Podcasts about Harrisonburg

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 156PODCASTS
  • 496EPISODES
  • 24mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Harrisonburg

Latest podcast episodes about Harrisonburg

Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Cutting Plays for Performance, with Aili Huber

Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:31


It might surprise you to learn that just about every production of a Shakespeare play that you've ever seen onstage has been cut, from student shows to Broadway revivals. Cutting Plays for Performance: A Practical and Accessible Guide, a new book by Aili Huber and Dr. Toby Malone, lays out some of the reasons that theater-makers cut Shakespeare's plays, and suggests some handy questions directors and dramaturgs should ask themselves as they take a pen to the plays. Barbara Bogaev interviews Huber about the argument that brought Huber and her co-author together, strategies for cutting plays, and how a good cut can reveal a new and exciting story. Aili Huber has been a theater director for over 20 years. She holds an MFA in directing from Mary Baldwin University and the American Shakespeare Center. Her new book, co-written with Dr. Toby Malone of SUNY-Oswego, is called Cutting Plays for Performance: A Practical and Accessible Guide. It was published by Routledge in December 2021. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published January 18, 2022. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “Your Way Is Shorter,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer. Leonor Fernandez edits a transcript of every episode, available at folger.edu. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Evan Marquart at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California, and Mikael Glago at Midnight Spaghetti Productions in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Grounded by the Farm
Visiting a Chicken Farm & a Chance to "Meet My Meats"

Grounded by the Farm

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 29:52


The Arbogast family farms outside of Harrisonburg, VA. From the beautiful Shenandoah Valley, their chicken houses dot the farm as do cattle out on the pastures. Lauren talks with us about the chicken farm, explaining the way the chicken houses are managed and how chickens go from freshly hatched chicks to ready for the market.  Having a blend of generations, the Arbogasts have the benefit of both innovation and tradition. For instance, the family spent some of the time they were isolating due to the pandemic installing solar panels on their barns. The next generation, though teenagers are beginning to participate more and opened a meat market to sell beef direct.  She says they eat a lot of chicken too from my favorite -- chicken biscuits for breakfast to the cast iron skillet full of chicken, veggies, carbs and yumminess that Lauren served for dinner. Videos & photos are available at https://groundedbythefarm.com/chicken-farm-arbogast/

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 12/23/2021

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 9:27


Historic preservationists on Wednesday opened the time capsule discovered in the pedestal of the statue of confederate general Robert E. Lee in Richmond; Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin names another member of his leadership team; The Harrisonburg community is rallying around a 76-year-old man who lost his home to a fire back in August; And many local businesses see an upswing in customers, but pandemic-related issues are stifling some sales

WMRA Local News
WMRA Daily 12/23/2021

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 9:27


Historic preservationists on Wednesday opened the time capsule discovered in the pedestal of the statue of confederate general Robert E. Lee in Richmond; Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin names another member of his leadership team; The Harrisonburg community is rallying around a 76-year-old man who lost his home to a fire back in August; And many local businesses see an upswing in customers, but pandemic-related issues are stifling some sales

WMRA Local News
Neighbors rally around Harrisonburg man who lost home to fire

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 3:39


The Harrisonburg community is rallying around a 76-year-old man who lost his home to a fire back in August. WMRA's Randi B. Hagi reports.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 608 (12-20-21): Virginia's Coastal Resilience Planning Moves Forward in December 2021

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:18).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-17-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 20, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec - - Lyrics: “When the rains come, when the rains come, is it gonna be a new day?” That's part of “Rains Come,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels, from their 2019 album “Over the Trees.”  It opens an update of a previous episode on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan—an effort to prepare for and adapt to sea-level rise, recurrent flooding, and impacts of climate change.  As in the earlier episode, we set the stage with part of “Cypress Canoe,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., from his 2019 album “I Made It Just for You.”  The song's a commentary on the current and potential impacts of sea-level rise, and in the part you'll hear, the story-teller bemoans a lack of planning and action to avoid or reduce such impacts. Have a listen for about 20 seconds. MUSIC – ~18 sec – Lyrics: “Half of a city awash in the tides; when I think of what happened, it tears my insides. Oh, we could've been smarter, we could've have planned, but the world caught a fever, infected by man.” Facing current and predicted impacts to coastal areas from sea-level rise and recurrent flooding, Virginia has started planning.   On December 7, 2021, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced completion of Phase One of the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  Work on the plan started about four years ago accelerated after the November 2020 release of a planning framework identifying guiding principles and specific steps to complete the plan.  Since then, a technical study, the work of a technical advisory committee, and input from some 2000 stakeholders have helped form the plan. The 266-page plan covers the area of Virginia from the Fall Line to the Atlantic coastline, which includes about six million residents.  For those areas, the plan identifies vulnerabilities to, and impacts from, current and expected sea-level rise and increased flooding.  It focuses on ways the Commonwealth can increase resilience, which the plan defines as “the capability to anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from hazards to minimize damage to social well-being, health, the economy, and the environment.”  A Coastal Resilience Database compiled for the plan includes over 500 examples of projects to adapt to changing conditions and of initiatives to build capacity in information, skills, and tools.  Funding for such efforts may come from various sources, but one key source is the Virginia Community Flood Preparedness Fund, created by the Virginia General Assembly in 2020 and using money accrued from the auction of carbon allowances. Implementation of the plan will be managed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation in cooperation with the Commonwealth's Chief Resilience Officer and the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection.  Phase Two of the plan, with more data and project information, is to be completed by 2024, and updates to the whole plan are supposed to occur every five years. According to the plan's impact assessment, between now and 2080 Virginia is projected to face large increases in residents exposed to coastal flooding, in flood property damage, in roadway miles exposed to chronic flooding, and in losses of tidal wetlands, dunes, and beaches.  As Gov. Northam stated in a December 7 letter accompanying the plan's release, the plan provides a “clearer picture of the scope and scale” of these challenges, catalogs current resilience efforts, and identifies gaps in actions and in information.  Here's hoping Virginia puts its Coastal Resilience Master Plan to good use. Thanks to The Steel Wheels and to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of Mr. Gramann's “Cypress Canoe.” MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.   In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode is a follow-up to Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Cypress Canoe,” from the 2019 album “I Made It Just for You,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Rains Come,” from the 2019 album “Over the Trees,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  A July 2019 review by Americana Highways of this album and track is available online at https://americanahighways.org/2019/07/09/review-the-steel-wheels-over-the-trees-is-primary-rhythms-and-organic-melodies/.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/ and in a July 2015 article at http://whurk.org/29/the-steel-wheels.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 552, 11-23-20. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map of the four master planning regions, with their respective and the planning district commissions (PDC) and regional commissions (RC), in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Map from the plan document, page 9, accessed online https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. Chart of population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the four master planning regions identified in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Image from the plan document, page 24, accessed online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA COASTAL RESILIENCE MASTER PLAN, PHASE I Following is an excerpt from the December 7, 2021, news release from Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's office, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels. “HAMPTON—Governor Ralph Northam today released the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, providing a foundational and fundamental step towards protecting Virginia's coast. “Virginia's coastal areas face significant impacts from rising sea levels and increased storm flooding.  The Commonwealth, regional and local entities have to take meaningful and continuous action to ensure the long-term sustainability of Virginia's coastal resources and communities. … “Earlier this year, the Commonwealth worked with 2,000 stakeholders to build the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  This plan documents which land is exposed to coastal flooding hazards now and into the future, as well as the impacts of those future scenarios on coastal Virginia's community resources and manmade and natural infrastructure. “The Master Plan concluded that between 2020 and 2080: the number of residents living in homes exposed to extreme coastal flooding is projected to grow from approximately 360,000 to 943,000, an increase of 160%; the number of residential, public, and commercial buildings exposed to an extreme coastal flood is projected to increase by almost 150%, from 140,000 to 340,000, while annualized flood damages increase by 1,300% from $0.4 to $5.1 billion; the number of miles of roadways exposed to chronic coastal flooding is projected to increase from 1,000 to nearly 3,800 miles, an increase of nearly 280%; and an estimated 170,000 acres, or 89%, of existing tidal wetlands and 3,800 acres, or 38%, of existing dunes and beaches may be permanently inundated, effectively lost to open water. “The Coastal Resiliency Database and Web Explorer is a publicly available database that shows the impact of coastal flood hazards, current and proposed resilience projects, as well as funding sources.  This database will serve as a vital tool to support resilience efforts at the state, regional, and local levels. … “The Commonwealth intends to develop successive updates of the Master Plan on at least a five-year cycle, managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation in consultation with the Chief Resilience Officer, the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection, and the Technical Advisory Committee. “The next phase of the Master Plan is anticipated by 2024, will aim to address recommendations of the TAC to broaden the analysis of natural hazards by including rainfall-driven, riverine, and compound flooding, expand and improve the inventory of resilience projects, by continuing to add efforts and working with project owners to better understand the benefits of projects, and extend this critical work beyond the coastal region to encompass statewide resilience needs. …” SOURCESUsed for AudioVirginia Governor's Office News Release, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels, December 7, 2021. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, December 7, 2021, letter accompanying release of the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/document/CRMP-Gov-Letter.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Community Flood Preparedness Fund Grants and Loans,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/dam-safety-and-floodplains/dsfpm-cfpf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan.  The full document and a two-page summary are available on the page.   “Resilience” is defined in the Master Plan “Introduction” on page 5; the areas covered by the plan are identified in the “Introduction” on page 9; who's coordinating the plan is identified in the “Introduction” on page 6. Virginia Legislative Information System (LIS), online at http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm. See particularly the following bills related to recurrent coastal flooding: 2014 HJ 16 and SJ 3, calling for formation of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding; 2016 HJ 84 and SJ 58, continuing the work of the joint subcommittee formed in 2014 and changing it to the Joint Subcommittee on Coastal Flooding;2016 SB 282, establishing the Virginia Shoreline Resiliency Fund;2020 HB 22 and SB 320, continuing the Shoreline Resiliency Fund as the Community Flood Preparedness Fund;2020 HB 981 and SB 1027, establishing a carbon allowances trading program for Virginia and providing that some of the revenue from the sale of carbon allowances go to the Community Flood Preparedness Fund. For More Information about Sea Level Rise, Coastal and Tidal Flooding, and Resilience John Boon et al., “Planning for Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding,” Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), October 2008, online (as PDF) at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/legacy/icccr/_docs/coastal_sea_level.pdf. City of Alexandria, Va., “Flood Mitigation,” online at https://www.alexandriava.gov/special/waterfront/default.aspx?id=85880. City of Norfolk, Va., “Flood Awareness and Mitigation,” online at https://www.norfolk.gov/1055/Flooding-Awareness-Mitigation. City of Virginia Beach Department of Public Works, “Sea Level Wise,” online at https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/public-works/comp-sea-level-rise/Pages/default.aspx. Coastal Resilience, online at https://coastalresilience.org/. Coastal Resilience/Virginia is online at https://coastalresilience.org/category/virginia/. Sandy Hausman, “Online Tool Helps Coastal Communities Plan for Climate Change,” WVTF FM-Roanoke, Va., 10/11/18, 2 min./34 sec. audio https://www.wvtf.org/post/online-tool-helps-coastal-communities-plan-climate-change#stream/0. This is a report about the Virginia Eastern Shore Coastal Resilience Mapping and Decision Support Tool. Joey Holleman, “Designing for Water—Strategies to Mitigate Flood Impacts,” Coastal Heritage, Winter 2019, South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, online at https://www.scseagrant.org/designing-for-water/. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), “Sixth Assessment Synthesis Report,” online at https://www.ipcc.ch/ar6-syr/.  Sea level rise is addressed in the “Physical Science Basis” section (by Working Group I), online at https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-i/. The IPCC “Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate,” September 2019, is online at https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/. Rita Abou Samra, “Alexandria is already often waterlogged. How will it adjust to climate change?” 9/13/18, for Greater Greater Washington, online at https://ggwash.org/view/69058/alexandria-is-already-often-waterlogged-how-will-it-adjust-to-climate-change. SeaLevelRise.org, “Virginia's Sea Level Is Rising—And It's Costing Over $4 Billion,” online at https://sealevelrise.org/states/virginia/. U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (US CLIVAR), “Sea Level Hotspots from Florida to Maine—Drivers, Impacts, and Adaptation,” April 23-25, 2019, workshop in Norfolk, Va., online at https://usclivar.org/meetings/sea-level-hotspots-florida-maine. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “U.S. Sea Level Report Cards,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/products/slrc/index.php. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “Recurrent Flooding Study for Tidewater Virginia,” 2013, available online (as a PDF) at http://ccrm.vims.edu/recurrent_flooding/Recurrent_Flooding_Study_web.pdf.  This study was significant in the Virginia General Assembly's formation in 2014 of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)/Center for Coastal Resources Management, “Climate Change and Coastal Resilience,” online at https://www.vims.edu/ccrm/research/climate_change/index.php.  This site includes a 40-second video on sea level rise in Virginia and a 40-second video on nuisance flooding. Wetlands Watch, “Dutch Dialogues—Virginia: Life at Sea Level,” online at http://wetlandswatch.org/dutch-dialogues. William and Mary Law School/Virginia Coastal Policy Center, 7th Annual Conference: “The Three P's of Resilience: Planning, Partnerships, and Paying for It All,” November 15, 2019, Williamsburg, Va., online at this link. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on climate change, sea-level rise, and coastal flooding in Virginia. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Climate change impacts in Virginia National Park Service units, including Assateague Island National Seashore. Episode 441, 10-8-18 – on sea-level rise and citizen measurement of king tides. Episode 494, 10-14-19 – on sea-level rise and coastal flooding. Episode 511, 2-10-20 – on sea-level rise and the Saltmarsh Sparrow. Episode 552, 11-23-20 – on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Planning Framework. Episode 602, 11-8-21 – on photosynthesis, including its relationship to climate change. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life Science LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations. ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Virginia Studies Course VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present Course USII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics Course CE.7 – Government at the state level. CE.8 – Government at the local level. CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography Course WG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Virginia and United States History Course VUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government Course GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers. GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels. GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

