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Human history from the earliest records to the end of the classical period

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Best podcasts about ancient world

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Latest podcast episodes about ancient world

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
Nostalgia and the Soft Reboot of Cultural Religion: Critical Drinker, JBP, Clay Routledge, Holland

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 73:27


​ @The Critical Drinker  Soft Reboot https://youtu.be/YyU63LJV3AE  @Jordan B Peterson  and Clay Routledge on Nostalgia https://youtu.be/3yV0b-NhKTY Tom Holland: Did Religion Exist in the Ancient World https://youtu.be/ZeCTC_r4vMI  @Jordan B Peterson  on What is Religion? https://youtu.be/V32WHDuy-Do  @Jonathan Pageau  Parasitic Story Telling https://youtu.be/gFxu3Q71NvE  @Jonathan Pageau  on rebooting ancient paganism https://youtu.be/YIn7qnLhbjc Oldies on the Apple Charts https://www.showbiz411.com/2022/01/16/what-year-is-it-nearly-a-third-of-the-itunes-top-100-taken-by-oldies-new-releases-not-catching-on  @Grizwald Grim  on NPCing all day https://youtu.be/QDTz7K9ionI The Rest is History: 1922 Birth of the Modern World Pt. 2 https://pca.st/k41eknq4 Discord link. Good for just a few days. Check with more recent videos for a fresh link. https://discord.gg/PAfngxkD Paul Vander Klay clips channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0jIcadtoxELSwehCh5QTg My Substack https://paulvanderklay.substack.com/ Estuary Hub Link https://www.estuaryhub.com/ If you want to schedule a one-on-one conversation check here. https://paulvanderklay.me/2019/08/06/converzations-with-pvk/ There is a video version of this podcast on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paulvanderklay To listen to this on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paul-vanderklays-podcast/id1394314333  If you need the RSS feed for your podcast player https://paulvanderklay.podbean.com/feed/  All Amazon links here are part of the Amazon Affiliate Program. Amazon pays me a small commission at no additional cost to you if you buy through one of the product links here. This is is one (free to you) way to support my videos.  https://paypal.me/paulvanderklay To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin (BTC): 37TSN79RXewX8Js7CDMDRzvgMrFftutbPo  To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) qr3amdmj3n2u83eqefsdft9vatnj9na0dqlzhnx80h  To support this channel/podcast with Ethereum (ETH): 0xd3F649C3403a4789466c246F32430036DADf6c62 Blockchain backup on Lbry https://odysee.com/@paulvanderklay https://www.patreon.com/paulvanderklay Paul's Church Content at Living Stones Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh7bdktIALZ9Nq41oVCvW-A To support Paul's work by supporting his church give here. https://tithe.ly/give?c=2160640

The Ancient World
Episode C9 – Horse to Horse, Army to Army

The Ancient World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 22:55


Synopsis: In the mid-11th century BC, the Hittite kingdoms of northern Syria are joined by others– in the Philistine pentapolis, the Amuq plain and the region of Classical Cilicia – with ties to the former Mycenaean Greeks.  The Phoenician cities of the Levantine coast begin […] The post Episode C9 – Horse to Horse, Army to Army first appeared on THE ANCIENT WORLD.

SPEAK! A Dogcast
Ep. 60 - Does Your Dog Have Anxiety?

SPEAK! A Dogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


Today on SPEAK! A Dogcast, we ask the question Does Your Dog Have Anxiety? We'll go over what signs to look for and how to best approach alleviating that anxiety. Then comes our recurring segment Dogs of the Ancient World, followed by the Breed of the Week and Listener Q&A! You're in for a real treat!

How To Love Lit Podcast
Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 55:30


Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This week we embark on a seafaring adventure across the seas and through time to the ancient world of the Greeks to meet  someone who some have said is the greatest poet to have ever lived- Homer- and his second epic- The Odyssey.      To be honest, I think I agree with that assessment.      That's high praise. How does one get to that level?    I know.  It really is.  I guess, one way of looking at it may be attrition- how many poets do we still read from 3000 years ago.  That's not a large club.   We certainly don't have anyone in the English language canon that is competitive, but it's more than Homer basically invented the coming of age novel with the Telemachaie; he invented the flawed hero, as I choose to understand Odysseus.  In many ways, his epics, although they are poems, are pre-runners to modern day novels.   They are pre-cursors to fantasy.  Heck, even the success of the Marvel movies to me suggest a thinly veiled nod to Homer.  What is Superman or Wonder Woman if not demi-gods?    Well, if I may weigh in, although I don't feel even remotely qualified to suggest someone is the greatest poet to have ever lived, but what impresses me the most is the level of psychological and archetypal insights into the nature of man that crosses through culture.  Of course, I've heard of a lot of the characters and several of the stories, but I was impressed by how relatable Odysseus is.  And although so many of his adventures at sea are fantastical- they feel like hyperbolic expressions of what I go through- For example, what is Scylla and Charybdis if not being caught between a rock and a hard place?  Another thing that fascinates me is the order he wrote them in- at least the order as we think them- the first one, The Iliad, and then some years later, as an older man, The Odyssey.  That's also psychologically interesting- The Iliad has its version of a hero- Achilles is idealistic, proud in large and obvious way, self-righteous, vindictive even.         It's young man's idea of heroism versus The Odyssey and its version of heroism- a much more nuanced.  He also gets revenge, but it's slow and not very reactionary- he plots, he lies, he bides his time- things we learn by life beating the hound out of us.      I think that is well said.  Studying Homer for me is also very intimidating historically.  There is so much history and culture- beyond just the language differences just between my world and Homer's- 2600 years- give or take.  The language is different.  The culture is different. The geography and the religion are literally worlds and worlds away, and I'm not very confident I can understand the context.  And if that weren't scary enough, when you realize that Homer may have been describing events that may have preceded him by perhaps another 400- 1000 years or so, depending on who you believe- I just get lost in the math.  I might as well be saying, “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…”.   It's foreign and mysterious.  Lizzy asked me today as I was sitting on my computer reading some research on the Mycenaens what book I was working on and I said, “Research for ‘Homer's The Odyssey'” – to which she replied, “Sounds boring.”  And Lizzy listens to our podcasts!!  But on the screen of my computer were broken pieces of pottery and archeological data, not super-man and wonderwoman.    Ha!  Well, if you can't guilt-trip your family members into listening to you, even if you are boring, what hope do you have?  But, I totally understand where she's coming from, over the years, I've taught a lot of history from US to Europe to World, and the Ancient World, and I love it.  I will admit, though, even though a lot can be fascinating with the ancients, there's no doubt the farther back in time you go, it can be very difficult to conceptualize.  It is also a lot more guesswork.  Ancient Greece feels far away because it IS far away, and often we don't know what we're looking at when we see it. I hate to keep coming back to the arrogance of the present, but we really have to guard against looking at ancient peoples as primitive thinkers just because their technologies were not advanced.  I mean, honestly, which of us could survive one week on an island?  I think Survivor has proven that that's not happening.    Ha!  Those people always lose so much weight! Survivor also proves that the most cunning and deceptive you are- Odysseus style, the more likely you are to survive, but getting back to the historical side of it.  Did the Trojan war really happen?  And if it did, what was it?      That's a great question.  For years and years, even centuries- the greatest minds said no.  If Troy existed, we would know it.  And just for context, in case you are unfamiliar with the story, the story goes that there was a woman, today we call her Helen of Troy, but she wasn't Trojan, she was Greek, and she ran away with a young lover- named Paris- to a city called Troy across the ocean.  Her sister's husband, King Agamemnon, launched 1000 ships and all the Greek kings and heroes to get her back for her husband Menelaus.   The war to get Helen back took ten years before the Greeks were finally able to penetrate the wall, theoretically using a gigantic horse and a gimmick devised by Odysseus.  The story goes that Odysseus and a few others hid inside this gigantic horse.  Everyone else hid and pretended to return to Greece.  They left the horse there claiming that it was a gift to the god, Poseidon.  The Trojans brought the horse inside the gate, Odesseus came out, unlocked the gate and the Greeks sacked the city.    For forever, no one thought this place even existed with any real certainty.  We couldn't find it.   Until an outrageous and bombastic but exceedingly wealthy amateur self-proclaimed archeologist by the name of Heinrich Schliemann set out to find it in the 1860s and actually did.      Outrageous and bombastic sounds kind of like code for a schmuck?    Well, he did have a few personal issues as well as professional ones.  For one thing, he wasn't trained in archeology, so he just went around blasting everything he saw – to the point that- Historian Kenneth Harl has said that Schliemann's excavations did to Troy what the Greeks couldn't do, destroy and level the city walls to the ground.    Oh no, that's terrible.       Well, it really is and he destroyed a lot of history.  He wanted so badly to get to the jewels belonging to Helen of Troy that he actually blasted through the actual walls of the city.  But, that being said, there is something to the fact, that he actually found the walls of the city and was something no one had done before him.  He found tons of gold and all kinds of very important things- he claimed his loot belonged to people like King Priam and Agamemnon including a very important solid gold.  One of the most famous is still called The Mask of Agamennon.  This, of course, has mostly been debunked by actual archeologists who know how to properly date archeological finds, but that being said, he found stuff that is real and validated many of the events referenced by Homer, albeit in myth form.   And if you ever  have the opportunity to visit Athens, you can see the mask of Agamennon in the National Archeological Museum.  Anyway, The best historical sources we have suggest that the Trojan war actually happened and took place around 1183 BC.  Not everyone is willing to say it lasted ten years or that was fought on the scale the Homer describes with thousands of ships, but we now believe it did happen.    Well, we are less likely to believe it was sparked by petty gods and goddesses and fought by demi-gods fathered by goddesses who dip their children in magical rivers that make them mostly immortal.  But I will say, I wish they would find a mask of Helen.  I would love to see what the uncontested most beautiful woman in human history, daughter of Zeus.      True, Christy, there is so much I don't know about all the myths of the gods and goddesses, and before I started researching for this podcast seris, honestly, I thought the story of the Illiad was the story of the Greeks sacking Troy.  I have to admit I got my information from the movie Brad Pitt made called Troy.  There are so many gods and goddesses and furies and nymphs and creatures and shapeshifters.  It's overwhelming.      True, the Illiad ends with the death and funeral of the Trojan hero, Hector,  and his father very sadly begging for his body and returning it home- not the sack of Troy.  In other words, the Greeks haven't won.  That's a story you get from other places.  The Odyssey references the Trojan horse when Telemachus goes to visit his father's old war buddies, but there is not a Homeric version of the Brad Pitt movie.  I was disappointed to find that out myself.     Speaking of things that have proven disappointing about Homer, One of those things is that we don't know him or even if there IS a him.    I know this is controversial and not universally accepted, but I will say from the get-go, that I am of the persuasion that Homer was an actual person who actually composed both pieces.  Although I'm sure there was a collection of traditional myths, like we saw with the Iroquois confederacy that were passed down orally from generation to generation, I believe that there was a man named Homer who drew from the myths kind of like Shakespeare did in our English tradition from popular stories he knew people recognized, and he composed his own pieces- one being the Iliad- where he doesn't retell the entire story of the war, but focuses on one hero and one aspect of it- and the other being the Odyssey- where he again focuses on one person.  Obviously I'm not an archeologist or a university professor with a degree in classical studies and I'm not prepared or qualified to argue with anyone who is.  But, I've read enough from those who are to convince me of that.    Do we know anything about Homer at all, assuming as you do, that he existed?    Not really- to be honest.  Most traditions claim that he was blind, although I can't find any real compelling reason for that belief except there's a blind poet named Demodacus in the Odyssey that sings at the court of the Phaeacian king- which I wouldn't think means anything at all, except that the ancients themselves took it for something- so if they believed it, maybe it was so.  Oh, This is interesting, there is one tradition that believes Homer was a woman- based in large part to the prominence Homer gives women in the text- that's my favorite theory, but a minority view for sure.  No ancient scholars were making that claim.  Tradition, and by tradition, we're talking about a couple thousand of years- so that's a long time for a tradition to develop- but traditional views consider him to have been  a male bard, or what today we call a professional singer/songwriter.  No one really knows where he's from.  Although, at least seven different places claim him; the most convincing arguments, at least for me, suggest he came from islands that are actually closer to Turkey then mainland Greece- more specifically the island Chios which is in the Aegean sea but close to Smyrna, modern day Izmir.  But maybe he came from Ios or Cyme.        If you are not all that well acquainted with the geography of the Mediterranean Sea or the Aegean ocean, I'll try to create a mini-map in your mind's eye.  Think of the big Mediterranean sea being a like a giant lake, and mainland Greece jets kind of halfway between Turkey and Italy with all of these scattered islands everywhere that go with it.  So, the part of the water that is between Greece and Turkey we call the Aegean Sea.  I don't want to oversimplify to people who know their maps, but, I've learned over the last couple of years, it's harder for those of us who use GPS  all the time to see the world in terms of maps, the way we old-schoolers used to have to do all the time- no disrespect. I definitely love my GPS over a paper map- but there's the trade-off.   I guess a good linked-in question might be, do we need maps anymore?      Anyway, Ancient Troy or modern day Hissarlik is on the north side of this inlet.  If you go down about 120 towards the Mediterranean you run into Chios and Smyrna.  Both of these places are about 158 miles across the ocean from Athens.  So, today, by modern standards they don't take long to get from one to the other, but obviously if you make the gods make, like Odysseus did, it can take up to 10 years.  But, Garry, beyond the geography of Greece being so different from other parts of the world because it's so based around a culture of the sea, I have trouble understanding the different periods- the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, all that stuff.  Can you give us a two minute crash course?    Sure, well we usually call what you're talking about this age of the early Greek glory years where they built the big palaces with the gigantic walls with the gods and heroes that were larger than life- the Mycenaean civilization- and the dates for that, generally speaking, are between 1650-1200 BC.  We really don't think of the Myceans as having a writing system like we think of today-  they likely had some ways of using script perhaps to mark things for business, but the culture and stories were passed down by an oral tradition.  The most important city-states, at least this is what we think today, were some of the ones we see in the Odyssey for example Mycenae was home to the legendary King Agamemnon and Pylos was the home of King Nestor.  All of these city states worshiped the same gods and spoke the same language, but politically, they had different kings.  Kings had to be strong.  Piracy was a way of life and not even considered immoral.  We think today that these people were highly aggressive and warlike amongst themselves as well as against outsiders.  They also made their armor out of Bronze- hence the Bronze Age.  So, back to the Iliad, Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world, was the queen of Sparta.  If we referring back to your little mental map- Sparta, Mycenae and Pylos are on the other side of mainland Greece- the side closer to Italy.  The ruins from those cities show big walls and lots of wealth. Sparta is about 300 or so miles across the sea, pass the mainland and into the Aegean Ocean.  This would have been the warpath to Troy but honestly, we really don't know what happened and that is not even just about this particular war.  We don't know for sure what happened to any of these towns.  What we do know is something devastasted all of these beautiful city states.  They were burned to the ground and whatever happened caused this area to fall into a period called the Dark Age- because we know nothing about it.  Almost the only thing we really know is that during the Dark Age, there was a transition from Bronze weapons to the much stronger Iron ones.    The big changes and the big cultural movement that shaped the world- at least the Western world- like we think of today comes out of the next period- the one following the Dark Age. We call this one the Archaic period which we consider to be from 800-500BC.  This era as well as the next are where we get things we're familiar with like the Olympics, the new sophisticated writing system- the Greek alphabet- democracy- like we associate with Athens.  And to make things even more confusing, the big Greek guys that we think of- like Plato and Aristotle and the “Golden Age” do not coincide with Homer- they come much later.  So, it's a lot of history- for us on the American continent who are mostly immigrants from other parts of the world- be it Europe, Africa or Asia, it's more than we can really even conceptualize- our entire nation as we understand it as a nation is less than 250 years old.  If we add what we know of the Indigenous people like the Iroquois confederacy into our timeline -we still fall short by thousands of years- Dekcadeakoah wasn't born til 1200 AD, at least that's our best guess.  So- there's your historical context in the two minute nutshell.  Does that work?    Well of course, so- to summarize even more Homer, a man who comes this Archaic period 8th century BC,  was writing about people who claimed lived during the Mycenaean civilization a full 400 before his life time- so if we want to give Odysseus, the man, an age- he's like 3000 plus years old-  Like I said before- for me it is basically “A long time ago in an galaxy far far away”...and yet…it's not… I want to start out by reading the first page of Fagle's translation- and then let's jump into the story itself- because for me-and I mean to disrespect to history- you know I love history- but I think you will agree with me- that it's not the history of this story that has kept it around for 3000 years.  It's not the religion; it's not the culture.  Homer writes the story of our lives- all of our lives- and we keep coming back to it generation after generation for that reason.      Read page 77    Okay- Christy- I think there's one more thing I think we need to clarify- there are so many translations.  Does it matter?    Well, I think the answer to that is the same if you ask that question about translations of the Bible- whichever you like personally-- which I may add- if you want to compare when Odysseus lived with Biblical characters, Moses arguably lived about 200 years before Odysseus-my best guess from my looking at the most respected timelines for each of these guys – but I stand to be corrected -if you have an article that parallels the two histories, I'd love to see it- email it over.  The more important point- and in some sense this is true for any text- but it is especially true for ancient texts- it's not the nuance of the language that matters really at all.  It's the essence of the ideas of the stories- the universal truths.  Most of the millions who read these stories every year can't read the original Greek. And although those that can really talk about the beauty of  all that- that part is lost on us.   It's not the translation that is going to make or break the story.  The Rouse translation, which, by the way, is the one we used when I taught this text to freshmen in Wynne Arkansas, was the first one I knew and the only one I knew for a really long time.  