and hours. They are you're with kids. So if you do make it to that area with kids, definitely check out the Strong Museum of Play and also downtown. There's this area called High Falls.   [00:28:59.080] - Tamara Gruber That is basically I think it's like a 90 foot waterfall in the middle of town. It's like one of these surprising things that you're in the middle of what feels like not industrial city. But you have a strong presence there of Kodak and some other large commercial buildings. And there's really interesting architecture downtown. So you don't really expect to see this big waterfall in town. There's a great bridge that you can walk and get a good view of it. It's right by the genes. Have you heard of Genesee Cremale?   [00:29:33.210] - Tamara Gruber Jenny Cream ale? Is that just like an East Coast thing?   [00:29:36.130] - Kim Tate But I was like.   [00:29:36.780] - Tamara Gruber I haven't heard it very much. I think what people's grandfather's drink, it's like an old cream ale. So it's like one of the breweries that's been around for a long time. But now they still produce that. But they also have more of, like a craft brewery side as well. So I actually had dinner there because it's kind of like the next generation of these original breweries. And I did not try the cream ale, but I tried some others, and those were pretty good. And the other thing that Rochester is really famous for is called a garbage plate.   [00:30:06.930] - Tamara Gruber So it's one of their famous dishes that was created. And I was feeling exactly. It was so funny. I was talking to the tourism in person, and she was saying like, yeah, some people are like, why would you want to advertise your city with something with garbage in the name? But at the same time, so many people search for that because they know that that's the thing to eat there. So it's like, where are you going to get the best garbage plate. So I went to the place that invented the garbage plate, which is like a total little hole in the wall kind of place.   [00:30:35.970] - Tamara Gruber But now everywhere you go for dinner, if it's a casual place has their version of the garbage plate. So they might call it the everything plate or something like that. But it is basically like a pile of French fries, a bunch bunch of macaroni salad, which is like a strange combination to begin with, topped with either like burgers or cheeseburgers or hot dogs without buns. And then on top of that, just like this meat sauce and onions and ketchup and mustard. And who knows what else?   [00:31:07.910] - Tamara Gruber I'm not even sure. So it's just like this pile of carbs and meat I just presented to you on a plate. It's pretty funny. I think it's the kind of thing where if you are looking for something after a late night, it would hit the spot. I was really surprised at the place that I went to that originated it closed at, like, six. I'm like, is this more like a two in the morning kind of thing to eat?   [00:31:31.730] - Kim Tate Maybe they need to open up a thing in Colorado or Seattle? I'm just kidding.   [00:31:42.760] - Tamara Gruber But it was good to experience that because it was something that everyone's like, you got to try the garbage plate.   [00:31:47.830] - Kim Tate Yeah, it sounds. I don't know.   [00:31:50.500] - Tamara Gruber Oh, well, I like fries. So fries.   [00:31:53.420] - Kim Tate I like fries, but are you talking about macaroni salad, like the creamy potato salad thing?   [00:32:00.080] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. I thought it was going to be like, Mac and cheese. Yeah. But it's like macaroni salad, like the mayonnaise based one. Yeah.I like macaroni salad, like on a picnic and stuff.   [00:32:13.160] - Tamara Gruber But, like, apart from the so it would not be good for the people that are like, I don't like my food touching.   [00:32:19.670] - Kim Tate Yeah. Exactly.   [00:32:20.800] - Tamara Gruber Definitely not good.   [00:32:21.680] - Kim Tate My husband is not one of those people. He would probably be if he ate meat. He would be all over it, I'm sure.   [00:32:29.170] - Tamara Gruber But it's something like if you go there, you have to try it. Try it.   [00:32:32.870] - Kim Tate No, that's awesome. I'm glad you tried it. So you could report back. I'm sure there's some people listening right now on this podcast. They're like, oh, yeah. I'm craving one right now.   [00:32:40.240] - Tamara Gruber And people were, like, telling me where to go to favorite was funny. Yeah. But then I drove from Rochester over to Buffalo, and Buffalo was definitely so fun. I mean, if you're looking for a place where there's a wide selection of food, it's not just Buffalo wings. There are 35 craft breweries, five distilleries. There's a ton of street art. They have all these different areas that they've developed along the river front that are being revitalized. There's history. So there's a lot to do there now pretty busy for our three days there.   [00:33:19.270] - Tamara Gruber So we had a great time. It's like a lot of what interests me. I think when you go to a place and luckily, the friend that met me, there was not somebody that travels a lot, but she was really happy to have discovered something that she would have never thought to go to. And I was like, That's what I love to do. And she's like, Well, I need to travel with you more often. I'm like, yeah, come along.   [00:33:40.060] - Tamara Gruber So it was fun. But a couple of things that I'll call out. So we stayed at the downtown Marriott in Buffalo, which is a rate in the Canal Side District. So this is an area that has different boat tours going out from. We took one called the Buffalo River History Tour, and there's also one that go out more onto Lake Erie. And you can also rent kayaks and paddle boards and even those water bikes if you just want to explore the river front on your own. So you can do all of that rate in this Canal Side district.   [00:34:14.370] - Tamara Gruber And there's also a naval or more of a military ships park there. So if you like to climb onto an old naval ships and submarine, that kind of thing. So that would be a fun thing to do, I think, with kids as well. And it's just an area where they have, like, a carousel. And there's a little beer garden, and they do a lot of outdoor events. So they would do music there. I know the day that we were checking out, I look down from our hotel room and you could see this big lawn.   [00:34:42.550] - Tamara Gruber And there was a big yoga class taking place out there because it's very community driven to have a lot of entertainment, like free entertainment available for people as well. So that's one area there's this other area called River Works, which was about a mile from where we were staying. But we walked because it was pretty easy. And there they actually they're building out more of a whole entertainment center or district. I should say they have a couple of ice or roller banks, so they will do curling, their ice hockey, roller Derby.   [00:35:18.610] - Tamara Gruber They have a ropes course. There's a couple of bars there's a brewery, there's a Tiki bar. There's one of those floating Tiki bars that leaves from there as well. And what they're building right now is like a Ferris wheel. And then they're going to have zip lining between grain silos and some other rides and entertainment there. So it's going to be like this whole district. There's quite a bit of it. They are already and you can tell that they do concerts because the inside of the one restaurant was huge and clearly had a stage where they would have live entertainment.   [00:35:52.540] - Tamara Gruber So definitely like a fun place there. And another section that's being developed. It's called Silo City. So one of the things that Buffalo is really famous for is all these green silos, because their position on the Great Lakes, like corn and wheat would come in from the Midwest. And then they would put it onto trains or into the canals or whatever. And they would also process some of it there. They're actually still a General Mills plant there. And so when you're going by, it smells like Cheerios.   [00:36:26.580] - Kim Tate That's funny.   [00:36:27.570] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So like Cheerios or I don't know, something very sweet, because what's the one with the little leprechun, Lucky Charms, because they have a mural right next to the plants with those two things on it. So I'm like, really, it makes you hungry when you're near there that they have the largest collection of green silos in one area in the world. But a lot of them are abandoned now. And so when you go along the river front, you learn about this history. You see all these big old structures, but they're like, prime real estate for developing into different kinds of things.   [00:37:01.820] - Tamara Gruber So some of them this area of Silo City, they're into, like, lofts. And so that will be like part residential, part commercial. And they have an entertainment space and some of them or they will do, like art exhibits or poetry readings or live music, something like that. And we went to one of the bar. Well, there's 1 bar that's there as well called Duende, and we went good cocktails, local craft beer. And they had live music playing outside or just like a very cool settings. So there's a lot of these cool little places, you know, when you're just walking somewhere and you're like, oh, this is neat.   [00:37:40.820] - Tamara Gruber This is cool. This is not chain restaurants or overly busy, overly commercial. It has this nice modern vibe to it. And so we took a walking tour one day, and we met at one of the breweries called Resurgence Brewery. And again, that was a really cool space that felt like it was probably an industrial building and that's been transformed into this brewery. And that's something that we see here in Providence a lot, too. And great beer. So it was a lot of fun. And we definitely did a range of things for the food scene.   [00:38:16.420] - Tamara Gruber We went to Ted's Hot Dogs, which is famous for their spicy meat sauce that they put on their hot dog, of course, went to Anchor Bar because Buffalo wings were invented there. Okay.   [00:38:28.330] - Kim Tate I never knew. I figured it's funny how that becomes such a thing. Are you a Buffalo Wings fan to start with?   [00:38:37.160] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I love buffalo wings but I like them crispy with a lot of sauce.   [00:38:44.110] - Kim Tate I don't like the skin to be kind of rubbery. No, I like it crispy. And I also like lots of sauce. It's tricky finding those, because so often I find that they're not fried enough.   [00:38:57.580] - Tamara Gruber I agree. And I actually will say I Anchor Bar not my favorite wings that I've ever had, but it's definitely a tourist attraction. It's the kind of thing where you can buy swag from the T shirts and all that. And it's like a food challenge.   [00:39:10.850] - Kim Tate Like you have to eat a plate of wings to earn a shirt or something.   [00:39:13.750] - Tamara Gruber All the locals are, like, the only people that go to Anchor Bar, the tourist.   [00:39:18.380] - Kim Tate But fine.   [00:39:19.130] - Tamara Gruber They have a good business for that. Everyone has their own favorites, and they also have Buffalo style pizza. They have something called sponge candy, which I remember when I was told about it. I expect it to be like those marshmallowy kind of candies that you get in a sampler box. But it's not. It's actually like the circus peanuts kind of. And I wonder if it was going to be like that, too, but it's actually more of like a coffee, like a square, like an inch square crunchy butter crunch or coffee type of candy.   [00:39:51.880] - Kim Tate So I'm near bubbles in it. That's where it's sponge.   [00:39:55.240] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. And actually, what we found out was if you just leave it out when it's not sealed, then it I get spongy. It was not as crispy the second day. Yeah, it wasn't, again, my favorite, but it was interesting to seek it out. And it's just one of those things that you see everywhere, and people just don't understand that you don't know what sponge candy is.   [00:40:15.440] - Kim Tate Yeah. That's funny.   [00:40:16.850] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it was fun just exploring all of that. I would definitely recommend it if you enjoy the kind of things that I talked about, then give it a shot. Actually, I was looking into flying there, and I think they have direct flights from 20 different cities across the country, so maybe easier to get to than you might expect.   [00:40:38.980] - Kim Tate That sounds cool. It sounds like you had a lot of good experiences.   [00:40:41.870] - Tamara Gruber We did, and I got to hang out with a friend of mine that I used to be very close to. That just don't get to see very much anymore. So that was nice as well. The other thing we did was we visited one of the Frank Lloyd Wright houses.   [00:40:53.960] - Kim Tate Oh, yeah. I saw that.   [00:40:55.130] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:40:55.630] - Kim Tate That's the one architect I knew. And you were like, which architect? Yes.   [00:41:00.260] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Exactly. I know it's pretty easy between his style and the fact that he is probably the most famous architect. It's an easy guess, right?   [00:41:08.980] - Kim Tate Exactly. Well, it sounds like we both had kind of a nice little end to our summer, and you got to eat some good food. I got some good family time. And now, as we mentioned earlier, cross our fingers that we will see each other in person in October.   [00:41:24.520] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. We will let you guys know so you can follow along. Yeah. Otherwise, good luck with back to school shall even mention that that are going back to school.   [00:41:33.890] - Kim Tate Should you even mention what?   [00:41:35.330] - Tamara Gruber That we both have seniors?   [00:41:38.320] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:41:38.540] - Tamara Gruber I know.   [00:41:40.330] - Kim Tate For those of you who know that we are in the stressful College application time frame of our lives right now, right?   [00:41:49.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Well, especially for me. It's like the last is the last that it's like.   [00:41:55.330] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:41:55.960] - Tamara Gruber The thing of having only one is that it's your first and last at the same time.   [00:42:00.130] - Kim Tate Right? I guess for me, it's also the first one. I feel kind of guilty because my first one's kind of mad that she didn't know more advance. And so she's telling her little sister everything and making me feel really bad. Why didn't you have me take more AP classes?   [00:42:15.740] - Tamara Gruber I'm like. I don't know. So anyways, well, I'm pretty sure if you were, like, take all of these AP classes, she would have said, I don't want to take all these AP classes.   [00:42:27.260] - Kim Tate Well, it's just weird. It's sad how competitive it's gotten because she doesn't love history and routine, so I would never push her into those APS. So she took all the APS she could with math and science. But when you're going against people who've had seven and ten APS, it's a little hard to show up before, but she's a great student, and I'm sure she's going to end up where she's supposed to end up and have a great College experience.   [00:42:54.170] - Tamara Gruber I and Hannah will tell her she's better off that she didn't take a push because it's not really fun class.   [00:43:01.900] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:43:02.200] - Tamara Gruber Exactly. Yeah. So anyway, best of luck to everyone out there this year, back to school because obviously continues to be challenging.   [00:43:12.660] - Kim Tate Those who are going back to school. Enjoy your travels. I'm on your time not having to manage it, but, yeah. Thanks for joining us again. And we will look forward to talking to you guys again.   [00:43:23.260] - Tamara Gruber Soon. Take care.  