work bay humans university agency music natural relationships earth political state audio college climate change map steel wheels tech water web index rain pond research climate ocean weather government education public recreation conservation loans trees development forward chesapeake snow sea resilience paying environment adaptation images designing cooperation norfolk governor va domestic funding pages sb planning commonwealth atlantic stream citizens williamsburg environmental dynamic phase one tac sj hj hb biology civics partnership grade resource rc public works bio facing chart billion implementation northam coastal scales govt watershed transcript earth sciences wg freshwater impacts virginia tech ls atlantic ocean sea level rise intergovernmental panel climate change ipcc natural resources comprehensive grades k virginia general assembly fredericksburg harrisonburg master plan phase two virginia governor sea level sections life sciences stormwater pdc special assistant policymakers mitigation bmp ralph northam ipcc special report email campaigns changing climate gross domestic product gdp rockingham county new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek virginia institute cumberland gap technical advisory committee sols tmdl chief resilience officer greater greater washington united states history vus wetlands watch climate variability cryosphere virginia standards water center fall line coastal resilience assateague island national seashore space systems audio notes flood mitigation virginia gov
WMRA Local News
Police suspect serial killer in recent Harrisonburg, Charlottesville women's deaths

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 1:30


Two women who were found dead in Harrisonburg last month are now thought to be victims of a serial killer. WMRA's Randi B. Hagi reports.

The Auto Body Podcast Presented by ClarityCoat
Second Generation, Best Generation?

The Auto Body Podcast Presented by ClarityCoat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 71:43


On this episode we have Isaac Hall on from Autobody Pro Shop in Harrisonburg, VA. Isaac has a story that maybe some of you in the industry will be able to relate to which is he was a second generation shop/owner. After trying his hand at estimating, he opened up his shop to a whole new world of possibilities of billing what is correct from the insurance companies. You can find Autobody Pro Shop here: Website: https://www.autobodyproshop.com/?fbclid=IwAR3X2SrBPFx5Rj8795rDFngD3Pa5N1dL_CZ2L4dIWfFUHSU7wo_bi52ehMUIf you are interested in learning more about ClarityCoat, you can visit us here-Website: claritycoat.comFacebook: Facebook.com/claritycoatofficialInstagram: instagram.com/claritycoat_official

The College Football Experience
FCS Playoffs & Army vs Navy Preview (Ep. 906)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 85:32


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews the upcoming Army vs Navy game and the FCS Playoffs. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) , Patty C (@PattyC831) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) give out their top plays for the weekend and key in on all the action this weekend. Can Diego Fagot and the Navy Midshipmen pull off the upset against Christian Anderson and the Army Black Knights? Can Pierre Strong and South Dakota State grab a huge road win against Daniel Smith and the Villanova Wildcats? Will Camron Humphrey and Montana take down Cole Johnson and James Madison on the road Friday night in Harrisonburg? Will Cam Miller and North Dakota State take care of business against Quay Holmes and East Tennessee State? Will Isaiah Ifanse and Montana State be a live dog against Eric Schmid and Sam Houston State? Plus the guys talk Mario Cristobal, Brent Venables, Jeff Tedford and more on this special edition episode of The College Football Experience. Make sure you subscribe to The College Basketball Experience at sg.pn/tcbe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

REP. MATT SHEA - PATRIOT RADIO
Patriot Radio | Cort Kirkwood

REP. MATT SHEA - PATRIOT RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 56:51


Cort Kirkwood is a long-time contributor to The New American and a former newspaper editor. He has been writing about American politics and culture for 35 years. His articles have appeared in Crisis, The Remnant, Chronicles, National Review, The New American, and elsewhere. He was editor of the Daily News-Record in Harrisonburg, Va. for 18 years and is the author of Real Men: "Ten Courageous Americans to Know and Admire".   Like our page at Facebook/PatriotRadioUS and listen in each Tuesday and Thursday at 4:00 PST with a replay at 9:00 PST on any of these great stations! 106.5 FM Spokane 101.3 FM Tri-Cities/Walla Walla 93.9 FM Moses Lake 106.1 FM Moses Lake 96.1 FM Yakima 96.5 FM Spokane/CdA 97.7 FM Spokane/CdA 810 AM Wenatchee/Moses Lake 930 AM Yakima 630 AM Spokane 1050 AM Spokane and Far Beyond

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 12/8/21

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 6:24


After months of debate, Harrisonburg's school board votes to keep police officers in city schools… Governor Northam wants law enforcement officers to get a big pay boost… Unlike requirements for kids to get immunized for diseases such as measles and polio, the state department of health says it does not have authority to mandate COVID-19 vaccines for students or school staff….