I really like it because I know it.  But, the knock on it is that it's prose and the Odyssey was not written in prose.  It's by far one of the lesser respected ones today. A lot of people today prefer Robert Fagle's translation because his book is really easy to read but he tries to make it sound like poetry.     Well, for the record, I am using Rouse's translation. I picked up Fagles, but I ended up preferring Rouse's because I wanted to read the story in prose instead of verse, for me that's easier.  But just so I know, Christy, assuming we were Greek and could understand this as it was originally composed what would it be like.    Good question- not that anyone knows for sure- but the general understanding is that it was written in meter- dactylic hexameter to be exact.  DAH -duh-duh- One accented syllable with two unaccented syllables in a row and then each line would have six of these.  Now, this is just me, but I really compare these ancient bards to modern day rap artists.  The Bards that would go around singing these stories- would improvise- but would use the beat to kind of keep them on course- obviously it didn't sound like rap, but it's the same skill that we see rap artists do when they improvise and you wonder- how can they think of all those rhymes?  Well, the trick is to already have little phrases in your mind that you know will make your lines work.  In the case of the Greek bards, they would have these epithets, or phrases they would use to describe the names of different gods- these lines that keep repeating throughout- would help them keep up with the demands of the meter.  So what does that mean- that means when you hear them say, as we will “Bright-eyed Athena”- he's adding syllables to make the meter work.  If that makes sense.      So, the descriptions don't necessarily mean that her eyes are the most important thing about her- it's just to make the music work?     That's it exactly.  The thinking is we aren't supposed to read too much into those kinds of things.  Also, the bards themselves used a very specialized vocabulary which was a mixture of different Greek dialects in order to make it all work.   This is a tangent, but it's kind of interesting, there was a classical linguist named Milman Parry who really wanted to figure out how in the world Homer could memorize so many lines.  You know the Odyssey has over 12,000 lines.  Well, Parry, by studying modern day illiterate singer/songwriters in Bosnia.  He came to believe that Homer didn't memorize anything- he had these patterns, these phrases and names of the gods that he knew rhymed well and fit the pattern and he would just tell the story and improvise the language for every different audience- he'd end the lines with the phrases and patterns that rhymed.  Maybe like professional comedians who do comedy improv in “Who's line is it anyway?”  So, in my mind, a Greek bard is something between a cross between a rap artist and modern day improv comedian.     HA!  Well, there's some creative analogies, but I get it.  Honestly, the idea of improvising makes it cooler than if Homer just wrote a piece of writing and then just read/chanted/sang the same thing over and over again.  As a musician, it reminds me of what Jazz musicians do or even bands in general.  You know, and this is really going to sound nerdy, but every once in a while, I have some buddies that I've known from years ago- we all went to the same church at one time- but many have moved out of Memphis- but we get together about once a year and do something like this. We'll go to a friend's house with our instruments, bring up some good ole' rock and roll music that we like and just improvise.  We all know the songs, but the specific variations, solos- that sort of thing- will be just be stuff that we make up.    Parry thought a Homer show was exactly that- every time he performed The Odyssey it was totally new.  But again, this is all total speculation- no one knows.  It's just too long ago.  So- having said that, back to the question you asked, for most of our purposes none of this stuff really matters- the translation doesn't matter, that Homer may or may not even have been a person, or a male or a person with vision who wrote with letters at all- or that the text itself may not even have been a fixed text or a story with improvised performances- all of those things- all though interesting- are really not the reason we love these stories and teach them in the ninth grade- at least around here.  It's this Homeric universe- this fantastical story- this hyperbolic creation  that has magnified the human experience.  Homer gave us a  new way to conceptualize our world- and a way to feel about the events- both controllable and uncontrollable that plague our lives.  Every once in a while, someone shows up in the world that can produce such a space.  In some ways we could say that Tolkien did this with Middle Earth, that JK Rowling did it, that CS Lewis did it, even George Lucas did it- each of those artists conceptualize entirely new and different universes- and when we spend time in their work- whatever medium we use- can inhabit that universe.  We can understand our world better through their world- it's fantasy.  So, Homer was the first that we know of to do this at the scale in which he did.  This is not to say that there are not legends and stories that predate him- there most certainly are- but they don't exist, that I know of, in this full length single unit form- not like what we have with Homer.  But yet, there is more to it than even that, although that is quite a feat.    Homer defined reality for a large number of people for centuries- maybe even still- and I'm not sure those other writers that I just listed out can say that.  The Greeks for hundreds of years, were able to ground their reality on the backs of the principles, morals, the world view that was laid out in his work- The Illiad and The Odyssey.  It helped people answer basic questions like- how do I conduct myself in the world.        Let's look at those first lines again and go through them-    “Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.”    Christy, is Homer telling us his entire story in the first lines.    Yes- of course he is- first of all, I do want to point out that Homer does not take credit for his story.  He is going to say it was given to him from a Muse.  That's interesting and really Jungian- so, I'll let you speak to that since that's your cup of tea-    Ha!  Well, he's basically saying, it's not that he made up the story- but he found the story or the story found him-the Muse is the originator- the idea being that the story existed before him in some larger context- that there is something here greater than he is.    And of course, all religious traditions speak to this reality, but since you referenced Jung, so does psychology.  There is something greater… and that is his starting point.    Exactly, and then he brings up why we love Odysseus- he was a man of twist and turns.  You know James Joyce who wrote that incredibly complicated masterpiece Ulysses was asked why he wrote his masterpiece about Odysseus- Ulysses is the Roman way to say Odysseus- and he famously responded that he was the only complete man in literature.  Odysseus, as we are going to see is a different kind of hero.  In the Iliad which is the book that came first, the Achilles is a demi-god. He's perfect.  He is totally beautiful, totally powerful, totally honest- that is something he took pride in. He never had to lie, he never had to back down- he was bigger and stronger and could overpower anyone.  That's not Odysseus- he was amazing- for sure.  But he wasn't the absolute biggest- he had to rely on lies- he sacked cities but he also got sacked himself- he had twist and turns- and for two reasons- on the one hand, the gods had agendas that had nothing to do with him that affected his world, but also he, himself,  made choices that steered him way off course.      Odysseus is a hero- for sure-   he definitely gets all the women- haha- if you want to look at it that way- but he's the kind of hero- we as mere mortals might aspire to be.  His life didn't turn out the way he wanted it, but he still wins at life- and actually he gets to make choices that allow him to live the kind of life he ultimately figures out he wants for himself.    Exactly- and Homer shows us how to make that happen.  In this Homeric universe that is safely far away- full of monsters and goddesses and magic- we can test drive some of the things we'd like to do if we could.  In this magical place we see consequences for things like running your mouth when maybe you shouldn't. But we can get some good ideas at how to get back when we're being exploited- ways that are smarter than just running our mouth.   Maybe by watching Odysseus we can get ideas about how to correct the course of our personal odyssey, we can figure out success that looks like for ourselves in our mundane realities. At least, that's the idea.    And yet, Christy, it is magical and otherworldly with characters we don't know.  I'll just be honest, as a person who doesn't know a lot about mythology, am I going to get confused the farther into this I read?  So far, so good, but I'll admit I haven't finished the whole thing yet.    Again, back to Homer's brilliance- the answer is NO.  Homer is going to build a pantheon of gods that is manageable and knowable.  And this is brilliant.  Just like other polytheistic faiths there are hundreds of gods in the Greek pantheon- but how do you wrap your brain around 600 or so? Homer is going to reduce it to a few- the Olympians.  He's going to create a hierarchy we can understand and he's going to personalize the gods so that we can know them.  As we read the story, we meet them little by little.  We learn who they are, what they value, how they operate- and of course- how we appease them and stay out of trouble. First and foremost- we meet Zeus- he's the chief, the god of the sky- protector and father of all the other gods and humans.      We're also going to learn an important principle, that will explain a lot about life- both to us and the ancients- there are things that are in the hands of the gods, but there are also things that are in our control.  We can control what we can control but then there are times we can strive hard and still meet disaster.  Sometimes, we have offended the gods; sometimes they just like us- sometimes we are just victims of happenstance.      Yes- exactly- and how do we account for that?  Let's keep reading…    Page 78    So, we met Zeus- he's the god of the sky- now we get to meet Poseidon- he's the god of the sea- he's Zeus' brother, but he is way more unpredictable and volatile- hence the behavior of the sea.  The big three are Zeus, Poseidon and Hades- God of the Sky, God of the Sea and God of the underworld.  We meet all three in the Odyssey- and in some sense, this brings order to a universe.      There are powers out there- things we can't see but that determine our fate- but are also arbiters of justice.  There is also a spiritual battlefield- spirits- invisible forces, however you want to understand the world- energy forces larger than our own humanity can see through our natural senses- there is a story that is larger than our story, but we play a part.   Sometimes we are just a speck in humanity, but other times we are not invisible, even to these larger forces.    Of course, as we think through this, although, not many of us adopt Greek mythology as our spiritual worldview, there is a lot there, that most of the world still accepts as truth- even if you're a monotheist.    Exactly- those are the major big boys- but there are a few others that we're going to meet.  We meet Hermes pretty quickly and we quickly understand his role in the role- he is a messenger.  He's Zeus' son, but not with his wife, Hera.  Zeus is always getting in trouble with his wife because he has fidelity issues.  But Hermes, as we will quickly learn is in charge of messages.        After we meet the men, we will slowly meet some of the important women of Olympus.  The first one here is probably my favorite goddess- Athena, she might be everyone's favorite goddess. She's a virgin, not controlled by a man, ha- but a goddess of both wisdom and war.  She's awesome.    I don't know that she's everybodies- Aphrodite has fans.      Yeah- you're right- but she's a trouble-maker.  Aphrodite makes you like fall madly in love with someone you know is no good for you- or be sexually compelled to do behave improperly.    Some would say that's low impulse control.      Yes- but those would not be the ancient Greeks.  They would say it's Aphrodite's fault- you are listening to her- that was Helen of Troy's problem.  But back to Athena    Athena seems she likes Odysseus.      She DOES!!  And that's how Odysseus wins.  Someone is watching over him and he is sensitive to her leading.  Athena is the goddess of wisdom, and Odysseus is attuned to this sense of wisdom in the universe.  She speaks to him, guides him, and most importantly, Athena enables Odysseus to always keep his cool. Odysseus, we will see, with a few exceptions, is led by wisdom- not by lust,  not by uncontrollable rage- by god-given wisdom.  Seeing people as being visited by outside forces that inspire them one way or the other is not a bad way of understanding why people are the way they are- even if you don't believe in gods and goddesses- which for the record, I don't personally, but this is my understanding of the ancient Greek worldview.  In the Homeric Universe, men and women are led by one god or goddess for the most part- not by a variety of different ones.  We mentioned that Helen of Troy is attune to Aphrodite, the goddess of sexual love- that's who's giving her direction.  But Odysseus is attuned and sensitive to Athena.  Athena takes credit not for Odysseus' strength, although he is strong, not for his ability with a bow and arrow, which we'll see he's pretty good at that too, but she takes credit for his wisdom.  The Odyssey is a story of this collaboration- there are things that we can't control, but there are things we can, and if we control the things we can, the universe, a goddess or someone outside of ourselves can and will intervene on our behalf with grace and kindness.  It's a way to organize our thinking about how the universe works- a very old way of thinking about how the universe works.     Let's quote Zeus here- again from the Fagles translation- as he explains the responsibility of humans- at this point in the story- Poseidon is out of town, so to speak- he's off in Ethiopia receiving offerings by the hundreds.  And with him away, Athena will make her play to save Odysseus' life, but we also see this philosophy of the Greeks explained here in the beginning of how and why things work out the way they do.    Page 78      But now let me read what Athena says back to her father= here she demonstrates the role the gods play in the destinies of man    page 79-       And so we have our narrative hook.  The gods will intervene in the destinies of men.  Calypso has been holding Odysseus hostage.  Hermes is being sent with a message from the gods forcing Calypso to release Odysseus.  At the same time this is happening,  Athena will visit Telemachus' Odysseus' son back in their hometown, Ithaca.  Telemachus was a newborn when Odysseus' left.  He is now 20 years old.  For ten years Odysseus fought in Troy.  Then after angering Poseidon, he spent the next ten years wandering lost at sea.  Telemachus has been left to be raised by his mother and a man named Mentor (guess where got that word).  Anyway, there is trouble in Ithaca which we'll find out about next episode, but more importantly than that, it is time for Telemachus to take his own journey and go out into the world on his own.        The Odyssey can easily be divided into three parts- the first four books are about Telemachus' journey to visit all of his father's war buddies.  The second part is Odysseus wandering around the magical seas, and the third is what he finds when he gets back to Ithaca, how he finds his beautiful and faithful wife and what he sees in his palace estate.  The first part, which we'll tackle. Next episode is about the coming of age from a boy to a man. After that we'll look at what all these seas trials are all about and then finally, we'll discuss some ideas about the famous finale in our finale.    Well, it sounds like we have a plan.  You know, the Iliad is a pretty straight forward narrative- a linear timeline and a kind of tragic ending.  The Odyssey is written in circles.  It's winding with endless setbacks but it has a happy ending.      I think that's exactly the right way to look at it.  They are both charming and enduring books but for different reasons, my book club recently just finished reading the latest take on the Iliad.  Madeline Miller wrote a novel called The Song of Achilles from the perspective of Patroclus that we read and really liked, but it was sad too.   If we ever analyze the Iliad, we'll get into the appeal of that book- it certainly is there- but if we just look at what's appealing the Odyssey – I think the ending is definitely a factor- many of us know what it's like to offend the gods, experience the wrath of Poseidon, maybe even the lures of Aphrodite or Circe – we've also likely been jilted by suitors or friend-enemies- as we call them nowadays- we can live vicariously through this steady under pressure goddess led hero- and maybe be inspired to face down our monsters- maybe we can even do a little listening for Athena and learn to bide our time and wreck havoc on our foes if we need to.  But mostly, we all want that heart-warming reunion after a long absence with our loved-ones and own home- we want to rest in the prophecy that old Greek prophet Tiresias gave Odysseus during his visit to the underworld- that when our time comes death will steal upon us a gentle painless death, far from the seas it comes to take you down, borne down with the years in ripe old age with all your people there in blessed peace around you.”                                      