JUST THE TIP-STERS
208. Looks Like It's Good To Volunteer - The Missing Persons Cases Of Dane Elkins, John Stivers And Ron Brown

JUST THE TIP-STERS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 60:38


Over the course of these first three-and-a-half seasons of this podcast, Melissa has been presented with a wide array of missing persons cases from Tip-Sters from around the world.  Melissa has followed up, done her research, and presented many of them as episodes.  The inspiration for “Just The Tip-Sters” itself was inspired by Melissa's deep devotion to solving the 2017 disappearance of Will Cierzan – an ongoing mission that could be culminating soon with the trial of Will's nephew Daniel.  But hovering over every such case are questions – about the nature of the case itself – and how to actually help when help is needed.  What makes one missing persons case more compelling or worthy of attention than another?  How can one tell if a reported vanishing is evidence of wrongdoing or someone walking away from their life or a hoax?  And if one is motivated to help the family and friends of a missing person, how does one do so without getting in the way or actually hindering the investigation?  And what, in fact, are one's motivations to help in the first place?  In this episode Melissa touches on all of the above by focusing on three recent missing persons cases – two of which are now closed (with the missing persons in question now known to be alive and well) and one of which is still open (with the missing person still missing and actively being sought)…  Dane Elkins, a 23-time world champion professional racquetball player, disappeared in mid-December 2020 after visiting friends in Northern California.  His brand-new car – with four flat tires and his wallet and cell phone inside – was found abandoned near a rural exit off Interstate 5 between Bakersfield and Los Angeles.  All indications are that the then-21 year-old had become delusional and paranoid for reasons that are still unclear.  His family believes he has gone “off the grid” and is slowly working his way up to Oregon – and is seeking help from anyone who thinks they've spotted him.  John Stivers is the owner of an RV campground and marina in Jamestown, California in tiny Tuolumne County.  On August 2, 2021 Stivers left his wife and daughter to run some errands and did not return.  His van was found abandoned on a nearby road.  Local residents, friends and family rushed to social media to find him – and started a GoFundMe account that raised nearly $20,000 to help the family conduct the search.  On September 4, 2021, just over one month since his disappearance, the Tuolumne County Sheriff's Office issued a statement that Stivers was located;  that he has been removed from the missing person database; that foul play was not indicated; and that all other information will remain confidential.  As word has spread, outrage by some of the volunteers who helped search for him has grown – many believing that the entire case was a fraud, and that they are owed payback for the time they devoted in the search.  Others – Melissa being one – believe that sometimes people just walk away from their lives – for whatever reason – and that if one volunteers to help find someone before anything else is known, that should be the end of the discussion – that volunteering means letting go of pride or any sense of being “owed.”  Ron Brown, a 62 year-old resident of the small mountain community of Sierra Madre in Southern California, is a part-time golf instructor and longtime server at a well-known high end restaurant in next-door Pasadena.  He went missing on August 9, 2021 after his car was found – engine running – in the parking lot of a Pasadena fast-food restaurant.  Melissa relates her personal investment in getting involved in the search for Brown – the frustration of a day in the field – and the joy she felt when she learned, just after arriving home from the field trip, that Brown had been found alive and well.  All three of these cases demonstrate the varying but equally important considerations that must be taken when getting involved in missing persons cases.  Melissa doesn't hold back on her opinions – and she also offers kudos to those who are helping find the missing – and some helpful hints from her own experience on how to be prepared when going into the field to help search.  During her search for Ron Brown, Melissa discovered the AWARE Foundation – a Virginia-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit made up completely of volunteers dedicated to locating those who have gone missing, wherever their help is needed.  AWARE can be contacted by phone at (540) 357-5135.

Proven and Probable
Lakewood Exploration - Silver Strand 43-101, Exploration, Adds 2 Silver Projects in Nevada

Proven and Probable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 9:44


Joining us for a conversation is Morgan Lekstrom the CEO of Lakewood Exploration, which on track to become the next pure silver play in the United States. In today's interview Mr. Lekstrom will discuss the latest update on pending NI43-101 on the flagship Silver Strand, along with current exploration successes, and the new additions to the property bank, both located in the prolific Hamilton District of Nevada, which are the Eliza Silver Project and Silverton Silver Mine, and we will conclude with pending catalysts. Lakewood Exploration is one of the junior mining stocks that we see having a lot of blue sky potential. Please share this video: https://provenandprobable.com/lakewood-exploration-silver-strand-43-101-exploration-adds-2-silver-projects-in-nevada/ Lakewood Exploration | CSE: LWD | Website: https://lakewoodexploration.com/ Silver Strand: https://lakewoodexploration.com/silver-strand/ Corporate Presentation: http://lakewoodexploration.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/Lakewood-Exploration-Investor-Presentation-August-2021-FINAL-.pdf Twitter: https://twitter.com/silverhmr Contact: 604.908.1695 Lakewood Exploration is focused on building a multi mine silver production company. Its growing asset portfolio includes the recently acquired past-producing Silver Strand and Burnt Cabin mines located in the renowned Coeur d'Alene mining district in Idaho, USA, one of the most prolific silver districts in the world and the earlier stage Lacy Gold-Silver project in British Columbia, Canada. The Silver Strand Project - The Silver Strand Mine has a 5.5km strike length in the Coeur d' Alene mining district in Idaho. - Located in North Idaho's Silver Valley along Interstate 90. - The district is known for its depth potential with numerous deposits and has produced over 1.2 billion ounces of silver. Lakewood Exploration is partner and we are shareholders. Website| www.provenandprobable.com Call me directly at 855.505.1900 or email: Maurice@MilesFranklin.com Precious Metals FAQ - https://www.milesfranklin.com/faq-mau...​ Proven and Probable Where we deliver Mining Insights & Bullion Sales. I'm a licensed broker for Miles Franklin Precious Metals Investments (https://www.milesfranklin.com/contact/​) Where we provide unlimited options to expand your precious metals portfolio, from physical delivery, offshore depositories, and precious metals IRA's. Call me directly at (855) 505-1900 or you may email maurice@milesfranklin.com. Proven and Probable provides insights on mining companies, junior miners, gold mining stocks, uranium, silver, platinum, zinc & copper mining stocks, silver and gold bullion in Canada, the US, Australia, and beyond. We cannot confirm if Eric Sprott or Rick Rule are shareholders.

Here Come the Sequels
257 - Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers

Here Come the Sequels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


Tyler, Alex, and Briton welcome Michael Myers back with open arms and open hearts.Find us on iTunes and Spotify, online at herecomethesequels.blogspot.com, through email at herecomethesequels@gmail.com, and on Twitter at HCTSequels. Here Come the Sequels · 257 - Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Some interstates still closed as of Tuesday afternoon

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 7:56


Scoot talks to Louisiana State Police PIO Melissa Matey about the condition of South Louisiana's roadways See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1189: GM Bolt Owners Get More Range Via Recall | 30 August 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 21:18


