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Here & Now
Tyre Nichols' family lawyer on charges; Breaking barriers to Asian mental health care

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 24:54


Tyre Nichols died at the hands of Memphis police officers earlier this month at what should have been a routine traffic stop. One of the attorneys representing Nichols' family, Antonio Romanucci, joins us. And, the Biden administration is proposing changes to the U.S. census and federal surveys that research shows will make data on Latinos and people of Middle Eastern or North African descent more accurate. NPR correspondent Hansi Lo Wang joins us. Then, the Asian Mental Health Collective started during the pandemic to provide free therapy and work toward erasing the stigma around mental healthcare. The group is rallying counselors across the country amid shootings targeting Asian communities. Jeanie Chang, board president of the Asian Mental Health Collective joins us.

The President's Daily Brief
January 26th, 2023. Good News From Europe! Also, JFK's Assassination.

The President's Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 26:31


It's January 26th. You're listening to the President's Daily Brief. Your morning intel starts now. ------ A good day to you, ladies and gentlemen. I've got four briefs for you this morning that are shaping America — and the world. First, we've got some US economic data coming out today. I'll explain what it is, and how it's connected to our second brief on… Europe. They've also got some economic news, good news, that you should know about. Third, we head to the North African country of Libya where we've got an update involving oil and spies. Fourth, it's another brief about spies and intrigue in Africa, this time about the Russians, gold, and a city named Ougagadogu.  Later, we close out the podcast with a listener question about the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. There's been some reporting on that recently and a listener wondered, “Bryan, you sure have been quiet about that. I wonder why?” Well, today I'll discuss it. ----- Please remember to subscribe if you enjoyed this episode of the President's Daily Brief. Email: PDB@TheFirstTV.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bike Shed
368: Sustainable Web Development