Remedial Herstory: The Other 50%
Episode 21: Should we remember Augustus for his war on women? With Dr. Barry Straus

Remedial Herstory: The Other 50%

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 72:11


A provocative title perhaps, but this week Kelsie and Brooke are joined on the podcast by Dr. Barry Straus. We are talking Ancient Rome, Cleopatra, Octavia, the Julias and other women whose stories have been overshadowed by their male peers. Strauss is a classicist and a military and naval historian and a professor of history at Cornell University. He is the Series Editor of the Princeton History of the Ancient World and author of seven books on ancient History. You can find his book, THE WAR THAT MADE THE ROMAN EMPIRE, here. Support our work at www.patreon.com/remedialherstory Find lesson plans at http://www.remedialherstory.com Educators! Get professional development credit for listening to our podcast! Head to our website and complete the form and we will send you your certificate. https://www.remedialherstory.com/podcast-pd-certificate.html --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/remedialherstory/support

The Ancients
Alexander The Great vs Julius Caesar

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 45:08


They've both been described as the greatest military commanders in the ancient world, but who really takes the title? Alexander, the undefeated conqueror of the largest empire in the world, or Caesar, a leader who was critical in expanding and creating what later became the Roman Empire?For this episode, Tristan is joined by Dr Simon Elliott, author of Alexander the Great versus Julius Caesar: Who was the Greatest Commander in the Ancient World? Together, they analyse their leadership styles, victories, and their tactical and strategic genius, to finally answer who really was the greatest military leader.While you're here, don't forget to leave us a rating and review - let us know who you think was the greatest leader.For more ancient content, subscribe to our Ancient History Thursday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to the Android or Apple storeMusic:Phoenix Rising - Edgar Hopp See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ancient World
Episode C8 – The Heirs of Hatti

The Ancient World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 22:53


Synopsis: The Great Kings of Carchemish continue ruling over a Hittite rump state in northern Syria as they support the region's recovery.  After an attack by the Assyrian king Ashur-bel-kala, the Carchemish dynasty is supplanted by the house of Suhi. “In that year, in the […] The post Episode C8 – The Heirs of Hatti first appeared on THE ANCIENT WORLD.

The Ancient World
Episode C7 – The Heirs of Babylon

The Ancient World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 24:58


Synopsis: Even as Anatolia, Syria and Egypt confronted the Bronze Age Collapse, the eastern kingdoms of Assyria, Babylonia and Elam continued their ancient cycle of dynastic conflict. “Why I – who am a king, son of a king, seed of a king, scion of a […] The post Episode C7 – The Heirs of Babylon first appeared on THE ANCIENT WORLD.

Laid Back Lush
The History of Wine Part 1: Wine in the Ancient World

Laid Back Lush

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 27:29


Welcome back, we're starting a new series! We'll be discussing the development and history of wine from our earliest records through the modern day. In this episode, we're tackling the early history of wine from the ancient world. The cultural spread and development surrounding wine was highly esteemed in the major cultural centers as well as trade, and we're excited to share our research with you!

Solomon's Bookcase
Ancient Flying Serpent Seraphs and You: A Primer

Solomon's Bookcase

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 20:41


Angels are often portrayed as messengers, yet the prophet Isaiah describes a very different type of "angelic" encounter with 6-winged flying creatures bathing in smoke.  Isaiah doesn't even seem that surprised to see them - perhaps there's a reason for that?  Oh, and we'll talk about the Angel of Death.  Not his real name, but he's kind of a big deal. Books: 1.  "Sarapu."  In The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.  Chicago:  Oriental Institute, 1962.  Pgs. 102-5. 2.  John Walton.  "Demons in Mesopotamia and Israel."  In Windows to the Ancient World of the Hebrew Bible.  Bill Arnold, Nancy Erickson, and John Walton, eds.  Winona Lake, IN:  Eisenbrauns, 2014.  Pgs. 229-45. 3.  T.N.D. Mettinger.  "Seraphim."  In Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible.  Karel van der Toorn, Bob Becking, Pieter van Horst, eds.  Leiden: Brill, 1999.  Pgs. 742-4. Music: Clip from The Ten Commandments.  Paramount Pictures, 1956. Clip from Evan Almighty.  Universal Pictures, 2007. Alexander Nakarada.  "Vopna."  Creative Commons license.  www.serpentsoundstudios.com Artwork: Seraphim, from the Hagia Sofia, Istanbul.  Unknown date and artist.

Inquisikids Daily
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

Inquisikids Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:33


The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Join us today as we learn about the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and find out which one is still standing! Sources: https://www.britannica.com/topic/Seven-Wonders-of-the-World https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-seven-wonders-of-the-ancient-world.html Send us listener mail! Send an audio message: anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/message Send an email: podcast@inquisikids.com

Wines To Find
Wines To Find, Ep 96: Women In Wine Expo featuring Georgian Wines

Wines To Find

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 48:17


Wines: Marani Gemieri and Marani MukuzaniGuest: Senay OzdemirWe are joined by a dynamo of a guest for this episode. Senay Ozdemir is the organizer of the Women In Wine Expo. An award winning journalist, PR executive and professor, Senay Ozdemir drew upon her collective career and life experiences to create the Women In Wine Expo.From her early days as a journalist, Senay has always been a champion of women - whether in life or the workplace, she has focused on uplifting and highlighting the experiences of women, especially those in under-represented cultures. Drawing upon her experiences as a Muslim female, she was determined to not only strike a path for herself and others but to ensure that path is filled with support, creativity and, yes, WINE!As we taste two Ancient World wines from Georgia (the country!), we discuss the history and process of wine-making in the Ancient World. Known as the cradle of civilization, Mesopotamia is also the birthplace of wine. Today, wines from Georgia, Turkey and Croatia are seen as up-and-coming, but the reality is, they were the first wines of the world.Listen as Senay tells her story. Whether she was a magazine publisher, creating a PR Firm to represent wines from her home of Turkey, or establishing the Women in Wine Expo, Senay's journey has spanned many countries and  broken through many cultural stereotypes and misconceptions.WARNING - you WILL be inspired to buy a plane ticket to Georgia to join Senay at the 2022 Women In Wine Expo - we're still trying to figure out how we can!Wines To Find Podcast,  Finalist in the 12th Annual TASTE AWARDS  in  four categories. -Best Drink or Beverage Program-Best New Series-Best Single Topic Series-Best Food or Drink PodcastWe have been listed in the Top 30 wine podcasts! https://blog.feedspot.com/wine_podcasts/==============Music from https://filmmusic.io "Night In Venice" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/winestofind)

Antemortem
AM100: Surgery Part I - The Ancient World

Antemortem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:18


Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
Is Jordan Peterson Religious or Political? Is he a Prophet or a Clinical Psychologist?

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 72:29


I got a lot of requests to talk about  @Jordan B Peterson   two recent short videos as well as  @Carefree Wandering  response to JBP's comments on his video. Best to wrap it all up together because it touches on the same issues. People misunderstand Peterson's project and the definition of "religion" including "civil religion". JBP: A Wing and a Prayer https://youtu.be/PcM3Y8kACo4  JBP: The Actor https://youtu.be/pEWEEZ8rp24  HGM: Response to JBP https://youtu.be/Lp7aSJ-q4h4  Tom Holland Did Religion Exist in the Ancient World?  https://youtu.be/ZeCTC_r4vMI  JBP and  @Jonathan Pageau  https://youtu.be/2rAqVmZwqZM  JBP and Stephen Fry https://youtu.be/fFFSKedy9f4  JBP Telegraph Interview https://youtu.be/q4zZ2ker1iI    Discord link. Good for just a few days. Check with more recent videos for a fresh link. https://discord.gg/UtXjCExw Paul Vander Klay clips channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0jIcadtoxELSwehCh5QTg My Substack https://paulvanderklay.substack.com/ Estuary Hub Link https://sites.google.com/view/estuaryhubcontent/home If you want to schedule a one-on-one conversation check here. https://paulvanderklay.me/2019/08/06/converzations-with-pvk/ There is a video version of this podcast on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paulvanderklay To listen to this on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paul-vanderklays-podcast/id1394314333  If you need the RSS feed for your podcast player https://paulvanderklay.podbean.com/feed/  All Amazon links here are part of the Amazon Affiliate Program. Amazon pays me a small commission at no additional cost to you if you buy through one of the product links here. This is is one (free to you) way to support my videos.  https://paypal.me/paulvanderklay To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin (BTC): 37TSN79RXewX8Js7CDMDRzvgMrFftutbPo  To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) qr3amdmj3n2u83eqefsdft9vatnj9na0dqlzhnx80h  To support this channel/podcast with Ethereum (ETH): 0xd3F649C3403a4789466c246F32430036DADf6c62 Blockchain backup on Lbry https://odysee.com/@paulvanderklay https://www.patreon.com/paulvanderklay Paul's Church Content at Living Stones Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh7bdktIALZ9Nq41oVCvW-A To support Paul's work by supporting his church give here. https://tithe.ly/give?c=2160640

Ancient World
Meditations #1 - Dante, and Aiming in Life.

