Podcasts about london school

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Best podcasts about london school

Show all podcasts related to london school

Latest podcast episodes about london school

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan
Caring for Yourself & Your Team - Dr. Foojan Zeine chats with Jamie Lerner and Kian Gohar

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 54:00


Inner Voice – a Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan on KMET 1490 AM / ABC News Radio.  In this segment- Caring for Yourself & Your Team- Dr. Foojan shares the Tip of the Week about needing and deserving guilt-free breaks. Dr. Foojan chats with Jamie Lerner, co-author of the book The Ever-Loving Essence of You, can put a fresh spin on just about anything that anyone throws her way. Jamie talks about the art of allowing personal responsibility. www.jamie-lerner.com . The latest research is shared with you regarding allowing autonomy in the team to create great productivity and customer satisfaction leading to our next guest Kian Gohar who inspires the world's leading organizations to harness innovation and moonshots to solve complex problems. A former executive director of the XPRIZE Foundation and Singularity University, Kian has coached the leadership teams of dozens of Fortune 500 companies. He is a sought-after public speaker on innovation, a Ted Speaker, and has been featured on CNBC, NPR and Axions. He is a graduate of Northwestern University, the London School of Economics, and Harvard Business School. He is the co-author of “Competing in the new world of work – how radical adaptability separates the best from the rest”. @fromthekgb - www.radicallyadapt.com Check out my website: www.foojanzeine.com Remember to Subscribe, Listen, Review, Share! Find me on these sites: *iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i...) *Google Play (https://play.google.com/music/m/Inpl5...) *Stitcher (https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=185544...) *YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/DrFoojanZeine ) Platforms to Like and Follow: *Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DrFoojanZeine/) *Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/Dr.FoojanZe...)

Post Corona
Anti-Semitism's Enablers with Bret Stephens of The New York Times

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 36:16


Anti-semitism was tragically back in the news in recent days with the hostage-taking at the Beth Israel synagogue in Colleyville, Texas. But was this event covered the way it should have been? Barely. And this tells us a lot about anti-Semitism during these times. Is this period different? Have we entered a ‘new normal' for anti-Semitism? Is it just the extremes or are there now more enablers? Bret Stephens, Pulitzer Prize winning columnist for The New York Times, joins us. Bret came to The Times after a long career with The Wall Street Journal, where he was most recently deputy editorial page editor and, for 11 years, a foreign affairs columnist. Before that, he was editor in chief of The Jerusalem Post. Bret has reported from around the world and interviewed scores of world leaders. He is also the author of "America in Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder.” Bret was raised in Mexico City, earned his BA at the University of Chicago and his Masters at the London School of Economics.

Livenet.ch Podcast
18.01.2022 | Livenet-Talk: Ist das Misstrauen gegenüber den Medien berechtigt?

Livenet.ch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:53


Der Medienwissenschaftler Vinzenz Wyss und die Epidemiologin Annelies Wilder-Smith sprechen mit Chefredaktor Florian Wüthrich über den Einfluss der Corona-Pandemie auf die Schweizer Gesellschaft. Welches Zeugnis stellen sie den Medien und der Regierung punkto Kommunikation aus? Wie hat das Virus den Umgang miteinander geprägt? Wo wird die Bevölkerung in Zukunft ihre Informationen beziehen? Gäste im Talk: - Vinzenz Wyss (Professor für Journalistik und Medienwissenschaftler an der ZHAW) - Dr. Annelies Wilder-Smith (Professorin für neu auftretende Infektionskrankheiten an der London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)

The Take
Somalia in the face of famine

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 22:34


Famine is a slow-moving disaster and when it is declared, people are typically dying of starvation already. It is too late to save every life. Much of Somalia is facing its third dry season which is bad news for crops, animals, and people. Famine could arrive as soon as March. The Take talks to Somalis trying to get the word out about what is happening in their country and what they hope will be done to save lives. In this episode:  Aydrus Daar, Executive Director at WASDA, a Somali aid group working in the horn of Africa Nisar Majid, Research Associate at the London School of Economics where he was recently Research Director on the Conflict Research Programme (Somalia portfolio) Guhad Adan,a Research Associate at the London School of Economics who has been a freelance consultant based in Nairobi and has been working as an aid practitioner and researcher in the Horn of Africa for over 20 years Florence Mangwende, Humanitarian and Resilience Program Manager at Oxfam Novib (@oxfamnovib) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Wisdom.MBA
The Future of Private Aviation, Leadership & Special Forces Training with Tommy Sowers, PhD

Wisdom.MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 56:52


Tommy Sowers is a true renaissance man with an incredible resume. He is an entrepreneur, academic, politician and a decorated Military officer with an 11-year career in the Army, having achieved the rank of Major. He has taught at West Point, the University of Missouri and Duke. He also served as the Assistant Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.Tommy is currently the President of flyExclusive, which is the fastest growing private jet charter in the United States, located in Kinston, North Carolina. Tommy and I discuss the future of private aviation and how COVID-19 has impacted the demand for private jet ownership. Tommy also talks about cofounding GoldenKey, a venture backed firm which disrupted the buying and selling of homes. The company raised $3.7 million in funding and was sold in 2018.Tommy graduated first in his class at the Special Forces Qualification Course, and we talk about how his military training and time as a Green Beret prepared him for diverse leadership challenges. Tommy completed his undergraduate from Duke University and earned his MSc and PhD from the London School of Economics.This episode has a lot of great insights on leadership, dealing with adversity and adapting to different work environments and situations. Also … if you have dreams and aspirations about flying private or owning a jet, you'll want to tune in.Discussion Topics:(1:47) Duke basketball & being a seven-foot Army Ranger.(4:45) Private jet travel and sales during the COVID era.(14:14) Investment trends in the private aviation industry.(20:56) Adding innovative technical jobs in North Carolina.(26:15) The economics of jet ownership. Does it make financial sense?(29:00) Becoming an entrepreneur, founding GoldenKey and raising venture capital.(35:54) University education and teaching styles.(41:40) Special Forces mindset to help with career and life transitions.(49:35) Veteran career transition advice.(53:33) Rapid fire questions.

Marketing Trends
Jumping on Opportunities Through Rapid Expansion with Christine de Wendel, Co-Founder and CEO US Sunday

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 46:32


There is an old saying that in every tragedy there is an opportunity. Sometimes it's our darkest moments that we find a way to make the world a better place, and that's exactly what Christine de Wendel, Co-Founder and CEO US Sunday sought out to do during the pandemic. Today marketers are all trying to create a frictionless experience. Or simply, a better buying experience for the consumer. But what is less seamless than waiting on the person to bring you the bill? Sunday sought to rectify this, and they did. “We said, if we want to get to market really quickly and take advantage of this incredible wave, and this opportunity that has come out of the COVID pandemic, we need to make [payment] really easy. And so our solution is we put a QR code on the table. We map it to the point of sale system. It allows you as a consumer to scan the QR code on the table, see the menu, order like many restaurants already had, but then pull up your bill and pay. And so we're transforming something that used to take 15 minutes and we're turning it into a ten second experience” Sunday's technology is simple, but has innovated the restaurant industry in ways that has staying power.. Not only is it creating a smoother process for consumers, but it also has the possibility to give businesses a better sense of who they are working with while also creating more personalized experiences.. On Marketing Trends, Christine takes us through the process of jumping on an opportunity, how to scale quickly while finding good candidates regardless of market, and, the importance of a strong central branding and so much more on this episode of Marketing Trends.Main TakeawaysQR Codes should be an important part of your business.They help make payments smoother for your consumers.It's important for a start up to over invest in brand identity.Hiring local experts when expanding globally is important to understand the culture and mindset of customers.It's important to have a strong central brand, but allow for flexibility in local markets.When you're an entrepreneur, you're going to have extreme emotional highs and lows as you see your idea come to life.Key Quotes“We said, if we want to get to market really quickly and take advantage of this incredible wave and this opportunity that has come out of the pandemic, we need to make it really easy. And so our solution is we put a QR code on the table. We map it to the point of sale system. It allows you as a consumer to scan the QR code on the table, see the menu, order like many restaurants already had, but then pull up your bill and pay. And so we're transforming something that used to take 15 minutes and we're turning it into ten-secondnd experience”“As an early stage startup, you over-invest in brand.”“We've had great traction and great partnerships with most of the point of sales because they realize that it's a very fragmented market and that working with us means that we're really building something that's going to address 70, 80, 90, 100 percent of the market, as opposed to just their customer base.”“Entrepreneurs will tell you this every day, it is full of challenges and the ups and downs of building a company like this are incredible. Seeing your product live is so rewarding and the stress and the anxiety of making sure that you're building a really robust product that won't disappoint is also extremely nice. I love the enthusiasm we're getting, and am extremely appreciative of my teams because I never thought it would be such a roller coaster in terms of emotions. It's really a call out to other entrepreneurs that this is exciting, but this can be so hard. BioChristine de Wendel is the co-founder and CEO of Sunday, a QR-based payment platform that improves the ease of the guest checkout experience. Prior to Sunday, Christine became an expert in European E-commerce. Between 2020 and 2017, Christine was Chief Operating Officer of ManoMano, one of France's fastest growing tech companies and Europe's leading online platform for home improvement.  Prior to joining ManoMano, Christine spent seven years at Zalando, Europe's largest online fashion retailer, where she built up the Paris office and managed Zalando's French business.  Christine began her career as a consultant with Bain & Company in Paris and New York.  She is currently working on a new venture.Christine holds a BSc in International Affairs from Georgetown University, an MSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and an MBA from INSEAD.  Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Christine has American, French and Austrian citizenship. She currently lives in Atlanta with her husband and three children after spending 15 years in Paris.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

Business Angel Talk mit David Rhotert
#37,"Das Schulsystem ist gescheitert – das Potential im Bildungsmarkt ist gigantisch", Ben Dietrich, HeyTimi GmbH

Business Angel Talk mit David Rhotert

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 30:34


In dieser Podcast-Folge spreche ich mit Ben Dietrich darüber, wie er dazu kam, das Startup HeyTimi zu gründen. Ben Dietrich ist einer der Mitgründer des Startups, der sein Know-how dafür einsetzt, eine smarte Nachhilfeplattform für Schüler:Innen anzubieten. Ben studierte an der Universität Bamberg, wo er seinen Bachelor und Master of Science in Information Systems erlang. Bei HeyTimi ist er speziell für das Marketing zuständig. Vor HeyTimi war Ben unter anderem für zwei Jahre in den Privatschulen seiner Eltern tätig und gründete eine digitale Marketingagentur. Gegründet wurde HeyTimi von David Kanis, Ben Dietrich sowie Martin Schneid und Philipp Rößner. David absolvierte sein Bachelorstudium in International Business an der Universität Bamberg, bevor er 2018 an der London School of Economics and Political Science seinen Master of Science erlang. Vor der Gründung von HeyTimi war David als Consultant im Bereich Strategy & Transactions für EY tätig und ist von dort auch mit dem Private Equity Geschäft in den Bereichen Consumer Technology sowie Education vertraut. Vervollständigt werden die Kernkompetenzen u.a. durch Martin Schneid und Philipp Rößner. Beides Software- bzw. Appentwickler mit jeweils über 18 Jahren Software Projektleitungserfahrung, die für die Umsetzung der Plattformentwicklung verantwortlich sind.

