Podcasts about Huns

Tribe of eastern Europe and central Asia

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Huns

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Best podcasts about Huns

Latest podcast episodes about Huns

On The Wing Podcast
PODCAST EP. 186: Pheasant Hunting Openers in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Iowa

On The Wing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 49:51


We've finally reached the best time of the year – opening day! Host Bob St.Pierre is joined by Renee Tomala, PF's regional representative for North Dakota; Matt Morlock, PF's state coordinator for South Dakota & North Dakota; and Eric Sytsma, PF & QF's regional representative for Iowa; to provide opening weekend forecasts from three big pheasant hunting destinations. The conversation also includes tips for opening weekend success and highlights PF's banquet calendar of events being held in conjunction with opening weekend celebrations. Episode Highlights: • North Dakota's season opened last weekend, so Tomala provides the first in-field report for 2022. Spoiler Alert: she talks about how hunting this year's lush habitat SLOWLY is a key ingredient to success. • Morlock reports on this weekend's upcoming “traditional” pheasant hunting opener for South Dakota and why this year looks to be the best in a decade for the nation's “Pheasant Capital.” • Sytsma rounds out the conversation highlighting the upland hunting prospects for Iowa that includes pheasants, quail, and Huns. Find a calendar of all PF & QF chapter banquets and events at www.PheasantsForeverEvents.org

Gun Dog It Yourself
159. Sharps, Huns, and Sage in Montana!

Gun Dog It Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 165:01


We've got a fun long one for ya this week! My buddy Jacob of The Southern Outdoorsmen joins me to breakdown the Montana trip we recently experienced. Harold also joins me in the outro to discuss a few highlights or topics that were missed or needed a little more attention! Goals and targets going into the trip The truck setup and travel plans A quick detour in SD on the way up Having a strategy on your walks and setting up for success Hunting with confidence HUN dog it yourself Sharptail Grouse are EVERYWHERE Use the gun you're comfortable with! Lucy tracking the bomber Blown foot pads A pups first wild bird sequence! Sage Grouse!!! Tips for the first timer going out on a trip Any special gear taken/used throughout the trip The meat supply ---- Episode Gear References: Tuff Foot DT Bark Boss Dog Hunting Vest Ruffwear Boots (Called Tuffwear in the episode) Govee Temperature/Humidity Monitors ---- Patreon and Partners: Support the Podcast: PATREON Gear: STANDING STONE SUPPLY Training Collars: DT SYSTEMS Events: Kamo, Inc. Burt County Bird Bounty Whiskey: Ugly Dog Distillery Other GDIY LINKS ---- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A Short Walk through Our Long History
Episode 35 - The Far East and the Mongols

A Short Walk through Our Long History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 17:39


We've already talked about a lot of galloping hordes in this podcast, including the Goths, the Huns, and the Vikings. But there is one tribe that outstrips them all, and even outstrips the Roman Empire in terms of sheer territory conquered. In fact, this tribe conquered and ruled the largest territory in the entire history of the world. Yes, I'm talking about Genghis Khan and the Mongols.

Night After Night
Duke of Squiggman (S5E24) with guest Christin Haws!

Night After Night

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 78:26


Joined by our good pal Chesh from the Book 'em Danno! podcast, we take on the wonder that is The Duke of Squiggman. When the boys are asked to housesit for Laverne & Shirley while they're away, Squiggy's habit of sleepwalking takes a dangerous turn. Dreaming that he's a well-heeled Duke living out wild fantasies fighting Huns, Lenny soon learns that Squiggy's sleepwalking could threaten his life. Even worse, he's driving his best friend (and Carmine. and Frank and Edna) to a near breaking point. Can Lenny help Squiggy realize who he really is and help him confront the source of his sleepwalking? On pod, we talk the characterizations, Penny's directing on the episode, and of course have many many many many feelings about Lenny and Squiggy. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Un bonbon sur la langue
L'INTÉGRALE - Pourquoi notre langue s'appelle-t-elle le français ? (18/09/22)

Un bonbon sur la langue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 2:59


Vous êtes-vous jamais demandé, amis des mots, pourquoi notre langue s'appelle le français ? Naturellement, le nom de notre langue vient de celui de notre pays, la France. Mais... et le nom de la France ? Eh bien, il vient des Francs. Les Francs étaient des barbares, comme les Huns ou les Goths...