WMRA Local News
WMRA Daily 12/8/21

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 6:24


After months of debate, Harrisonburg's school board votes to keep police officers in city schools… Governor Northam wants law enforcement officers to get a big pay boost… Unlike requirements for kids to get immunized for diseases such as measles and polio, the state department of health says it does not have authority to mandate COVID-19 vaccines for students or school staff….

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 12/7/21

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 7:57


The Lee statue that once stood in Charlottesville will be melted down into public art, and the giant pedestal that held Richmond's monument to Lee is coming down… Governor Northam wants teachers in Virginia to get a 10% pay hike… School kids from all over Virginia and D.C. meet in Harrisonburg to battle it out -- with robots….

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 11/25/21

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 7:47


Harrisonburg police identify the two women found dead in a vacant lot, and a suspect is in custody… After some Virginia school officials, including Harrisonburg's superintendent, recently removed book titles from school library shelves after parent complaints, a national anti-censorship organization pushes back… One bill proposed for the next General Assembly could take away some discretion that school officials have when they suspect a crime has been committed….

Walmart Radio Podcast
The Bo Show: Spreading the Love

Walmart Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 18:11


It's always a slice day when it's both National Butter Day and Homemade Bread Day. In honor of these, Producer Josh made delicious banana chocolate chip bread. If he was trying to butter us up, it sure worked. We were on a roll with some great associate shoutouts, starting with our Associate Caller of the Day, Tasha from Store 1726 in Harrisonburg, Virginia, who gave a shoutout to Jordan. Jake from DC 7048 in Sparks, Nevada, gave props to Rich for his infinite wisdom, and Thomas from Store 3372 in Largo, Florida, called to appreciate the whole AP team. Everyone at Store 582 in Port Orange, Florida, received a shoutout from Fe. Associate shoutouts like these just melt our hearts. We kneaded to celebrate these great anniversaries in Milestone Minute, beginning with Genevieve at Store 35 in Manhattan, Kansas, who celebrated 40 years. Margaret at Store 5460 in Portland, Texas, celebrated 35, and on the rise was Ruth at Store 7329 in Saint Pauls, North Carolina, celebrating 30. We're spreading the love with great associate shoutouts and more, so listen in now!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Partners for Better Communities (Virginia's DHCD Podcast)
58. Shaping Intentional Spaces ⇒ Kirsten Moore on Harrisonburg's Magpie & The Perch

Partners for Better Communities (Virginia's DHCD Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 31:46


Kirsten Moore opened Magpie–a breakfast and lunch diner-inspired restaurant and bakery, and The Perch at Magpie–a coworking space for small businesses, freelancers, and remote workers—in July 2020 in the middle of the pandemic lockdown. Having started an extensive historic renovation of an old auto service building in September of 2019 to house the businesses, it was a train that couldn't be stopped once the pandemic hit. As it turned out, it wasn't the worst possible time to open, but rather the perfect time to open. An entrepreneur and food writer with a background in design and marketing, Magpie is the culmination of many aspects of her career and synthesis of her passions. Get the full Creating Community Vitality Series here.

WMRA Local News
A gun safety class... for women only

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 4:44


On Sunday [Oct. 24] in Harrisonburg, students learned the ins and outs of concealed handgun permits. The class, for women only, also covered when an ordinary citizen is legally justified in using deadly force. WMRA's Randi B Hagi reports.

WMRA Local News
Harrisonburg struggles to safely house homeless with COVID

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 4:31


When someone who's homeless in Harrisonburg gets COVID-19, the city has been paying for them to stay in a hotel. But Harrisonburg stopped doing that at the beginning of the month -- and shelters are scrambling to come up with an alternative. WMRA's Randi B. Hagi reports.

WMRA Local News
WMRA Daily 10/26/21

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:23


Homeless shelters in Harrisonburg are scrambling to safely house people who are sick with COVID-19, now that the city is no longer paying to put them up in hotel rooms… An update on the trial of Unite the Right rally organizers in Charlottesville… Virginia's redistricting commission is a bust, so now it's up to the state Supreme Court to draw boundaries….

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 10/26/21

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:23


Homeless shelters in Harrisonburg are scrambling to safely house people who are sick with COVID-19, now that the city is no longer paying to put them up in hotel rooms… An update on the trial of Unite the Right rally organizers in Charlottesville… Virginia's redistricting commission is a bust, so now it's up to the state Supreme Court to draw boundaries….

The Mike McFeely Mess
The McFeely Mess: James Madison is going FBS and I'm jealous

The Mike McFeely Mess

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 27:18


Greg Madia, who covers James Madison University for the Daily News-Record in Harrisonburg, Va., joins podcast host Mike McFeely of InForum.com to chat about the Dukes moving up from FCS to FBS.  JMU is a playoff rival of North Dakota State in FCS, and won a national title as recently as 2016, but the Dukes will soon be leaving for the higher-level Sun Belt Conference.

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 10/21/21

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:06


Virginia's redistricting commission is going behind closed doors in a last-ditch effort to do its job… A ‘climate emergency choir' from Harrisonburg performs in Richmond… Hiking has surged during the pandemic, but a lack of trail etiquette is damaging the Appalachian Trail….

WMRA Local News
WMRA Daily 10/21/21

WMRA Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:06


Virginia's redistricting commission is going behind closed doors in a last-ditch effort to do its job… A ‘climate emergency choir' from Harrisonburg performs in Richmond… Hiking has surged during the pandemic, but a lack of trail etiquette is damaging the Appalachian Trail….

MEAT+POULTRY Processors Podcast
Farmer Focus promotes poultry industry in Virginia

MEAT+POULTRY Processors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:58


Farmer Focus, based in Harrisonburg, Va., wants people to think about the family farm when they buy their product. It's that mission and intention that fuels Corwin Heatwole, president of Farmer Focus. In this episode of the MEAT+POULTRY podcast, Heatwole describes how the idea for this poultry company and brand developed into an important lifeblood for the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. Farmer Focus has also developed a Farm ID system for greater transparency in chicken. Later, Heatwole talks about the poultry processing aspect of his business and how the product demand continues to grow around the East coast. In addition, a major element of this business is how Farmer Focus has developed a network of independent farmers. The emphasis on family farms instills great pride in Heatwole and he hopes to continue to build a strong agricultural footprint for future generations of Virginians. This podcast is sponsored by Anritsu Anritsu offers leading-edge technology that's trusted worldwide for superior product inspection and contaminant detection. Anritsu x-ray, checkweigher, metal detection, and combination systems deliver performance, reliability, and low total cost of ownership. Simply, Anritsu provides a level of precision, dependability and support that truly advances the quality of your products and efficiency of your operation You can learn more at anritsu.com/infivis --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/meatpoultry-podcast/message

Beltway Golfer
Erika Larkin - Creighton Farms - Golf Digest

Beltway Golfer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:33


.elementor-2581 .elementor-element.elementor-element-7d80d96{text-align:center;} Open up the current issue of Golf Digest (Sept ’21) and you will see an 8-page feature by the Club at Creighton Farms’ first ever Director of Instruction, Erika Larkin.  Having been named the #1 teacher in the state of Virginia by her peers in every vote conducted by the publication since 2014, Golf Digest recently brought Erika in as their newest staff teaching professional.The New York native played her college golf in Harrisonburg and has been teaching the game at various northern Virginia clubs ever since.  Erika’s social media presence is huge and continues to rapidly grow as her ability to take what can be complex swing concepts and boil them down to fun, understandable tips, appeals to golfers of all types.  She joined the podcast to talk about her career, teaching methods, students and what is in the works going forward.erikalarkin.com