Show #1195. If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 30th August. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. GM CHEVY BOLT EV BATTERY FIX COULD BRING MORE RANGE - Owners of 2017-2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV models have had to contend with a reduced driving range for many months, as GM attempted to find a remedy for a battery related fire issue that culminated with a plan to replace all battery modules. - Now GM has confirmed that it's stepping up by offering a significant range boost for those earlier Bolt EVs.  In a communication to some owners sent over the weekend—spotted by friends of Green Car Reports—the automaker emphasized that the all-new lithium-ion battery modules installed in older Bolt EVs will offer “GM's most advanced Bolt chemistry.” - Their pending 8-percent boost in battery capacity is described as “resulting in a range improvement in equivalent driving conditions,” and includes a new 8-year/100,000-mile limited parts warranty covering the battery after the module replacement. - Think of it this way: It's not unusual to see 10 percent battery degradation after a few years of EV ownership. Now for the inconvenience, any range drop will be erased, and they'll likely be getting more range than the cars did when new. For a company that's depending on the reputation of its upcoming Ultium EVs for a decade of growth, that sounds like a smart move. Original Source : https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1133416_gm-chevy-bolt-ev-battery-fix-could-bring-many-owners-more-range-than-they-originally-had CHINESE BATTERY MAKER SAYS IT'S READY TO PRODUCE COBALT-FREE EV BATTERIES - one problem with most electric vehicles: they depend on lithium-ion batteries made with heavy metals like cobalt - A Chinese company called SVOLT claims it's ready to start producing a cobalt-free battery at scale. At the Chengdu Motor Show, the firm showed off an 82.5KWh capacity power pack inside a vehicle from Chinese automaker Great Wall Motors. Under normal temperatures, SVOLT says its battery can deliver approximately 373 miles of range on a single charge and allow a car to accelerate from zero to 60 miles per hour in under five seconds. Original Source : https://www.engadget.com/svolt-colbalt-free-battery-scale-production-234534595.html SVOLT UNVEILS COBALT-FREE BATTERY, CLAIMING FIRST COMPANY TO REACH 'SERIES PRODUCTION' - The company currently employs nearly 3,000 people worldwide, half of whom work in research and development (R&D). In fact, SVOLT has shared that over the past several years, it has dedicated 1,200 R&D personnel to cobalt-free batteries alone. - According to a press release from SVOLT, the manufacturer unveiled what it calls “the world's first cobalt-free battery pack to reach series production.” - However, while SVOLT should be recognized for bringing its EV pack to production, it's tough to justify its claim as the first. For example, Tesla removed cobalt from its lithium-iron-phosphate (LFP) batteries last year for the Standard Range Model 3 in China alongside CATL. Panasonic was also developing similar techniques alongside Tesla earlier this year. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2021/08/30/svolt-unveils-cobalt-free-battery-claiming-first-company-to-reach-series-production/ ANOTHER TESLA REPORTEDLY USING AUTOPILOT HITS A PARKED POLICE CAR - Another Tesla has hit an emergency vehicle, apparently while using the Autopilot driver-assist feature, adding to a problem that is already the subject of a federal safety probe. - The Florida Highway Patrol reported the accident just before 5 in the morning Saturday along Interstate 4 in Orlando. No one was seriously injured in the crash, though the Tesla did narrowly miss hitting a state trooper as he left his car to assist another driver who had broken down on the highway. - "The driver stated that [the Tesla] was in Autopilot mode," said the report from the Florida Highway Patrol. Original Source : https://edition.cnn.com/2021/08/30/business/tesla-crash-police-car/index.html THE PLYBERTRUCK IS A TESLA CYBERTRUCK REPLICA MADE WITH WOODEN PANELS - since its unveiling in 2019, the tesla cybertruck has racked up a lot of interest with creatives around the world continuously dreaming up new iterations of the vehicle. with production pushed to 2022, the longing to have one has increased significantly among fans, inciting them to create their own version of the long-awaited truck. such is the case of the plybertruck, a cybertruck replica that ditches the car's stainless steel body and replaces it with wood. - the plybertruck by CJ cromwell was created to participate in the gambler 500 rally - under the plybertruck's wooden body there's a first-generation acura MDX, as reported by carscoops. ‘so while it's obviously not electric like the real cybertruck, we have no doubt that it met the $500 purchase cost cap,' Original Source : https://www.designboom.com/technology/plybertruck-cybertruck-wooden-panels-08-30-2021/ BIPARTISAN TEXAS LAW SMOOTHS THE PATH TOWARD A MORE VIBRANT EV MARKET - On September 1, a bill that helps businesses build a better, brighter future for electric vehicles in Texas will become state law. - SB 1202, makes it possible for companies or individuals that own or operate equipment used solely for electric vehicle charging services to avoid being regulated as electric utilities or electric retail providers. - Electric vehicle charging stations are different. EV owners are not reliant on any particular stand-alone charging station; they use any given charging station and have no further relationship with it after they depart. Any regulatory framework for charging stations should be tailored to what Texas regulators and drivers want from the nascent charging marketplace. - The new law will help ease Texas EV owners' worries about long distance travel — one of the most common barriers to EV ownership. Without the possibility of utility-style regulation, EV charging companies can now develop charging stations more quickly and extensively. Original Source : https://blogs.edf.org/energyexchange/2021/08/30/bipartisan-texas-law-smooths-the-path-toward-a-more-vibrant-ev-market/ IDEANOMICS TO BUY EV FLEET MAKER VIA MOTORS IN $450M ALL-STOCK DEAL - Ideanomics, a fintech and electric mobility firm based in New York, has added to its list of acquisitions: commercial electric vehicle manufacturer Via Motors (in an all-stock deal valued at $450 million). - Ideanomics has been aggressively purchasing mobility businesses this year, as it seeks to build out vertically integrated offerings for fleet operators and transit authorities transitioning to electric vehicles. - This year alone, Ideanomics has completed acquisitions of US Hybrid, a manufacturer of electric powertrain components and fuel cell engines; EV tractor maker Solectrac, which builds the only American-made electric tractor; Utah-based wireless charging company Wave - Via designs and manufacturers electric vans and trucks for short- and middle-mile delivery, using a modular, “skateboard” style architecture across three vehicle models. Original Source : https://techcrunch.com/2021/08/30/ideanomics-to-buy-ev-fleet-maker-via-motors-in-450m-all-stock-deal/ AUDI MAKING ROADS SAFER WITH DEPLOYMENT OF C-V2X TECH - Audi's use of cellular vehicle-to-everything technology (C-V2X), which was announced in April and has now been tested in Alpharetta, Georgia - C-V2X works by utilizing 4G LTE or 5G cellular networks, thereby transmitting wireless signals between cars, pedestrians' mobile devices, and objects like traffic lights. This way, a vehicle can obtain information about its surroundings and feed the driver with warnings to slow down if, for example, they entered a school zone. - Audi worked with Qualcomm, a wireless technology company, and Commsignia, a software systems provider, to test C-V2X tech in a 2021 Audi e-tron Sportback. Original Source : https://carbuzz.com/news/audi-making-roads-safer-with-deployment-of-c-v2x-tech AUDI CEO SEES BETTER ODDS OF U.S. PRODUCTION AS VW GROUP ELECTRIFIES - Audi's chances of building vehicles in the U.S. are rising as parent Volkswagen Group electrifies its lineup, the premium brand's CEO, Markus Duesmann, said. VW Group's strategy to bring down the cost of electric vehicles involves developing common platforms to underpin models across its many brands to conserve costs. - Since these architectures will be used all over the world, "the potential to put an Audi car, production-wise, into the U.S. is even higher than now," Duesmann said Friday on Bloomberg Television. "The likelihood of us producing in the U.S. is there." - Last month, CEO Herbert Diess told Bloomberg TV that the company will decide this quarter on building more electric models in the country. Original Source : https://europe.autonews.com/automakers/audi-ceo-sees-better-odds-us-production-vw-group-electrifies DS AUTOMOBILES TO BECOME A PURE-ELECTRIC BRAND FROM 2024 ONWARDS Original Source : https://electriccarsreport.com/2021/08/ds-automobiles-to-become-a-pure-electric-brand-from-2024-onwards/ ELECTRIC CAR BEATS HYDROGEN: VOLKSWAGEN EXPLAINS Original Source : https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/auto/cars/electricity-beats-hydrogen-volkswagen-explains-favouring-latter-again/articleshow/85764547.cms QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM As cars like the IONIQ 5 and trucks like the Ford F-150 Lighting arrive being able to draw power from the traction battery, what will you power from your EV in the future? Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Interstates & Heartbreak
63. For Better…and For Worse

Interstates & Heartbreak

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 111:40


David Zeff opens up about dating after divorce in arguably the most vulnerable Interstates & Heartbreak episode to-date. He outlines the journey of his last relationship- from first Tinder swipe, to "I do," to eventually parting ways. We're left pondering questions around closure, and David's romantic future. For tongue-in-cheek interpretations of men's dating profiles as told by my inner Carrie: https://www.instagram.com/interstatesandheartbreak/ . For (slightly) deeper insights into my philosophies on dating and relationships: https://interstatesandheartbreak.com/ . To email any thoughts, questions, or business inquiries: interstatesandheartbreak@gmail.com . For a glimpse into my life when I'm not talking about dating: https://www.instagram.com/lesliegnope .