Amaazen Outdoors Podcast
S3EP56 2022 Montana Upland Opener with @the_uplanded

Amaazen Outdoors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 110:43


Warning - this podcast contains cuss words, beer drinking and smoking - please be advised. May not be suitable for young children. Brian dropped a few too many F-bombs to make this a family friendly show. With the kick off of the 2022 bird hunting season Brian and a pack of dogs headed west to make a pilgrimage to the last best place on earth... Montana. Brian was able to wrangle Travis to come over to camp and hang out behind the Yukon (to stay out of the wind) and bull sh** about the week. Travis had great success chasing Huns. Brian didn't do so well on the Huns but banged out sharp-tails! Travis and Brian both hunt Kansas so there is a smattering of bird hunting talk. Enjoy the show! Contact Brian for open dates for Grouse and Woodcock in Oct. 2022 Join Patreon - Giveaways and get entered into the drawing for Kansas Quail camp Follow Amaazen outdoors on Instagram Follow Travis in Instagram @the_uplanded www.uplndoutfitters.com - Discount code Amaazen for 20% off Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ETims
Jolly_Bhoy_Jota-For_REAL

ETims

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 82:54


ETims get together to discuss the 4-0 gubbing of the Huns and the highly anticipated meeting with Real Madrid on Tuesday in the Champions League at Celtic Park.They discuss the players, tactics and performances from Saturdays brilliant win and consider what could happen against the current holders of the Best side in the World Title. One things for sure, theres gonna be goals one way or another.

The Fall Of The Roman Empire
The Fall of the Roman Empire Episode 37 "War with the Goths"

The Fall Of The Roman Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 23:06


In the summer of AD 376, a vast mass of Goths, maybe 200,000 men, women and children, appeared on the river Danube, begging for asylum. They were fleeing from the Huns. The eastern emperor, Valens, was at that moment preparing for war against the Persians. What should he do? The next few years would prove decisive for the future of the Roman Empire.

True Story
Attila, le barbare sanguinaire qui a fait trembler l'empire romain

True Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 21:06


C'est l'un des plus grands guerriers de l'Histoire. On dit que là où passait son cheval, l'herbe ne repoussait pas. Barbare, sanguinaire, brutal… les adjectifs ne manquent pas pour qualifier cet homme qui a fait trembler l'empire romain. Mais celui que l'on a surnommé le “fléau de dieu”, était en réalité aussi cultivé que brillant stratège et tacticien. Son nom : Attila. Découvrez sa True Story. Un barbare sanguinaire et stratège 20 juin 451 après J.C., au Sud de la ville de Reims, la terre semble trembler. Mais en réalité, c'est une gigantesque armée qui se regroupe. Des dizaines de milliers de chevaux martèlent le sol de leurs galops sauvages et menaçants. Des cris de guerre retentissent dans les airs. Depuis quelques mois, près d'un demi-million de personnes déferle sur la Gaule en traversant le pays d'Ouest en Est. C'est tout un peuple en mouvement qui ravage tout sur son passage, pille les villes, rase les champs, brûle et anéantit. On les appelle les Huns, et la peur qu'ils inspirent est sans limite. Personne ne semble pouvoir les contrôler… à part leur chef, le fier et terrible Attila. Ecoutez la suite de cette histoire incroyable dans ce podcast. Pour découvrir d'autres récits passionnants, cliquez ci-dessous : Bobby Fischer, celui qui a inspiré la série “Le Jeu de la Dame” Le thérémine, l'instrument qui a révolutionné la musique Madame Claude, la proxénète qui a régné sur le Tout-Paris Ecriture : Elie Olivennes Réalisation : Célia Brondeau, Antoine Berry Roger Voix : Andréa Brusque Production : Bababam Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Fall Of The Roman Empire
The Fall of the Roman Empire Episode 36 "The Huns are Coming"

The Fall Of The Roman Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 21:54


In AD 376, a huge host of Goths, maybe 200,000 strong, appeared on the banks of the river Danube. But this was not the usual raid for plunder. Instead, the Goths appealed for asylum on Roman territory from a terrifying new enemy - the Huns.