Ancient World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 5:46


Welcome back to the Ancient World Podcast! We'll be warming up again now with some short meditations and reflections from the Ancient World and the Renaissance, aiming for shorter episodes with inspiration and beauty, and new food for thought. First meditation is from Purgatory 16, the importance of Reason to balance Wrath, and about Aiming in Life. Thanks for listening! A special thanks goes out to our very generous Patrons: Caldazar, Seán Eckmann, Laura Daligan, Michael Leighty, Claudia, Aidan Chavasse and Santheep on patreon.com/ancientworld - thank you!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ancientworld/message

Arts & Ideas
Caesar, Hogarth and images of power

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:02


Caesars with the wrong beard, faint laurels in the background of a scene from Hogarth's A Rake's Progress and the experiences of the guardian of empty tombs, part of a ruined Neolithic necropolis in the Sharjah desert in the United Arab Emirates: Rana Mitter and his guests discuss the ghosts of history and depictions of power in art. Classicist Mary Beard has traced the collecting of images of Caesar over centuries in her latest book. Ali Cherri's artwork, born out of his experiences growing up in Lebanon, includes films like the Digger and interventions in galleries designed to make us notice what is on display and what is being hidden or erased. Alice Insley is Curator of Historic British Art at Tate Britain and she's been exploring the continental connections between Hogarth and his fellow artists. Hogarth and Europe runs at Tate Britain from November 3rd to 20th March 2022. Ali Cherri is the National Gallery's new Artist in Residence for 2021. He is also making work inspired by the archives held by Coventry's Herbert Art Gallery and Museum. You can find examples of his work https://www.alicherri.com/ Mary Beard's book is called Twelve Caesars: Images of Power form the Ancient World to the Modern Our playlist of conversations about visual arts includes the 2021 Frieze Discussion with three directors of museums and galleries, an exploration of colour, and Aboriginal artworks on show at the Box Plymouth https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026wnjl Producer: Robyn Read

The Daily Stoic
Dr. Kara Cooney on the Power Strategies of the Ancient World | This Is The Secret To Stoicism

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 64:04


Ryan reads today's daily meditation and talks to author and Egyptologist Dr. Kara Cooney about her new book The Good Kings: Absolute Power in Ancient Egypt and the Modern World, the use of short term thinking and long term thinking as tools to gain power, ancient strategies that were used to gain and maintain power, and more.Dr. Kara Cooney is a professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA. Specializing in craft production, coffin studies, and economies in the ancient world, Cooney received her PhD in Egyptology from Johns Hopkins University. She has released several books including The Woman Who Would Be King and When Women Ruled the World. She is also the host of the Afterlives Podcast.Check out the new perennial Daily Stoic Page A Day Calendar: https://store.dailystoic.com/products/daily-stoic-page-a-day-desk-calendarCometeer partners with the best locally owned roasters in the world and through their breakthrough brewing technology, provides a delicious, high-quality, balanced cup of coffee for a fraction of the price. For a limited time, you can save 20 Dollars off your first order - that's 10 free cups on your first order, and shipping is always free - but only when you visit cometeer.com/STOICTalkspace is an online and mobile therapy company. Talkspace lets you send and receive unlimited messages with your dedicated therapist in the Talkspace platform 24/7. To match with a licensed therapist today, go to Talkspace.com or download the app. Make sure to use the code STOIC to get $100 off of your first month and show your support for the show.LinkedIn Jobs is the best platform for finding the right candidate to join your business this fall. It's the largest marketplace for job seekers in the world, and it has great search features so that you can find candidates with any hard or soft skills that you need. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit linkedin.com/STOIC to post a job for free. Sign up for the Daily Stoic email: https://DailyStoic.com/signupFollow us: Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, FacebookFollow Kara Cooney: Homepage, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTubeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chalke Talk
144. Tom Holland (2019)

Chalke Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:41


The IliadTom Holland, classicist, historian and master storyteller, returns to the Ancient World with his unique, captivating and witty take on Homer's tale of the Trojan War. A retelling of this most enduring of stories, this is for young and old, and all ages in between. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

You're Dead To Me
Disability in the Ancient World

You're Dead To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 59:45


Greg Jenner is joined by comedian Rosie Jones and historian Dr Jane Draycott to discuss stories of disability from over a thousand years of history, including people with disabilities excelling on the battlefield and others with very well-dressed guide dogs. Research: Kierri Price Script: Emma Nagouse and Greg Jenner Project manager: Siefe Miyo Edit producer: Cornelius Mendez

Intelligence Squared
Mary Beard on Images of Power from the Ancient to the Modern World

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 57:16


What does the face of power look like? Who gets commemorated in art and why? And how do we react to statues of figures we deplore? In October 2021 Mary Beard, Britain's best known classicist, came to Intelligence Squared to talk about the ideas in her new book Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern.To follow along with the images referenced in the podcast visit: https://intelligencesquared.com/slides/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weird Distractions Podcast
Episode 81: The Banshee

Weird Distractions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 24:37


The devil, children and owls - aka the Weird Distractions trifecta. This week, Alex tries to weave through the folklore of the Irish Banshee. Once a former figure in the community, it seems as though it has taken a very unsettling turn to become an entity no one would want to cross paths with. Was the banshee real? Who did the banshee come after? What drag queen does Alex have on the mind? You'll have to tune in and find out! Need a distraction? We got you. As discussed in episode 62 about the 215 bodies of Tk'emlups te Secwepemc First Nation children recently found in Kamloops (and counting found in other provinces/locations), please check out: https://truenorthaid.ca/how-to-help-first-nations/. If you have any additional resources you'd like to share, please email: weirddistractionspodcast@outlook.com. Listener discretion is advised. Shout out to our Patrons Tom, Angela & Bailey! Thank you for supporting Weird Distractions on Patreon. You can also support the show on Patreon and get monthly bonus episodes, behind the scenes footage, and more! We're also on Buy Me a Coffee if you want to support the show with a one time donation. You can also find us on Redbubble for some Weird Distractions merch. If you want to provide feedback or even your own weird story to be read on air in an upcoming Listener Distractions episode - please email: weirddistractionspodcast@outlook.com. If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, please consider rating & reviewing! It's the best way to support the show (for free). Thanks for listening! Resources: Claddagh Design website – “Ireland's Best-Known Spirit – the Banshee” – March 12th, 2018. Britannica website – “Banshee” – By the Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica Irelands Eye website Celtic wedding rings website - www.celtic-weddingrings.com Your Irish website – www.yourirish.com YouTube video – “Banshee: Ireland's Screaming Harbinger of Death | Monstrum” – uploaded by user Storied – September 25th, 2019. Bird Watch Ireland website Ask About Ireland website – askaboutireland.ie Listverse website – “10 Terrifying Tales of Ghosts of the Ancient World” – by Debra Kelly, fact checked by Jamie Fraser – November 1st, 2015

Keen On Democracy
Mary Beard on What We Can Learn from Images of Roman Autocrats

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 29:06


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Mary Beard, the author of "Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern", to discuss how images of Roman autocrats have influenced art, culture, the representation of power for more than 2,000 years. Dame Winifred Mary Beard, DBE, FSA, FBA, FRSL is an English scholar of Ancient Roman civilization. She is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge, a fellow of Newnham College, and Royal Academy of Arts Professor of Ancient Literature. She is the classics editor of The Times Literary Supplement, where she also writes a regular blog, "A Don's Life". Her frequent media appearances and sometimes controversial public statements have led to her being described as "Britain's best-known classicist". Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Did That Really Happen?
Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 61:55


This week we travel back to 18th century France with Portrait of a Lady on Fire! Join us as we talk about female artists, Vivaldi's Four Seasons, herbal abortifacients, flying ointment (aka "the armpit scene") and more! Sources: Female Painters: Laura Auricchio, "Eighteenth-Century Women Painters in France," The Met Museum (October 2004), https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/18wa/hd_18wa.htm Cath Pound, "The great women artists that history forgot," BBC (19 October 2016), https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20161019-the-great-women-artists-that-history-forgot Heidi A. Strobel, "Royal "matronage" of Women Artists in the Late-18th Century," Woman's Art Journal 26:2 (2005-2006): 3-9. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3598091 Catherine R. Montfort, "Self-Portraits, Portraits of Self: Adelaide Labille-Guiard and Elisabeth Vigee Lebrun, Women Artists of the Eighteenth Century," Pacific Coast Philology 40:1 (2005): 1-18. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25474166 Laura Auricchio, "Self-Promotion in Adelaide Labille-Guiard's 1785 Self-Portrait with Two Students," 89:1 (March 2007): 45-62. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25067300 The Four Seasons: Betsy Schwarm, "Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm," TED-Ed YouTube (24 October 2016), https://youtu.be/Xcpc8VDsv3c "VIVALDI: "Four Seasons" Sonnets texts in Italian & English," https://www.baroquemusic.org/vivaldiseasons.html https://www.charlottesymphony.org/blog/vivaldis-four-seasons-poems/ Film Background: Rotten Tomatoes: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/portrait_of_a_lady_on_fire Ela Bittencourt, "Portrait of a Lady on Fire: Daring to See," The Criterion Collection (23 June 2020), https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/6991-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-daring-to-see Mark Kermode, "Portrait of a Lady on Fire review - mesmerised by the female gaze," The Guardian (1 March 2020), https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/mar/01/portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-review-celine-sciamma "The Fine Brushstrokes Of 'Portrait Of A Lady On Fire'" NPR https://www.npr.org/2020/02/24/809112455/the-fine-brushstrokes-of-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire Hilary Weaver, "Portrait of a Lady On Fire Is A Queer Survival Guide To Self-Isolation," ELLE (28 March 2020), https://www.elle.com/culture/movies-tv/a31965622/portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-self-isolation-coronavirus-guide/ Carlos Aguilar, "Love Dialogue: Celine Sciamma on Portrait of a Lady on Fire," (12 February 2020) https://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/love-dialogue-c%C3%A9line-sciamma-on-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire Drew Gregory, "Celine Sciamma on "Portrait of a Lady on Fire," the Lesbian Gaze, and Queer TV That Gives Her Hope," Autostraddle (12 February 2020), https://www.autostraddle.com/celine-sciamma-on-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-the-lesbian-gaze-and-queer-tv-that-gives-her-hope/ https://www.telerama.fr/ecrans/regardez-le-brulant-portrait-de-la-jeune-fille-en-feu-de-celine-sciamma-sur-arte.tv-6966315.php Herbal Abortifacients: Boyce Rensberger, "Pharmacology," Washington Post, 25 July 1994, available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1994/07/25/pharmacology/573a3a65-8038-482c-9097-0cf992d72929/ Londa Schiebinger, "Agnotology and Exotic Abortifacients: The Cultural Production of Ignorance in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 149, 3 (2005) John M. Riddle and J. Worth Estes, "Oral Contraceptives in Ancient and Medieval Times," American Scientist 80, 3 (1992) John m. Ridde, J. Worth Estes, and Josiah C. Russell, "Ever Since Eve. . . Birth Control in the Ancient World," Archaeology 47, 2 (1994) Lucille F. Newman, "Ophelia's Herbal," Economic Botany 33, 2 (1979) BTM, "Early Abortifacients," Pharmacy in History 35, 2 (1993) Flying Ointment: Karsten Fatur, "Peculiar Plants and Fantastic Fungi: An Ethnobotanical Study of the Use of Hallucinogenic Plants and Mushrooms in Slovenia." PLOS One 16 (1) 2021 David MJ Carruthers, "Lines of Flight: An Enquiry Into the Properties of the Magical Plant, It's Literature and History," Mosaic, an Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 48, 2 (2015) Clive Harper, "The Witches' Flying Ointment," Folklore 88, 1 (1977) Michael Ostling, "Witches' Herbs on Trial," Folklore 125, 2 (2014) Danielle Piomelli and Antonino Pollio, "In Upupa O Strige: A Study in Renaissance Psychotropic Plant Ointments," History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16, 2 (1994)