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 36:03


Stephanie talks about hosting a "Soup Group"! Joël got nerd-sniped during the last episode and dove deeper into Maggie Appleton's "Tools for Thought." Stephanie has been thinking a lot about Sustainable Web Development. What is sustainability? How does it relate to tech and what we do? This episode is brought to you by Airbrake (https://airbrake.io/?utm_campaign=Q3_2022%3A%20Bike%20Shed%20Podcast%20Ad&utm_source=Bike%20Shed&utm_medium=website). Visit Frictionless error monitoring and performance insight for your app stack. Maggie Appleton's Tools for Thought (https://maggieappleton.com/tools-for-thought) Tangrams (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tangram) Tessellation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessellation) Hexagons are the Bestagons (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thOifuHs6eY) Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails (https://sustainable-rails.com/) Transcript: AD: thoughtbot is thrilled to announce our own incubator launching this year. If you are a non-technical founding team with a business idea that involves a web or mobile app, we encourage you to apply for our eight-week program. We'll help you move forward with confidence in your team, your product vision, and a roadmap for getting you there. Learn more and apply at tbot.io/incubator. JOËL: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Joël Quenneville. STEPHANIE: And I'm Stephanie Minn. And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. JOËL: So, Stephanie, what's new in your world? STEPHANIE: I'm excited to share a winter survival idea for folks out there who are, like me, in a very cold place where all your friends don't want to hang out [laughs] and bear the cold temperatures of deep winter in January. Because tonight, I'm hosting my first soup group where I'm basically just going to make a really big batch of soup and have my friends come over with bread, and we're going to eat soup and bread and be cozy. And I'm really excited because I was trying to figure out a way to combat the winter blues a little bit. And, yeah, I think this time of year can be really tough after the holidays to get people together again. At least for me, I was feeling like I haven't seen my friends in so long. And I was like, well, I could just be the person to take the initiative [laughs] and be like, "Come over to our place." And the goal is to eventually do this regularly and just have this low-stakes open invitation for anyone to come and show up however they want to. It doesn't have to be, like, big pressure or anything. And if they can't make it at any one time, then there will hopefully be one in the future where they can make it, so I'm excited. After this, I am going to make soup for ten people, and it's going to be great. [laughs] JOËL: I love this idea. Soup on a cold day is just the coziest thing. STEPHANIE: Yeah, exactly. I definitely wanted to just make people feel warm and cozy. And that's what I want, so I'm really doing this for myself. [laughs] JOËL: And you know the advantage of hosting is you don't have to go outside. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's the real thing is I'm probably going to kick everyone out at like 11:00 p.m. and then go straight to bed, and it's going to be great. [laughs] JOËL: Have you been experimenting with a particular kind of soup recently? Are you going to bring out an old favorite? STEPHANIE: Yeah, I'm excited to make ribollita today, so kind of like a Tuscan style of veggie hearty soup. And I've just been bookmarking soup recipes left and right. [laughs] And I've outsourced the bread situation. So I'm excited to see what kind of bread people bring. And yeah, it'll be very fun and kind of surprising in a comforting way. JOËL: I'm not familiar with this soup. It's ribollita you said? STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's it. JOËL: You said it's a vegetable soup. STEPHANIE: Yeah, mostly veggies and beans. So I have this giant cabbage, a lot of kale, multiple cans of Great Northern white beans, and they're all going to get mixed together. And we'll see how it turns out. I'll update the podcast on how the soup group goes. It is the inaugural one. So I can't think of a time that I made that much soup before. So, hopefully, it goes well. We'll find out. So, Joël, what about you? What's new in your world? JOËL: So, in the previous episode, we talked a little bit about some of the things you had learned about note-taking. And you'd mentioned an article by, I think, Maggie Applebon -- STEPHANIE: Maggie Appleton. JOËL: Appleton...on tools for thought. It was linked in the show notes of that episode. And I went back and read that article, and it was so good, particularly the section, I think, on historical tools for thought and how they, over time, were sort of groundbreaking in helping us to either remember things or to think about problems or ideas in a different way, or to sort of interrogate those ideas and see if we think they're true or helpful. And these were things like writing or the number system but even some more fancy things like the scientific method for the Cartesian coordinate system. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I was really excited to share this with you because I think it was the intersection of a lot of your different interests, including note-taking, diagrams, history, and human cognition, so I'm glad that you found it interesting. JOËL: I definitely got nerd-sniped there. STEPHANIE: [laughs] JOËL: I think one thing that really struck me was the power of having multiple different representations for ideas. And one that jumped out at me was the Cartesian coordinate system, which, among other things, a really powerful tool that gave people...when this was invented, it allowed you to convert algebra problems into geometry problems. And so now, something that used to be an equation you can draw as a triangle or something. And we know how to find the area of a triangle. That's been known since the ancient Greeks and even earlier. And so now a problem that sounded hard is now easy, or at least we have a different way to think about that problem. Because if this equation is equivalent to a triangle, what does that mean? And vice versa, you can use this to convert geometry problems into algebra problems. And so sometimes the power of a new tool for thought might be in that it allows you to sort of convert between two other existing ways of representing things. And making those connections, all of a sudden gives you a whole new way of thinking about things. That blew my mind. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I agree. I think the other really cool thing is that a lot of these ideas that humans are discovering also already existed in the natural world. So when you are talking about math, you can see representations of math in plants and nature, and I was reminded of how honeycomb from bees is one of the strongest shapes. And yeah, it's really neat to draw inspiration from a lot of places and learn from things that, like, figured it out before we did. JOËL: Have you seen the video on YouTube called "Hexagons are the Bestagons?" STEPHANIE: No, I have not. Tell me more. JOËL: It's a video on YouTube. We can link it in the show notes. Basically, the hexagon shows up everywhere in nature in part because it has a lot of really fun mathematical properties. It's one of the few shapes that you can use to completely cover a surface. So if you want to subdivide a two-dimensional surface into smaller shapes without leaving any empty spaces between them, you really don't have that many options. I want to say it's like squares and triangles and hexagons are the only shapes that can do that. And hexagons have these really fun properties around strength. They also are one of the best balances between volume versus the amount of material that it takes to give you that volume and for strength and things like that. So it's good for honeycombs because you can store a lot of honey for very little amount of wax. But it's also good for all sorts of structural engineering because you can build things that are very strong yet light because they require very little metal or other material to create them. STEPHANIE: When you're saying hexagons filling a lot of space, I also thought about how they've become kind of popular in tiles or interior design in kitchens, and bathrooms, and stuff. [laughs] I've definitely seen that trend a bit. [laughs] So that's really cool just to see, like, yeah, this thing in the natural world that we have adopted for other uses. It's really fun. JOËL: I want to say this idea of taking a 2D space and being able to completely cover it without spaces with a shape is called tessellating a plane. It's a fancy term for it. And if you want to do it with just a single shape, I think there are only like three or four shapes that can do it. STEPHANIE: That's really interesting because it reminds me of those tessellation puzzles that I used to play with as a kid. Do you know what I'm talking about? JOËL: You're thinking like a tangram or something different. STEPHANIE: Yeah, yeah, tangram, that was...oh my gosh, those were fun. Wow, I was learning math as a young child, [laughs] just didn't even know it. JOËL: Another random fun fact: the logo for the Elm programming language is a tangram. STEPHANIE: [Gasps] JOËL: And the community is sort of encouraged to then remix it because the tangram is just a square tessellated out of a bunch of these shapes. But then, if you're building a library or you've got an event or something, the community will take those shapes and remix them into some other shapes that might fit your event. STEPHANIE: That's really cool. Is it a metaphor for how Elm can be used in different ways? [laughs] JOËL: I'm not sure about the story behind the logo. We'd have to look that up. STEPHANIE: That'll be a good adventure for later. [laughs] JOËL: In...I want to say Moroccan art, but I think it might be broader than just Moroccan. It might be more broadly North African or Moorish or whatever you want to call that. There's a long history of building these tessellations, I think, out of tiles, but maybe other things as well where you're doing it with a variety of shapes. So you might start...a classic one, I think is an eight-pointed...is it eight, or? I think it's an eight-pointed star, and then you sort of add other shapes around it. And those can create patterns that take a long time to repeat. And there are these beautiful geometric patterns that just keep on going and expanding without necessarily repeating over a lot of space. STEPHANIE: Whoa. That kind of blows my mind a little bit. It seems so counterintuitive, but then I feel like there are a lot of things in math that are like that as well. JOËL: So, yeah, I think a classic pattern you might start with something like an eight-pointed star. And then maybe to fill in the spaces around that central star, you might put some squares, and then maybe you put some triangles around that, and you sort of keep trying to fill in. And maybe eventually you get to another