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] A Reply to the Texas District Paper on Internet Communion — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 27:17


A Reply to the Texas District Paper on Internet Communion Here is the video of the recent three-martini Texas District convention. Someone shared this with me as a chance to respond to the “Bible Study” that begins at roughly 1:09 and ends at 2:04. The official title is “The Church in a Post-Covid World,” but that's not really what it is about. It is, in fact, an advocacy and apologia for “internet communion.” The presenter is the Rev. Zach McIntosh of Concordia Lutheran Church in San Antonio. He seems like a nice, bright guy. And I have to say that I like the fact that he's a McIntosh. His Highlander ancestors probably fought with mine in the wars of Scottish independence with a confederation known as the Clan of Cats. I have to give him props for that, especially as we Celts are dreadfully outnumbered by Germans in our synod. Having said that, the cuisine in Texas and Louisiana beat anything cooked up by Scots or Germans. That said, I have to give him a demerit for lecturing about Holy Communion (part of his argument for internet communion is the profound importance of the Holy Sacrament) given that his congregation only celebrates it on the first Sunday of the month. I cannot even grasp it. Not counting holidays, that's twelve times a year. That sounds like starvation rations to me. My little congregation offers the Holy Sacrament more than a hundred times a year. Perhaps Pastor McIntosh can give a presentation to his own congregation on Article 24 and the importance of the Holy Eucharist and its frequent reception. I notice that other advocates of home-internet communion tend to be pastors of churches that practice infrequent communion. I have no explanation for this. All that said, Pastor McIntosh is open and honest that this is indeed a position paper more than a Bible Study. He presents it based on four “theses.” A thesis is part of an argument. And during the course of his talk, he openly admits that the real question behind the paper, that is the real thesis statement is: “Is it possible for a local church to rightly participate together in a livestreamed Word and Sacrament service while remaining in their individual homes?” And he is open about his answer: Yes, he is “sympathetic” to the idea of a livestreamed “Word and Sacrament” service. He also admits that the service of the Word is not really problematic, but the service of the Sacrament is the actual controversial issue. And that it is. His four theses are: The Church is Invisible. The Church is Confessional. The Church is Inter-Spatial. The Church is Fraternal.   The Church is Invisible This is really nothing more than the assertion that faith is invisible. He cites Eph 5:33, AC 7&8, he quotes Luther using the term “invisible,” and cites 1 Cor 6:19 and 1 Pet 2:5. The Church is Confessional He explains the development of the ecumenical creeds and the Lutheran confessions. He argues that although the Bible, Creeds, and Confessions never address remote electronic worship, we can use these resources to discern whether we should or should not make use of such technology. One statement that he makes is “There was no Mass when the New Testament was written.” This is simply untrue. Jesus established the Lord's Supper “on the night when He was betrayed.” St. Paul, in 1 Cor 11, explains that the Words of Institution were already a tradition that was handed over to him when he was writing the letter in about 55 AD. Indeed, the Sacrament of the Altar was being celebrated by the apostles on a weekly basis very early on, according to Acts 2:42, when none of the New Testament had even yet been written. Pastor McIntosh refers to this very verse later on. This thesis that “The Church is Confessional” is really just a premise to use the confessions to make arguments regarding administration of the Sacrament. For some reason, he omitted the longest treatment of the Divine Service and Holy Communion in the Book of Concord: Article 24 in the Augsburg Confession and the Apology. The Church is Inter-Spatial This is where the rubber meets the road, as they used to say in Akron, Ohio. This word “inter-spatial” is a neologism coined by the presenter just to make the obvious point that the Church is both universal and local. He addresses the universality of the Church by appealing to the Una Sancta of the Nicene Creed. More accurately, the Church is “catholic.” The word “Universal” is a weak translation of καθολικός, which comes from two words: κατά (kata - according to) and ὅλος (holos - the whole). Catholicity not only means that the Church is more than simply the local congregation, it means that the Church is una owing to a wholesomeness and fullness of doctrine. And it is ironic that he should appeal to the Church's catholicity to argue for communion celebrated by either laymen speaking the verba, or the remote words of a pastor who is not present for the consecration. This is as un-catholic as you can get. It is sectarian, as no historic communion that confesses the Real Presence ever had, or has, practiced this, or confessed a doctrine that allows it. Pastor McIntosh points out the both/and nature of the universality and the locality of the Church by comparing it to an interstate highway that is both within states, and crosses state lines. I think this illustration betrays him, as we are talking about roads that actually exist in space and time. You cannot be on Interstate-10 and not exist somewhere physically. If I'm in a Zoom session in Iowa, then I'm not on I-10. Roads are incarnational. The fact that the road is in California doesn't negate the fact that when I'm driving to Baton Rouge, I'm in Louisiana. He uses the term “ecclesiis sanctorum” from Jerome's Latin of 1 Cor 14:33. He translates this as “multiple churches with many holy ones.” “Sanctorum” is a genitive plural. It is better translated as “churches of the saints,” as does the ESV. Of course, there are multiple churches in the sense of local congregations, even as there is one holy catholic and apostolic Church (una sancta). This reality has nothing to do with internet communion. He tries to argue for internet communion based on Acts 4:42, 46-47 - “breaking bread in their homes.” Of course, prior to Constantine, nearly all Christian worship was conducted in homes. There is no indication that these services were lay-led, or that the pastors somehow conducted services from afar, perhaps by epistle or messenger or carrier pigeon. And local churches meet in homes to this very day, including parishes of our sister church body, the Siberian Evangelical Lutheran Church. I visited one such congregation in 2015, with a Divine Service held in a parishioner's apartment. But the Mass was officiated by ordained clergymen who drove a long way to lead the service. It would be unthinkable to our sister church body to conduct a Divine Service over Zoom, or to just have the laity speak the verba over bread and wine themselves - in spite of the reality that it takes a lot of time and money to physically travel. And it was the same way in the LCMS's frontier days. Pastor McIntosh cites Luther giving assent to meeting “alone in a house somewhere… to baptize and to receive the sacrament” (AE:53:63-64). But the larger context is not lay-led communion or allowing pastors to somehow consecrate from afar. This quotation comes from The German Mass and Order of Service (1526). In it, Luther identifies three types of “divine service or mass.” The first is the Evangelical Latin Mass, to be used in a parochial setting where the people speak Latin. The second is the German Mass, which is to be used for “untrained lay folk” who do not speak Latin. And then there is the “third kind of service,” which: should be a truly evangelical order and should not be held in a public place for all sorts of people. But those who want to be Christians in earnest and who profess the gospel with hand and mouth should sign their names and meet alone in a house somewhere to pray, to read, to baptize, to receive the sacrament, and to do other Christian works. According to this order, those who do not lead Christian lives should be known, reproved, corrected, cast out, or excommunicated, according to the rule of Christ, Matthew 18. Here one could also solicit benevolent gifts to be willingly given and distributed to the poor, according to St. Paul's example, II Corinthians 9. Here would be no need for much and elaborate singing. Here one could set up a brief and neat order for baptism and the sacrament and center everything on the Word, prayer, and love. Here one would need a good short catechism on the Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Our Father. Nowhere does Luther advocate lay-led or remotely-led clerical ministry of Sacraments. He is describing a house-church - obviously where there is no Evangelical parish church to attend. This was certainly the case in many places during the Reformation. Luther is describing what we would call today, a “church plant,” and avers that “the rules and regulations would soon be ready.” In fact, Luther goes on to say that church planting is not his particular thing, but “if I should be requested to do it, and could not refuse with a good conscience, I should gladly do my part and help as best I can.” He adds, “In the meanwhile, the two above-mentioned orders of service [i.e. the Latin and German parochial Masses] must suffice.” He also warns of the risks of such a church, that care should be taken lest it “turn into a sect.” Pastor McIntosh does finally admit the real crux of the problem: “There's not a pastor there.” So how does a pastor give care and oversight when he's not in the same room? He acknowledges the limits of pastoral care even in the same room, such as the pastor's inability to know about all people who should be excluded from the Christian congregation because of wickedness. He points to St. Paul's giving pastoral care