Start the Week
Images of power

Start the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 42:02


What does the face of power look like? It's a question the academic Mary Beard explores in her latest book, Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern. She tells Kirsty Wark how the depiction of Roman autocrats have influenced art, culture and the presentation of power for more than two thousand years. King George III was condemned in the 18th century as ‘the cruellest tyrant of his age' and depicted as a diminutive and pompous figure in the 21st century musical, Hamilton. These are images the historian Andrew Roberts seeks to counter in his new biography of the King. His revisionist account argues that far from being a tyrant or incompetent he was one of the country's most admirable monarchs. Modern political leaders are no strangers to the importance of public image. As the Conservative government holds its party political conference in Manchester the political commentator and sometime-stand-up comedian Ayesha Hazarika looks at how leaders of different parties have tried to stage manage their hold on power. Producer: Katy Hickman

Leading By History
S3 Ep. 10 - Geography and the Ancient World (Geography as the 'Tattle Tale' of History)

Leading By History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 65:17


In this long awaited episode of the Leading By History podcast, host Ma'asehyahu Isra-Ul talks with Professor Cyndi Parker about the power and purpose of geography for unravelling historical mysteries and disputes. Were the Egyptians white Europeans? Is Egypt in Africa or the Middle East? How can we know the location of ancient events? Is religion developed within a geographical context? These questions and others like them will be points of interest within this dialogue. If you never thought that "mapping" your way through the world was important then this is the episode that you want to tune in to! As we continue to produce quality content, we look forward to your feedback. Thank you for supporting the Leading By History podcast! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/leadingbyhistory/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/leadingbyhistory/support

Saint Dominic Media
What can the ancient world teach us about hospitality? // World So Loved

Saint Dominic Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


What can the ancient world teach us about hospitality? // World So Loved

The Dirt Podcast
Disability in the Ancient World With Andrew Gurza - Ep 156

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 65:50


This week, Anna and Amber are joined by Andrew Gurza, disabled content creator and fellow podcaster, to talk about disability and care in the ancient world. We talk with Andrew about the need for disabled voices in archaeology, his path to podcasting, and some archaeological case studies that show that humans have always taken care of one another. Links Andrew Gurza's website Ancient Bones That Tell a Story of Compassion (NY Times) Ancient Bones Offer Clues to How Long Ago Humans Cared for the Vulnerable (NPR Goats and Soda) Follow Andrew on Twitter: @AndrewGurza_ Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Disability in the Ancient World With Andrew Gurza - Dirt 156

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 65:50


This week, Anna and Amber are joined by Andrew Gurza, disabled content creator and fellow podcaster, to talk about disability and care in the ancient world. We talk with Andrew about the need for disabled voices in archaeology, his path to podcasting, and some archaeological case studies that show that humans have always taken care of one another. Links Andrew Gurza's website Ancient Bones That Tell a Story of Compassion (NY Times) Ancient Bones Offer Clues to How Long Ago Humans Cared for the Vulnerable (NPR Goats and Soda) Follow Andrew on Twitter: @AndrewGurza_ Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Rants About Humanity
Prof. Robert Garland - The Greeks And The Fall Of Civilization (#039)

Rants About Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 87:43


In this podcast we talked about: ● The Importance Of Art ● The Lessons From The Greeks ● The Current-Day Moral Revising Of History ● Do We Still Have Democracy? ● The Decline Of Education Prof. Garland was a Roy D. and Margaret B. Wooster Professor of the Classics at Colgate University. He got my Ph.D. in Ancient History from University College London. He's studied drama, became a gardener, and taught English and drama to secondary school students and lectured at universities throughout Britain and at the British School of Archaeology in Athens. His research focuses on the social, religious, political, and cultural history of both Greece and Rome. I've 16 written books, which have been translated into many languages. He has recorded five courses for the Great Courses, including The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World; Athenian Democracy, and The Greek World: A Study of History and Culture. He has given up academics to do art. That's why he retired a year ago.. ☟ Find out more about Prof. Garland at☟ ◼︎ All his books: https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Garland/e/B001HD1TWW/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

Casting Through Ancient Greece
Interview: The Bronze Lie with Myke Cole

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 80:16


Todays episodes sponsor is Hello FreshHead to Hello Fresh here to receive $80 Discount ($50 - $20 - $10) Including Free Shipping on your First Box! with the code HFAFF80"Shattering the Myth of Spartan Warrior Supremacy"The Spartans are one of the most recognisable ancient Greek societies in our modern day. Though, just about no writing from the Spartans themselves survives, everything we know about them comes from outsiders looking in. This has resulted in many Myths and stereotypes to develop over the ages. In this episode, Myke Cole sits down and talks about his latest book, The Bronze Lie, Shattering the myth of Spartan Warrior supremacy, where he peals back the myth and gives the Spartans and their society a human face and story.Myke Cole has had a colourful and varied career, with service in war and crisis response. Myke's writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Daily Beast, The New Republic, and Foreign Policy. He is the author of Legion versus Phalanx: The Epic Struggle for Infantry Supremacy in the Ancient World. Myke is also a popular fantasy and science fiction novelist with several major imprints. He appeared on CBS' hit TV show Hunted, where he joined a team of elite investigators pursuing fugitives across the southeastern United States, and later starred on Discovery Channel's Contact alongside fellow Osprey author Dr Michael Livingston. And now Myke has written his second work on history, the Bronze Lie, Shattering the myth of Spartan warrior supremacy.Links for Myke Cole:Twitter – @MykeColeFacebook – Myke ColeWebsite – www.mykecole.comFind Myke's book here on AmazonThe Bronze LieLegion Versus PhalanxSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Mary Beard, Tabitha Soren

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 89:25


Episode No. 516 features art historian and author Mary Beard and artist Tabitha Soren. Beard's new book is Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern. It details how for more than two millennia, portraits of the rich and powerful have been informed by portraits of Roman emperors (and often by portraits believed to be Roman emperors), and investigates how 12 murderous rulers came to be so prominent in the work of artists -- and in the minds of patrons -- ever after. The book descends from Beard's 2011 Mellon Lectures at the National Gallery of Art. Indiebound and Amazon offer the book for about $35. Material referenced on the program includes: Aegidius Sadeler II's prints after Titian's Eleven Caesars (which were destroyed by fire in 1734). Hall of the Emperors, Capitoline Museums, Rome. On the second segment, Tabitha Soren discusses her work on the occasion of "Surface Tension" at the Mills College Art Museum in Oakland, Calif. The exhibition features work from Soren's series of the same title, pictures of iPad screens made to reveal how we interact with digital screens in ways that join touch, art history and the present. The exhibition is on view through December 12. Concurrently, RVB Books has published a book of pictures from the series. It's also titled Surface Tension and includes an essay by Jia Tolentino. As of taping, it's available from RVB Books for 29€. Works from the series have previously been shown at museums such as the Davis Museum at Wellesley College and at Transformer Station in Cleveland. Soren's work is in the collections of many museums, including the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Harvard Art Museums, the New Orleans Museum of Art and the George Eastman Museum.

Tides of History
When Did Things Happen in the Ancient World? Interview with Professor Sturt Manning

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 58:08


We can't understand the past without understanding when things happened, because if we can't place them in some sort of chronological order, we can't understand the relationship between them. But how do we know when things happened in the distant past? Professor Sturt Manning of Cornell University is an expert on chronology, using tree-rings, radiocarbon, and historical sources to date events and archaeological sites from many thousands of years ago. Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here.Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.Better Help- Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/tides.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Wines To Find
Wines To Find, Ep 89: Ancient World Wines

Wines To Find

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 25:26


Wines: Enijigi Grasévina and Tikves VranecTo kick off Season 7, we wander off the beaten path to explore some Ancient World Wines.As we venture further down the path of wine exploration, we have been on the hunt for wines that are a bit out of the ordinary. As we sip on a Grasévina from Croatia and a Vranec from Macedonia, we discuss what wines are considered "Ancient World" wines and why.The Grasévina was highly recommended as an excellent wine for anyone but it piqued our interest due to its place of origin. Both Croatia and Macedonia have historical roots in wine making that date beyond Western Civilization. Listen today to join us on our Ancient World Wine Adventure!Wines To Find Podcast,  Finalist in the 12th Annual TASTE AWARDS  in  four categories. -Best Drink or Beverage Program-Best New Series-Best Single Topic Series-Best Food or Drink PodcastWe have been listed in the Top 30 wine podcasts! https://blog.feedspot.com/wine_podcasts/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/winestofind)

The Ancients
Werewolves and Strix-Witches

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 41:39


It's werewolf time on the Ancients! In this episode Exeter University's Professor Daniel Ogden highlights how these mythical creatures have their origins in ancient times and thrived in a story world shared by witches, ghosts, demons and dragons. Join Tristan and Daniel as they shine a light on werewolf (or werewolf-related) stories that survive from antiquity. From Homer's Circe to Petronius' Satyricon. Also making an appearance is the Strix-Witch, a Roman phenomenon and persistent feature of their folklore. Daniel's new book, The Werewolf in the Ancient World, is out now.For behind the scenes and extra Ancients, follow Tristan on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/ancientstristan/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

34 Circe Salon -- Make Matriarchy Great Again -- Disrupting History
Julian Laws - Misogyny in the Ancient World - Ep. 2

34 Circe Salon -- Make Matriarchy Great Again -- Disrupting History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 67:49


Controlling female sexual behavior is one of the foundations of patriarchy.  In cooly efficient Ancient Rome, it was through law, of course, that the restriction of women's sexuality was achieved.  Join us as we explore the history and nature of what have been called "The Julian Laws," a series of legislation in the 1st century BC that were meant to promote "family values" by controlling women's bodies. 