Brad Huddleston
Activated Men‘s Conference - October 8 - 9, 2021

Brad Huddleston

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 14:18


There's a powerful men's conference coming to Harrisonburg, Virginia (USA) October 8 - 9,  2021! Details are in the video. Thank you for sharing this where practical.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
September 29, 2021: Fry's Spring rezoning could depend on innovative sidewalk agreement; Virginia redistricting process nearing public hearing stage

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 17:17


In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  It’s not too early to think about next spring! Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!On today’s program:A rezoning in Fry’s Spring for 170 units hinges on how to pay for a sidewalk on a road that would be more traveled The Weldon Cooper Center compares its population estimates to the Census countA quick lesson redistricting in VirginiaThe Foxfield Fall Races will benefit Habitat for Humanity this year and for the next fourOn this upcoming Sunday, Foxfield Races will hold their annual fall Family Day events at the tracks on Barracks Road west of Charlottesville. This year, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Charlottesville will be the nonprofit group that will receive a portion of the proceeds as part of a five-year partnership.  The races are held on land under conservation easement. “We are focused on preserving open space to enable the broad diverse Charlottesville community to use Foxfield,” said Foxfield Executive Director Kelsey Cox in a Habitat press release. “We are overjoyed to create a long-term partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Charlottesville and look forward to welcoming new and returning attendees on race day to further support this partnership with Habitat.”Mark Lorenzoni of the Ragged Mountain Running and Walking Shop penned an article in the September 25 Daily Progress that provides a lot of background and perspective as we wait for the 43rd annual fall races at Foxfield. Visit the Foxfield website at foxfieldraces.com for details and to purchase ticketsThe Virginia Redistricting Commission met again this morning. They’ve been meeting this month to finalize a map for the 100-seat House of Delegates and the 40-seat Virginia Senate. The sixteen members consisting of eight legislators and eight citizens must finalize their maps this Saturday in time to meet one of several deadlines in the Virginia code. The Commission’s work began as soon as the U.S. Census Bureau released population counts from 2020. Further meetings are scheduled for this Friday and Saturday, with the public hearings beginning on Monday. Coverage of what will be in those maps will come up in a future edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement. The Commission must submit maps to the General Assembly by October 10. Virginia Code also specifies nine criteria for Congressional and legislative districts. You can register to speak at the public hearings at the redistricting website. It’s now been almost two months since the U.S. Census Bureau released the official population count for the country. That’s given the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia the time to make some observations about how the results compare to the annual estimates and regular projections their demographers make. “Our projections were higher than the actual counts in 66 localities, and lower for 67 cities and counties, indicating well-balanced results,” writes Shonel Sen in the latest edition of the Stat Chat blog that Weldon Cooper produces. The article explains the methodology used to calculate estimates and projections. Thirteen localities were in excess of a margin of error of five percent, including Charlottesville at 8.9 percent. Weldon Cooper’s 2020 estimate for Charlottesville was 49,447, but the Census count was 46,553. (2020 Weldon Cooper estimates) (Charlottesville Census quickfacts)An explanation in the footnotes of the blog post states that many college towns are perhaps undercounted due to students leaving the area at the start of the pandemic. Weldon Cooper’s 2020 estimate for Harrisonburg was 54,049, whereas the Census was 51,813. The Census Bureau’s 2019 estimate for Harrisonburg had been higher at 53,016, and 47,266 for Charlottesville. For more information, go back to the August 21, 2021 edition of this newsletter for an interview with Hamilton Lombard of the Weldon Cooper Center. (link)A quick Patreon-shout out before we continue.A concerned Charlottesville parent wants to make sure the community participates in the Middle School Reconfiguration process that is currently underway. After years of discussion, concrete plans are being put forward. You can learn more and contribute at the City of Charlottesville Schools/VMDOs information page" at charlottesvilleschools.org/facilities. (For my latest story on the topic, go back to the September 16, 2021 edition of this newsletter.)If the population projections put out by the Weldon Cooper Center at the University of Virginia are to be believed, the area will continue to grow for many decades. The act of planning as well as the art of land development both take place in response to anticipated needs for places to live, seats in classrooms, and ways for people to get around. In many cases, it takes a legislative decision by elected officials to approve larger residential complexes. “I personally live in an area where many apartment units have gone up and they fill quickly,” said Ned Gallaway, the chair of the Board of Supervisors. “The question is whether the infrastructure is there to support the density.” On September 15, 2021, the Board of Supervisors voted 5-1 to approve a rezoning off of U.S. 29 for 332 units on property where the county’s Comprehensive Plan has long anticipated growth and along a stretch of U.S. 29 where a $61.3 million road project was completed in October 2017. The firm RST Development agreed to restrict 75 percent of the units to households below a certain income percentage. “We talk a lot about how we are an inclusive and welcoming place to live and this is an opportunity to create a place for people to live that have not been able to live in our community,” said Supervisor Diantha McKeel.“It is part of our primary development area, and when you’re looking at the development area, it is the area where there should be a larger concentration of lower-cost and more affordable housing,” said Supervisor Donna Price. A similar conversation took place in Charlottesville the night before on September 14, 2021. That’s when the Charlottesville Planning Commission held a joint public hearing with City Council on a rezoning at 240 Stribling Avenue in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood.Southern Development seeks a rezoning to Planned Unit Development to build up to 170 units on about 12 acres of wooded land. That came after a directive at an earlier work session for the firm to increase the units in the development.“The Planning Commission told us very clearly that you wanted to see something less dense and more suburban,” said Charlie Armstrong, vice president at Southern Development.      Last year, the Fry’s Spring Neighborhood Association voted on a resolution to support the rezoning if sidewalks and other infrastructure on Stribling could be built to handle the additional traffic. The current Comprehensive Plan designates the land as low density residential, which is one reason a sidewalk there has not been prioritized in the city’s limited Capital Improvement Program budget. Southern Development’s proposal would set aside 15 percent of those units for either rental or homeownership to households making below 60 percent of the area median income. They also worked with the city’s economic development team to come up with a financing structure to pay for the roadway improvements on Stribling. However, this novel approach points to a potential disconnect in the process.Armstrong negotiated an agreement with the city’s Office of Economic Development to where Southern Development would make a $2 million loan for the city to build those improvements. The city would then pay Southern Development back over a period of years out of the increased property taxes that it will receive. “I do want to be clear that this agreement is not part of the rezoning request but it does impact the area nearby and certainly of interest to many in the neighborhood,” said Economic Development director Chris Engel. "In its simplest form this agreement that the developer provides up to $2 million in funds to construct the needed improvements in a timeframe that is likely contemporaneous with the PUD development.” The cost estimate provided by Southern Development for the upgrades is around $1.6 million.  City Engineer Jack Dawson only saw the agreement or the two days before the hearing and said that amount would not be enough because it did not contemplate the full extent of work required. “My concern is that probably that estime is a little light, to probably very light,” said Jack Dawson. “It isn’t just a sidewalk. It’s essentially a streetscape because when you touch a road you need to bring it up to code.” Code requires a 20 foot right of way which Dawson said would likely require the taking of private property for curb and gutter drainage, which would add to the cost.  Dawson cited an internal estimate created within City Hall of $2.9 million. However, Armstrong bristled at the cost estimate provided by Dawson.“That’s not a number that I’ve ever seen published or have ever heard and we’ve been talking with the city and been in this review process with the city for months and years so I would have hoped that might have come up,” Armstrong said. Under the terms of the agreement, the city would have to pay anything in excess of $2 million but finding those funds will be difficult. Earlier this month, Council opted to transfer funding allocated for the West Main Streetscape to the $75 million reconfiguration of Buford Middle School. Budget staff said when added to the existing capital improvement program, reconfiguration will require a 15 cent tax increase next year, or less depending on how the 2022 property assessments come in. “Right now, every penny we are going to have in capital funds until we figure out something else every penny is going to get allocated for school reconfiguration,” said City Councilor Lloyd Snook. The co-president of the FSNA appreciated the work that went into the agreement but said it was not yet enough to satisfy his concerns. “There is a potential to find a solution here but there is a big but,” said Jason Halbert. “It’s about safety on that street and the JPA intersection.”Halbert said the agreement had not been fully reviewed by the appropriate staff. He asked for the project to be delayed while the details of the agreement are worked out. Commissioner Hosea Mitchell said he liked the project over all but agreed it might not be ready.“I think it could use a little more baking,” Mitchell said. “There would be value in sitting with the engineers and the economic development people and working out the details and logistics so that we know exactly what it would like before we’re going to move on it.”Another commissioner suggested the city has to do a better job of communicating better internally about coming up with innovative ways to support density. “It’s endlessly frustrating to me the degree of dysfunction within the city where the economic development is negotiating this agreement and isn’t even telling [the city engineer] about it literally two days ago,” said Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg. The issue comes at a time when new city management is just finding its feet. Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders has been on the job less than two months, and new planning director James Freas has been in his job for less than two weeks. At the same time, the city is debating a new Comprehensive Plan. The current draft encourages more density across the city. “There’s no way to support this project without having a firm grasp of how we’re going to provide these infrastructure improvements to the neighborhood,” said Councilor Heather Hill. But which comes first? The rezoning or the infrastructure?  And whose cost estimate is to be believed? Southern Development’s $1.6 million, or $2.9 million from the city engineer? City attorney Lisa Robertson had this advice. “Leadership needs to put their heads together and talk about what’s realistic in terms of whether or not from inside City Hall a number can be developed that builds upon the work that Mr. Armstrong’s team has done, or clarifies it,” Robertson said. “Another function that really needs to be updated is the process by which we develop the city’s capital improvement program.”Robertson said the CIP cannot be a wish list of aspirational projects. More developed projects with more concrete estimates would provide more certainty. At the hearing, the question was whether an updated performance agreement could be completed to further scope out the project. Armstrong asked for an indefinite deferral while the agreement is worked out. What’s happened in the past two weeks?“The City is continuing to discuss the project with the developer while looking to confirm the cost estimate for the sidewalk project,” wrote Brian Wheeler, Charlottesville’s Communications Director. Before you go, a plug for a campaign forum I’m co-hosting with the Free Enterprise Forum. Here’s the media advisory:On Thursday September 30 the, three candidates for Charlottesville City Council will appear in person to answer questions posed by Town Crier Productions President Sean Tubbs and Free Enterprise Forum President Neil Williamson in a candidate forum sponsored by The Hillsdale Conference Center. The event will also be live streamed via Zoom webinar. Register here!WHO: Candidates: Brian Pinkston, Juandiego Wade, Yas WashingtonModerators: Sean Tubbs, President, Town Crier ProductionsNeil Williamson, President, Free Enterprise ForumWHAT: Candidates will explore their vision for the city including their views on the Future Land Use Map (FLUM), proposed tax increases, affordable housing, equity issues, organizational issues, and Economic Development. WHEN: Thursday, September 30 th 7:00 pmWHERE: Hillsdale Conference Center Ballroom, 550 Hillsdale Drive, Charlottesville, VA 22901. MASKS REQUIRED – SOCIAL DISTANCING ENFORCED. WHY: Election Day 2021 is now. Early voting has already begun. Learn where the candidates stand before casting your ballot. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 596 (9-27-21): Water and Muscles