eight-pointed star, but it's not always perfectly symmetric. STEPHANIE: Someone should make a board game or something out of this idea. [laughs] JOËL: Oooh. STEPHANIE: I bet there's one that exists. But I'm just thinking about people who like jigsaw puzzles and that being the next level challenge of, like, can you figure out how things fit together without the confines of a little jigsaw shape? [laughs] JOËL: Right, right. You have a rectangle shape that you have to perfectly fill in with all of these other smaller shapes, and there is a single solution that will work. You have to figure it out. STEPHANIE: I personally would be very overwhelmed, [laughs] but it sounds fun at the same time. JOËL: So those are a lot of thoughts that I've been having inspiration reading that article that you shared on a previous episode. Have you been reading anything interesting recently? STEPHANIE: I have. I'm really excited to talk about this topic because during my investment time this past week, I've been thinking a lot about it, taking a lot of notes in Obsidian, which is a callback to the last episode, and yeah, I'm excited to kind of get into it. So what I've been reading is Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails by ‎David Bryant Copeland. And I think a lot of fellow thoughtboters have referenced this book or talked a little bit about ideas from this book; at least, I've seen discussion about it in Slack, so that's kind of why I wanted to pick it up. But what really blew my mind was honestly the first chapter where he talks about why he wrote this book and basically what sustainable web development is because it is a little bit, maybe, like a buzzy word. It's like, what is sustainability? How does it relate to tech and what we do? And he basically gets down to it by saying that the software that we write is sustainable if it continues to meet our needs years into the future or has longevity and continues to be something we can iterate and work on and not feel that pain or friction, and we feel like we want to, and we feel joyful working on this codebase. So that was kind of my interpretation of his definition about sustainability. JOËL: I love that definition of sustainability about code that can grow and live for a long time. And I feel like that's not a universal value in the tech industry. And on the extreme end of that, you'll have teams that promote the idea that maybe every few years, you should throw out your old codebase and rewrite. I want to say some teams at Google may have done that as a practice for a while, and, of course, then people quote that as a best practice. To a certain extent, I want to say that's kind of what happens with Basecamp in that there are multiple versions of Basecamp. And I want to say each of those is a fresh Rails app. So there's a sense in which those or that style of development is not sustainable in the definition that you were just giving there. How do you feel about that? STEPHANIE: I definitely think the industry has a bias towards newness and change. And a lot of people want to pick up the hot, new technology and, like you said, rewrite code, especially when it's become hard to work with. And honestly, I think that could be its whole own episode, rewrites because I think you and I have pretty strong opinions about it. But I genuinely think that most of our work is, at least, you and I on the Boost team, in particular here at thoughtbot, where we embed on existing client teams, and usually, that means legacy code as well, but I think that the work of development is mostly extending existing code and trying to sustain applications that have users and are working for users. And I think that that's certainly a value that I wish were highlighted more or were invested in more because sometimes that change or wanting to hop on to do something different or do something new has a lot of consequences that I'm not sure we talk about enough as an industry. 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Finally, Airbrake Deploy Tracking helps developers track trends, fix bad deploys, and improve code quality. Since 2008, Airbrake has been a staple in the Ruby community and has grown to cover all major programming languages. Airbrake seamlessly integrates with your favorite apps to include modern features like single sign-on and SDK-based installation. From testing to production, Airbrake notifiers have your back. Your time is valuable, so why waste it combing through logs, waiting for user reports, or retrofitting other tools to monitor your application? You literally have nothing to lose. Head on over to airbrake.io/try/bikeshed to create your FREE developer account today! JOËL: It's interesting you mentioned the types of projects that we tend to be on. I feel like there are a lot of projects that I've been brought on where my goal, specifically coming onto this project, was to make the software more sustainable for the team. It's very easy to sort of start moving very fast in the beginning with a greenfield app, and then eventually, a lot of your choices catch up to you. And then, as your team grows and your product grows, it becomes less and less sustainable. And that's often the point in the lifecycle of the product where I might join the team and try to help make things better for them. I love the keyword sustainable. I don't think that's one that I've used a lot, but it's a great label to put on that kind of work. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I agree. I think what you mentioned earlier, too, about values that, really stuck out to me in this book because it basically says, "This book is for you if you value these three things: sustainability, consistency, and quality." And all of the recommendations and techniques that he then presents in the rest of the book, using Rails, those decisions are recommended with those three values in mind. And I think, one, those values are personally important to me as a developer. But it also helped me develop some guiding principles around decision-making and provided a lot of clarity around times that I've been on teams where we were doing things that didn't quite align with my values, and I didn't enjoy it. And I couldn't really figure out why. But now I'm able to see that, oh, perhaps this team or organization was valuing something like speed, or profit, or change, or something like that that I just fundamentally value differently. And that was kind of where my internal friction or contentment or discontentment was coming from when working on these teams. So, yeah, that was really clarifying for me. JOËL: Would you say, for you, when you talk about these values, that these are fundamental or ultimate values for you when you write code? Or are they values that are a good way to sort of be a means to some other end? You know, for example, sustainability, do you care about sustainability just for its own sake? Or do you care about it because you want a product to be able to live for a long time? You're building for ten years or 20 years or however long you want this project to last. STEPHANIE: I think the thing with values is that they are really fundamental to a person's identity or belief system. In fact, the definition that I'm kind of working off of here is that values are those fundamental beliefs that drive our actions. And so when you say, like, are values driving how you write code? I think they drive everything. [laughs] But the point that he makes in this book is like, here's how they drive code and technical decisions. So the book is actually quite specific about technical recommendations that he has in the context of Rails. And it's funny because we're talking pretty abstractly and big picture about values and things like that. But then I think it's because he sets the stage to be like, everything I recommend here is what I believe to be sustainable, and good quality, and consistent. And just for an example, one of the recommendations he makes is to, when you're kind of setting up a greenfield application, is to use a SQL schema instead of the default ActiveRecord DSL, so using a structure .SQL file. Because, in his eyes, having the flexibility to write SQL and use the most you can with those tools when it comes to database work is more sustainable in the long term than using the DSL that might not have all the tools available to you that SQL does. And so he kind of gives his reasoning about, like, this is what I recommend, and here's why it contributes to sustainability, in my opinion. And so I have found myself, while I'm reading along, either agreeing, like, oh yeah, I can see his reasoning here, or maybe even disagreeing because I might think about things differently or have other considerations in mind that are more important to me and what sustainability means to me. But what I hopefully want to take away from the framework or understanding of values is evaluating technical decisions that I make based on my values as an individual but, more importantly, the values of the team or organization. JOËL: I love mental frameworks like that that give you clarity into your own thought processes or how you make decisions moving forward. Sometimes you can look at something that's very concrete. Somebody gives you some advice on maybe structuring your database schema, and that might be helpful in and of itself. But if you came away with a larger thought process, I think that's doubly valuable. As an aside here, I love this approach to writing where he sort of lays down almost like preconditions for this book. If you don't agree on these values, this book is not going to be very helpful for you. And then also, here are situations where this advice is not going to apply. Now that I've put down all these edge cases for the rest of this book, I'm going to be speaking very decisively; these are the things I recommend and not have to caveat myself all the time. It's like, yes, I know there are some edge cases where you might not want to do this if it's a one-off script or whatever it is. We've already dealt with all of those upfront. And now, I can be very confident and very direct for the whole rest of the book. And I feel like that's something I struggle with in some of my work sometimes is. I care a lot about nuance, and my audience probably cares about edge cases even more than I do. They probably care too much. Because I say something that's generally true most of the time, and I know somebody's already thinking about the one edge case where that's not true. And that doesn't matter for the main point I'm trying to make. So it's always a struggle to know when to caveat a statement that I'm making. But if you caveat too much, then you undermine your whole point. And so I like this idea of putting some caveats up front and then just saying, like, now we're in the 80% case. Within the 80% case, these are things I think are true. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's a really good point. I agree he is very clear about the intended audience. And so when you read this book, you are either on board because you value the same things he does, or you're not because you are focused and your goals are things that are different from him. So I think it was really helpful to get on the same page, even in a piece of content or in a piece of writing. Because I want to use my time well as a reader, so I want to make sure that what I am consuming makes sense for me, and I will find it worthwhile. David takes a really strong stance on what quality means. And even though that is a pretty subjective value, he describes it as doing things right the first time and acknowledging the reality that we likely won't have the time to go back and clean things up after they've been shipped. So, on this client project, I found myself wanting to refactor things as part of my process, suggesting different implementations to do things the quote, unquote, "right way," or the best way we could, and not everyone shared that sentiment. I sometimes got pushback, and that was challenging for me to figure out how I wanted to navigate that situation and what I was willing to let go and what I wasn't. And so I'm curious if you've ever been in a consulting position like that where maybe the team and organization's values were a little bit different from your understanding, or if they just weren't clear at all, and you were driving towards something that seemed very nebulous. JOËL: I think I've been on both sides of that, both sometimes saying, "Look, we need to maybe slow down," or "Here's a thing that we need to do otherwise that's going to cost us on the longer term. Here's an area where we need to invest in quality today." And sort of on the other side where I'll feel like someone is really pushing an overengineered solution claiming it's going to make life a whole lot better, "If we invest three months upfront today, and maybe in three or four years, it'll pay off if certain things happen," that don't really necessarily line up with the immediate goals. A lot of this, I think, comes down to understanding the client, and their business, and their goals. Sometimes there is a really important deadline for something that has to happen based on an event in the real world. If you were building software for something that had to do with, let's say, the World Cup, you don't want it shipping in January 2023. That's just pointless. And so you've got to prioritize shipping things. And sometimes you say, "Okay, well, do we ship a few broken things? Or do we prefer to ship something that's a little bit smaller, more tightly scoped, but that holds well together?" That again, you have to really understand the client, their business, their needs. So I think for me those values of sustainability, quality...I forget what the third one was that you'd mentioned. STEPHANIE: Consistency. JOËL: Consistency, yes. They all sort of inform how it's going to mesh with the product I'm working on, the goals of that product. Where's it going in the next three months, six months, 12 months? Where's it coming from? Who's the team that I'm working with? Am I with a team of 300 people that are just committing to the main branch all the time with no tests, and we're constantly fighting regressions? Then sustainability looks very different there than a one other-person team, and we're trying to ship something for the World Cup. STEPHANIE: Oh yeah, I have a lot of thoughts there too. Because I do agree that it can look different and sometimes shift a little bit depending on the situation. What you were just describing about team makeup that is really interesting to me because, yeah, sustainability can look different for different teams. If you have, let's say, a lot of earlier career developers on your team, maybe you really want to focus on readability and making sure that they're able to navigate the codebase and figure things out over something like more advanced patterns and skills that will just cause them friction. But maybe you have a team where you all agree that that's what sustainability means to you is choosing those more advanced technical patterns and committing to them and figuring out how to maintain that because it's important to you. And the other thing that you brought up that is also mentioned in this book is that the more information developers have about the future and direction of the business, the better code we can write. For some reason, I've found myself in situations where I don't know all too much about what we are working towards or what the goals of the business are both in the short term and the long term. And I try to make the best guess I can. But I think in those scenarios, at least moving forward, I would really like to be better about pushing product folks or leadership to explain to me why we're doing what we're doing, kind of share the information that they have so that we can build the best product that we can. I think sometimes that information doesn't get shared for some reason. They kind of think that engineers are going to go do their engineer thing, and we'll focus on long-term strategy over here. But yeah, I truly believe that the more information we have, the better quality work we can produce. JOËL: I 100% agree. And I think that's what we see in a lot of classic agile literature talking about things like cross-functional teams or even the client or the product team should be integrated with the development team. You're all one team working together rather than someone has an idea, and then the technical team executes on it. We see that also in some of the domain-driven design literature as well, where oftentimes projects start, and you sit down with a subject matter expert, and they just walk you through all of the business aspects. And particularly for the purpose of domain-driven design, you talk about a lot of the terms that make sense for the business. You build up a glossary of terms. I think they call it a ubiquitous language of things that are specific to your business and how does that work on a day-to-day basis. STEPHANIE: Do you have any strategies for getting more clarity around the work and why you're building it if it's not yet available to you? JOËL: I think there are sort of two scenarios where you have to do that; one of them that comes up maybe more often for us as consultants is onboarding onto a new client. There's a whole new business that we may know nothing about, and we have to learn a lot of that. And so, as part of the onboarding process, I think it's really valuable to have conversations with people who are not part of the dev team to learn about the business side of things. On a per-feature basis, if you've already been onboarded on a project, you've been there for a while, it's often good to go back to the person who maybe created a ticket, a product person who's asking for a feature, and ask, "Why? Why do you want this?" Ideally, maybe that's even part of the ticket-creating process because the two teams are more integrated, and product team is like, here's a problem we're trying to solve. Here's what we think would be a solution. Or maybe even just "Here's a business problem. We need a technical solution. Can you do that for us?" But I've often followed up with people outside of the engineering team to ask follow-up questions. And why are we doing this? And sometimes it's even you have to do like five Whys where it's like, "Oh, we're doing this because we need to do this thing for this customer. They asked for it." And it's like, "Okay, well, why are they asking for that?" "Oh, it's because they have this problem." And why are they having this problem?" And eventually, like, "Oh, I see. Okay." The real solution has nothing to do with what was asked, and you come up with something that's maybe much tighter scoped or will better solve, and everybody's a winner in that case. But it does require following up. So I guess the short and boring answer is talk to people outside the engineering team. STEPHANIE: That's a great point. I think the questions that we as engineers ask can drive more clarity to product people as well if we continue to ask those five levels of why in ways that they maybe didn't think about either. We have the opportunity to do that if we want to do our work well, too. That's kind of exciting to me that it isn't just okay, we're handed some work to do, and they've done all of that strategic thinking separately. And having to implement those details, we can kind of start to chip away at what are we really doing here? And you mentioned talking to people outside of the engineering team. I just was thinking that pairing with non-developers would also be a really great task to do, especially when you get a ticket that's a bit ambiguous and you have questions. And you can always comment on the ticket or whatever and ask your questions. But perhaps there's also a good opportunity to work things through synchronously. In some ways, I think that is a more natural opportunity for that conversation to evolve rather than it being like, okay, I answered these questions, and now I'm going to move on to whatever else I have to do. JOËL: So you mentioned pairing. It's often good to have someone maybe outside the development team pair with you on a technical thing, but sometimes it's good to flip the script. If you're building especially software for an internal team, it can be really valuable to just shadow one of them for a couple of hours or a day. I did a project where we were building a tool for an internal sales team. And I had the privilege to shadow a couple of the sales members for a few hours as they're just doing their job. And I'm just asking all the questions like, "Oh, why do you do it that way? And what is the purpose behind this?" And I learned so much about the business by doing that. STEPHANIE: I love that we took this idea of sustainable development and went beyond just technical design decisions or aspects of how we do our jobs. Because there is so much more that we can do to foster the value of sustainability or whatever other values that you might have, and yeah, I feel really excited to try both these technical strategies from the book and also the collaborative aspects as well. JOËL: I'm really excited about some of these ideas that are coming up from the book. I think today we basically just talked about the introduction, the idea of sustainability. But I think as maybe you read more in the book, maybe we can do another episode later on talking about some of the more specific technical recommendations, how they relate to sustainability and maybe share some of our thoughts on that. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I definitely am excited to keep y'all updated on this journey. [laughs] JOËL: On that note, shall we wrap up? STEPHANIE: Let's wrap up. JOËL: Show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. This show has been produced and edited by Mandy Moore. If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. If you have any feedback, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me at @joelquen on Twitter. Or at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. Thank you so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot, your expert strategy, design, development, and product management partner. We bring digital products from idea to success and teach you how because we care. Learn more at thoughtbot.com.