remotely. And here, I think Pastor McIntosh sinks his own boat. Giving remote pastoral care is nothing new. But let's consider how technology has or has not been used. We have audio and video livestreaming today, but we have had the ability to send remote visual and audio images over the air since the 1940s. The LCMS was actually a pioneer in television programming. But no one in decades past, in the Golden Age of television, ever encouraged people at home in the viewing audience to put bread and wine on a TV tray while a televised pastor “teleconsecrated” the elements. There were services for shut-ins, but no suggestion of some kind of “private Mass” with “home communion” over the airwaves. And before TV, we had radio, the technology of which predates the 20th century. And yet not even during World War I and the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic was anyone suggesting the use of the pastor's transmitted radio voice to “teleconsecrate” remote elements. Before radio was the telephone. And even before the telephone, dating back to 1844, Samuel Morse found a way to encode words over telegraph lines. And again, not even in remote frontier locations did anyone even dream of having a pastor send a consecratory telegram or phone in the Words of Institution. And long before electronic communication, we had pen and ink technology and mail delivery. And this is where Pastor McIntosh defeats his own argument. St. Paul indeed provided pastoral care remotely by means of epistles. But not even in 1 Cor 11 does the apostle ask that the verba be read by a layman over bread and wine outside of the pastor's sight and control. Rather, Paul preaches the Word and gives catechetical instruction in writing. Baptisms and Eucharists were conducted by “elders” (presbyters) who were appointed for pastoral service in the local churches. The Church is Fraternal Pastor McIntosh's last thesis has nothing to do with the argument other than to try to prevent argument. He uses AC 26:44 “Diversity does not violate the unity of the Church” to argue that whether one uses internet communion or not, this doesn't affect our unity. He said, “False doctrine, yeah, that's a problem… but not every diverse practice is evidence of doctrinal disagreement.” And that is true. But it is equally true that not every expression of diversity is evidence of correct doctrine. He should not assume that internet communion is as indifferent as the color of the walls in the parish hall. We are dealing with the consecration of the elements. That is not a matter of “anything goes.” Contextually, Article 26 is dealing with diversity in fasting practices, not with consecrating the elements. This is a very different matter. In his conclusion, Pastor McIntosh says, “It's so important to continue to offer, whether it's in a cathedral or in a condo, the gifts of God to the people of God” [including] “the reception of the sacraments.” Yes, this is true. And parish pastors typically celebrate Masses in church buildings on Sundays, and often during the week at hospital beds for patients and at kitchen or living room tables for shut-ins. Yes, we do this both “in the cathedral and in the condo,” so to speak. But the point is that we pastors celebrate and consecrate, we preach, baptize, and absolve as circumstances dictate. We don't just tell the shut-ins to commune themselves. We don't just facetime them and say “magic words” while they hold the phone over bread and wine. That would be to treat the consecration as ex opere operato. Pastor McIntosh's presentation overlooks and omits all of the potential problems of remote consecration - assuming that it is even valid. But let's say that it is valid for the sake of argument. There are unintended consequences. For example, if I'm consecrating at the altar, and I misspeak a word, or get tongue-tied, I can simply repeat the verba. This is what celebrants are instructed to do based on the fact that we have been doing this for nearly two millennia, and stuff happens. But what happens if, unbeknownst to the remote celebrant, the Zoom transmission gets garbled, and the pastor's voice begins to sound like ET on Quaaludes? That happens all the time. So what then? What happens if only part of the verba are heard and the connection drops? What do we tell the viewing audience at home to do with the bread and wine? Are they, or are they not, the body and blood of Christ? It matters. It really does! And how can the pastor be a “steward of the mysteries” while he isn't there? The steward was an ancient office dedicated to table service. The steward could water down a diner's wine if he were getting inebriated, or even cut him off. That's because he is able to watch and listen and make changes based on feedback. Pastors do something similar when they officiate. They may need to consecrate more hosts, or break some in half. They may need to get stingy with the Lord's blood at the last table, or they may need to consecrate more. A theoretical remote communion separates the pastor from his vocation of stewardship. He cannot say what is being consecrated and what is not. In my practice, I count out how many hosts I need and only consecrate those in the paten on the corporal. The rest in the ciborium remain unconsecrated. I consecrate only the wine in the chalice, not every drop in the cruet. So I know what is the Lord's body and blood, and what is not. If I were not in the room, how would I do this? Is the wine in the glasses on the table the only ones consecrated? What about the bottle on the table? If there is a leftover piece of toast from breakfast on the table, is that now consecrated? These are not inconsequential questions. The Eucharist is not do-it-yourself project. Jesus established an office of steward. And how is the reliquiae taken care of afterwards? And if an accidental desecration happens, why should we put the burden on laymen, perhaps miles away, when we pastors are the stewards? And all of the above problems grant the assumption that remote consecration is possible, that this is a valid consecration. One glaring problem is that the pastor's voice never actually comes into contact with the elements. What comes out of a speaker is a simulation of the pastor's voice that fools your brain into thinking that it is his voice - not unlike the RCA Victor dog. In the same way, a Zoom image or a photograph is not actually the person, but is rather a simulation of that person that gives an appearance of that person's presence. Da Vinci's Last Supper is only a painting. It is not really Jesus and the apostles. I argue that because of this reality, it is physically impossible to consecrate the elements remotely. And even if it were possible, it would still open up a Pandora's Box of problems. And this is why we don't tear down Chesterton's Fence. This is why we don't do sectarian things. This is why catholicity is more than just “universality” in the sense that local manifestations of Church are to be found hither and yon. In times past, there have been wars, plagues, tyrannical rulers, and natural disasters that have impeded the ability of pastors to preach and administer Sacraments. We do what we can with our human limitations, and we accept those limitations as part of our humanity - the same humanity that our Lord Jesus Christ took on at His incarnation. Unlike the technocratic Klaus Schwabs of the world, we don't look to transcend those human limitations by means of turning ourselves into transhumanistic cyborgs. The Church is indeed invisible in the sense that faith is not seen by the naked eye. But the Church is also visible, as she gathers around a visible preacher even as faith comes by hearing, heard from someone preaching, one who has been sent (Romans 10). The Church is visible as the administration of the Sacraments is visible, as real, physical bread and wine and water occupy space and time, and we experience them with our bodies by means of our senses. Pastor McIntosh only spoke of the invisible Church, not the visible Church. We must consider both halves of the paradox to get the full picture. The Church is indeed confessional, and our confessions address the question of who is charged with consecrating the elements (AC 14) and how that is to be done (AC 24, Ap 24). The Church is both local and trans-local - as evidenced by the fact that instead of a single temple, we have altars all over the world with the miraculous presence of God resting on them. And Holy Communion is not called “the Sacrament of the Altar” by our confessions for nothing. The elements are consecrated by the Word by means of one authorized to proclaim that Word - not just any person, and not by a simulacrum of a pastor's voice. And indeed, the Church is fraternal. It is an act of fratricide to introduce a divisive, sectarian, ahistorical practice in the Church that leaves people in doubt and scandalized, not to mention leaving behind a host of other chaotic consequences in its wake. At the conclusion of Pastor McIntosh's “Bible Study,” President Newman pointed out that there just so happened to be resolutions pertaining to internet communion yet to be voted on by the body, and that the CTCR and seminary faculties have already weighed in. And to my knowledge, none of them agree with Pastor McIntosh and President Newman that this practice should be done in our churches. Hopefully, this whole uproar about internet communion will be nothing more than an eyebrow-raising little episode in LCMS history that future generations will find quaint when they read about the synod's 21st century history. And in the short term, I hope that our synod will find some way, even with our convoluted polity, to enforce biblical, confessional, and catholic doctrine and practice, and facilitate the restoration of a genuine Eucharistic piety and of yearning for its frequent reception in our churches, an ethos that would make internet communion - not to mention the practice of churches withholding the Sacrament of the Altar for three weeks out of the month - unthinkable.