Profit From the Inside with Joel Block
148: Thought Leadership: The Inside Track on Executive Marketing

Profit From the Inside with Joel Block

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 31:55


Contact info:Peter Winick CEO of Thought Leadership Leverage Thoughtleadershipleverage.com Bio:Peter Winick is the founder and CEO of Thought Leadership Leverage. For the past two decades he has helped individuals and organizations build and grow revenue streams through designing and growing their thought leadership platforms as well as acting as a guide and advisor for increasing business to business sales of thought leadership products. His clients come from a diverse set of backgrounds and specialties. They include New York Times bestselling business book authors, members of the Speakers' Hall of Fame, recipients of the Thinkers50 award, CEOs of public and privately held companies, and academics at prestigious institutions such as Yale, Wharton, Dartmouth, and London School of Business. Peter has built his career and Thought Leadership Leverage to serve the needs of these individuals and others like them. Peter uses a combination of art, science, logic, focus, passion, and creativity to transform a thought leader's great ideas into a platform and practice so they can effectively reach business leaders and executives to serve them the tools they and their organizations need. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Business Daily
White privilege

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 18:00


Does the global economy need to start dismantling 'global white privilege'? The Black Lives matter protest movement has focussed lots of attention on racial attitudes in rich western countries. How easy is it for instance, for people of black or Asian heritage to get on the ladder to business success in those countries? But is the economics of what's now called 'white privilege' a global problem too? Ed Butler speaks to Chandran Nair, the founder and Chief Executive Officer of The Global Institute for Tomorrow, an independent think-tank in Hong Kong and the author of ‘Dismantling Global White Privilege: Equity for a Post-Western World'. And also to Lucinda Platt, from the London School of Economics, who has recently written a report for the IFS on the degree of social and economic mobility being achieved among the UK's minority racial and ethnic groups.

Your Parenting Mojo - Respectful, research-based parenting ideas to help kids thrive

This episode continues our conversation on the topic of children and food.  A few months ago we heard from https://yourparentingmojo.com/captivate-podcast/eating/ (Dr. Lindo Bacon about how the things we've learned about obesity might not actually be the whole story).  Then we talked https://yourparentingmojo.com/captivate-podcast/dor/ (with Ellyn Satter about the approach she devised called Division of Responsibility), which holds the parent/caregiver responsible for the what, when, and where of eating and the child responsible for whether and how much.   We followed that with a https://yourparentingmojo.com/captivate-podcast/sugarproof/ (conversation with Dr. Michael Goran, a world-renowned expert on the impact of sugar on our bodies, and specifically on children's bodies) – and co-author of the book SugarProof.  While the research seems to indicate that consuming large amounts of sugar isn't necessarily the best thing for us, when I dug into the original papers that form the backbone of SugarProof I found that the results didn't always seem to be quite as large as the book indicated.   In this episode we take another look at sugar – this time from the perspective of sociologist https://essl.leeds.ac.uk/sociology/staff/53/dr-karen-throsby (Dr. Karen Throsby).  Dr. Thorsby received her BA in English Language and Literature from Lincoln College, Oxford, and a MSc in Gender and later a Ph.D from the London School of Economics.  She is currently  an Associate Professor in Gender Studies at the University of Leeds, and is writing a book entitled Sugar Rush: Science, Obesity, and the Social Life of Sugar.  For the book, she is analyzing over 500 UK newspaper articles about sugar, as well as policy documents, scientific publications, popular science articles, self-help literature, and documentaries.  She wants to understand what happens when we demonize sugar as ‘public enemy number one,' and along with it the fat body.  She doesn't aim to determine the ‘truth' about sugar or offer prescriptions about what people should eat, but instead think about how this debate relates to how scientific knowledge is produced, validated, and appropriated, panics about health and body size, the role of generation, gender, race, and class, and the lived inequalities associated with food.   Shownotes: (02:10) Introducing Dr. Throsby (03:22) One of your big focuses is on the idea of sugar being addictive.  Can you tell us why you start there?  What does it mean to be addicted to something, and can we be addicted to sugar? (09:46) We have to be really careful with any attempt to define addiction because some people and certain groups of people are seen as more liable to be seduced by sugar than others (12:18) The neuroscientific model of addiction recognizes that addiction is more than a failure of will and morals but also factors in biological vulnerability which can affect some people more than others (15:10) The idea that you could stop consuming sugar if you wanted to is part of the problem in the way that sugar is being figured because it ignores the social context within which consumption occurs (21:18) The reason the book is called Sugar Rush is obviously it's a play on the idea of having a lot of sugar, but also about the rush to blame sugar (22:04) Sugar is often referred to as empty calories but actually, it's a category of food that is absolutely laden with meaning that I think is really important   Other episodes mentioned in this episode: https://yourparentingmojo.com/captivate-podcast/sugarproof/ (145: How to Sugarproof your kids with Dr. Michael Goran)   Links: https://yourparentingmojo.com/subscribe/ (Subscribe to the show) https://yourparentingmojo.com/recordtheintro/ (Record the intro to Your Parenting Mojo :))   Resource Links:...

Disaster Area
Episode 188: The New London school explosion

Disaster Area

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 118:49


On March 18th, 1937, the students in the junior-senior high school of New London, TX, sat waiting in eager antipation of the end of the school day, looking forward to a three-day weekend. But the school, and many of the students and teachers inside the building, wouldn't make it to 3:30.

Business Daily
Starting a company to fight rare disease

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 17:28


Mapping the human genome led to big advances in diagnosing rare disease. But diagnosis is only the first step in dealing with an illness. So what do you do if your child is found to have a condition that has no treatment? We hear from Michelle Teng, a mother who co-founded a biotech firm called SynaptixBio, that is looking to find the world's first treatment for a rare neurodegenerative disease. Also in the programme, the Chief Medical Officer at Genomics England, Dr Richard Scott, tells us his hopes for the future of genomics medicine. And Dr Segun Fatumo of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, explains why Africa is so important when it comes to genetic research. Presented by Vivienne Nunis and produced by Sarah Treanor. Image: Scientists look at a DNA model. Credit: Getty Images.

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Still uncertainty about Omicron peak

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 6:41


Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Incroyable !
Les homards sont sensibles à la douleur

Incroyable !

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 1:56


Une pratique culinaire plutôt répandue consiste à ébouillanter un homard, alors qu'il est encore en vie. Un peu de compassion devra désormais être de mise : en effet, il est maintenant prouvé que ces crustacés ressentent de la douleur.Sous leur carapace, des êtres sensiblesVoilà une découverte qui risque de chambouler les us et coutumes du monde de la gastronomie.En effet, une étude commandée par le gouvernement britannique est formelle : les poulpes, les crabes et – donc – les homards ressentent de la douleur lorsqu'ils sont plongés dans des liquides bouillants.Avec ce rapport, les experts de la "London School of Economics" ont en fait contribué à poser les premiers jalons d'un projet de loi visant à préserver le bien-être animal.Au total, ce sont même 300 études scientifiques qui certifient que les céphalopodes (des mollusques munis de tentacules), les octopodes (regroupant les poulpes et pieuvres) et les décapodes (des crustacés à cinq paires de pattes) doivent être classés dans la catégories des "êtres sensibles à la douleur".Pour parvenir à cette conclusion, les chercheurs ont – à vrai dire - utilisé des méthodes d'analyse bien précises.Homard à tuerPour cerner les réactions des homards (et autres animaux marins), les scientifiques ont mesuré leur sensibilité de huit façons différentes.Par exemple, les analystes ont cherché à identifier la présence (ou l'absence) de récepteurs à la douleur chez les êtres observés.De même, il ont scruté les comportements adoptés par ces animaux lorsqu'ils étaient impliqués dans des situations menaçantes ou bénéfiques (quand ils étaient blessés ou, au contraire, aidés par des soins ; par exemple).Verdict : de manière plutôt contre-intuitive, les crabes et autres crustacés ont la capacité de ressentir la douleur... contrairement aux poissons qui seraient complètement dépourvus d'un système neurologique suffisant, pour avoir ce genre de sensations !Du coup, les conséquences ne se sont pas fait attendre : depuis mars 2018, les Suisses interdisent catégoriquement la pose d'un décapode marcheur en vie (homard, tourteau ou araignée de mer) dans de l'eau bouillante.Pour être cuisinés, ces animaux doivent donc être - au préalable – assommés (si possible par choc électrique). Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

The Human Risk Podcast
Sebastian Boo on Kindness

The Human Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 62:52


What is kindness and why does it matter? One of my New Year's resolutions for 2022 is to be kinder to others. So, in this episode, I'm learning more about what being kind means — spoiler alert, it doesn't mean always being nice — and why that matters.My guest Sebastian Boo is a trainer, tutor and researcher at the London School of Economics and Political Science and the founder of Kindness Advantage Ltd, a company that brings kindness training to the workplace. So he knows what he's talking about when it comes to kindness. During our discussion, we explore what kindness is — in particular why it might not mean what we tend to think it means — why it matters and what we can practically do to be kinder.Aside from having a fascinating conversation with Sebastian, the other reason for getting him onto the show is to publicise my resolution so there's hopefully more chance of me sticking to it. Let's see...During our discussion we talk about:Kindness Advantage https://kindness-advantage.com/Kindness: A Pocket Guide https://kindness-advantage.com/the-bookProfessor David Canter's ( ) research on measuring kindness entitled ‘Development of a measure of kindness' https://www.researchgate.net/publication/351889065_Development_of_a_measure_of_kindnessAn interview with Professor Paul Bloom on his book Against Empathy: https://www.vox.com/conversations/2017/1/19/14266230/empathy-morality-ethics-psychology-compassion-paul-bloom
Against Empathy - https://www.google.com/books/edition/Against_Empathy/op67CwAAQBAJ?hl=enThe study undertaken at Coca Cola Span on acts of kindness called Everyday Prosociality in the Workplace: The Reinforcing Benefits of Giving, Getting and Glimpsing - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317355148_Everyday_Prosociality_in_the_Workplace_The_Reinforcing_Benefits_of_Giving_Getting_and_Glimpsing
The Isle of Skye - https://www.isleofskye.com/

The Intuitive Customer - Improve Your Customer Experience To Gain Growth
Customer Relationships Are a Waste of Time! Is This True? What Do You Think?