The Upland Rookie Podcast
BONUS EPISODE: 04 Tailgate Talk w/ Jeremy and Tres Garcia

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 45:53


On this bonus episode of Tailgate Talk with Jeremy, we are joined by our buddy Tres Garcia from Upland Arizona. We catch up on summer and talk more about some common mistakes we all have made with our bird dogs.  ------------ The podcast fall kick off giveaway is still going on and prizes are up for grabs for August, Sept and Oct. Become a patron supporter to get entered. There are some incredible prizes from comapny's such as, Final Rise, Cable Gangz, Upand Knife Company and Gunner Kennels.  Subscribe to the YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  BPro Kennels - FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 2022, LISTENER CAN SAVE 30% ON A DOG BOX FROM BPRO KENNESL USING PROMO CODE ROOKIE30)  BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out the new Sidekick fest for ultra slim design and light weight. Every product is made in the USA and is durable season after season.   Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

The Upland Rookie Podcast
Ep. 55: Building Final Rise with Matthew Davis

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 97:01 Very Popular


On this episode I catch up with my good friend Matt Davis from Final Rise. Matt just picked up a new puppy recently and has some big hunts ahead for this fall. We dive into the growth and development of his company and look ahead to what's in the future.  Links: FinalRise.Com ------------ The podcast fall kick off giveaway is still going on and prizes are up for grabs for August, Sept and Oct. Become a patron supporter to get entered. There are some incredible prizes from comapny's such as, Final Rise, Cable Gangz, Upand Knife Company and Gunner Kennels.  Subscribe to the Upland Rookie YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  BPro Kennels - LISTENERS CAN SAVE 10% ON A DOG BOX FROM BPRO KENNESL USING PROMO CODE ROOKIE10)  BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out the new Sidekick fest for ultra slim design and light weight. Every product is made in the USA and is durable season after season.   Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

Catholic Saints & Feasts
August 16: Saint Stephen of Hungary

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 5:44


August 16: Saint Stephen of Hungaryc. 975–1038Optional Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of Hungary and of kingsBaptized by his pagan father, made King by the Pope, his heirs demolished his legacySaint Stephen of Hungary was a warrior king whose silhouette stands proud on a far distant horizon as the sun rises behind him at the dawn of the medieval age. His year of birth can only be guessed, as ancient chronicles give conflicting dates. His father was of that generation of rough pagans who had to confront the new, vibrant force of Catholicism which challenged the old ways of paganism and its local gods who satisfied local needs. The Mediterranean Basin had long been Christian by the tenth century. But daring missionaries had only recently penetrated deep into the wide plains of the Magyars, the Bulgars, and that vast land of the Rus that lay beyond. That Christian dawn in Eastern Europe is when our saint first comes on the scene.He was born Vaik and baptized Stephen when his father, a duke, converted to Christianity. When he was about twenty-two, he succeeded his father as a Magyar leader and warlord. After consolidating his territory and power through various wars, he sent an emissary to the Pope in Rome to petition for the founding of Church structures in his land. Pope Sylvester II concurred with Stephen's plans and took him one step further. Tradition holds that the Pope had a crown fashioned for Stephen and sent it to Hungary, where the papal ambassador crowned Stephen king in 1001.King Stephen took his duties as a Catholic king with utmost seriousness. He founded an enormous Benedictine monastery, numerous dioceses, and mandated one tax-supported parish with a priest for every ten towns. He built a shrine to the Virgin Mary, which became the sacred forum for the coronations, and burials, of the kings of Hungary. He aggressively punished those who practiced the outlawed pagan customs of yesteryear and prohibited marriages between pagans and Christians. Interestingly, he required that all his subjects be married, except for priests and religious.After sadly familiar intrigues over succession, money, and power, Stephen died on August 15, 1038. Most of his children had died as infants, and his one adult son, his presumptive heir, died in a hunting accident in 1031. Thus Stephen's efforts to establish a Christian state were placed in jeopardy. Just as Stephen had feared, once the mighty king died, all of his accomplishments were neglected. Chaos and civil war raged for decades after his burial. The two ostensibly pagan kings who succeeded him were apathetic, or even antagonistic, toward Christianity. The fruits of Stephen's Christian efforts rotted on the tree, and his immediate legacy dissipated.Eventually, order was restored to Hungary, and Stephen's greatness was recognized. He was canonized in 1083. He is now a revered saint-founder of the Hungarian nation. The Huns, the Goths, and the Vandals don't have a nation today. Over time, these pagan tribes were absorbed into the stable cultures they invaded. They melted into the many nations and identities of modern Europe. The Magyars, however, did not disappear, merge with other peoples, or melt away. They have their own nation, language, culture, art, and history. They are the people of Hungary, and they owe their enduring identity to Saint Stephen. He imposed the stability of a first-class religion on a horse-riding clan and so transformed that roaming tribe into a stable nation. Stephen gave his people God. And to God and His Church they were faithful. Hungary matured over the centuries like wine, until it was a refined Christian nation, a defender of Christ and the Church. Neighboring tribes resisted the gospel and dissipated into thin air with the passing of time. Saint Stephen was a model King because he knew that to found a country you have to found a Church along with it.Saint Stephen, you bear the name of the first martyr of the Church and showed similar courage in battling the enemies of God. May your brave and visionary leadership embolden all civil and church leaders to lay the foundations for a success which flourishes long after they have died.