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy
Graham Dunlop | Northern Lockdown, Synchronicities, and Grimerica Outlawed, Plus Bonus Archives.

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 127:50


Graham Dunlop, The Grimerica Show, Joins me for a conversation about our world today, what to do if your family thinks your crazy, my favorite topic Synchro's! and even some Ancient wisdom talk.The Grimerica Show - Grimerica Outlawed - Support Grimerica Plus a Re-Edit of episode 32 with Aeon Animus. Originally published 4/26/21. Aeon Animus, Author of Eden & Entheogens, Joins us for a conversation about the use of Psychedelics in the Ancient World, He describes the Mushrooms available to he people of that time period and traces the potential influence of psychedelics through various cultures. Check out Aeon Animus book available here for free. Leave me a message at https://podinbox.com/MFTIC:For Exclusive My Family Thinks I'm Crazy Content:Sign up on our Patreon For Exclusive Episodes. Check out the S.E.E.E.N.or on Rokfin@MFTICPodcast on Twitter@myfamilythinksimcrazy on Instagram, Follow, Subscribe, Rate, and Review we appreciate you!https://www.myfamilythinksimcrazy.comIntro Song by Destiny Lab Intro background music Music: Prime TimeBy GLASWINGInterlude Music: Sunneby GLASWINGSegwayMusic: On The Line By GLASWINGReleased under a Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Panorao Podcast
Episode 16 - Graveyard of Empires?

Panorao Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 60:58


Dr. Lupu welcomes his first guest to the show to discuss the Hellenistic period of the Ancient World, how Alexander made it all the way to and past Afghanistan, and why the moniker of "Graveyard of Empires" for Afghanistan doesn't stand the test of time.

ArchaeoAnimals
Time Warped! Part Four: The Zooarchaeology of the Post Roman Period - Ep 38

ArchaeoAnimals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 57:16


In this episode of ArchaeoAnimals, Alex and Simona delve into the zooarchaeology of the post Roman period. Learn more about exquisitely carved combs, antler pottery stamps and very courageous sheep. Links JORVIK Viking Centre - a must see attraction in York Stanley West, 1985. 'West Stow, the Anglo-Saxon Village, Suffolk', East Anglian Archaeology 24 Crabtree, P. J. And Campana, D. V., 2013: Wool Production, Wealth and Trade in Middle Saxon England In Arbuckle, B. S. and McCarty, S., eds. Animals and Inequality in the Ancient World. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, in press Pam Crabtree, 1989. 'West Stow, Suffolk: Anglo-Saxon Animal Husbandry', East Anglian Archaeology 47 Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Time Warped! Part Four: The Zooarchaeology of the Post Roman Period - Animals 38

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 57:16


In this episode of ArchaeoAnimals, Alex and Simona delve into the zooarchaeology of the post Roman period. Learn more about exquisitely carved combs, antler pottery stamps and very courageous sheep. Links JORVIK Viking Centre - a must see attraction in York Stanley West, 1985. 'West Stow, the Anglo-Saxon Village, Suffolk', East Anglian Archaeology 24 Crabtree, P. J. And Campana, D. V., 2013: Wool Production, Wealth and Trade in Middle Saxon England In Arbuckle, B. S. and McCarty, S., eds. Animals and Inequality in the Ancient World. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, in press Pam Crabtree, 1989. 'West Stow, Suffolk: Anglo-Saxon Animal Husbandry', East Anglian Archaeology 47 Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Bob Enyart Live
*The 360-Day Year on Real Science Radio

Bob Enyart Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


*Today we present the return of a classic show. * Did the whole world once use a 360-day calendar? If so, why? From our archives, RSR hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams look at the Mayans, Egyptians, Aztecs, Indians, Sumerians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and the Hebrew Bible to answer the first question: Yes, ancient civilizations used a 360-day calendar. To answer the question why, one must keep in mind the sophistication of ancient astronomers. Nasa reports that in 650 B.C., "Mayan astronomers [made] detailed observations of Venus, leading to a highly accurate calendar." And the Encyclopedia of Time says of the Aztecs that, "they carried on and further developed calendrical traditions that had their roots some 2,000 years before their own time." Real Science Radio investigates the reason why the ancient world used a 360-day calendar and discusses a mechanism for speeding up the rotation of the Earth that in historical times could add 5.24 days to the year. See more at 360dayyear.com. * RSR on YouTube: You're invited to check out RSR's 360-day year program turned into this important YouTube video: * The Calendar is one of the Greatest Monuments of a Culture: Along with language, the calendar is one of the greatest monuments of a culture. Ranke, as quoted by Norman Lockyer (The Origin of the Year, 1982, Nature, p. 487) wrote, "The calendar may be considered the noblest relic of the most ancient times which has influenced the world." And in 1903 Emmeline Plunket judged (Calendars and Constellations of the Ancient World, 1903, p. 188) that interest in ancient calendars is a necessary part of being "interested in the history of the human race". * Would You Consider Purchasing a Rare Research Book for RSR: [See kgov.com/wish-list for the latest status.] Over at Amazon.com, to further our investigation of one of Bob Enyart's favorite topics, the 360 day year, we've created a KGOV Research Amazon Wish List. We hope to procure an important and rare research book, The Cultic Calendars of the Ancient Near East. The text of this book is not available online, and there is a used copy of the book currently available, as of January 2016, that is $600 less expensive than the other copies also for sale. So if you're considering helping RSR continue to press forward on this significant topic, then please consider purchasing that book by clicking on our Wish List link just above. And for shipping, you can use the address at the Wish List. Thanks so very much for considering this! -Bob & Fred * Other RSR 360 Shows and Related Links: - The 360 Day Year on RSR (this show) and then Part 2 of today's program (broadcast in 2016 but not again in 2019) - Astronomer Danny Faulkner on the 360-Day Year with Bob Enyart - Danny's CRSQ paper rejecting the widespread belief among many creationists (including RSR, Henry Morris, Walt Brown, etc.) that God originally created the Earth with a 360-day year and 30-day months - Danny's paper rebutted in CRSQ by Enyart - How the Moon's Orbit Changed from 30 to 29.5 Days by a professor of astronautics at the U.S. Air Force Academy - On the origin of the world's first-known number system (a hybrid decimal/base 60 system)- 24 Hours in a Day -- How Ancient is the 24-hour Measurement? - Seven Days in a Week -- How Ancient is the 7-day Week?- 30 Days in a Month -- How Ancient is the 30-Day Month? - RSR's 360 Day Year show on YouTube - rsr.org/predictions#lunar-libration - The Genius of Ancient Man - 360dayyear.com - rsr.org/300 - rsr.org/3* What Year Is It On These Calendars? As of September 20, 2020, using these calendars, the year is: - 6770 Assyrian - 6024 Ussher - 5781 Hebrew - 5134 Mayan (3114 B.C.) - 4719 Chinese * Lunar Calendar At All Costs: Ancient man had more than sufficient knowledge to know that the year was more than 360 days and that the lunar month was less than 30. Yet his allegiance to a year of twelve 30-day months was intense. Of course, widely, great significance was placed on lunar-based religious feasts, yet these could have been observed within a solar calendar context (for example, the seventh month's New Moon). For a lunar calendar, like a 360-day calendar, unless corrected, would cause the seasons to migrate from winter to fall, and so on to spring. So while a lunar calendar readily supported the "New Moon" and other such religious festivals, and could help the especially astute person anticipate the strength of the tides (as Seneca reported in about 60 A.D.), a solar calendar would better enable mankind to accomplish pretty much everything else. Enormous benefits in implementation and planning in the areas of agriculture, hunting, fishing, civil administration, military planning, commercial agreements, political reigns, and in religious observations, would result from using a solar calendar. (For example, the annual rainy season coinciding with the melting of snow in the Ethiopian highlands led to Egypt's extraordinarily significant recurring flooding of the Nile.) In comparison with all that, the benefit from a lunar or 360-day calendar was minimal. Yet the ancient world adhered to their lunar and 360-day calendars. For millennia. Their loyalty speaks volumes. And if a man is to be a student of history he should listen to their voice. * Minor Note from Assyro-Babylonian Mythology: A text from the Neo-Assyrian Period describes a battle wherein Marduk defeats the Eshumesha gods and takes 360 of them as prisoners of war. Today's Resource: Real Science Radio 2018   Welcome to Real Science Radio: Co-hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams talk about science to debunk evolution and to show the evidence for the creator God including from biology, genetics, geology, history, paleontology, archaeology, astronomy, philosophy, cosmology, math, and physics. (For example, mutations will give you bad legs long before you'd get good wings.) We get to debate Darwinists and atheists like Lawrence Krauss, AronRa, and Eugenie Scott. We easily take potshots from popular evolutionists like PZ Myers, Phil Plait, and Jerry Coyne. We're the home of the popular List Shows! And we interview the outstanding scientists who dare to challenge today's accepted creed that nothing created everything. This audio disk features all of the Real Science Radio episodes from 2018.