FAQ City
Is Anyone Really Fooled By Those Cell Tower Trees In Charlotte?

FAQ City

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 11:07


There's something awfully suspicious about that pine tree off the side of Interstate 485 in Charlotte. What is it? And why are there more like it?

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1182: IONIQ 5 Dethrones Tesla Model 3 In Safety Tests | 17 August 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 19:54


Show #1182. If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Tuesday 17th August. It's  Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. AUDI BRINGS E-TRON S THREE-MOTOR ELECTRIC SUV TO THE US STARTING AT $84,800 - Audi is bringing the e-tron S and e-tron S Sportback, its three-motor electric SUV, to the US, starting at $84,800. - The German automaker launched the vehicle last year as “the first electric cars worldwide with three motors in mass production“: - The three electric motors, two of which are located on the rear axle, together provide 370 kW of boost power and 973 Nm (717.6 lb-ft) of torque. This allows the two purely electrically driven models to accelerate to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 4.5 seconds - Nearly two inches wider than the e-tron and e-tron Sportback models, the e-tron S is the only Audi “S” model with wider bodywork than the standard model. - The EPA-estimated range with the standard wheel/tire package is expected to be 208 miles for e-tron S and 212 miles for the e-tron Sportback S. It's going to start just under $85,000. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2021/08/17/audi-e-tron-s-three-motor-electric-suv-us-starting-84800 FORT WORTH OFFERS OVER $400 MILLION TAX BREAK TO ATTRACT ELECTRIC VEHICLE MANUFACTURER - The City of Fort Worth is currently in negotiations to bring Rivian, an American electric vehicle manufacturer, to the city. - The competitive process to woo Rivian to Fort Worth involves a 2,000-acre site location upon which up to 12 million square feet of buildings will be located. The currently proposed site would be 12 miles from downtown Fort Worth and south of Interstate 20. According to the city, the project would generate 1,875 jobs by the end of 2025 and over 7,500 jobs by the end of 2027 with minimum average annual salaries of $56,000. - Fort Worth is offering tax abatements and grants that will be capped at $440,000,000. One incentive is a 15-year economic development program agreement grant which would reduce the company's tax burden by 85 percent of the taxes on real and business personal property. - the city plans to nominate the project for funding through the Texas Enterprise Zone program, a “state sales and use tax refund program designed to encourage private investment and job creation in economically distressed areas of the state,” according to the Office of the Governor's website. Original Source : https://thetexan.news/fort-worth-offers-over-400-million-tax-break-to-attract-electric-vehicle-manufacturer RIVIAN BATTERY SUPPLIER SAMSUNG SDI IS CONSIDERING ILLINOIS FOR US PLANT - Rivian battery supplier Samsung SDI is considering a new battery plant near the EV hopeful's Illinois factory, local NPR affiliate WGLT reported last week. The report cites United States Senator Dick Durbin, who said Normal, home to Rivian's ex-Mitsubishi assembly plant, is a "finalist" for a planned Samsung battery factory. Durbin met virtually with Rivian CEO RJ Scaringe recently. - The project has been discussed for at least six months under the codename "Project Maximus," according to the report. Normal Mayor Chris Koos told WGLT that a local incentives package was in play, and the media outlet reported that the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) was involved, indicating that state-level incentives might be presented as well. - Samsung SDI is the sole battery supplier of Rivian's vehicles at launch, although Rivian hasn't said that it's using them exclusively. Original Source : https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1133253_rivian-battery-supplier-samsung-sdi-is-considering-illinois-for-us-plant ROBOTIC SYSTEM DISMANTLES EV BATTERIES FOR RECYCLING 10X FASTER - As electric vehicles continue to gain in popularity, one thing we'll have to deal with down the road is mounting piles of batteries that have reached the end of their lives. Casting their eye toward this future, scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a new robotic system that automatically disassembles spent electric vehicle batteries with great efficiency and safety, making them easier to recycle. - . Doing so by hand currently involves first discharging the battery, and then taking it apart piece by piece, which exposes workers to toxic chemicals and power levels potentially as high as 900 volts. Looking to build a robotic system that can do the heavy lifting, the team actually turned to one previously developed to extract rare-earth magnets from old hard drives. This was adapted for use on spent electric vehicle batteries, with the new disassembly system able to be configured to tackle any type of battery stack, safely undoing bolts and the housing even if the device has charge remaining. - the automated system can disassemble the batteries down to the cell level and pull out different materials for recovery, such as the cobalt, lithium or metal foils. Alternatively, it can extract individual battery modules to be refurbished and reused in energy storage systems. According to the team, the system can disassemble 100 or more battery stacks in the time it would take a human worker to disassemble 12. Original Source : https://newatlas.com/automotive/robot-ev-batteries-recycling-speed AD IONIQ 5 BEATS TESLA MODEL 3 IN SAFETY TEST - Hyundai Motor's Ioniq 5 is safer than Tesla's Model 3, according to a government test. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport said Tuesday that a safety test conducted by the Korea Transportation Safety Authority compared the two models. The Ioniq 5 EV received a score of 92.1 points out of 100 compared to the Model 3's 83.3 points. - The car's high-voltage electrical system did not catch fire during the collision test and, after a crash, the doors still opened. In testing for possible collisions with pedestrians using dummies and simulations, the materials and design of the bumper was found to absorb shocks, preventing major injuries. Testing for possible head injuries found that the materials used in the vehicle and the design of its hood reduced the possibility of critical injury.  Its autonomous emergency braking system received high scores while other accident prevention features such as a lane assist system also received a perfect score. - As of July, 8,628 Ioniq 5s have been sold and 6,297 Model 3s. Original Source : https://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/2021/08/17/business/industry/Ioniq-5-Model-3-Safety/20210817171100401.html GLENCORE INVESTS IN BRITISHVOLT'S ELECTRIC BATTERY GIGAFACTORY PLANS - Mining giant Glencore is investing in the battery start-up Britishvolt and its construction of a gigafactory to support the UK's car industry transition to electrical vehicles. As part of the partnership, Glencore will also supply cobalt, one of the key raw materials used in electric batteries, the Financial Times reported. As the biggest producer of cobalt globally, the FTSE 100 company will provide Britishvolt with 30 per cent of the metal's supply from 2024 to 2030. - Britishvolt's £2.6bn electric car battery plant is currently under construction in Northumberland in the northeast of England. Planning permission was granted in early July. The factory will initially employ 1,000 people, increasing threefold when operating at full capacity. The 235-acre operation will support the production of electric cars at scale domestically by providing infrastructure and battery supplies. It will help to meet the government's carbon reduction targets and transition to electric cars with the ban on the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles from 2030. - The gigafactory will be operational by 2023, says the start-up, and produce 300,000 batteries for EVs a year by 2027. Original Source : https://www.cityam.com/glencore-endorses-britishvolts-electric-battery-gigafactory-plans TESLA'S GIGA AUSTIN: IDRA SHIPMENT, NEW GIGA PRESS HAS ARRIVED - A few days ago, Teslarati reported that Tesla had received a shipment that consisted of a massive box from IDRA Group. It would only make sense that the contents of the box could be related to a Giga Press, since we know that's what IDRA makes, and we also know that Tesla has already purchased and installed some of these large casting machines. - Tesla is now preparing the foundation for the machine's installation. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/527181/tesla-texas-new-giga-press FORD-OWNED SPIN ANNOUNCES GLOBAL INTEGRATION WITH GOOGLE MAPS - Spin, the micromobility unit of Ford Motor Company, is working with Google Maps to provide e-scooters and e-bikes as a transportation option on the platform in Spin's markets Google Maps users are now able to see Spin vehicle availability as they plan their journeys in 84 cities, campuses, and towns in Europe and North America The integration will bring wider public awareness to Spin's vehicle availability and point people towards a more sustainable option for short journeys in urban areas - Google Maps users are able to see, in real-time, the nearest available Spin e-bike or e-scooter, including how long it will take to walk to the vehicle, as well as the estimated battery range and expected arrival time. Users will then be directed to the Spin app to pay for the vehicle, unlock it and take their ride. - Micromobility is continuing to gain traction to become a mainstream transportation solution for those living in urban areas or campuses. As e-scooters and e-bikes are being increasingly built into journey-planning platforms, residents and visitors can more easily take a multimodal approach to the way they get around cities. Original Source : https://evobsession.com/ford-owned-spin-announces-global-integration-with-google-maps-helping-users-take-advantage-of-spin-e-bikes-and-e-scooters-as-they-plan-their-journeys QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM It's back next week after a short break! Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene
1880: Eddie Trayner Interstate Vans