Off The Bench
Brody Miller, LSU football is like the Huns-ESPN 104.5 Off the Bench 2022-08-10 HOUR ONE

Off The Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 46:06


In HOUR ONE of OTB, we talk LSU football with Brody Miller of the Athletic! We also check in on Saints camp, and we discuss Shohaei Otani making baseball history.

The Dark Ages Podcast
Gepids East Goths and Huns, Oh My

The Dark Ages Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 37:02


453 CE to 460 CE Out of the wreckage of Attila's empire, new peoples emerge. New actors inject new elements into the political game of the late Roman empire British Museum entry for the Gepids, with some artefacts History Files Article and Regnal List of the Gepids Scirian Earring found at Bakod Puszta   Sources Title Music: "The Britons" by Kevin MacLeod at Free Music Archive Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

The Upland Rookie Podcast
BONUS EPISODE: 03 Tailgate Talk with Jeremy

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 48:38


Tailgate Talk with Jeremy. North Dakota, Setters, marriage advicve and so much more.  ------------ The podcast fall kick off giveaway is still going on and prizes are up for grabs for August, Sept and Oct. Become a patron supporter to get entered. There are some incredible prizes from comapny's such as, Final Rise, Cable Gangz, Upand Knife Company and Gunner Kennels.  Subscribe to the YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  BPro Kennels - FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 2022, LISTENER CAN SAVE 30% ON A DOG BOX FROM BPRO KENNESL USING PROMO CODE ROOKIE30)  BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out the new Sidekick fest for ultra slim design and light weight. Every product is made in the USA and is durable season after season.   Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

The Upland Rookie Podcast
Ep. 52: Bird Dog Doc with Shawn Wayment

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 107:41 Very Popular


On this episode get the chance to talk with Shawn Wayment, DVM. Shawn has been practing Veterinary Medicine for well over 20 years and he breaks down some common qustions and concerns we may have with running and owning bird dogs. We get to hear about some of Shawn's most memorable hunts and a little more about his upland hunting journey.  Links: Bird Dog Doc Upland Ways Blog ------------ Consider becoming a Patreon supporter by visiting my Patreon page today.Podcast Summer/Fall giveasway items are announced and company's include Final Rise, Cable Gangz, Upand Knife Company and Gunner Kennels.  Subscribe to the YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  BPro Kennels - FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 2022, LISTENER CAN SAVE 30% ON A DOG BOX FROM BPRO KENNESL USING PROMO CODE ROOKIE30)  BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out the new Sidekick fest for ultra slim design and light weight. Every product is made in the USA and is durable season after season.   Inukshuk Professional Dog Food is a Canadian business, providing professional mushers, sporting dog handlers and kennels around the world with the highest quality dog food on the market.  Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

No Flowers In This Attic
How MLMs Use Trauma to Keep Huns Trapped

No Flowers In This Attic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 60:07


I hate seeing them do this. Please get out if you can.