PreserveCast
Preserving Cultural Heritage Amid Climate Change with Charles Henry

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 33:29


On this week's PreserveCast we are talking with Charles Henry the President of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), a non-profit organization that works with libraries, cultural institutions, and higher learning communities to improve research, teaching, and learning environments through the digitization and preservation of cultural heritage. Charles will be sharing the threat that climate change poses on cultural heritage. Charles is the president of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), a non-profit organization that works with libraries, cultural institutions, and higher learning communities to improve research, teaching, and learning environments through the digitization and preservation of cultural heritage. He believes preserving cultural heritage connects us with humanity's collective experience and knowledge, and gives us a sense of identity. However, cultural memory loss can easily occur through destruction (e.g. the early Library of Alexandria), neglect, lack of awareness, war and displacement - even climate change poses a significant threat.  To address this, CLIR has been working for decades on the preservation and access to cultural heritage. Projects include the Digital Library of the Middle East, one of the world's largest online archives of Middle Eastern and North African artifacts; the HBCU Library Alliance Partnership, which fosters awareness of and access to collections held by Historically Black Colleges and Universities; and Digitizing Hidden Collections, a $4 million annual grant program that aims to bring highly significant cultural content to light.  

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons
Jesus's Prayer for His Disciples

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 44:30


QUOTES FOR REFLECTION“Satan wants us to view God's commands as barriers that keep us from enjoying the things we are entitled to. In reality, God is protecting us from what will harm us.”~Alisa Childers, singer-songwriter and author “The exposition of the Word of God and prayer belong together. It is in prayer, costly, sustained, and prevailing, that the Word of God is released through teaching and preaching. Prayer is the price of power, and the church is not likely to recover its lost authority until this basic biblical truth is recovered.”~Bruce Milne, pastor and educator “Eternal life is not so much everlasting life as knowledge of the Everlasting One.”~D.A. Carson, New Testament scholar “The prize of your faithfulness is your God. He is what you will get, He is preparing Himself as the reward of His worshippers … He it is who is the reward of your faith and fidelity. You greedy misers, what will ever satisfy you if God Himself doesn't?”~Augustine (354-430), North African church leader “The Father, Son, and Holy Ghost were happy in themselves, and enjoyed one another before the world was. Apart from the fact that God delights to communicate and spread His goodness, there had never been a creation.”~Richard Sibbes (1577-1635), pastor and theologian “You never have to drag mercy out of Christ, as money from a miser.~Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892), famed London pastor “Folks, if we could lose our salvation, we would.”~Voddie Baucham, Dean at African Christian University (Lusaka, Zambia) “The secret is Christ in me, not me in a different set of circumstances.”~Elisabeth Elliot (1926-2015), author, speaker, and missionarySERMON PASSAGEJohn 17:6-19 (ESV) 1 When Jesus had spoken these words, he lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son that the Son may glorify you, 2 since you have given him authority over all flesh, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. 3 And this is eternal life, that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. 4 I glorified you on earth, having accomplished the work that you gave me to do. 5 And now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had with you before the world existed.6 “I have manifested your name to the people whom you gave me out of the world. Yours they were, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. 7 Now they know that everything that you have given me is from you. 8 For I have given them the words that you gave me, and they have received them and have come to know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me. 9 I am praying for them. I am not praying for the world but for those whom you have given me, for they are yours. 10 All mine are yours, and yours are mine, and I am glorified in them. 11 And I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, keep them in your name, which you have given me, that they may be one, even as we are one. 12 While I was with them, I kept them in your name, which you have given me. I have guarded them, and not one of them has been lost except the son of destruction, that the Scripture might be fulfilled. 13 But now I am coming to you, and these things I speak in the world, that they may have my joy fulfilled in themselves. 14 I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. 15 I do not ask that you take them out of the world, but that you keep them from the evil one. 16 They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. 17 Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth. 18 As you sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world. 19 And for their sake I consecrate myself, that they also may be sanctified in truth. 20 “I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, 21 that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22 The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one, 23 I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one, so that the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me. 24 Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world. 25 O righteous Father, even though the world does not know you, I know you, and these know that you have sent me. 26 I made known to them your name, and I will continue to make it known, that the love with which you have loved me may be in them, and I in them.”