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:09).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 27, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall on water connections to the human body and human biology.  This week, we start with some mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you know the body system you can hear at work in all of these sounds.  And here's a hint: it'll be a show of strength if you guess this. SOUNDS  - ~23 sec If you guessed the muscular system, you're right!  Walking, dribbling a basketball, lifting weights, and jumping rope all involve some of the over 600 skeletal muscles in the human body.  Skeletal muscles, also called striated or voluntary muscles, are one of three muscle types in the body.  The other two are smooth, or involuntary muscles, found in internal organs; and cardiac muscle in the heart.  Whatever their location or function, muscles have several important connections to water, including the following six. First, water is a major component of muscles, making up over 70 percent of muscle mass. Second, cell volume, that is, the space within cells, is affected by the amount of water that cells contain, or the cells' hydration state.  This is believed to be related to muscle strength and contraction capacity by affecting the shape and function of muscle proteins. Third, water is the medium containing all the dissolved biochemicals that the body needs to function, including those involved in muscular contraction and in nourishing muscle cells. Fourth, water is involved in reactions that release energy from the molecule ATP, and water is associated with the important energy-storage molecule glycogen. Fifth, water helps regulate body temperature, including the heat generated by muscular activity. And sixth, water helps lubricate moveable joints, the structures upon which skeletal muscles act to move parts of the body. Overall, water plays a significant role in muscle strength and function, and muscle, in turn, is an important area of water storage for the body. We close with some music whose title speaks of one of the most common uses of our muscles.  Here's the closing 25 seconds of “Walk This Way For Awhile,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “…you walk this way for awhile; will you walk this way for awhile?  I think you will, I know you still, I hope you will.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 23, 2021. “Walk This Way for Awhile,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 14, 2010, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Music; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  The song is also on The Steel Wheel's 2010 album, “Red Wing.”  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  More information about Goose Creek Music is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  More information about the Franklin Park Arts Center is available online at http://www.franklinparkartscenter.org/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 286, 10-19-15. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Structure of a representative human skeletal muscle.  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Structure of Skeletal Muscle,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/structure.html. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN MUSCULAR SYSTEM The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. “The muscular system is composed of specialized cells called muscle fibers.  Their predominant function is contractibility.  Muscles, attached to bones or internal organs and blood vessels, are responsible for movement.  Nearly all movement in the body is the result of muscle contraction.  Exceptions to this are the action of cilia, the flagellum on sperm cells, and amoeboid movement of some white blood cells. “The integrated action of joints, bones, and skeletal muscles produces obvious movements such as walking and running.  Skeletal muscles also produce more subtle movements that result in various facial expressions, eye movements, and respiration. “In addition to movement, muscle contraction also fulfills some other important functions in the body, such as posture, joint stability, and heat production.  Posture, such as sitting and standing, is maintained as a result of muscle contraction.  The skeletal muscles are continually making fine adjustments that hold the body in stationary positions.  The tendons of many muscles extend over joints and in this way contribute to joint stability.  This is particularly evident in the knee and shoulder joints, where muscle tendons are a major factor in stabilizing the joint.  Heat production, to maintain body temperature, is an important by-product of muscle metabolism.  Nearly 85 percent of the heat produced in the body is the result of muscle contraction.” SOURCES Used for Audio Ann Baggaley, ed., Human Body, Dorling Kindersley Publishing, New York, N.Y, 2001. Cedric Bryant and Daniel Green, eds., Essentials of Exercise Science, American Council on Exercise, San Diego, Calif., 2017. Michael Houston, Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science, 3rd Edition, Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ill., 2006. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access).  National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). Scott Powers and Edward Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body, online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. For More Information about Water and the Human Body American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system.Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, “Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Another episode related to human exercise is Episode 483, 7-29-19.  It focuses on buoyancy and drag in the water and is designed for middle school and high school students. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 595, 9-20-21 – Skeletal system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy5.2 – Energy can take many forms.5.3 – There is a relationship between force and energy of moving objects. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory.LS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16

kids new york science bay university agency performance music natural state audio college walking live energy accent dark steel wheels tech water heat web cells index rain pond research ocean government education medicine fitness plants vol school force illustration philadelphia netherlands chesapeake snow penn exercise environment neuroscience heart va amsterdam msonormal blood motion stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens san diego ill environmental structure american society times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology lyrics chemical grade nutrients posture muscles colorful walk this way national institutes signature application bio scales human body watershed transcript nervous system calif virginia tech neurological ls essentials atlantic ocean natural resources grades k function name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes medical science circulation exceptions harrisonburg textbooks exercise science bristol england ar sa blacksburg american council mcgraw hill champaign franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center msohyperlink atp awhile red wing hematology sections life sciences stormwater daniel green policymakers elsevier msobodytext blood vessels bmp rockingham county human kinetics new standard acknowledgment virginia department goose creek cripple creek skeletal cumberland gap scott powers sols tmdl geological survey mayo clinic health system lymphatic system skeletal muscle circulatory blood cells living systems purcellville virginia standards water center audio notes covid-19
Sew Much More
276- Heidi Yoder - Know Yourself and What You Need

Sew Much More

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 52:03


The Sew Much More Podcast is sponsored by; The Workroom Channel Scarlet Thread Consulting The WCAA The Curtains and Soft Furnishings Resource Library Merril Y Landis, LTD Angel's Distributing, LLC Trading Up Consulting, LLC National Upholstery Association Heidi Wenger Yoder is the owner of Smithland Custom Interiors in Harrisonburg, VA. which is celebrating 20 years of operation.  Heidi's husband, Brent, is an invaluable member of her team as chief installer and cornice board fabricator.  Her three teenage children pitch in on occasion as directors of recycling, dust bunny chasing, and van loading. Heidi is passionate about helping her clients live more fully in their homes and creating beauty in the process.   Heidi is on Instagram  and Facebook   The website below is currently under construction by Kate the Socialite and should be up and running soon My old site, www.seamslikehomeva.com, is still up. For my 20th business birthday, I re-branded and re-named the business.   Links and Resources; (I use some affiliate links and appreciate it if you choose to use them) Profit First by Mike Michalowicz Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life  by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans Kanban board Kate The Socialite    

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 593 (9-6-21): Water's at the Heart of Blood