The Intuitive Customer - Improve Your Customer Experience To Gain Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 30:49


Our listeners have problems and they let us know about it. For our I'm in a Pickle feature on the podcast, Tina in New Zealand wrote to us because the engineering firm she works with  thinks customer relationships are a waste of time. She wants to know how to convince the engineers that customer relationships are what get the customer strategy gears turning toward long-term success.   I found this pickle particularly interesting because I have faced this myself in our global Customer Experience consultancy. In fact, it was the impetus for the research we did with the London School of Business that led to my third book, The DNA of Customer Experience: How Emotions Drive Value.  In this episode, we share our experiences working with firms that are less than convinced that customer relationships are essential to business success. From storytelling to Emotional Signature® research to adopting the same strategies as one would for personal relationships, we share plenty of practical tips to help Tina get out of her pickle and on her way to convincing the team to see things her way. Key Ideas to Improve your Customer Experience People didn't always have interpersonal relationships. Now, we do, and not just in our personal lives. We have personal relationships in business, too. As customers, we use the same cognitive machinery to manage both types of relationships, and, not surprisingly, there are parallels in the management of them, too. We take a close look at Tina's business pickle and present real-world, practical solutions to convince the engineers it's worth it to develop a business relationships with customers.   Here are a few key moments in the discussion: 03:02  We read Tina's pickle to set up the discussion on what business problem our listener is facing.  05:17  We start by looking at some of the reasons this might be happening to Tina at work and Colin shares an example of his experience in a similar situation. 09:21  Ryan chimes in with how convincing people to do anything requires a mixture of what they are interested in and what you are trying to tell them.     12:16  Colin shares how a skeptic at a German insurance company asked him to prove what Colin was saying was true, and how that led to the research behind Colin's third book, The DNA of Customer Experience. 15:48  Colin share his insight on what makes successful customer-facing people and what Tina can do to optimize the experience for the engineering customers.    18:08  Ryan discusses how part of the convincing might require pointing out that relationships have staying power, but competitive differentiation in the marketplace. 20:48  Colin shares how his work with Maersk Line revealed to leadership the pitfalls of a transactional relationship with customers, and how their changes led to a giant turnaround for the company. 23:19  We share 5 tips (well, really only four; one of the tips will get you in trouble) for building relationships from HelpGuide.org, and our other advice for Tina and her company.  Do you have a business problem you would like our help with? Please contact us to tell us about it. We may solve it with you and our listening audience on the podcast! Please tell us how we are doing! Complete this short survey.  Customer Experience Information & Resources LinkedIn recognizes Colin Shaw as one of the 'World's Top 150 Business Influencers.' As a result, he has 289,000 followers of his work. Shaw is Founder and CEO of Beyond Philosophy LLC, which helps organizations unlock growth by discovering customers' hidden, unmet needs that drive value ($). The Financial Times selected Beyond Philosophy LLC as one of the best management consultancies for the last two years. Follow Colin on LinkedIn and Twitter. Click here to learn more about Professor Ryan Hamilton of Emory University.  Why Customers Buy: As an official "Influencer" on LinkedIn, Colin writes a regular newsletter on all things Customer Experience. Click here to join the other 22,000 subscribers.  Experience Health Check: You already have an experience, even if you weren't deliberate about it. Our Experience Health Check can help you understand what you have today. Colin or one of our team can assess your digital or physical Customer Experience, interacting with your organization as a customer to define what is good and what needs improving. Then, they will provide a list of recommendations for critical next steps for your organization. Click here to learn more.  How can we help? Click here to learn more about Beyond Philosophy's Suite of Services.

Post Corona
From Baby Boom to Baby Bust - with Nicholas Eberstadt

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 60:30


China is poised to pass one of the great demographic inflection points” – that's according to the Financial Times. The inflection point the FT is referring to is that of diapers for the elderly growing into a larger market than diapers for infants. China won't be the first. As far back as a decade ago in Japan, adult diapers started outselling infant diapers. What does that tell us about demographics, not just in China, but about the developing world as a whole? We are in the midst of a larger global trend that has not received enough attention: crashing fertility rates and shrinking populations. According to forecasts by an international team of scientists published last year in The Lancet, the world population will peak at 9.2 billion around 2065, and then drop to 8.8 billion by the end of the century. That's a stunning difference -- if you take into account that in the 20th century world population grew 600%, from one billion to six billion. The Lancet study also found what the lead scientist for the project called a “jaw dropping” result: the population of twenty-three countries -- including Japan, Italy, Spain, and Thailand -- would drop by at least half by the end of the century. The U.S. and the rest of Europe are also headed for a worrisome situation. This is a trend that will have far-reaching implications for the 2020s. It will impact economics, geopolitics, culture…it could radically change the very nature of how our societies are organized. To get a crash course on the issue, we invited someone who has been screaming from the hilltops about this trend for a long time. Nicholas Eberstadt holds the Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he researches and writes extensively on demographics and economic development generally. His many books and monographs include “Poverty in China”, “The Tyranny of Numbers”, “The End of North Korea”, “The Poverty of the Poverty Rate” and “Russia's Peacetime Demographic Crisis”. His latest book is “Men Without Work: America's Invisible Crisis”. Nick earned his PhD and masters degree in political economy from Harvard, and a Master of Science from the London School of Economics.

WSJ What’s News
2021 Year in Review: China's Business Crackdown

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 15:22


Dec. 30 edition. Beijing has taken a new, hard stance on business this year, and there are many signs the crackdown isn't over, with more regulation of fintech, health and insurance in the cards. Keyu Jin from the London School of Economics gives her predictions for the future business climate in China and what it could mean for investors. Peter Granitz hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Du grain à moudre
Le tabou de l'héritage est-il indépassable ?

Du grain à moudre

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 38:42


durée : 00:38:42 - Le Temps du débat - par : Emmanuel Laurentin - Mardi dernier, le Centre d'Analyse Économique a publié une note sur la nécessité de réformer les droits de successions pour combattre la perpétuation des inégalités, remettant le sujet de l'héritage sur la table. Au-delà de l'échéance électorale, pourquoi l'héritage reste-t-il un sujet sensible ? - invités : Jean-Philippe Feldman Professeur agrégé des facultés de droit et maître de conférences à SciencesPo. Avocat à la Cour de Paris; Camille Landais Économiste et professeur associé à la London School of Economics and Political Science, co-auteur du rapport sur l'héritage pour le Conseil d'Analyse Economique; Mélanie Plouviez Maîtresse de conférences en philosophie à l'université Côte d'Azur, en charge du pilotage du projet de recherche « Philosophie de l'héritage » financé par l'Agence Nationale de Recherche

France Culture physique
Le tabou de l'héritage est-il indépassable ?

France Culture physique

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 38:42


durée : 00:38:42 - Le Temps du débat - par : Emmanuel Laurentin - Mardi dernier, le Centre d'Analyse Économique a publié une note sur la nécessité de réformer les droits de successions pour combattre la perpétuation des inégalités, remettant le sujet de l'héritage sur la table. Au-delà de l'échéance électorale, pourquoi l'héritage reste-t-il un sujet sensible ? - invités : Jean-Philippe Feldman Professeur agrégé des facultés de droit et maître de conférences à SciencesPo. Avocat à la Cour de Paris; Camille Landais Économiste et professeur associé à la London School of Economics and Political Science, co-auteur du rapport sur l'héritage pour le Conseil d'Analyse Economique; Mélanie Plouviez Maîtresse de conférences en philosophie à l'université Côte d'Azur, en charge du pilotage du projet de recherche « Philosophie de l'héritage » financé par l'Agence Nationale de Recherche

World Business Report
Omicron leading to global staff shortages

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 25:58


Omicron is having an impact on the global workforce. To try and tackle the problem in the US, health authorities have halved the recommended isolation period for people who test positive for COVID-19, but don't exhibit symptoms. Dr Sara Machado, health economist from the London School of Economics, looks at what measures could get people back to work, and which are unlikely to help. Also in the programme, China's foreign ministry has accused the United States of putting astronauts in danger by ignoring obligations under treaties on outer space. This programme is presented by Rahul Tandon and produced by Josh Thorpe and Susan Karanja.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation December 28, 2021 Special