Upland Nation
Bird hunting podcast: chukar hunters share stories, dog training, new places to go

Upland Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 71:55


My friend Eric Thompson joins me in studio (sorry about the goofy audio in the main section!) for a wide-ranging discussion about chukars, dogs, strategy and tactics. We cover how and why to bring new hunters into the sport, why Huns are on the upswing, make some predictions on this season, and share some good times. The Upland Nation Glossary stops at the letter "V", and we have a public access spot you might want to visit this winter. Listeners chip in on the new places they hope to hunt this season, too. Please visit our sponsors: Sage & Braker Mercantile, Dr. Tim's performance dog food, Pointer shotguns, RuffLand performance Kennels, the Ringneck Nation of Huron, SD, Mid Valley Clays and Shooting School, your online shotgun shopping resource, FurFeathersFriends and FindBirdHuntingSpots.com.

The Upland Rookie Podcast
Ep. 51: Reflections on Bird Dogs, Banner Days and Other Roadside Revelations with Andrew Wayment

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 86:39


On this episode I talk with Andy Wayment who wrote a new book called Idaho Upland Days. We talk more about the book and learn more about a few of the stories in the book and hear about Andy's writing journey, bird dogs and talk a lot of grouse hunting.  Links: Idaho Upland Days Book on Amazon Upland Ways Blog ------------ Consider becoming a Patreon supporter by visiting my Patreon page today. Podcast Summer/Fall giveasway items are announced and company's include Final Rise, Cable Gangz, Upand Knife Company and Gunner Kennels.  Subscribe to the YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  BPro Kennels - FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 2022, LISTENER CAN SAVE 30% ON A DOG BOX FROM BPRO KENNESL USING PROMO CODE ROOKIE30)  BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out the new Sidekick fest for ultra slim design and light weight. Every product is made in the USA and is durable season after season.   Inukshuk Professional Dog Food is a Canadian business, providing professional mushers, sporting dog handlers and kennels around the world with the highest quality dog food on the market.  Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

The Upland Rookie Podcast
Ep. 49: It's Chukar Time with Weston Hatten

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 65:58


On today's episode I chat with Weston Hatten of Chukar One. We talk about how Weston got into chasing Chukar and learn about the habitat they thrive in. If you've ever thought about chasing Chukar then you will want to listen in! Oh, and if you love English Pointers and GSP's, you may like this as well.  ------------ Consider becoming a Patreon supporter by visiting my Patreon page today. July Giveaway is for ALL Patron members so get signed up today! Subscribe to the YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  BPro Kennels - (LISTEN IN FOR SPECIAL LAUNCH EDITION DISCOUNT CODE VALID FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 2022) BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out their only sale of the year now until June 5th. Use code FINALRISE to save $30 on any vest system.  Inukshuk Professional Dog Food is a Canadian business, providing professional mushers, sporting dog handlers and kennels around the world with the highest quality dog food on the market.  Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

Our Fake History
Episode #158- How Should We Remember Attila the Hun? (Part II)

Our Fake History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 76:24 Very Popular


The Huns were not a literate culture, which means their version of history was never written down. As a result we rely on sources written by outsiders to trace the rise of the Hunnic empire and the career of King Attila. This means that the record is patchy, incomplete, and deeply affected by the anti-Hun prejudices of the authors. But despite that, there are still a number of remarkable stories that have survived in the historical record that help us get a more nuanced picture of Attila the Hun. The man had a truly ferocious reputation and yet he could also be gracious, merciful, and patient. Attila was certainly no stranger to violence, but he was also no mindless brute. Does he deserve to be cast as one of history's great villains? Tune-in and find out how Australian propaganda, a scheming palace eunuch, and 50lb bag of gold all play a role in the story.  

The Upland Rookie Podcast
Ep. 48: A Millionaire's Dream with Bret Wonnacott

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 92:46


On this episode I sit down Bret Wonnacott who just wrote a book, called A Millionaire's Dream. You can find it wherever books are sold.  We dive into Bret's story as an upland bird hunter and hear more about his journey into NSTRA and the progress he has made with educating youth in Utah on the outdoors and upland bird hunting.    ------------ Consider becoming a Patreon supporter by visiting my Patreon page today. Subscribe to the YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- SPONSORS:  Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out their only sale of the year now until June 5th. Use code FINALRISE to save $30 on any vest system.  Inukshuk Professional Dog Food is a Canadian business, providing professional mushers, sporting dog handlers and kennels around the world with the highest quality dog food on the market.  Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  Gunner Kennels. The search for the perfect kennel is over and having the peace of mind knowing your best friend is safe in the back of your truck is priceless.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --

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geoff emerick spicks david sheff humperdinck danger man biggles road manager ian macdonald i feel fine long tall sally merseybeat paperback writer mark lewisohn john drake bruce johnston august bank holiday churchills james jamerson michael lindsay hogg all our yesterdays sergeant pepper northern songs say you love me alfred jarry alternate titles martin carthy hogshead john betjeman brechtian sloop john b billy j kramer edwardian england good day sunshine european broadcasting union zeffirelli you know my name joe orton owen bradley simon scott portmeirion it be nice leo mckern robert stigwood richard condon tony sheridan gershwins west meets east all too much exciters baby you bert kaempfert mcgoohan bert berns tyler mahan coe mount snowdon cynthia lennon tony palmer brandenburg concerto she said she said david tudor hide your love away danny fields john dunbar barry miles only sleeping montys from head nik cohn invention no brian hodgson your mother should know andrew oldham michael hordern tara browne how i won we can work stephen dando collins lewisohn mike hennessey steve barri love you to get you into my life mike vickers alistair taylor christopher strachey kaempfert up against it gordon waller tilt araiza
Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, June 20, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 371All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Paulinus of NolaAnyone who is praised in the letters of six or seven saints undoubtedly must be of extraordinary character. Such a person was Paulinus of Nola, correspondent and friend of Saints Augustine, Jerome, Melania, Martin, Gregory the Great, and Ambrose. Born near Bordeaux, he was the son of the Roman prefect of Gaul, who had extensive property in both Gaul and Italy. Paulinus became a distinguished lawyer, holding several public offices in the Roman Empire. With his Spanish wife, Therasia, he retired at an early age to a life of cultured leisure. The two were baptized by the saintly bishop of Bordeaux and moved to Therasia's estate in Spain. After many childless years, they had a son who died a week after birth. This occasioned their beginning a life of great austerity and charity, giving away most of their Spanish property. Possibly as a result of this great example, Paulinus was rather unexpectedly ordained a priest at Christmas by the bishop of Barcelona. He and his wife then moved to Nola, near Naples. He had a great love for Saint Felix of Nola, and spent much effort in promoting devotion to this saint. Paulinus gave away most of his remaining property—to the consternation of his relatives—and continued his work for the poor. Supporting a host of debtors, the homeless and other needy people, he lived a monastic life in another part of his home. By popular demand he was made bishop of Nola and guided that diocese for 21 years. Paulinus' last years were saddened by the invasion of the Huns. Among his few writings is the earliest extant Christian wedding song. His liturgical feast is celebrated on June 22. Reflection Many of us are tempted to “retire” early in life, after an initial burst of energy. Devotion to Christ and his work is waiting to be done all around us. Paulinus' life had scarcely begun when he thought it was over, as he took his ease on that estate in Spain. “Man proposes, but God disposes.” Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Gun Dog It Yourself
142. Pavel's Hunt

Gun Dog It Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 82:26


We are joined by Pavel Francev this week to breakdown all of the elements and occurrences you see on a video he recently posted of a trip he took last year. You can find the link to his video at BLUEPRINT. What makes a bird hunter move 13 hours away? Birds.... Hunting with a Weimaraner! An honest portrayal of upland hunting with your dog on camera Some dogs develop faster or slower "The first hunting season doesn't count" A companion dog before a hunting dogs Anxiety before the hunt??? PORCUPINE! SKUNK! COUGAR! Huns and Pheasants! Finally! Per Pavels description on the video: "Upland hunting is not about birds for me, it's about dogs. Raising your bird dog is a unique experience. You have a vision, than a plan. You start building brick by brick and than your blueprint starts coming alive. All for a single moment - moment your dog freezes on point and the world stops spinning." ----- PATREON LINKTREE ----- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos
Huns, Pagans, Sons of Odin and Hells Angles Bar Fight Results in 8 Arrests