Real Science Radio
*The 360-Day Year on Real Science Radio

Real Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


*Today we present the return of a classic show. * Did the whole world once use a 360-day calendar? If so, why? From our archives, RSR hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams look at the Mayans, Egyptians, Aztecs, Indians, Sumerians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and the Hebrew Bible to answer the first question: Yes, ancient civilizations used a 360-day calendar. To answer the question why, one must keep in mind the sophistication of ancient astronomers. Nasa reports that in 650 B.C., "Mayan astronomers [made] detailed observations of Venus, leading to a highly accurate calendar." And the Encyclopedia of Time says of the Aztecs that, "they carried on and further developed calendrical traditions that had their roots some 2,000 years before their own time." Real Science Radio investigates the reason why the ancient world used a 360-day calendar and discusses a mechanism for speeding up the rotation of the Earth that in historical times could add 5.24 days to the year. See more at 360dayyear.com. * RSR on YouTube: You're invited to check out RSR's 360-day year program turned into this important YouTube video: * The Calendar is one of the Greatest Monuments of a Culture: Along with language, the calendar is one of the greatest monuments of a culture. Ranke, as quoted by Norman Lockyer (The Origin of the Year, 1982, Nature, p. 487) wrote, "The calendar may be considered the noblest relic of the most ancient times which has influenced the world." And in 1903 Emmeline Plunket judged (Calendars and Constellations of the Ancient World, 1903, p. 188) that interest in ancient calendars is a necessary part of being "interested in the history of the human race". * Would You Consider Purchasing a Rare Research Book for RSR: [See kgov.com/wish-list for the latest status.] Over at Amazon.com, to further our investigation of one of Bob Enyart's favorite topics, the 360 day year, we've created a KGOV Research Amazon Wish List. We hope to procure an important and rare research book, The Cultic Calendars of the Ancient Near East. The text of this book is not available online, and there is a used copy of the book currently available, as of January 2016, that is $600 less expensive than the other copies also for sale. So if you're considering helping RSR continue to press forward on this significant topic, then please consider purchasing that book by clicking on our Wish List link just above. And for shipping, you can use the address at the Wish List. Thanks so very much for considering this! -Bob & Fred * Other RSR 360 Shows and Related Links: - The 360 Day Year on RSR (this show) and then Part 2 of today's program (broadcast in 2016 but not again in 2019) - Astronomer Danny Faulkner on the 360-Day Year with Bob Enyart - Danny's CRSQ paper rejecting the widespread belief among many creationists (including RSR, Henry Morris, Walt Brown, etc.) that God originally created the Earth with a 360-day year and 30-day months - Danny's paper rebutted in CRSQ by Enyart - How the Moon's Orbit Changed from 30 to 29.5 Days by a professor of astronautics at the U.S. Air Force Academy - On the origin of the world's first-known number system (a hybrid decimal/base 60 system)- 24 Hours in a Day -- How Ancient is the 24-hour Measurement? - Seven Days in a Week -- How Ancient is the 7-day Week?- 30 Days in a Month -- How Ancient is the 30-Day Month? - RSR's 360 Day Year show on YouTube - rsr.org/predictions#lunar-libration - The Genius of Ancient Man - 360dayyear.com - rsr.org/300 - rsr.org/3* What Year Is It On These Calendars? As of September 20, 2020, using these calendars, the year is: - 6770 Assyrian - 6024 Ussher - 5781 Hebrew - 5134 Mayan (3114 B.C.) - 4719 Chinese * Lunar Calendar At All Costs: Ancient man had more than sufficient knowledge to know that the year was more than 360 days and that the lunar month was less than 30. Yet his allegiance to a year of twelve 30-day months was intense. Of course, widely, great significance was placed on lunar-based religious feasts, yet these could have been observed within a solar calendar context (for example, the seventh month's New Moon). For a lunar calendar, like a 360-day calendar, unless corrected, would cause the seasons to migrate from winter to fall, and so on to spring. So while a lunar calendar readily supported the "New Moon" and other such religious festivals, and could help the especially astute person anticipate the strength of the tides (as Seneca reported in about 60 A.D.), a solar calendar would better enable mankind to accomplish pretty much everything else. Enormous benefits in implementation and planning in the areas of agriculture, hunting, fishing, civil administration, military planning, commercial agreements, political reigns, and in religious observations, would result from using a solar calendar. (For example, the annual rainy season coinciding with the melting of snow in the Ethiopian highlands led to Egypt's extraordinarily significant recurring flooding of the Nile.) In comparison with all that, the benefit from a lunar or 360-day calendar was minimal. Yet the ancient world adhered to their lunar and 360-day calendars. For millennia. Their loyalty speaks volumes. And if a man is to be a student of history he should listen to their voice. * Minor Note from Assyro-Babylonian Mythology: A text from the Neo-Assyrian Period describes a battle wherein Marduk defeats the Eshumesha gods and takes 360 of them as prisoners of war. Today's Resource: Real Science Radio 2018   Welcome to Real Science Radio: Co-hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams talk about science to debunk evolution and to show the evidence for the creator God including from biology, genetics, geology, history, paleontology, archaeology, astronomy, philosophy, cosmology, math, and physics. (For example, mutations will give you bad legs long before you'd get good wings.) We get to debate Darwinists and atheists like Lawrence Krauss, AronRa, and Eugenie Scott. We easily take potshots from popular evolutionists like PZ Myers, Phil Plait, and Jerry Coyne. We're the home of the popular List Shows! And we interview the outstanding scientists who dare to challenge today's accepted creed that nothing created everything. This audio disk features all of the Real Science Radio episodes from 2018.

Ancient Warfare Podcast
AWA166 - How effective was psychological warfare in the ancient world?

Ancient Warfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 10:40


Patron of the podcast Joshua asks 'I often read about certain battles, sieges, or encounters being influenced through psychological warfare. How effective was psychological warfare in the ancient world? What were the most effective methods?' Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast

SPEAK! A Dogcast
Ep. 43 - From the Shelter to Your Home

SPEAK! A Dogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021


On this episode of SPEAK! A Dogcast, we talk about getting a rescue dog From the Shelter to Your Home. We're covering how to make a smooth transition for your new rescue dog and talk about how I have been doing with my new rescue Captain Nemo! We will also have our newest segment to the show, Dogs and Pets of the Ancient World. Then comes the Breed of the Week and Listener Q&A! You're in for a real treat!

Remedial Herstory: The Other 50%
Empresses, Monarchs, and Politicians: How did women rise to power in the Ancient world?

Remedial Herstory: The Other 50%

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 31:06


In this episode Kelsie and Brooke are introducing the first theme of the season: Empresses, Monarchs, and Politicians. Then Kelsie teaches Brooke a little bit about just how far back you can take this theme... to the very beginning. They discuss the Sumerian King, Kubaba, and the Egyptian Pharaoh, Nefertiti. Support our work at www.patreon.com/remedialherstory Find lesson plans at http://www.remedialherstory.com Bibliography Cottier, Cody. "Queen Kubaba: The Tavern Keeper Who Became the First Female Ruler in History." Discover. February 23, 2021. https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/queen-kubaba-the-tavern-keeper-who-became-the-first-female-ruler-in-history. History Editors. "Nefertiti." History. June 7, 2019. https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/nefertiti. Marchant, Jo. "Is this Nefertiti's Tomb?" Nature. February 19, 2021. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00465-y. Silver, Carly. "Kubaba, A Queen Among Kings." Thought Co. May 30, 2019. https://www.thoughtco.com/kubaba-a-queen-among-kings-121164. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/remedialherstory/support

Ancient Warfare Podcast
AWA165 - Which was the fastest army in the ancient world traveling over land?

Ancient Warfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 9:54


Patron of the podcast Ian asks 'which was the fastest army in the ancient world traveling over land? Herodotus mentions the Spartan relief force that raced to Marathon, travelling around 150kms in 3 days- is this a record?'. Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast

Ancient Heroes
Monsters, Ghosts, & Oracles: Beliefs in the Ancient World (w/ Garrett Ryan)

Ancient Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 36:34


Did the ancient Greeks and Romans believe in supernatural phenomena? Did they believe mythological monsters and gods really existed? Author and academic Garett Ryan comes on the show to help answer these questions and many more.

Conspiracy or Just a Coincidence?
Intelligence Services in the Ancient World

Conspiracy or Just a Coincidence?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 91:18


Book: Origins of Intelligence (its over like 300$ on amazon, I have the PDF) support the show: www.conspiracyorjustacoincidence.com Thanks for listneing --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jackallen1/support

The Ancient World
Episode C6 – The Splendid Flame

The Ancient World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 26:44


Synopsis: In the wake of the Sea Peoples, the Hittite Great King Kuzi-Teshub focuses on rebuilding and strengthening his kingdom.  A powerful new threat soon emerges in the form of King Tiglath-Pileser I of Assyria. “In the service of my Lord Ashur, my chariots and […] The post Episode C6 – The Splendid Flame first appeared on THE ANCIENT WORLD.

Timesuck with Dan Cummins
247 - The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 148:53


The Great Pyramid of Giza. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon. Colossus of Rhodes. The Lighthouse of Alexandria. The Temple of Artemis. The Statue of Zeus at Olympia. The Mausoleum at Halicarnassus. These are just SOME of the wonders we go over today. Get ready to want to explore the world. We are so surrounded by so many impressive man-made monuments. And also so much natural beauty - we also look at the seven natural wonders of the world today. And we look at the new seven wonders of the world. And at even more wonders. We also examine a lot of strange theories some questionable folk on the internet have postulated about many of these wonders in numerous Idiots of the Internet segments. Enjoy all this wonder!  June charity TBD as of this recording date.  Watch the Suck on YouTube: https://youtu.be/X42vSfTEGbU Merch  - https://badmagicmerch.com/   Discord! https://discord.gg/tqzH89v Want to join the Cult of the Curious private Facebook Group? Go directly to Facebook and search for "Cult of the Curious" in order to locate whatever current page hasn't been put in FB Jail :) For all merch related questions/problems: store@badmagicproductions.com (copy and paste) Please rate and subscribe on iTunes and elsewhere and follow the suck on social media!! @timesuckpodcast on IG and http://www.facebook.com/timesuckpodcast Wanna become a Space Lizard? We're over 10,000 strong! Click here: https://www.patreon.com/timesuckpodcast  Sign up through Patreon and for $5 a month you get to listen to the Secret Suck, which will drop Thursdays at Noon, PST. You'll also get 20% off of all regular Timesuck merch PLUS access to exclusive Space Lizard merch. You get to vote on two Monday topics each month via the app. And you get the download link for my new comedy album, Feel the Heat. Check the Patreon posts to find out how to download the new album and take advantage of other benefits. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.