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 28:19


In this week's edition of Circulation on the Run, Dr. Amit Khera introduces the new Social Media Editors to our Circulation listeners. Please welcome Dr. Vanessa Blumer, Dr. Pishoy Gouda, Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia, Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre, and Dr. Sonia Shah to Circulation. Dr. Amit Khera: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. I'm Amit Khera, Associate Editor from UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and Digital Strategies' Editor for Circulation. And today I have the privilege of sitting in for your usual host, Dr. Carolyn Lam, and Dr. Greg Hundley. Well, two times a year, we really have a special issue, there's no print issue for Circulation in the summer and here in that holiday time. So, fortunately, we get to use this for really whatever we want to do. Dr. Amit Khera: And today we have a very special issue. A few months ago, we transitioned over from a prior social media editor team that was Jainy Savla Dan Ambinder, and Jeffrey Hsu. We were able to recruit a fantastic group of new social media editors. You probably have seen their work behind the scenes, but you've not gotten to meet them personally. So, today I have the privilege of introducing you to our new social media editors. This group of five, that's been working for several months and we get to know them a little bit. Get to hear a little bit about their perspective on social media from fellows in training, and also what they've learned so far in their few months in working with Circulation. So, I'm going to go one by one and introduce you. And first I want to introduce you to Dr. Vanessa Blumer. Vanessa, tell us a little bit about yourself. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much, Dr. Khera, it is such an honor to be here. And I've had so much fun the months that I've been working for Circulation, it's truly just a privilege to work alongside this talented group. So I'm Vanessa Blumer. I am originally from Caracas, Venezuela, born and raised there, did all of my medical training back home. That included medical school, a year of rural service, or rural medicine. Then I actually did residency training in Venezuela as well. It wasn't really in my plans straight away to come to the US, but a little bit due to the political situation that we all know that Venezuela's going or suffering, I decided to come to the US. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: I did residency in the University of Miami, Jackson Memorial hospital, which I loved. Stayed there for a chief year. And then after that came to Duke University to do cardiology fellowship. I'm currently a third year cardiology fellow at Duke, doing a year of research at the DCRI, which I am enjoying a lot, and will be doing heart failure next year. I will be going to Cleveland Clinic for a year of advanced heart failure. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, you've had quite a journey, Vanessa, and congratulations, I think your match was relatively recently. So, we're excited to see where your career takes you from here and appreciate your contribution so far. Now I'm going to introduce you to Pishoy Gouda. Pishoy Tell us a little bit about yourself.     Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Morning, Dr. Khera. My name is Pishoy. I have had the privilege of doing my medical trading all over the world. I was born here in Toronto and moved to Edmonton where I mostly grew up. Since then, I traveled to Galway Ireland where I spent six years to do my undergraduate medical training. Hopped over a short flight and did my Masters in Clinical Trials in the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine before returning to Canada to start my residency training. Got to work with some amazing people in Calgary while I completed my internal medicine training, and then finally returned home to Edmonton where I am in the last few months of my adult cardiology training. Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Next year, I'm really excited to start my interventional cardiology training, which is going to be really exciting. Some of my interests, working with social media, wearable technology so working with this great group has been really awesome. Dr. Amit Khera: Thank you Pishoy. Obviously lots of travels from you as well, and we definitely appreciate your expertise and interest in social media and in technology. It's been very valuable. Next someone who's closer to my backyard. Ming Jia. Ming, welcome. Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia: Hello from Houston, and thank you Dr. Khera. So, it's been a great opportunity to be involved as a social media editor for Circulation. So I'm a current cardiology fellow at Baylor College of medicine in Houston, Texas. Was originally born in China, and grew up in sunny Florida. I did my medical training in Florida as well, and then moved over to Houston, Texas for residency, and now wrapping up my last year in general fellowship. Next year, I'll be staying in Houston at Baylor for interventional fellowship. Then, hopefully after that career in interventional cardiology, but as well as preventional cardiology as well, I tended to actually interest in both interventional and preventional cardiology. Dr. Amit Khera: Very cool. I know you and I were talking about this right beforehand, how that nexus of the two fields and just some of your interest in a lot of the research you've done so far. So again, offering a unique and different perspective, which we appreciate so, welcome, Ming. Next, Peder Myhre. Peder, welcome. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: Thank you so much, Dr. Khera. This is Peder Myhre from Norway, all the way across the pond. And it's such a great honor to be part of this podcast, which I've been a big fan since it started a couple years ago and where Carolyn Lam has been doing with it, it's been really amazing. And I've actually been promoting it to everyone I know with any kind of interest in cardiology. My position in training right now is that I'm in the last year of cardiology training and I'm also doing a 50% post-doc at the University of Oslo with Professor Torbjørn Omland as a mentor. And as a part of my training, I was one year at Harvard University at Brigham Women's Hospital to do research with Professor Scott Solomon's group a couple of years ago. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, we appreciate your affinity and now you get to be on the podcast. That's pretty exciting as well. I should say, each of you is linked to an outstanding Associate Editor at your home institution. And so we're glad you have that mentorship as well there too. And speaking of someone at home institution, someone who I've known for a very long time, Dr. Sonia Shah. Sonya, introduce yourself, please.   Dr. Sonia Shah: Thank you, Dr. Khera. No, just to echo what everyone has said already, it truly has been an honor and a privilege to work with this awesome team. And it's been a lot of fun along the way. So I'm Sonia Shah. I'm a third year cardiology fellow at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. Originally from Central Florida, actually. And then did my undergrad medical school training in Chicago and then went out to the West Coast for my residency training was out at Stanford and now I'm loving being in Dallas. So it's been a lot of fun. So I particularly have an interest in women's cardiovascular health and advanced imaging. And so currently looking for jobs now. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I can say you've been a star fellow and have a really incredible and unique skillset. And, so we look forward to seeing what your career brings and certainly you've brought a lot to our podcast. And we'll talk more about that in just a bit, since you are longest standing social media editor currently. Well, I want to now dig in a little bit and you all again, I want to thank you for what you've done for the last several months. I certainly have learned a lot from you. We've had some discussions as a group about, thoughts about social media and how social media works. Dr. Amit Khera: And so maybe we'll start with the sort of existential question about, why social media? What is the value for journals, if you think about Circulation, but really any journal. What does social media bring? And again, you all have a unique perspective as largely fellows in training and Vanessa, maybe I'll go back to you a little bit about, why social media? What's the point of relevance about all this work that you're doing? Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Yeah. Thank you so much, Dr. Khera. I think that's a great question. And I do think that that's a question that we ask ourselves every day as we're doing this. I think the way that the medical literature has been evolving, it's been evolving in a way of social media and people are consuming more and more social media daily. I think in my own daily life, I discover articles that I'm interested in through social media a lot more than I used to before. And I also discover that I'm interested in particular articles, the way that they are transmitted in social media or the way that they're presented in social media. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: So I think we're reinventing ourselves and reinventing the way that we present to the public, the articles that we have in Circulation, so that people want to read our articles or want to read the articles that authors are doing such a great job at putting together. So I think, we are coming up with creative ideas every day and it's part of what we discuss as a group of how do we present this so that people want to read the articles and discover all the hard work that authors are putting together through different social media platforms. Because we know that people consume not just one social media platform, but several. So I think there's huge potential in social media if we use it in the right way. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. I think your points well taken. I know we're going to talk a lot about Twitter today, but as you pointed out, there are other media as well. That's just in the sort of main, I guess, currency and in the medical and cardiovascular literature. And you mentioned value to authors and one thing you mentioned, which I'll transition a little is about the way things are presented, help you get interested in them. And so that gets to the art of the tweet. Something we've talked about a little bit and, there's a little bit of on the job training, if you will. And we've talked about is there a gold standard in terms of what makes a good frankly, a medical journal tweet. Well, Ming, what do you think? You've been toiling over this for a few months now and tell us what you think is helpful in a medical journal tweet in terms of achieving the goals that Vanessa mentioned. Getting an audience interested in reading these articles is really doing justice for the authors to transmit their research. Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia: Great question, Dr. Khera, and this is something that, as a social media editor, I'm still learning. So for me, writing a concise tweet is very important. Trying to get that essence of a entire study into a very limited number of characters. Obviously having a great figure that highlights the key findings of a study is also very important as well. Now at the same time, I think the most effective posts though, are those that serve as a hook for the paper. So, while we want are tweet to stand on their own. I think the most effective tweets helped to entice the audience to want to read a little bit more and go and read the entire manuscript. So certainly there is a art and skillset in terms of writing these effective posts. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. You certainly bring up some key points, right? So being concise, one by definition and but two is, there are tweets that sometimes can go on and on and that comes into using some interesting hashtags and some shortcuts. But I think your point about innuendo, enticing, not giving away the whole story, but just enough to get people to want to read more. And I think that that is an art. Dr. Amit Khera: And I've certainly seen as you all have done this more and more about how your own writing and tweets have evolved. Pishoy, we've talked a little bit about, all of you are researchers, you've all done some great research, about thinking about social media, sort of a research area. Again, since there's no gold standard about what's a great tweet, just thinking about it more of a discipline as we do any other area that we want to explore scientifically. What are your thoughts about, how do we figure out more, learn more about what makes a great tweet? Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Yeah. Evidence based tweeting is something that I've been interested in. Everything that we do, we want to make sure that we do it well and that we do it effectively and the same goes with social media posts. So what works, what raises interactions with our content. And that's something that other disciplines and advertising have been doing all the time and we should be doing the same as well. If our goal is to increase interactions with our content, then we want to make sure that we are doing it in the most evidence based way. And we've learned a few things. We know that cardiologists and individuals in medicine in general have been using Twitter much more frequently as a way to consume in both your medical and research content. Dr. Pishoy Gouda: So what makes a post great and what increases its interaction and the bottom line is we don't really know. We have a few studies and a few small randomized controlled trials that have been done that give us some insight. We know that vigor, that tweets that include images might pull readers to them a little bit more. But you know what exactly works. We have a lot of observational data, but we don't have a lot of high quality data that gives us the answer to this question. So what we've learned so far is use images, use links. If you can use graphical abstracts, that seems to help as well. But, it's something that we're continuously looking at and we're really excited to put together some new evidence coming up soon in the future. Dr. Amit Khera: Evidence based tweeting. I like it. As you and I have discussed, my predecessor Carolyn Fox had a randomized trail called Intention-to-Tweet using Circulation and then a follow-up study to that. So we hope to do also some good high quality research about social media and what works. Well, that gets to who's your audience, right? I always like to think about when you start something, who's your audience. And there could be lots of people. I think probably our strike zone is researchers, scientists, clinicians, of course, there's lots of lay individuals too, that are paying attention on social media. One thing that's different about Circulation than some other journals is this melding of basic science and clinical science. Some journals are all basic science and all clinical science and Circulation's both. Dr. Amit Khera: And I mean, frankly, that's posed an interesting challenge for this group. None of you are, including myself, are card carrying basic scientists, if you will. So we've had to translate those articles. And I would consider that both a challenge, but also an opportunity because, if we're speaking to a basic science audience, of course we may have one tone we use, but we want this basic science. I think that's the purpose of Circulation is basic science applicable to the clinician and clinical researchers. So, translating that's been a real opportunity. And Peta, maybe I can ask you about that opportunity of translating basic science for clinical researchers and clinicians. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: Yes. I completely agree. And I've learned so much from this job as a social media editor to really try to get the essence out of a basic science paper and the translational outlook for clinicians. Because all of the papers that are basic science that at least I came across in Circulation also have a clinical implication and a translational side of it. And I think when we read these papers and try to sum it up in one tweet, we want to keep the most important essentials of the basic science, but also extend it to clinicians so that they understand in what setting and what this can potentially mean in the future. So for me, that's the biggest challenge when we review basic science papers, but it's also perhaps the part of this job that I learn the most. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. I agree. I think we're all learning a lot. I've certainly learned a lot by delving in deeper into the basic science papers and figuring out how to translate them appropriately. And I think this really highlights, as you mentioned, what Dr. Hill our Editor in Chief, his feeling is basic science papers in Circulation all have to have important clinical implications. That's the benchmark, if you will. So I think we've seen that shew in terms of what papers have come across for you all. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I'm looking now at our longest standing social media editor, Sonya Shaw, she started a few months before as sort of a transition because we certainly wanted someone in place that could help bridge between the old and the new. And Sonya, you've had a decent amount of experience now with two editorial teams. Tell us what you've learned so far by working as a social media editor at Circulation. What are some of the observations you've had and some of the things you've learned in this space? Dr. Sonia Shah: Yeah, certainly. So I think a couple things. I think my ability to accurately and concisely convey the important key points from each journal has definitely improved. But I think the other unique thing, unique perspective that we gain as social media editors is getting to actually see the behind the scenes workings of how the journal works and how papers are put together and accepted. And so I think it's been interesting to see how papers are being analyzed and the teamwork that's required by the Associate Editors and the Editors and making sure to do each paper justice and properly evaluate it. So I think that's been a really cool experience. It certainly has improved my ability to write when I try to think of, what are the key points I want to include. And how to convey information in a way that will be appealing to journals. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, thank you for that. We take this job very seriously, as you all have in that point about doing each paper justice, because you've seen, one, from the author's perspective about how much work they put in and you've been an author before and want to make sure that we appropriately appreciate that. And then also the Associate Editors, there are hours and hours of work for each paper. So even though it comes out, maybe in a few characters in a tweet, we appreciate all that's going behind it. And I'm glad you've gotten to see that process through. Ming, maybe I can come back to you. What have you learned so far by working in Circulation for the last few months? Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia: I do want to echo what Sonya just said in terms of really getting a glimpse of the behind the scenes work is quite amazing. The amount of work and coordination it takes to get a paper from publication to promotion. And, we don't really get that exposure as a author for a manuscript or even as a peer reviewer. So, that part has definitely been a great learning experience. On the other side, I do find it interesting that ever since taking on this role as a social media editor, my way of writing has changed as well. So, trying to be more efficient, getting key points across and really being concise and focused in my manuscript writing. So that's been very helpful from a personal level as well. Dr. Amit Khera: We're very thankful for that. I think we always want this to be bidirectional where you all are contributing in meaningful ways. But that the goal here with fellows in training in this role, social media editors. But for you all to be learning something as well. So I'm glad that that has occurred. And we'll talk more about that in just a few minutes. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, we have a couple of international social media editors and this is my intention. We want to make sure we have a diverse group of social media editors. By background, by thought, by location. And, one way that the beauty of that is again, we get different perspectives. I guess the downside is time zones. We were just joking before, as we were starting this podcast about some of us are very early in the morning and one of our social media editors unfortunately is always late at night when we have our meetings. Peta, tell us a bit about unique observations from an international perspective. You said you've been following Circ for a while, but tell us, from your perspective in Europe, the social media process and how you see it. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: Thank you so much. And it's actually been a really transformation for me from before I spent my year in Boston to after. Because I really learned the potential of using social media and especially Twitter to stay updated and get the latest papers and thoughts from experts in the field. And I remember before I went there, I was often very frustrated that it was so inconvenient to get across important papers that was within my field of interest. Because all the journals were not longer sent in paper to our hospital and the websites were confusing. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: So when Dr. Vaduganathan at the Brigham & Women's Hospital introduced me to Twitter, that really was an eye opener for me. And, ever since that, 90% of the papers that I read I first see on Twitter. Because that's the first place, the people that are within my field, publish it or tweet it. And also I'm able to, you follow a certain amount of scientists and physicians and they have the same interest as you. So it's also, most of it is relevant for what I want to read. So it's really been a revolution for me to start to use Twitter and social media for medical and scientific purposes. And not only for friends and family. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. I think it's some great points. One, is even simplistically just be able to access articles, which we don't always appreciate, from people from around the world. And then obviously what many can, is follow people that have similar interests and amazing to see sort of how different people consume the literature. And for you Twitter being your entry point, I guess, for how you do that, which is I'm sure many, many people do the same. And we have another international editor you met earlier. Pishoy, tell us your perspective. And obviously you're in Canada now and have moved many places. What's your perspective from an international perspective, looking at social media? Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Coming to work at Circulation, I expected a very niche editorial board, but what I'm really finding out is boy, does it take a village. And it is people from all over the world. And it really hits home that collaboration and research has become a global phenomenon. And to be able to do art well and to appropriately represent researchers from across the world. We have an editorial board and team that is global and it really does take a village to take a paper from submission all the way through the publication team, starting from the authors to the peer reviewers, editors. But then the entire post-production team, which is behind the scenes and don't get a lot of glory, but they do a lot of the heavy lifting to make sure that, the research that's submitted gets in front of readers. And that's something that I hadn't really thought of before. And it's been really interesting to see how that process unfolds. So that's definitely been eye opening for me. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I appreciate what you said about, when it takes a village and I would be remiss if I don't always call out Augie Rivera, who is the engine and mastermind behind Circulation, who's helping us do this podcast today and every week. But the other part is the international workings I think many may not appreciate. We have editorial board meetings every other week at very different time zones on purpose because we have people in Europe and in Asia and in Africa. And as you know, Dr. Lam who's the main podcast editor is in Singapore. Dr. Amit Khera: So, this is by intention. It really gives us a wonderful international perspective. And so we're so glad to have you two as part of our international team. Well, I think that's a great transition, a little bit to just talking about fellows in training and involvement in journals for Circulation perspective, and from the AHA, I should say, getting fellows in training involved in cardiovascular research, the editorial process, this is something that's really important to us and something we continually strive to find new ways to do. So, Vanessa, I'm going to come back to you. I know, not just at Circulation, but I know at other journals you've had some responsibilities. Tell us a little bit of what you tell other fellows in training about getting involved in journal activities. How to, and what's the benefit. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much Dr. Khera. I think this is such an important question. First my recommendation is, get involved in one way or another. I think there's different ways of getting involved as simple as just start reviewing articles. And the reason I say this is as I aspire to become an academic, a well-rounded academic cardiologist, I think my involvement with journals has just made me a much better researcher, a much better academic cardiologist. It's made me, I think, Sonya said this so well, it's made her a better author. It's made me a better writer. So I think it compliments what you do just so much better. I think you're better at what you do when you see the behind the scenes and you understand what happens in scholarly publishing. So I think there's different ways of getting involved. I know that Circulation has many and then probably a good way is to reach out. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: I know that people can reach out to us and we can probably guide them along the way, but different journals have different ways of getting involved. But I think if you want to start, one way is start reviewing. You learn a lot through the review process in itself on how an article is structured. And there's some journal that have a little bit more of a mentorship approach towards reviewing. And, that's also a good way starting out. When we start off as residents, we get some papers get in our inbox to review and we really don't necessarily know how to approach it. So maybe a mentorship approach to it is a good way to start. But overall, I would just say, start getting involved. I think it's a great experience. Personally, I have learned so much from it and I think I'm just a better academic cardiologist because of it. Dr. Amit Khera: Thank you for that. And I think your point about just find ways to get involved. And I think our challenge is to continue to facilitate ways for trainees, fellows in training and others to get involved. But I think that that first step in finding maybe a mentor of your institution that could help guide you would be important. And I'm going to finish with Sonya. I'm going to come back to you. You've not only had the social media editor window for quite some time. Being at Circulation, you get to see behind the curtain perhaps more than others because, Circulation is such a big part of what we do at UT Southwestern. And, we've had this Fellow Reviewer Program where you've been able to participate in reviews and things like that. From your perspective, maybe telling the fellows in training, listening out there about getting involved in journal activities, the value that you've seen and how to do so. Dr. Sonia Shah: Yeah, I think that's a really important question. At the end of the day, the ability to read and interpret and take away the major conclusions and properly interpret a study is a skill. And so I think the more you do it, certainly the better you get at it. And being part of a journal being on the reviewer end, being on the end where you're creating social media posts is really an opportunity to develop and refine that skill. And so to all the fellows out there who are interested, regardless of whether you want to do academic cardiology or not, it is an important skill, even in the future, to be able to read and properly interpret studies. So I highly recommend it. I find for me, I've definitely learned a lot through the process and have certainly improved. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, there you have it, our five social media editors. First, I want to thank you all for your contributions to Circulation. You're an incredibly bright group as everyone learned about. I have future leaders in cardiology. And we're very fortunate to have you contributing to Circulation and to our authors and readers. So thankful to have you as part of Circulation and look forward to working with you and innovating and coming up with some creative, new ways to think about social media and ways to transmit research for journal. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I think there you have it. Again, I'm Amit Khera. I'm associate editor and standing in this week for Carolyn Lam and Greg Huntley, who will join you again next week. So thank you for joining us for Circulation on the Run. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more visit ahajournals.org.