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 56:26


What happens when you get the Pagans, Sons of Odin, Huns, and Hells Angels together in one bar in the middle of Arizona? A good ole biker brawl! Problem is law enforcement is taking this very seriously. The last of 8 arrests occurred almost a year after the incident demonstrating that law enforcement is not looking the other way. Meanwhile fallout from biker groups stopping reporters in Uvalde, Texas isn't going away either. Join us on the round table as we discuss.Help us get to 10,000 subscribers on www.instagram.com/BlackDragonBikerTV on Instagram. Thank you!Follow us on TikTok www.tiktok.com/@blackdragonbikertv Subscribe to our new discord server https://discord.gg/dshaTSTGet 20% off Gothic biker rings by using my special discount code: blackdragon go to http://gthic.com?aff=147Subscribe to our online news magazine www.bikerliberty.comBuy Black Dragon Merchandise, Mugs, Hats, T-Shirts Books: https://blackdragonsgear.comDonate to our cause with Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BlackDragonNP Donate to our cause with PayPal https://tinyurl.com/yxudso8z Subscribe to our Prepper Channel “Think Tactical”: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-WnkPNJLZ2a1vfis013OAgSUBSCRIBE TO Black Dragon Biker TV YouTube https://tinyurl.com/y2xv69buKEEP UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blackdragonbikertvTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/jbunchiiFacebook : https://www.facebook.com/blackdragonbiker

The #1 Musical Experience
Giuseppe VerdiVoice(s) and Piano Attila

The #1 Musical Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 28:48


Verdi AttilaSheet MusicGiuseppe VerdiVoice(s) and Piano AttilaAttila is an opera in a prologue and three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on the 1809 play Attila, König der Hunnen (Attila, King of the Huns) by Zacharias Werner. The opera received its first performance at La Fenice in Venice on 17 March 1846.About this Piece

Cryptic Canticles presents Dracula
Dracula Episode: May 8th

Cryptic Canticles presents Dracula

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 13:26


The Count throws away Jonathan's traveling mirror when Jonathan starts to suspect that the Count casts no reflection. It dawns upon Jonathan that he is unable to leave the castle, and that the Count is secretly performing all the servants' duties. Jonathan resolves himself to try and discover all he can about the Count in case a chance to escape might present itself. Inspired by lively conversation, the Count boasts about his lineage and ancestry as though he were among them. He tells of the Icelandic Ugric Tribe and the Huns from which his people are descended, and of the many battles they won over the Turks. He concludes by stating that the time of glory has passed into dishonorable peace. This takes them again to the morning, when he allows Jonathan to retire to bed. Follow us on Twitter.com/CryptiCanticles, Facebook.com/DraculaRadioPlay, and at crypticcanticles.com

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls
There's a band of Huns re-enacting Top Gun (Replay!)

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 58:41


We feel the need...the need for beach volleyball! We're going back to the ‘80s again for a closer look at Top Gun, the fighter jet blockbuster that launched Tom Cruise to stardom. How does this movie compare with the real Top Gun in the Navy? What other pop culture has used this same pop culture ref? Why does all beach volleyball attire seem so uncomfortable? And why doesn't Paris feel the need for beach volleyball? We do our best to answer all those questions and get the scoop on the long-awaited sequel, Top Gun: Maverick.Other pop culture we ref: The Outsiders, Footloose, Marathon Man, 30 Rock, Pirates of the Caribbean, Hot Shots!, Planes, Independence Day, Pearl Harbor, Hamilton, Transformers, A Few Good Men, Law & Order, Harry Potter, Airplane!, Serena WilliamsCheck us out on Instagram!Subscribe to our email list!So it's a show? TwitterSo it's a show? Tumblr

Lei’s Little Golden Books

When an army of Huns invades China, Mulan goes to war for her father. Her cleverness and speed enable her to defeat the enemies and bring honor to her family. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/leilani-hargreaves/support

Gems Of History
Ep 63 - Attila the Hun Part 1: The Olden Times

Gems Of History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 58:19


This week begins our coverage on one of the most notorious generals in world history, Attila the Hun. After Rome began fighting between the two separate empires it became, the Huns began their move in. The information we have on them is relatively scarce, but the sources we do have paint an amazing picture of a fierce group of warriors who did things their way. Once Attila came along, that was pushed into overdrive. Follow us on Twitter (@gems_history), Instagram (@gems_of_history_podcast), and TikTok (@gemsofhistorypod). Also feel free to email us at GemsofHistoryPodcast@gmail.com!

The Activation Phase - Saga Podcast
Huns riiiide 'till they can't no more.

The Activation Phase - Saga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 31:05


In this weeks episode we talk about our common love for Huns! They're an amazing faction that we couldn't quite stop talking about. Enjoy!