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 38:54


Eddie Trayner is the owner of Interstate Vans. Eddie and his dog, Lainie, set off on a post-college adventure to travel with as few costs and as many experiences as possible. The best way to do this: creating a van that was outfitted with everything he needed. 

Tim Pool Daily Show
S5164 - Biden Admin Discussing Mandating Vaccines For Interstate Travel, More Cities Lockdown Unvaccinated

Tim Pool Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 84:38


Biden Admin Discussing Mandating Vaccines For Interstate Travel, More Cities Lockdown Unvaccinated Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Three Martini Lunch: Afghanistan Nightmare, Border Crisis Worst Yet, Vaccine Mandate Madness

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021


You may want an actual martini as you join Jim and Greg for three troubling stories. First, they chronicle the rapid collapse of the Afghan military, the Taliban’s seemingly inevitable return to power, and the Biden administration’s recent assurance that this would never happen. They also fume at the lack of any coherent Biden border […]

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers
TERROR TOWN, U.S.A.-John Ferak

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 69:51


From the author of WRECKING CREW, John Ferak returns to discuss his incredible book TERROR TOWN U.S.A.https://podcasts.apple.com/.../true-murder.../id393525078...https://www.spreaker.com/show/truemurderhttps://open.spotify.com/show/3lB164qZi9SySMEhC2bKuVDuring the early morning hours of July 17, 1983, fatigue became a factor for the young couple from central Illinois who spent their day under the hot sun at Marriott's Great America amusement park north of Chicago. On their drive home, the tired teenagers pulled to the shoulder of Interstate 55 to get a restful sleep.As the teens slept inside their car under the moon and the stars, a dangerous force of evil lurked in the shadows, parking directly behind them.The summer of 1983 was like no other for Joliet, Ill., a hard-working, rough-and-tough blue-collar industrial city an hour's drive southwest of Chicago. This was one of the hottest summers on record for Joliet, and an elusive serial-killing madman kept piling up the body count as he showed no signs of being caught.One overnight killing spree claimed five victims, including members of the Will County Sheriff's Office. The following month brought more bloodshed: a quadruple murder inside a small Joliet shop best known for its pottery classes.The plague of senseless violence sparked the controversial New York City-based Guardian Angels to mobilize foot patrols in Joliet, generating more unwanted news media attention for the community. Even the National Enquirer produced its own sensational piece, labeling Joliet “Terror Town, U.S.A.”Residents shuddered with horror. Determined detectives worked in overdrive, trying to find an overlooked clue or two. Finally, when an arrest seemed to come out of nowhere, area citizens breathed a sigh of relief.Authorities linked the so-called stone-cold killing machine to a chilling count of 14 homicides, plus three women who miraculously survived their agonizing encounters.But with multiple murder trials on the horizon, it remained anyone's guess whether Milton Johnson, whose family nicknamed him “Big'un,” short for “Big One,” was guilty of mass murder and if so, would he die by means of lethal injection at the Illinois Department of Corrections? TERROR TOWN, U.S.A.: The Untold Story of Joliet's Notorious Serial Killer-John Ferak