The Lawfare Podcast
The Fall of the Soviet Union, with Vladislav Zubok

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 45:24


This past weekend marked the 30th anniversary of the collapse of the Soviet Union. To discuss the collapse and its implications, Bryce Klehm sat down with Vladislav Zubok, professor of international history at the London School of Economics and author of the new book, “Collapse: The Fall of the Soviet Union.” They covered a range of topics, including Mikhail Gorbachev's economic and political reforms, Professor Zubok's experience reading Solzhenitsyn for the first time, and the Russian military's recent buildup along Ukraine's borders.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Breaking Bad Science
Episode 79 - Cephalopods

Breaking Bad Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 31:25


We'd love to hear from you (feedback@breakingbadscience.com)Look us up on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/385282925919540Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breakingbadsciencepodcast/Website: http://www.breakingbadscience.com/Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscienceIf spongebob taught us anything it's that seafaring creatures are…not intelligent at all. Fortunately, we have science and it turns out cephalopods and even decapods have a type of intelligence that we're only beginning to understand. Join hosts Shanti and Danny as we discuss the fascinating creatures we know as cephalopods and why their intelligence is or ever was really in question.ReferencesVendetti, J.; The Cephalopoda. Berkeley. 2006. https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/taxa/inverts/mollusca/cephalopoda.phpSeabrook, A.; The Story of an Octopus Named Otto. NPR. 02-Nov-2008. https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=96476905Davis, H.; Resting and Action Potential of Squid Giant Axons Intracellularly Perfused with Sodium-Rich Solutions. PNAS. 31-Jul-1963. 50 (619 - 626). https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/50/4/619.full.pdfBirch, J., et. al.; Review of the Evidence of Sentience in Cephalopod Molluscs and Decapod Crustaceans. London School of Economics and Political Science. Nov-2021. https://www.lse.ac.uk/News/News-Assets/PDFs/2021/Sentience-in-Cephalopod-Molluscs-and-Decapod-Crustaceans-Final-Report-November-2021.pdfSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscience?fan_landing=true)

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast
REISSUE: Dec 25th 1914 - The Christmas Day Truce

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 63:54


First release last Christmas (2020), Dotun and Tim talk to David Stevenson a history professor at the London School of Economics and author of '1914-1918: the History of the First World War.'They discuss the Christmas Day truce in 1914 and whether or not a football match is played in no mans land.

Z Report Live!
Z Report Live! Show #546

Z Report Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 124:43


On this week's spectacular edition of the Z Report LIVE, we have an amazing show for you. We have the World premiere of a NEW single from singer and composer Eli Schwebel created for AMUDIM and their 48 hour fundraiser this week titled Stand For You, the World broadcast debut of a cover of the world renown Kan Tzipor from the London School of Jewish Song recorded by Shlomo Simcha and his seven brothers also for the AMUDIM event, the broadcast debut of the My Way To You YIGAL Remix from 8th Day, the US premiere of a new single from Itzik Weingarten titled Ata Tashir, the US debut of a new single from Nehoray Arieli titled Bayis Neeman, the broadcast debut of the debut single from Cobi Russell and Akiva Nadoff titled Modim and the debut of a new single from Yoely Weiss titled Neshimo. We also have NEW music from Shloime Gertner Live In Jerusalem and more, PLUS all of your concert information.

Radio El Respeto
Programa 114- Oriol Mitjà y el Control de Infecciones

Radio El Respeto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 82:24


Hablamos sobre el control de las infecciones, ómicron, qué hacer durante las navidades, la vacunación, y el futuro de la pandemia con el Dr. Oriol Mitjà. Oriol se licenció en Medicina en la Universitat de Barcelona. Realizó su residencia en la especialidad de medicina interna y enfermedades infecciosas. En 2009 obtuvo una beca Bada de cooperación internacional otorgada por el Colegio de Médicos de Barcelona que le permitió realizar los estudios de la diplomatura en Higiene y Medicina Tropical en la London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, en Londres. En 2012, en Barcelona, acabó su doctorado con la tesis Estrategias para el control del pian y otras enfermedades tropicales desatendidas de las islas del Pacífico Sur. Ha recibido numerosos premios internacionales, entre los que se cuentan el Anne Maurer-Cecchini o el Europeo de Medicina Tropical. También ha escrito revisiones para prestigiosas revistas especializadas, incluido un seminario para The Lancet, y para la publicación en línea UpToDate. En 2019 recibió una beca del European Research Council por valor de 1,5 millones de euros. La ayuda está destinada a identificar tratamientos alternativos para el pian y la sífilis, dos enfermedades treponémicas cuyas similitudes permiten trabajar para abordarlas de forma conjunta.