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:19).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 6, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND - ~3 secHow is a human heartbeat part of a water story?  Have a listen for about 25 seconds to the following mystery sounds, and see if you can guess the heart-and-water connections they represent.  And here's a hint: if you have the energy, you could follow many branches to this solution.SOUNDS - ~21 secYou've been listening to sounds from a platelets donation at the American Red Cross' New River Valley Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia.  The sounds—a blood-pressure measurement, a needle stick into an arm vein, and the machine separating blood components and recirculating fluid to the patient—illustrate three connections between the human circulatory system and water.First, the heart provides a force—measured by blood pressure—to keep blood circulating around the body, like the sun's energy powers evaporation and winds that help keep water circulating around the earth.  Second, arm veins are part of an intricately branched system of arteries, veins, and capillaries, resembling a watershed's branching pattern as one travels uphill from ocean to river to headwater streams.   Humans have an estimated 60,000 to 100,000 miles of blood vessels, compared to Virginia's approximately 100,000 miles of rivers and streams.  Finally, blood's components are mostly water: blood plasma is a solution of water and many biochemicals, mixed with water-based red and white blood cells and with platelets.  As a result, blood in the human system has water's physical and chemical properties for transporting materials and regulating heat.Cells and transported substances make blood “thicker” than water, just as the saying goes.  But the water we borrow temporarily from the global water cycle is at the chemical and physical heart of blood and the circulatory system's vital functions.Thanks to staff at the New River Valley Donor Center for participating in this episode, and thanks to Soundbible.com for the heartbeat sound. We close with some music inspired by the action of the human heart.  Here's about 20 seconds of “Heartbeat,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~23 sec –Lyrics - “Feel my heartbeat comin' in next to you; heartbeat, yes you do.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 392, 10-30-17, and Episode 236, 10-20-14. The human heartbeat sound was recorded by Mike Koenig and made available (9/14/09 upload) online at the Soundbible.com Web site, http://soundbible.com/1001-Heartbeat.html, for public use under the Creative Commons license “Attribution 3.0”; for more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. Other sounds heard in this episode were recorded at the American Red Cross New River Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia, during an October 19, 2014, platelet donation by Virginia Water Radio host Alan Raflo.  Thanks to the staff at the Donor Center for their help and for allowing the sound recording.  For information about blood and platelet donations, please visit the American Red Cross' “Donating Blood” Web site at http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood.

science bay humans university agency music photo natural earth heartbeat state audio college sound england accent dark shape steel wheels tech water web cells index nature rain dracula pond research ocean government education medicine prevention philadelphia chesapeake snow penn westport environment images skeleton heart va cambridge msonormal blood stream gilbert normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental structure american society times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology engineering chemical grade colorful national institutes signature bio watershed mike koenig soundbible transcript centers disease control conn virginia tech neurological atlantic ocean natural resources attribution grades k environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table circulation harrisonburg ar sa blacksburg american red cross cambridge university press franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology sections ben cosgrove stormwater cleveland clinic policymakers msobodytext blood vessels bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl greenwood press circulatory blood cells virginia standards circulatory system water center space systems audio notes covid-19
Missing Persons
Kelly Bergh Dove

Missing Persons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 50:21


Episode 35 Kelly Bergh DoveTwenty year-old wife and mother, Kelly Bergh Dove, vanished from the Harrisonburg, Virginia gas station-convenience store she was working at in the early morning hours of June 18, 1982. She has never been seen again. The only clues in her case are a series of disturbing phone calls that she received that night at work. They were so disturbing, that Kelly called 911, multiple times, and in one of the calls, mentioned a strange man in a Gray, possibly Silver Ford. who may have exposed himself to Kelly. By the time police arrived moments after her final call, Kelly was no where to be found. The only sign of her was a few of her possessions and her cigarette still smoking in the ash tray. As it turned out, another woman working the overnight shift at a nearby business recounted a similar incident and provided police with a composite sketch of the men she witnessed. A composite sketch of this man was created and circulated, but did not provide many clues. Almost four decades later, Kelly has never been found, and was declared legally dead. Her sister Elaine discusses this sad and mysterious case, and about new efforts to find out what happened to Kelly.If you have information about Kelly Bergh-Dove's disappearance, please call the Harrisonburg, VA police at Harrisonburg Police Department 540-434-2545To learn more about Kelly's case, visit the Facebook page created in her honor: https://www.facebook.com/nvrforgetthemKelly's NAMUS page:https://www.namus.gov/MissingPersons/Case#/1092?navKelly's page at CharleyProject.org:https://charleyproject.org/case/kelly-bergh-doveKelly's DoeNetwork page::http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/2413dfva.htmlIf you'd like to support this podcast via a donation, you can do so through Patreon here-https://www.patreon.com/MissingPodcastTo contact the podcast or learn more about the cases we discuss visit:Missingpersonspodcast.net

Frame This Podcast: Artists in Perspective

Jeff Moons, the owner and head brewer of Restless Moons Brewing Company, stops by and shares with us his knowledge and art of brewing beer, distain for water chemistry, and what it takes to run a successfull brewing company and tap room in 2021.  ....."Restless Moons Brewing opened its doors in February 2018, but the idea was born nearly a decade before then. Its beginnings were simple enough - a love of good beer and homebrew kit. A hobby became an obsession, brewing small batches on the kitchen stove and reading every beer book and article available. Years of brewing and research went by, with the dream of one day opening and running a brewery of our own. In 2017, we discovered that a brewery was for sale in Harrisonburg, VA. A few visits was all it took to fall in love with the city and realize that this was the opportunity we had been waiting for. We took over and made it our own, renaming it Restless Moons Brewing and devoting ourselves to creating great beer to inspire future brewers and serve the community that has welcomed us so warmly".   Check out Restless Moons Brewing Company: https://www.restlessmoons.com https://www.restlessmoons.com/the-beer.html   Follow Restless Moons: https://www.facebook.com/restlessmoons/ https://untappd.com/RestlessMoonsBrewing   Connect/listen to Frame This: https://linktr.ee/framethispodcast — — - #podcast #podcasting #spotify #headbrewer #beer #VA #Harrisonburg #HVA #smallbusinessowner #canning #taproom #pintglass #water 

Podcast UFO
AudioBlog: A UFO Flap in Virginia in 1965

Podcast UFO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 8:24


Throughout modern UFO history, there have been periods when a large number of reports have come from one area. These were termed UFO “flaps” by Air Force UFO investigators working for Project Blue Book. According to former Project Blue Book Director in his 1956 book “The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects,” in Air Force parlance, a flap was a state of confusion just below panic that could be brought on by any number of things. This week, we'll look at a 1965 flap in the Virginia area that involved reported EM effects, creatures, and armed citizens ready to defend the planet. Newspaper clippings and comments by investigators about the events can be found at the UFO History Group website. The flap actually began in 1964 with the December 21st sighting by Harrisonburg, Virginia, gunsmith Horace Burns. According to the report, he was driving on Route 250 near Fishersville when he saw a huge metallic object in the sky coming from the north. As it landed in a field to his right, his car stalled, and he drifted to a stop. Burns described the object as shaped like a beehive, 125 ft in diameter, and 80 ft tall. He observed it as it rested for 60 to 90 seconds and then rose up and flew away to the northeast. He was able to restart his car and drive home. Burns contacted the UFO Investigators Club at Eastern Mennonite College. Club President Ernest Gehman, who was a professor at the College and a member of the National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena, checked the area with a Geiger counter and claimed to have found heavy radioactivity. He also reported that homeowners in the area had complained to the Virginia Electric and Power Co. that their radios and televisions stopped working for several minutes and that their lights dimmed. Read more →

Detours in Music
S1, Episode 32: Eric Ruple

Detours in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 49:04


Our Season 1, Episode 3 guest Eric Ruple has come back for an update! Eric Ruple is a Professor of Piano at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA. "I don't know what the future is for music, but I think performers - we're part of the answer for that, because we choose what's going to be heard- we're the one's making those choices." - Ruple "It's important to look at things not just as a problem or obstacle, but as an opportunity." - Ruple instagram - @detoursinmusicpodcast Facebook - Detours in Music Podcast YouTube - Detours in Music Podcast website - www.detoursinmusicpodcast.com email - detoursinmusicpodcast@gmail.com Podcast artwork - Ana Hart Podcast music - Jack Yagerline --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/detoursinmusic/support

The Business & Pleasure of Flowers
Abby Chick from Blakemore's Flowers: Leading a Successful Team: Cliquer Spotlight!