Instant Trivia
Episode 733 - Grains And Staples - Names In Sports - Canadian Cities - Teens At Work - Howdy Doody

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 7:19


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 733, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: Grains And Staples 1: The name of this food, not a true grain, comes from the Dutch meaning "beech wheat". buckwheat. 2: The rolled form of this grain cooks in about 5 minutes; the steel-cut takes much longer. oats. 3: Basmati, an aromatic type of this grain, is grown in India. rice. 4: Millet seed, an important food for North Africans, is most often fed to these pets in the U.S.. birds. 5: The pot type of this grain retains more of the bran than the pearl type. barley. Round 2. Category: Names In Sports 1: This legendary jockey was known as "The Shoe". Willie Shoemaker. 2: (Hi, I'm Tim Dwight.) At Iowa I was one of these, like the sneaky scout in "The Last of the Mohicans". a Hawkeye. 3: L.A. Ram defensive end David Jones was better known by this nickname. "Deacon". 4: (Hi, I'm James Worthy.) In the 1980s my L.A. Lakers got this "entertaining" nickname, also the name of a cable television network. "Showtime". 5: First name of Mr. Boyer, the Yankee 3B who played against his brother Ken in the 1964 World Series. "Clete" (or Cletis). Round 3. Category: Canadian Cities 1: English is also widely spoken in this largest French-speaking city outside of Paris. Montreal. 2: The North Saskatchewan River divides this Albertan capital in half. Edmonton. 3: The CFL's B.C. Lions play their home games in this city. Vancouver. 4: Whitehorse replaced Dawson as capital of this territory in 1953. Yukon Territory. 5: This Ontario city's underground walkway system can get you from Eaton Centre to Union Station. Toronto. Round 4. Category: Teens At Work 1: At 14, this fairy tale author worked for a director of the Royal Theater in Copenhagen. Hans Christian Andersen. 2: At 16, Tracy Austin beat Chris Evert to win this tennis tournament at Flushing Meadows. U.S. Open. 3: In the 1720s at age 16, this statesman and inventor wrote popular articles for the New England Courant newspaper. Benjamin Franklin. 4: At 13, this march composer became an apprentice with the U.S. Marine Band. John Philip Sousa. 5: At 16, Cornelius Vanderbilt started a ferry service between Staten Island and this famous 31-square-mile-island. Manhattan. Round 5. Category: Howdy Doody 1: "He" was made up of dachshund, elephant, spaniel, duck, cat, giraffe, seal and pig. Flub-a-dub. 2: This 4 word question was asked at the top of every show, following the words "Say kids...". What time is it?. 3: Original number of Howdy's freckles, they equaled the number of U.S. states. 48. 4: Job held by Mr. Cobb in Doodyville; Mr. Hooper on "Sesame Street" did the same thing. grocer (general store keeper). 5: Last name of triplets Don Jose, Hector Hamhock and Phineas T.. Bluster. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia! Special thanks to https://blog.feedspot.com/trivia_podcasts/

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 194:00


Listen to the Sun. Jan. 8, 2023 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the African National Congress (ANC) 111th anniversary commemorations in the Republic of South Africa; Zimbabwe has emerged as the agricultural powerhouse of the continent setting records for grain production inside the country; Egypt's Coptic Church has celebrated the Orthodox Christmas in the North African state; and the government of Ivory Coast welcomed the release 49 soldiers previously held in neighboring Mali. There has been an attempted coup in the South American state of Brazil aimed at removing the recently inaugurated President Lula da Silva. In the second hour we look back on the 60th anniversary of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement during 1963 and its impact on the mass character of the African American struggle. Finally, we listen to the speech of Republic of South Africa President Cyril Ramaphosa at the 111th ANC anniversary rally.

DT Radio Shows
Dance Around the Globe with Cairo FX #067

DT Radio Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 60:00


Dance Around The Globe is a radio show hosted by producer, dj and live act @cairofxmusic Cairo FX presents a mix of fresh electronic music from around the globe. EPISODE 67 Is melodic with a lot of tracks from one of my favorite labels @get-physical-music with some North African and global touches. Enjoy the ride! Follow me and my show on social media: Cairo FX: https://bit.ly/3iBDE6T Dance Around The Globe: https://bit.ly/3MnxS6V Track List: 1. Me Monkey (Mi Manchi) - CIOZ 2. Algérie mon beau pays - Slimane Azem 3. Dance With Me - Kevin de Vries 4. As We Roll - Peer Kusiv 5. Ah Oh Uh - Niconé 6. Racos - Corpino 7. Valencia - Monkey Safari 8.Priscus - Ron Flatter 9. Snake Ritual - Adana Twins 10. The Haze - Steve Bug 11. Tibet - ARTBAT

The Turbulent World of Middle East Soccer
Getting It Right A Post - Qatar Roadmap For Activists

The Turbulent World of Middle East Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 10:38


Qatar 2022 put the myth of a separation of sports and politics to bed. Like in Qatar, human, worker, and LGBT rights are likely to be left, right, and centre as other Gulf and North African states move centre stage as hosts of and bidders for some of the world's foremost mega-sporting events, the 2030 World Cup and the 2036 Olympics, and major Asian tournaments, including the Asian Cup and the Asian Games.