AR Show with Jason McDowall
Replay: Kirin Sinha (Illumix) on Crafting Compelling Content & Experiences for AR

AR Show with Jason McDowall

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 56:31


Kirin Sinha is the co-founder and CEO of Illumix, a company building an AR-first mobile gaming platform. You may be familiar with Illumix if you're a fan of the horror franchise, Five Nights at Freddy's. The Illumix team has already found a lot of success with their first title, Five Nights at Freddy's AR: Special Delivery.Prior to founding Illumix, Kirin was the founder and Executive Director of Shine for Girls, whose mission is to transform the lives of middle school girls by cultivating a passion for mathematics through a program that incorporates both math and dance. Kirin has a BS in Theoretical Math and Computer Science from MIT as well as three Masters degrees spanning mathematics, machine learning, and business from Cambridge, The London School of Economics, and Stanford.In this conversation, Kirin shares how she thinks about creating compelling stories and gameplay for mobile devices where AR is a central component.We go to talk about how the Five Nights at Freddy's franchise is a great fit for AR, and also why the Illumix team needed to go beyond AR Kit, AR Core, and Unity in order to deliver their vision for a compelling AR-first mobile experience.Kirin talks about her broader ambitions and also has some amazing advice for building and maintaining self-confidence.You can find all of the show notes at thearshow.com.

Accidental Gods
Three-Way Solstice PodBoom: The Hive, Upstream and Accidental Gods virtual solstice party

Accidental Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 68:20


This is now official solstice tradition - we three explore the questions we've asked others through the year, look at what moved us in our podcast interviews and what they are pulling us towards for next year. And we offer a solstice meditation at the end, to bring you, too, to the quiet point of looks-withinNathalie Nahai is an international speaker, consultant and author of two books: the recently published Business Unusual: Values, Uncertainty and the Psychology of Brand Resilience, and business best-seller, Webs of Influence: The Psychology of Online Persuasion. Her work explores the intersection between persuasive technology, ethics, and the psychology of online behaviour, and clients include Google, Accenture, Unilever and Harvard Business Review, among others.Through keynotes, workshops and consultancy, she teaches people how to understand the psychological dynamics behind evolving consumer behaviours, and how to ethically apply behavioural science principles to enhance their website, content marketing, product design and customer experience. In 2021 Nathalie launched TheValuesMap.com, a free tool developed in collaboration with Dr Kiki Leutner of Goldsmiths University, to help people within organisations understand, communicate and practically express the values they stand for. A member of the BIMA Human Insights Council, Nathalie also hosts The Hive Podcast, and contributes to national publications, television and radio on the impact of technology in our lives.Della Duncan is  a Renegade Economist who hosts the Upstream Podcast inviting you to unlearn everything you thought you knew about economics. She is also a Right Livelihood Coach, a Senior Fellow of Social and Economic Equity at the International Inequalities Institute in the London School of Economics, the Course Development Manager of Fritjof Capra's Capra Course on the Systems View of Life, a Senior Lecturer at the California Institute of Integral Studies and Gaia Ed., Co-Founder of the California Doughnut Economics Coalition, and an Alternative Economics Consultant.Della holds a Master of Arts in Economics for Transition with Distinction from Schumacher College, a graduate certificate in Authentic Leadership from Naropa University, has completed Joanna Macy's Work that Reconnects Intensive Program, and is a Gross National Happiness Trainer through the Gross National Happiness Center in Bhutan.The Hive: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-hive-podcast/id1387510537Upstream: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/upstream/id1082594532

The Impact Investing Podcast
41 - Transforming idle church properties into thriving communities of sustainable impact

The Impact Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 14:19


Churches across the globe are in crisis. The arrival of COVID-19 served to dramatically accelerate a decades-long systemic decline in church attendance as the expectations and preferences of congregants have changed across generations. Falling church attendance has meant declining revenue and mounting financial pressure to maintain expensive real estate and buildings that sit increasingly idle. Ultimately these churches may face closure and even demolition. In Canada, it is estimated that nearly one in three churches is on track to close in the next decade.And while we live in an increasingly secular society, as today's guest will articulate, churches represent an incredibly important social infrastructure that a vast number of social programs rely upon. In Toronto alone, over 100 non-profit organizations operate from church buildings or land. Losing these churches (which are often rented out at below-market rates to non-profits) would be catastrophic for many secular social purpose organizations and the vulnerable communities they serve.Enter today's guest, Graham Singh, Founder & CEO of Trinity Centres Foundation, who joins us today to talk about his innovative work using impact investing to finance the transformation of idle church properties into thriving places of sustainable community impact. Over the past 15 years, Graham has led four historic building and community renewal projects in the United Kingdom and Canada. Graham is an ordained minister in the Anglican Church and has a long line of academic credentials that include a Master's from the London School of Economics, a Bachelor of Ministry from the University of Cambridge, and a BA in political science from Huron University.During this episode, Graham and I discuss the crisis that the church in Canada is facing, the role churches play as important social infrastructure, the role of blended finance in solving the financial challenges churches face, and the types of investors and organizations that are suitable partners in this work. And be sure to stay tuned to the very end where we discuss the importance of the church in placemaking; the process of co-creating quality places that people want to live, work, play, and learn in.Resources from this episode:Graham's LinkedIn profileTrinity Centres Foundation (TCF) websiteWhere you can donate to support the work of Trinity Centres Foundation.

We Build Great Apartment Communities
074: Where Technology and Real Estate Intersect with Amy Wan

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 51:52


In today's episode, we are graced by Amy Wan - one of the most prominent legal tech and blockchain attorney to talk about where technology and real estate really intersect! Prepare to be amazed and inspired by this marvellous achiever's accomplishments, current projects and future endeavours! Amy Wan is CEO & co-founder of Bling, which rewards mobile gamers with bitcoin. Previously, she founded Bootstrap Legal, which helps real estate syndicators get legal document faster and more efficiently. Amy is a securities attorney and has been in-house and outside counsel for various fintech startups. Episode Highlights: Amy talks about real estate in today's pandemic-striken world The world of syndications from a legal standpoint Upgrading your skills set to better communicate in this digital world Millennials and Investing Economic trends that Amy see in today's multi family marketplace Where does Amy Wan place her investment dollars Amy talks about Bootstrap Legal - a service that offers tools to bring legal help to entrepreneurs in a non-intimidating way, at an affordable and predictable price point. Amy Wan's most successful investment and her greatest takeaway from it   Connect with Amy LinkedIn  Email  About Our Guest: Amy Wan is Founder & CEO of Bootstrap Legal, which automates real estate syndication legal documents. She hosts The Law and Blockchain Podcast (a show on The Bitcoin Podcast Network) and has authored the Bloomberg Law practice guide to ICOs and Lexis Nexus' Private Equity practice guide. Previously, she was a Partner at a boutique securities law firm and General Counsel at a real estate crowdfunding platform. Amy founded Legal Hackers LA, which programs around the intersection of law and technology; was named one of ten women to watch in legal technology by the American Bar Association Journal in 2014 and one of 18 millennials changing legaltech by law.com in 2018; and was nominated as a Finalist for the Corporate Counsel of the Year Award 2015 by LA Business Journal. Amy has also worked in international regulatory and trade policy at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a Presidential Management Fellow at the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Transportation. She holds an LL.M. in Public International Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science, a JD from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, and a BA in Biological Sciences from the University of Southern California. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Events from the Brookings Institution
The 30th anniversary of the fall of the USSR

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 69:20


On December 15th, the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings hosted Donald Jensen, former foreign service officer in Moscow and current director of Russia and Strategic Stability at the United States Institute of Peace, and Vladislav Zubok, professor of international history the London School of Economics and Political Science and author of “Collapse: The Fall of the Soviet Union.” Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

The Inquiry
Should we be worried about the return of inflation?

The Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 24:05


As prices rise across the world, Tanya Beckett asks if this is a temporary blip owing to the pandemic, or a longer lasting return of inflation. Should we be worried and should policy makers be more willing to raise interest rates to deal with it? Contributors: Roger Bootle, Chairman, Capital Economics Bronwyn Curtis, former Governor, London School of Economics Claudia Sahm, Senior Fellow, Jain Family Institute Holger Schmieding, Chief Economist, Berenberg Presenter: Tanya Beckett Producer: Sheila Cook

The Content Mix Podcast
Why content plays a pivotal role in building a brand | Thiago Kiwi

The Content Mix Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 57:34


“I believe brands are built on content nowadays. You need content as a brand.” Brazil-native Thiago Kiwi has built a career in content, first as a journalist and now as a content marketer. Thiago is also extremely passionate about education and development, having worked for various brands like the London School of Business and Global University Systems. Thiago's current role as the head of marketing and communications at Headspring, a joint venture by Financial Times and IE University, reflects his love for learning and his dedication to providing educational opportunities to individuals around the globe. Tune in for the full episode as Thiago chats with Kyler Canastra about his career journey, building a brand from scratch and the importance of education and development—plus loads more.

Nine Questions for the World
Does the Twenty-First Century Need a New Social Contract?

Nine Questions for the World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 35:15


Richard Haass and Minouche Shafik, director of the London School of Economics, assess the future of the labor market and examine how to provide workers with the skills and training they need in an era of ongoing technological change.   Episode Guest:  Minouche Shafik (Director, London School of Economics and Political Science).   This episode is based on a live event that took place on July 15, 2021.   For an episode transcript and show notes, visit us at: https://www.cfr.org/podcasts/does-the-twenty-first-century-need-a-new-social-contract.