The Business & Pleasure of Flowers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 44:12


Episode 085: In this Cliquer Spotlight Vonda and Lori chat with Abby Chick, owner of Blakemore's Flowers in Harrisonburg, VA. She shares her secrets on leading and building a  successful team, which has reaped the benefits of a very successful business. We're sure you can relate to some of what she does and gain a few tips on how to strengthen your team.Enrollment closes soon for  Flower Prep School ...check it out today!Flower Clique Prep SchoolFlower Clique

WMRA Daily
WMRA Daily 8/4/21

WMRA Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 9:27


Harrisonburg and Charlottesville public school students will go back to school with masks… The General Assembly addresses the eviction problem during its special session… Although pot possession is now legal in Virginia, the only way to get it legally is to grow your own, and that means a big boost for local nurseries and garden stores….

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 589 (8-9-21): A Musical Tour of Rivers and Watersheds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image and Extra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 9, 2021.  This revised episode from February 2015 is the last in a series of eight episodes this summer related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 sec – Lyrics: “Take me down to the riverside.” This week, that excerpt of “Riverside,” by the Rockingham County- and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, opens an episode giving musical tour of some of Virginia's major river watersheds.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to parts of six other songs, and see if you can guess the six Virginia watersheds being represented.  Three may be obvious, but the other three may challenge your musical and hydrological knowledge. MUSIC – ~ 94 sec “Shenandoah” by Timothy Seaman – ~18 sec – instrumental. “Sandy Boys” by Sara Grey – ~11 sec – Lyrics: “Do come along, Sandy boys, waitin' for the bug-eye-boo.” “Banks of New River” by Whitetop Mt. Band – ~13 sec – Lyrics: “I'm sitting here on the banks of New River.” “Clinch Mountain Quickstep” by Timothy Seaman – ~14 sec – instrumental. “Rappahannock Running Free” by Bob Gramann – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “I love the Rappahannock and its waters running free; the rapids of this river, that's where I want to be.” “James River Blues” by Old Crow Medicine Show – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “James River blues.” “All Quiet on the Potomac” – ~18 sec – instrumental. You heard parts of “Shenandoah,” performed by Timothy Seaman; “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, referring to the Big Sandy River; “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band; “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” also by Timothy Seaman, selected here for its connection to the Clinch River; “Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann; “James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show; and “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales. The watersheds of these rivers are part of 14 major watersheds in Virginia, as identified by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.  Wherever you are in the Commonwealth, you're in one of the those watersheds, as well as being—in turn—in one of the larger watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico.  They all deserve to have songs written about them, because they're part of Virginia's varied, complex, and historic system of waterways and landscapes.Thanks to all of the artists mentioned for permission to use this week's music. We close this episode, and Water Radio's summer 2021 series on watersheds and rivers, with about 30 more seconds of The Steel Wheels' “Riverside.” MUSIC – ~29 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 251, 2-2-15. “Riverside,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 10, 2014, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Productions; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. More information about Goose Creek Productions is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 295, 12-21-15.The “Shenandoah” version in this episode's musical tour is by Timothy Seaman and Paulette Murphy, from the start of “Shenandoah/Hazel River” on the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 447, 11-19-18. “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, is from the 2009 album “Sandy Boys,” copyright by Sara Grey and Fellside Records, used with permission.  More information about Sara Grey is available online at http://www.saragrey.net/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 436, 9-3-18. “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band, is from the 2008 album, “Bull Plus 10%,” copyright Whitetop Mountain Band and Arhoolie Records, used with permission.  More information about Whitetop Mountain Band is available online at http://whitetopmountainband.tripod.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 546, 10-12-20. “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” from the 2002 album “Sycamore Rapids,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 435, 8-27-18.“Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann, is from the 2008 album, “Mostly Live,” copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 304, 2-22-16.“James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show, is from the 2006 album “Big Iron World,” copyright Nettwork Records, used with permission.  More information about Old Crow Medicine Show is available online at http://www.crowmedicine.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 373, 6-19-17. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard here was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 318, 5-30-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE AND EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT VIRGINIA'S MAJOR WATERSHEDS Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Four large watersheds containing, collectively, all of Virginia's lands are the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.  The watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Sound are also contained within the Atlantic Ocean watershed.The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds.  (This table was also included in the show notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21.)  WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River

time bay university agency mexico music natural earth state audio college live north america map accent dark steel wheels tech water web status index land band rain musical pond research ocean government education gulf recreation conservation banks maine north carolina chesapeake bay tour chesapeake snow environment types va yarmouth msonormal commonwealth figures stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide riverside shenandoah water resources rivers grade colorful madison county signature geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech back bay atlantic ocean potomac natural resources grades k roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table clinch rappahannock harrisonburg james river all quiet cosgrove msohyperlink sara grey smith river sections bluffs potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater old crow medicine show headwater new river policymakers msobodytext bmp environmental protection agency epa rockingham county powell river acknowledgment virginia department goose creek cumberland gap sols tennessee river big sandy tmdl geological survey little river yadkin dan river purcellville virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes dismal swamp
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 583 (6-28-21): One Blue Ridge Helps Start Many Virginia Rivers

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:41). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-25-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2014 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~ 10 sec – instrumental - “Big Run Thrives.” This week, musical selections highlight the connections between one famous Virginia ridge and the watersheds of six rivers.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds.MUSIC – ~46 sec – instrumentals – “Big Run Thrives,” ~18 sec; then “Hazel River,” ~28 sec.You've been listening, first, to part of “Big Run Thrives,” and second, to part of “Hazel River,” both by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., from the 1997 album “Here on This Ridge,” a celebration of Virginia's Shenandoah National Park.  Both tunes were inspired by streams flowing off of Virginia's Blue Ridge.  The part of the Blue Ridge that runs through the middle of the national park from Front Royal south to Waynesboro divides the watersheds of three Virginia rivers.  Throughout the park, mountain streams on the ridge's western slopes—like Big Run in Rockingham County—lead to the Shenandoah River watershed.  On the Blue Ridge's eastern side, streams in the northern part of the park—like Hazel River in Rappahannock County—flow to the Rappahannock River; in the southern part of the park, east-flowing streams are in the James River watershed. Outside of the national park, to the north the Blue Ridge separates the Potomac River watershed from the Shenandoah, a Potomac River tributary.  To the south of the national park, the Blue Ridge is part of the watershed divide between the James River and Roanoke River, and then between the Roanoke and New rivers. Countless other ridges in Virginia aren't as famous as the Blue Ridge, but whether high and obvious or low and indistinct, they all add to the landscape's pattern of waterways flowing through watersheds. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use parts of “Big Run Thrives” and “Hazel River.”  We close with another musical selection for mountain ridges and rivers, from the Rockingham County and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels.  Here's about 35 seconds of “Find Your Mountain.”MUSIC – ~35 sec – Lyrics: “Find your mountain.  Find your river.  Find your mountain.”  Then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 209, 4-14-14. “Big Run Thrives” and “Hazel River,” from the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” are copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.   More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  Information about the making of that album is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/timothys-blog/entry/the-making-of-our-album-here-on-this-ridge.  “Big Run Thrives” was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in in Episode 473. 5-20-19; “Hazel River was used previously in Episode 339, 10-24-16. “Find Your Mountain,” from the 2015 album “Leave Some Things Behind,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 425, 6-18-18, Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES South Fork Shenandoah River at the U.S. Rt. 211 bridge in Page County, Va., July 22, 2012.  Traveling east on 211 from this point takes you into Shenandoah National Park, across the Blue Ridge, and into the Rappahannock River watershed.The Rappahannock River, looking upstream from U.S. Route 29 at Remington, Va. (Fauquier County), December 27, 2009.  The Hazel River flows into the Rappahannock just a few river miles above this point.View of Floyd County, Va., from the Blue Ridge Parkway, June 1, 2014.  The photo shows the New River watershed; behind the photographer (on the other side of the Parkway) is Patrick County and the Roanoke River watershed. SOURCES Used for Audio College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000. National Park Service, “Shenandoah National Park,” online at http://www.nps.gov/shen/index.htm.Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission, “Local TMDLs,” online at https://www.rrregion.org/program_areas/environmental/local_tmdls.php.  Located at this site are Total Maximum Daily Load on the Upper Rappahannock River, the Hazel River, and other Rappahannock River basin waterways. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  Please see particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 365, 4-24-17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.  Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources 3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. 4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth Science ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.

canada bay university agency music natural earth state audio college north america impact accent dark steel wheels tech water web status index land rain musical united states pond research ocean government education recreation conservation maine route chesapeake snow helps traveling environment images va yarmouth msonormal commonwealth stream normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence williamsburg arial environmental national park service times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide located shenandoah water resources rivers grade colorful rt madison county signature geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech atlantic ocean natural resources grades k parkway roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table front royal rappahannock waynesboro harrisonburg countless seaman james river regions cosgrove msohyperlink fauquier county relyonvml smith river usi blue ridge parkway sections potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department floyd county cumberland gap leave some things behind sols tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park united states history total maximum daily load virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE
"Fighting Ableism in Our K-12 Schools" (Dr. Jen Newton & Dr. Mira Cole Williams)