Andrew Schulz's Flagrant 2 with Akaash and Kaz
Schulz Reacts: Messi GOAT, Ronaldo TRASH, & 36 Hours In Morocco

Andrew Schulz's Flagrant 2 with Akaash and Kaz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 133:10 Very Popular


What's up people, welcome to our first Flagrant PODUMENTARY. Throughout this episode we will intercut our favorite moments from watching the World Cup in Morocco. Before that, we will discuss the impact of this cup, Messi and Ronaldo's legacy, and why we're all North African. Thank you Jägermeister for making this wild adventure possible. Dima Maghreb!!! TIMECODES 00:00 - World's greatest athlete has to be a footballer (or Floyd) 09:02 - Messi vs Penaldo 22:31 - iShowSpeed is a Ronaldo fan 24:10 - Landon Donovan gotta shave it + Mark got MAD head 28:35 - PODUMENTARY STARTS: The Moroccan Adventure 36:02 - We went to the Times Square of Marrakech 44:06 - Dov's soft hands + Mark is a horrendous wingman 52:00 - Dov got hustled in Morocco 01:12:35 - KidSuper drops by… 01:45:17 - Andrew gets scared in the Medina 01:52:04 - What's the next big adventure? 02:00:04 - Andrew is a born again football fan 02:04:15 - Akaash hates having fun

Liberation Now Podcast
Liberation Now Ep 12: Ongoing Uprisings in Iran - Woman, Life, Freedom

Liberation Now Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 58:13


In this episode, Helen Neville speaks with Iranian American scholar-activists Dr. Mehrgol Tiv and Amir Maghsoodi about the current uprisings in Iran. We cover the nationwide protests and state responses since the murder of Mahsa Jina Amini on September 22, 2022. The guests provide context for the roots of the woman-led liberation struggle, and the goals and hopes for Iran and her people.   This episode was recorded on Nov 29, 2022. Since then, the Islamic Republic government has executed two young men for taking part in protests: Mohsen Shekari and Majidreza Rahnavard. As of late-December, Amnesty International and others fear more individuals are at imminent risk of execution by the government.  ABOUT THE GUESTS  Dr. Mehrgol Tiv, PhD (website) (Twitter: @mehrgoltiv) earned her PhD in experimental psychology at McGill University in 2021, where she examined how diverse linguistic experiences related to cognitive processes. Now as a postdoctoral researcher, she further probes the social determinants of cognitive adaptation by assessing the psychological impacts of context diversity and racial identity formation, including among Middle Eastern and North African communities. Mehrgol was born in Tehran, Iran and moved to the United States at the age of six with her family. She grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and now lives in Washington D.C. with her partner and cat.    Amir Maghsoodi, MS (website) (Twitter and IG: @soori_breeze) is a doctoral candidate in his fifth year in the Counseling Psychology Program at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. His interests in psychology center on health and well-being, sense of belonging, and radical healing & liberation of BIPOC folx, with a particular focus on those of MENA/SWANA descent. His mixed-methods dissertation research explores the psychological impacts of racial identity invalidation on MENA Americans (e.g., our legal classification as “white” in the U.S.). He enjoys service to the community and currently serves on the advocacy committee of the American Arab, Middle Eastern, & North African Psychological Association (AMENA-Psy) and on Dr. Kevin Cokley's Division 45 Presidential Task Force on Cross-Racial/Ethnic Solidarity.  RESOURCES   News and Editorials  BBC reporting of first known execution of Iranian protestors   CNN coverage of human rights abuses in political prisons   Hamed Esmaeilion memoir in Toronto Life magazine Association of Families of PS752 Victims   CBC Interview with dissident rapper Toomaj Salehi the day before his kidnapping by Islamic Republic police forces  Washington Post documents Islamic Republic's tactics of repression  Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRANA) Daily Update on Iran Protest  Videos  VICE documentary, part 1   VICE documentary, part 2  Protest Songs  Baraye (“For”) by Shervin Hajipour (turn on English subtitles)  Amir Maghsoodi's cover of Baraye  Soroode Zan (“Women's Anthem”) by Mehdi Yarrahi and Mona Borzouie (Translated lyrics) YouTube page of dissident rapper Toomaj Salehi, who was kidnapped, tortured, and faces execution in Iran  Farsi rendition of Italian protest song, Bella Ciao, played in many global protests and rallies  Relevant Social Media Accounts (mostly Twitter) to Follow  Twitter  https://twitter.com/1500tasvir_en  https://twitter.com/Vahid   https://twitter.com/BlackIranians  https://twitter.com/PriscilliaK  https://twitter.com/sinafazelpour  https://twitter.com/NazaninNour  https://twitter.com/maasalan  https://twitter.com/esmaeilion  https://twitter.com/ps752justice  https://twitter.com/me_too_iran  https://twitter.com/MEMOrganization   https://twitter.com/HRANA_English   Instagram  https://www.instagram.com/1500tasvir_en/  https://www.instagram.com/collectiveforblackiranians/  https://www.instagram.com/from____iran/  https://www.instagram.com/centerforhumanrights/  https://www.instagram.com/middleeastmatters/  https://www.instagram.com/localbrownbaby/  https://www.instagram.com/womanlifefreedom.art/   Academic Statements and Correspondences  AMENA-Psy statement of solidarity with the people of Iran  SPSSI statement of solidarity with the people of Iran  Psychology Coalition at the UN (PCUN) letter to Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC) of the UN  American Psychological Association's letter to UN High Commissioner of Human Rights  American Psychiatric Association's letter to the UN High Commissioner of Human Rights  Correspondence to Nature by Iranian scholars calling for support of persecuted academic  STAY IN TOUCH!  #LiberationNowPodcast Email: liberationlab.uiuc@gmail.com | Instagram & Twitter: @liberationlab_     EPISODE CREDITS  Music: Amir Maghsoodi and Briana Williams   Podcast Artwork: B. Andi Lee & Amir Maghsoodi  Episode Intro: Mahogany Monette  Episode Outro: B. Andi Lee  Episode Editing: Helen Neville and Amir Maghsoodi  Episode Transcript: bit.ly/LibNowEp12 