Best of Today
Omicron infections increasing 'quite dramatically'

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 24:45


Infections caused by the new variant Omicron are rising rapidly, doubling every two to three days. It is expected to become the dominant variant soon and then the UK is being warned to be braced for a surge in cases. Boris Johnson has won backing for Covid passes in England, despite the biggest revolt by Tory MPs since he became PM. A total of 99 Conservatives voted against the government on Tuesday, but the measure was passed by a majority of 243 thanks to Labour support. NHS Covid passes, showing a recent negative test or full vaccination, must be shown to get into many large venues, including nightclubs, from Wednesday. MPs also voted to back compulsory face masks in most indoor settings. Today's Mishal Husain speaks to Grant Shapps, Transport Secretary, as well as Graham Medley, Professor of infectious disease modelling at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Additionally, Today's Nick Robinson speaks to Mark Harper, one of the Conservative MPs who rebelled in the vote on Tuesday night. (Image credit: EPA/ANDY RAIN)

New Books Network
Anna Cant, "Land Without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change Under Peru's Military Government" (U Texas Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 50:44


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Anna Cant about her very interesting book Land without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change under Peru's Military Government published in 2021 by the University of Texas Press.   The book is a fresh perspective on the way the Peruvian government's major 1969 agrarian reform transformed the social, cultural, and political landscape of the country. Dr Anna Cant is a Latin American historian with expertise in twentieth-century politics, cultural history and rural development. She gained her PhD in History at the University of Cambridge (2015) with a thesis on land reform in Peru. Dr Cant has taught in the UK and Colombia and received scholarships from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Leverhulme Trust. She is currently an assistant professor of Latin American history at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist that works as a freelance journalist and as a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host in the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Anna Cant, "Land Without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change Under Peru's Military Government" (U Texas Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 50:44


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Anna Cant about her very interesting book Land without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change under Peru's Military Government published in 2021 by the University of Texas Press.   The book is a fresh perspective on the way the Peruvian government's major 1969 agrarian reform transformed the social, cultural, and political landscape of the country. Dr Anna Cant is a Latin American historian with expertise in twentieth-century politics, cultural history and rural development. She gained her PhD in History at the University of Cambridge (2015) with a thesis on land reform in Peru. Dr Cant has taught in the UK and Colombia and received scholarships from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Leverhulme Trust. She is currently an assistant professor of Latin American history at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist that works as a freelance journalist and as a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host in the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Latin American Studies
Anna Cant, "Land Without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change Under Peru's Military Government" (U Texas Press, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 50:44


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Anna Cant about her very interesting book Land without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change under Peru's Military Government published in 2021 by the University of Texas Press.   The book is a fresh perspective on the way the Peruvian government's major 1969 agrarian reform transformed the social, cultural, and political landscape of the country. Dr Anna Cant is a Latin American historian with expertise in twentieth-century politics, cultural history and rural development. She gained her PhD in History at the University of Cambridge (2015) with a thesis on land reform in Peru. Dr Cant has taught in the UK and Colombia and received scholarships from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Leverhulme Trust. She is currently an assistant professor of Latin American history at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist that works as a freelance journalist and as a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host in the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

Remote Works
The Coming Work-Life Rebalance

Remote Works

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 20:27


We are in a pivotal moment. Hybrid work is not only changing how we work, but also how we live. Host Melanie Green explores this fundamental work-life rebalance. We hear from Chris Herd, CEO of Firstbase, who believes that this moment in time is an opportunity to empower a billion people to access a better work-life balance. Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics sees hybrid work changing top-down management to become more democratic. Citrix is supplying you with critical intelligence to write the new work playbook. Explore research and perspectives for a successful hybrid work model on Fieldwork by Citrix [LINK: https://www.citrix.com/fieldwork/flexible-work/virtual-series.html] filled with research, tools, and best practices to guide, support, and enable the flexible workforce. Chris Herd is Founder and CEO of Firstbase [LINK: https://www.firstbasehq.com] based in Aberdeen, Scotland. Firstbase sets up businesses around the world with tools to work remotely. Grace Lordan [LINK:https://www.lse.ac.uk/PBS/People/Dr-Grace-Lordan] is an Associate Professor in Behavioral Science at the London School of Economics. She is also the Founding Director of the Inclusion Initiative at the London School of Economics.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
China's Greater Bay Area and Ours: Can We Collaborate?

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 64:15


China is rapidly connecting Hong Kong, Macao and nine cities in Guangdong Province into a regional finance, technology, manufacturing and tourism hub of 86 million people. Over the next decade, this Greater Bay Area (GBA) will mature into a global showcase for China's economic model, “One Country-Two Systems” integration, and Belt and Road development strategy. GBA hopes to partner with comparable regions worldwide, including the San Francisco Bay Area, in areas such as clean energy, health care, mobility and fintech. A new report by the Bay Area Council and the Hong Kong Trade Development Council assesses the commercial opportunities and political obstacles amid U.S.-China tensions. Join the sponsors of the report for a deeper dive into the report's findings. About the Speakers Sean Randolph is senior director of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute, where he served as president & CEO from 1998-2015, and manages its science affiliate the Bay Area Science and Innovation Consortium (BASIC). Randolph previously served as director of international trade for the state of California, and prior to that as international director general of the Pacific Basin Economic Council (PBEC), a 1,000-member Asia-Pacific business organization. His professional career includes extensive experience in the U.S. Government, where he served on congressional staffs, on the White House staff, and in senior positions at the departments of State and Energy. Dr. Randolph holds a JD from the Georgetown University Law Center, a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts and Harvard Universities), a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown's School of Foreign Service, and studied at the London School of Economics. Louis Chan is principal economist for the Global Research Team of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council. As the head of the Global Research Team, Louis provides leadership and direction for research on market developments in the Americas and Europe. To provide a macro view for SMEs to formulate export strategies, Louis and his team monitor and evaluate the performance, changing trends and competitiveness of Hong Kong's trading, manufacturing and service sector, at the industry-specific levels. To facilitate SMEs' sales efforts, they also keep a close eye on the emerging business opportunities, consumption and sourcing trends, as well as regulatory changes in the Americas, Europe and Central Asia. Moderator Scott Rozelle holds the Helen Farnsworth Endowed Professorship at Stanford University and is senior fellow and professor in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. Dr. Rozelle's research focuses on the economics of poverty—with an emphasis on the economics of education and health. Dr. Rozelle is the co-director of the Rural Education Action Project and is an adjunct professor in 8 Chinese universities. In 2008, Dr. Rozelle was awarded the Friendship Award—the highest honor that can be endowed on a foreign citizen—by Premiere Wen Jiabao. MLF ORGANIZER Lillian Nakagawa NOTES MLF: Asia-Pacific Affairs SPEAKERS Louis Chan Principal Economist (Global Research Team), Hong Kong Trade Development Council Sean Randolph Senior Director, Bay Area Council Economic Institute Scott Rozelle Helen Farnsworth Professor, Stanford University, and Senior Fellow and Professor, the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on December 9th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dose of Leadership with Richard Rierson | Authentic & Courageous Leadership Development
Mary Fox | Understanding Your Communicative Power & Influence

Dose of Leadership with Richard Rierson | Authentic & Courageous Leadership Development

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:38


Mary Fox is the co-founder and CEO of Marlow; a manager development platform combining in-house expert coaches with interactive resources. Marlow's mission is to help managers and emerging leaders gain access to the resources they need to drive success for themselves and their teams. Mary has more than 13 years of experience in people operations, business operations, and product marketing. Prior to launching Marlow, Mary served as Head of People Operations at the trucking marketplace, FR8Star, and Special Assistant at Massdrop, where she led people and talent initiatives. She holds a Master's of Science in Management, Organizations, and Governance from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Frjálsar hendur
Lea Ypi og lífið í Albaníu

Frjálsar hendur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


Lea Ypi fæddist árið 1979 í Albaníu sem þá var harðlæst og afskekkt kommúnistasamfélag þar sem Enver Hoxha ríkti yfir öllu. Lea ólst upp við persónudýrkun, tvískinnung og kúgun á öllum sviðum en gerði sér enga grein fyrir því sjálf, og hélt að lífið með foreldrum sínum og ömmu væri hið besta hugsanlega líf. Nú er Lea prófessor í stjórnmálafræði við London School of Economics, stórsnjöll kona og var að gefa út endurminningar sínar frá hinum undarlegu æskuárum. Illugi Jökulsson les sýnishorn úr þeim í þættinum í þættinum.

Asian Hustle Network
Sam Cho // S2 Ep 109 // A Passion for Public Service

Asian Hustle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 49:39


Welcome back to Season 2, Episode 109 of the Asian Hustle Network Podcast! We are very excited to have Sam Cho on this week's show. We interview Asian entrepreneurs around the world to amplify their voices and empower Asians to pursue their dreams and goals. We believe that each person has a message and a unique story from their entrepreneurial journey that they can share with all of us. Check us out on Anchor, iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Spotify, and more. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave us a positive 5-star review. This is our opportunity to use the voices of the Asian community and share these incredible stories with the world. We release a new episode every Wednesday and Saturday, so stay tuned! Sam Cho first ran for office and was elected to the Port of Seattle Commission in 2019 to become the youngest Port commissioner in its history at the age of twenty-nine and the only person of color on the commission. The Port of Seattle manages the 3rd largest container seaport and the 8th largest airport in the United States. In his day job, he leads Public Policy in the Pacific Northwest Region for the rideshare company Lyft. Prior to the port commission, Sam was the Founder and CEO of Seven Seas Export, an international trading company that exported to Asia. He identified an opportunity to export US egg products to Asian countries at the height of Asia's avian influenza (bird flu) epidemic in the winter of 2016. He exported more than 2.5 million pounds of eggs. Prior to his entrepreneurial endeavor, Sam was a political appointee under President Barack Obama. He also served as a Legislative Assistant to a member of the United States Congress. Sam received his Bachelor's degree from The American University in Washington DC and his Master's of Science from The London School of Economics. To stay connected within the AHN community, please join our AHN directory: bit.ly/AHNDirectory --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/asianhustlenetwork/support

Relentless Health Value
EP348: Your Burning Questions About Payviders Answered! With Jeb Dunkelberger