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 64:48


In this episode, I welcomed special education professors Dr. Jen Newton and Dr. Mira Cole Williams to the podcast for an important conversation about combating ableism in our K-12 schools. They also shared how ableism plays into the national conversation about critical race theory, the founding of the Teaching is Intellectual Platform, the actions that educators & school districts must take to integrate anti-ableist practices into their school communities, the future of special education during the COVID-19 pandemic, and much more! This episode is dedicated to all the special education teachers and inclusion teachers who are in the trenches! To learn more about their work, you can visit their website at teachingisintellectual.com or you can follow them on Instagram, Facebook & Twitter with the handle @teachingisintellectual. BIO: Jen Newton, PhD is an assistant professor in special education. Dr. Newton's research interests include strengths-based approaches to families, early childhood inclusion, inclusive teacher preparation, and socially just and equitable educational practices. She presents locally, regionally, and nationally on a range of inclusive educational topics. She served as an early interventionist and an inclusive prekindergarten teacher prior to pursuing doctoral studies. Dr. Newton earned her doctorate in special education with a focus on teacher education from the University of Kansas and spent four years as an assistant professor at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., then three years at Saint Louis University before finding her home at Ohio University. Mira Cole Williams, PhD, is an associate professor in the Educational Foundations and Exceptionalities Department at James Madison University. Dr. Williams earned a doctoral degree in Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education from the University of Virginia. She also received her Master's of Teaching and B.S. in Psychology from the University of Virginia. Dr. Williams taught for six years in inclusive early childhood preschool and elementary classrooms in Virginia. In addition, she served as an educational specialist, consulting with teachers and families of children with disabilities, focusing on differentiating instruction and providing curricular access to all children. She is a strong advocate of high-quality teacher preparation in the area of Early Childhood Inclusive and Special Education and is focused on social justice and equity for young children and their families. She presents locally and nationally on a range of topics related to improving teacher preparation, inclusive practices in early childhood education, and disrupting microaggressions in P-16 educational settings. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/identitytalk4educators/support

ESPN Harrisonburg
061121 WENDY KERN

ESPN Harrisonburg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 13:29


Wendy Kern from Mulligans Golf Center in Harrisonburg talks about program that get girls involved in Golf.

JMU Sports Blog
World Series Bound!!!!

JMU Sports Blog

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 74:32


Softball is headed to the World Series! After taking out two SEC teams to get there, JMU Softball has accomplished something right near the top of the all-timers in Harrisonburg and carries the support of softball fans around the country with them to Oklahoma City this week. Also, can we bet everything we own on Kate Gordon busting out this week!? Love love love love this team, this program, and what it all means for JMU!

KJAE Sports
Class C Baseball Quarterfinals: Simpson Broncos v. Harrisonburg

KJAE Sports

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 136:27


Virginia Water Radio
Episode 577 (5-17-21): Water's at the Heart of Virginia's Western Highlands

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021


 CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-14-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO

western merriam webster culture bay humans university agency america guide music highlands berlin natural relationships earth state audio living college swift history north america world abraham lincoln sound accent dark testing tech water web index land rain pond research tourism ocean government education recreation conservation development maine west virginia route charleston hot springs springs falls chesapeake snow caves environment images richmond va bath yarmouth msonormal maintenance commonwealth figures stream ky highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental spine times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading morton shenandoah commerce grade ancient history colorful signature nonesuch resort karst watershed transcript earth sciences see what i have done homestead wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table harrisonburg heidelberg germany poff ar sa homeowners blacksburg virginia museum warm springs james river regions environmental protection agency cosgrove msohyperlink occurrence usi sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater annals policymakers bmp acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap michael martz sols tmdl springer verlag united states history biotic alleghany county virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Mat Talk Podcast Network
#WrestlingShirtADayInMay founder and wrestling advocate Jim Dutrow

Mat Talk Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 72:25


Three years ago, Short Time host Jason Bryant (that's me) did a #WrestlingShirtADay challenge with some wrestling fans. The end result was 366 days of different wrestling shirts to promote the sport. After the drop of wrestling at some wannabe school in Norfolk, Virginia, the initial idea sparked something in Jim Dutrow, who wanted to do more to draw awareness to our sport -  the #WrestlingShirtADayInMay movement was born. Dutrow, a Virginia native and former college wrestler at some school in Harrisonburg that also dropped wrestling, launched the initiative as a way to recognize schools with wrestling and thank them for their support.  The second year #WrestlingShirtADayInMay has seen over 150 wrestling fans showcase over 1,000 shirts and counting just 10 days into the month. For a full scoreboard, updated by Mark Williams, check the link https://sites.google.com/view/wrestlingshirtadayinmay/entries-by-twitter?authuser=0 Links to Follow Daily Wrestling Newsletter: mattalkonline.com/news Contribute: mattalkonline.com/contribute Patreon: patreon.com/mattalkonline Rokfin: rokfin.com/creator/mattalkonline The Short Time Time Wrestling Podcast is proudly supported by Compound Sportswear: mattalkonline.com/compound Quick Subscribe: Podfollow.com/shorttime Short Time Wrestling Podcast: Episode 658 - May 10, 2021 Direct Link for the visually impaired

Short Time Wrestling Podcast
#WrestlingShirtADayInMay founder and wrestling advocate Jim Dutrow

Short Time Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 69:25


Three years ago, Short Time host Jason Bryant (that’s me) did a #WrestlingShirtADay challenge with some wrestling fans. The end result was 366 days of different wrestling shirts to promote the sport. After the drop of wrestling at some wannabe school in Norfolk, Virginia, Jim Dutrow wanted to do more to draw awareness to our sport and the #WrestlingShirtADayInMay movement was born. Dutrow, a Virginia native and former college wrestler at some school in Harrisonburg that also dropped wrestling, launched the initiative as a way to recognize schools with wrestling and thank them for their support. The second year #WrestlingShirtADayInMay has seen over 150 wrestling fans showcase over 1,000 shirts and counting just 10 days into the month. 

For a full scoreboard, updated by Mark Williams, check the linkhttps://sites.google.com/view/wrestlingshirtadayinmay/entries-by-twitter?authuser=0Links to FollowDaily Wrestling Newsletter: mattalkonline.com/newsContribute: mattalkonline.com/contributePatreon: patreon.com/mattalkonlineRokfin: rokfin.com/creator/mattalkonlineThe Short Time Time Wrestling Podcast is proudly supported by Compound Sportswear: mattalkonline.com/compound
Quick Subscribe:Podfollow.com/shorttimeShort Time Wrestling Podcast: Episode 658 - May 10, 2021

Golf DMV
Heritage Oaks Golf Course | Episode 193

Golf DMV

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 76:01


Golf DMV reviews Heritage Oaks Golf Course in Harrisonburg, VA. Vern's new clubs are in and his distance training is paying off. LB visited the Golf Dr. Claude now has no wedges and Manny wins his PGA Jr. match.

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Greg Madia, Harrisonburg Daily News Record Previews ND - JMU

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 16:34


Ed reacts to round 1 of the NFL Draft ABC 13 - WSET reporter Dave Walls gets you ready for HS Football state championship games for area teams Greg Madia previews JMU Dukes game vs North Dakota in the FCS Playoffs

Biz & Tech with Aegis
Reporting in the Capitol City with Monica Casey

Biz & Tech with Aegis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 21:44


Monica Casey is WCTV's Capital City Correspondent/MMJ, covering issues of local government and politics. She reports for early afternoon and evening newscasts.Before joining the WCTV family, Monica was a morning reporter in Harrisonburg, Virginia for our sister station, WHSV. While there, she covered issues including the inner workings of the Harrisonburg-Rockingham drug court, lawsuits related to the opioid epidemic, and social media in the 2018 US Senate election. She also created a historical documentary series called “Touring Our Towns.”In this episode, Blake and Monica discuss news, reporting during the pandemic, e-scooters, and much more.Produced by Level Up Digital Media http://www.levelup.media/​​Participants: Blake Dowling, CEO, Aegis Business TechnologiesMonica Casey, Capital City Correspondent, WCTVWEBSITE - https://www.aegisbiztech.com​​ FACEBOOK - https://facebook.com/aegisbiztech​​INSTAGRAM - https://instagram.com/aegisbiztech​​TWITTER - https://twitter.com/aegissales​​

On the Road with Buck & Phil
Episode 37 : Dell Curry

On the Road with Buck & Phil

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 64:19


Shooter, broadcaster, Harrisonburg, VA Native as well as Seth Curry's father, Dell Curry joins Buck and Phis this week.   Dell shares what drove Stephen to almost quit the game.   The Wizards continue to disappoint following the All-Star break.   The NBA has truly made the association a scorer's league.  The boys finish up with a stroll down memory lane, remembering some of their visits to Philly.