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 32:03


The discussion to follow is probably a 400-level class in payviders. If I just said the word payvider and you're scratching your head wondering where you may have heard that term before, this show is probably not the best place for you to start. I'd go back and get some context by listening first to the episodes with Steve Blumberg from GuideWell (EP304) and/or the one with John Moore from Chilmark (EP172); and for a really retrospective lookback, check out the one episode with Dr. Kris Smith from Northwell (EP127) from back when they were still trying to become an insurance carrier. It's like a time capsule into their ambitions.   OK, if you're still with me, in this episode I'm looking forward to digging into payviders with Jeb Dunkelberger, who is the CEO of Sutter Health | Aetna. Sutter Health | Aetna is the payvider joint venture between, you guessed it, Sutter Health and Aetna. Not only is Jeb one who would obviously know a whole lot about payviders and how they operate given his role, but he's also super articulate and thoughtful in terms of the potential impacts that this type of entity can have on patients and the surrounding healthcare ecosystem. I started to get really curious about payviders and what they're up to because the term keeps coming up in conversations, number one. And the more it came up, the more it started to become really obvious that payvider is one of those terms that everybody tosses around and may or may not define it the same way. Jeb refers to a payvider as an entity that delivers care but also writes insurance products and takes risk for them—not just taking capitated payments or doing direct contracting. While it's the employer who actually takes the risk, this is the definition of payvider that we explore in this healthcare podcast. Two kinds of interesting points that Jeb makes, which I'll just underscore here: One is “demand destruction.” I like the idea of the term because it brings a really obvious point into stark focus. Bottom line, taking on risk or value-based programs is easier if you are a smaller percentage of the healthcare spend. The bigger a percentage of the healthcare spend that gets cha-chinged into your cash register, the more you destroy your own demand by creating value-based programs that minimize downstream costs. Those downstream costs are your revenue, after all. Value-based care is all about demand destruction at its core. In the last question of this interview (so, this is the second thing I'm underscoring here), I ask Jeb if he thinks payviders will ultimately lower healthcare costs; and he comes back with a reframe of my question. He says if we take costs out of the system, will hospitals close? And if the hospitals close, then people get laid off. Fair point, since in many places the health system is one of the biggest employers in town if not the biggest—and also a political tour de force. So, there's more nuances here; but you'll have to either get to or skip to almost the end of the episode to hear them. Jeb Dunkelberger began his career as a health economist and consultant. He became the CEO of Sutter Health | Aetna to focus on alternative reimbursement models and value-based care. Jeb also wrote a book called Rich & Dying. You can learn more at sutterhealthaetna.com.   You can also connect with Jeb on LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter.   Jeb Dunkelberger, MSc, MHCI, currently serves as CEO of Sutter Health | Aetna (SH|A), a commercial insurance plan serving Northern California. The health plan aims to combine the value of retail, provider, and payer via its partnerships with CVS, Sutter Health, and Aetna. Prior to SH|A, Jeb led growth for two bay-area healthcare start-ups: Cricket Health and Notable Health. Jeb has also held executive roles at Highmark, McKesson, and EY. Jeb holds healthcare-related degrees from Virginia Tech, The London School of Economics, Cornell University, and University of Pennsylvania. 03:58 What all does Sutter Health | Aetna entail? 04:31 What does it mean to be a “performance network”? 04:48 What does it mean to be a payvider? 06:35 How common are payviders? 07:31 “We are writing direct risk.” 09:21 How does the fully insured product work? 12:30 “You want to hold their feet to the fire, from a value-based perspective.” 12:42 What's the incentive for providers to partner with payers? 15:25 “It's just math. It's the amount of lives times the amount of utilization multiplied by your unit costs.” 20:58 “You have to have a day of reckoning, and that only comes from financial incentives creating that gateway out.” 24:55 How do we think about reform and taking money out of the healthcare system? 26:58 “We also have to talk about repurposing the workforce.” 27:27 “We need to upskill our workforce.” 30:14 “Can a health system survive as the largest employer, year over year, if they give unit cost concessions, year over year? … The answer is no.” You can learn more at sutterhealthaetna.com.   You can also connect with Jeb on LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter.   @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth What all does Sutter Health | Aetna entail? @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth What does it mean to be a “performance network”? @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth What does it mean to be a payvider? @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth How common are payviders? @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “We are writing direct risk.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth How does the fully insured product work? @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “You want to hold their feet to the fire, from a value-based perspective.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth What's the incentive for providers to partner with payers? @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “It's just math. It's the amount of lives times the amount of utilization multiplied by your unit costs.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “You have to have a day of reckoning, and that only comes from financial incentives creating that gateway out.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “We also have to talk about repurposing the workforce.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “We need to upskill our workforce.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “Can a health system survive as the largest employer, year over year, if they give unit cost concessions, year over year? … The answer is no.” @Jeb_Dunk discusses #payviders on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Dr Ian Tong, Mike Schneider, Peter Hayes, Paul Simms, Dr Steven Quimby, Dr David Carmouche (EP343), Christin Deacon, Gary Campbell, Kristin Begley, David Contorno (AEE17), David Contorno (EP339), Nikki King, Olivia Webb, Brandon Weber, Stacey Richter (INBW30), Brian Klepper (AEE16), Brian Klepper (EP335), Sunita Desai, Care Plans vs Real World (EP333), Dr Tony DiGioia, Al Lewis, John Marchica, Joe Connolly, Marshall Allen, Andrew Eye, Naomi Fried, Dr Rishi Wadhera, Dr Mai Pham

Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight
Jamie Mustard, "The Iconist: The Art and Science of Standing Out" (BenBella Books, 2019)

Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 40:15


Today I talked to Jamie Mustard about his new book The Iconist: The Art and Science of Standing Out (BenBella Books, 2019). Ever feel like you're “screaming” to be heard but in a world saturated by social media messages, et cetera, your “messages” are falling on deaf ears? If so, Jamie Mustard has a solution to propose. In short, you need to follow the Primal Laws of Attention. In essence, that means be bigger, brighter, and bolder than ever before in history to break through the clutter. In greater detail, those laws entail steps like the following: use repetition, deliver an emotional jolt by addressing the audience's primary emotional concern, and practice transparency that establishes your authenticity. Most of all, engage in radical simplicity. If what you are saying can't be readily understand, forget it. Then to back up that radical simplicity, the “shaft” behind that arrowhead of simplicity is sufficient information to make the messaging worthwhile. All of that—and more—delivered by Mustard in an impassioned episode. Jamie Mustard is a London School of Economic graduate; he's also an artist, filmmaker, consultant, and a leading authority on branding, art, design, and media perception. Dan Hill, PhD, is the author of nine books and leads Sensory Logic, Inc. (https://www.sensorylogic.com). His new book is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Politics. To check out his related “Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight” blog, visit https://emotionswizard.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/dan-hills-eq-spotlight

Culture Stew
A Conversation with Element of Inclusion host, Jonathan Ashong-Lamptey

Culture Stew

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 48:18


“A globally recognised authority on Diversity and Inclusion in the workplace, Jonathan has a PhD from the London School of Economics which allows him to bring the academic rigour that his FTSE 100 clients expect. He is currently writing a book to support his mission to help one million people around the world to make the workplace inclusive.”On this episode of Culture Stew, Maria and Jonathan have an energetic and powerful conversation about Jonathan's personal and professional journey into the Diversity and Inclusion field, service and contribution, identity, and how  leaders can enact sustainable change rather than engage in performative allyship.  Listed below are items Jonathan mentions throughout the podcast.  Thesis: Crafting an identity: an examination of the lived experiences of minority racial and ethnic individuals in the workplace http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/3475/ Meta Review of the Business Case for Diversity  https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/49638/the_business_case_for_equality_and_diversity.pdf The Performative Problem of Diversity and Inclusion  https://elementofinclusion.com/the-performative-problem-of-diversity-inclusion The Propaganda Problem of Diversity and Inclusion  https://elementofinclusion.com/the-propaganda-problem-of-diversity-inclusion

The Long View
Dan Egan: Noisy Successes and Silent Failures

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 56:01


Our guest on the podcast today is Dan Egan. Egan is the director of behavioral finance and investing at Betterment, and he has researched behavioral finance topics extensively over his career. Prior to joining Betterment, he was a behavioral finance specialist for Barclays Wealth. He received his bachelor's degree in economics from Boston University and his Master of Science degree in decision science from the London School of Economics.BackgroundBioResearch Frictions and 'Free'"Closing the Behavior Gap," Betterment.com, Dec. 11, 2018."'Most People Don't Want to Be Called Average,' Says Betterment's Dan Egan, Who Designs Financial Tools for Them Anyway," by Andrea Riquier, MarketWatch, June 16, 2020."How Checking Performance Might Hurt Your Performance," by Dan Egan, Betterment.com, May 20, 2019."The Myth of the Panicky Individual Investor," by Dan Egan, dpegan.com, March 14, 2020."Memestonks: What's Different About This Market," by Dan Egan, Betterment.com, Jan. 29, 2021."5 Red Flags to Look out for in Your Favorite Investing App," by Liz Knueven, Insider, Feb. 17, 2021."Low Cost Is Better Than Free," by Dan Egan, dpegan.com, March 23, 2021."Are Commission-Free Investing Apps Encouraging Reckless Behavior?" by Robert Farrington, Forbes, Dec. 3, 2019.Betterment"Using Investment Goals at Betterment," by Dan Egan, Betterment.com, July 27, 2021."How Much to Save: Our Advice Guides You Toward Your Goals," by Dan Egan, Betterment.com, Jan. 24, 2019.“Betterment's 401(k) Investment Approach," by Dan Egan, Betterment.com, Feb. 2, 2021."Q&A: What's the Future of Investing?" Betterment.com, Feb. 17, 2021."When It Comes to ESG, Investors Want Specifics—and They Should," by Elizabeth Thompson, Spark Network, Feb. 4, 2021."'Robo' Advisers Betterment, Wealthfront Get in on Socially Responsible Investing," by Anne Tergesen, The Wall Street Journal, July 19, 2017. Retirement"Lifestyle Creep: The Biggest Threat to Financial Planning," by Dan Egan, Betterment.com, Feb. 28, 2019."Tiny Changes Can Help You Achieve Savings Goals for Retirement," by Anne Tergesen, The Wall Street Journal, Dec. 28, 2020.

Woman's Hour
Under Pressure, Julia Chain, Hyaluronidase

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 57:38


In our series Under Pressure we've been looking at what happens to relationships when couples are put under extreme strain: how do they cope? Today we hear from Kate and Annie who live in Northumberland. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. In March, Julia Chain was announced as the new chair of the HFEA. Now Julia is calling for the 1990 Human Fertilization and Embryology Act to be updated. She joins Emma to discuss the changes she wants to see. We talk to Deborah Bull and Jill Baldock about how dancing can lift your mood. A report out today from the Institute for Fiscal Studies says there's been 'almost' no progress towards closing the gender pay gap in the last 25 years. Professor Lucinda Platt, who's on the panel of the IFS Deaton Inequalities review, and who researches inequality at the London School of Economic, explains why not. If your facial fillers aren't to your liking, or worse injected in a dangerous spot, you can get them dissolved with a substance called hyaluronidase. But women are reporting nasty side effects including swelling, tissue loss, burning sensations and headaches. A cosmetic surgeon, Daniel Ezra, is studying this to try to establish exactly what's going on. We hear from him as well as our reporter Melanie Abbott.

The How Did We Get Here Podcast?
Episode 26 - From Saville Row to the Cotswolds, in conversation with Tom Wharton

The How Did We Get Here Podcast?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 46:20


The Boys chat to Tom Wharton of Barrington Ayre who started life on Saville Row and decided to take the plunge into his now very successful business. Tom talks about the challenges and experiences that led him to a business providing clothing to celebrities and sports stars. Barrington Ayre  provide luxury bespoke and made to order clothing from their Cirencester showroom located in the historic Market Place. Operating a full visiting tailoring service across The Cotswolds, The South West and London as well as the UK by appointment, their clothing is worn by the likes of Michael Vaughan, Robbie Savage, Jos Buttler, Greg James, and David 'Bumble' Lloyd to name a few. They pride themselves on making the finest clothing and have a real niche for tweed wedding suits. They have our own range of Made in Cirencester clothing, made by in house Savile Row tailor, Sian, studied tailoring at the London School of Fashion and then went on to work in Savile Row for Dege and Skinner for 3 years before returning to The Cotswolds.