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Dec. 17, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the ongoing African National Congress National Elective Conference taking place in South Africa where the ruling party leadership for the next five years will be selected; the World Cup has prompted a rise in sports gambling on the African continent; the North African state of Tunisia is holding elections for the formation of a new parliament; and the continent has undergone tumultous events during the course of 2022. In the second hour we look in detail at the White House-Africa Summit held this past week in Washington, D.C. Finally, we examine the 55th ANC National Elective Conference at Nasrec.

If You Don't Know
Let's talk about OCD

If You Don't Know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 24:29


We're talking about OCD in this week's episode. It affects two to three per cent of the population and is the lowest-funded mental health condition for research, according to the charity Orchard OCD. De-Graft is joined by Shaun Flores, who reveals what his life is like living with the condition. He noticed a lack of black people speaking about their OCD experiences and is on a mission to change that. Nick Sireau, co-founder and chair of Orchard OCD, also drops in. And the 2022 World Cup final is nearly upon us! Morocco becoming the first African team to ever reach the semi-final has been celebrated as a big win for Africa and Africans around the world. But, it has also brought up conversations around African identity in the North African country. De-Graft hears from Zainab, who felt conflicted about supporting Morocco, and Hajar Chaffag, a BBC Africa reporter in Rabat. What do you want to hear on the podcast? Drop us a line and let us know - our WhatsApp number is +44 0330 123 9480. Remember to start your message with IYDK, to make sure we see it. Presenter: De-Graft Mensah Producer: Kamilah McInnis Researchers: Paige Neal-Holder and Khadra Salad Sound: Kamilah McInnis and Dave O'Neill Editor: Alison Gee

The Anfield Index Podcast
World Cup Daily: France Progress. Morocco ARE the Real Deal

The Anfield Index Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 34:16


Dave & Karl are back to look at the second semi-final as France prove to be step too far for the injury hit Morocco as the North African side prove they're the real deal on the world stage of football.Prefer to listen to our shows without the ads? We've got your back, just head on over to http://anfieldindexpro.com and supercharge your listening experience.Chat and debate 24/7 with other Reds, join our FREE Discord community at https://bit.ly/3geu605Follow us on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3u9gYShFind us on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3KWFxbdSubscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3KXImsjFREE iOS app: https://apple.co/3KSqdMGFREE Android app: https://bit.ly/32KMxqmSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/theanfieldindex. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Always Cheating FPL Podcast
World Cup Day 21 - December 14, 2022

Always Cheating FPL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 22:48


Morocco finally reached their breaking point upon meeting France in Qatar's World Cup semifinals. Though soundly beaten, the North African team put up a mighty fight worthy of their Cinderella tournament run. But now it is France with an opportunity to repeat as consecutive World Cup champions as the young superstar Kylian Mbappé faces off against the legendary Lionel Messi. Who will lift the trophy? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

RNZ: Morning Report
Sports News for 15 December 2022

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 2:21


Morocco have already knocked over the football powerhouses of Belgium, Portugal and Spain at the World Cup in Qatar and they're hoping to continue their run into the final. The surprise semi-finalists meet defending champions France this morning in a match heavy with political and social overtones. France captain Hugo Lloris says they will be taking nothing for granted against the North Africans.

PBS NewsHour - World
The impact of Morocco's historic run at the World Cup

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 6:32


After an impressive run, Morocco's journey to the World Cup championship came to a close after its match against France, a country that shares a complicated history with the North African nation. Sports journalist Shireen Ahmed joined John Yang to discuss the Cinderella story of the first African and Arab team to advance to the semi-finals. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
The impact of Morocco's historic run at the World Cup

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 6:32


After an impressive run, Morocco's journey to the World Cup championship came to a close after its match against France, a country that shares a complicated history with the North African nation. Sports journalist Shireen Ahmed joined John Yang to discuss the Cinderella story of the first African and Arab team to advance to the semi-finals. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Travel Agents
Morocco: The Kingdom in North Africa

The Travel Agents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 58:04


Morocco is a land of stunning contrasts and captivating beauty, with a rich and vibrant culture that is deeply rooted in its history and traditions. From the bustling streets of Marrakech to the serene deserts of the Sahara, this North African country offers a wealth of exciting experiences for travelers.In Morocco, you can explore ancient medinas and marvel at the intricate tile work and architectural beauty of historic mosques and palaces. You can wander through colorful markets filled with spices, fabrics, and other treasures, or haggle with merchants in the bustling souks. You can also take a camel ride through the dunes of the Sahara, or climb to the top of the Atlas Mountains for breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape.In addition to its natural wonders, Morocco is also known for its delicious cuisine, which blends African, Arabic, and European influences. You can savor the flavors of tangy tagines, savory couscous, and spicy harira soup, or sample sweet pastries and fresh-squeezed juices from local vendors. The country is also famous for its music and dance, with lively performances of traditional Gnawa music and hypnotic belly dancing.With its stunning landscapes, fascinating culture, and rich history, Morocco is a must-visit destination for any travel enthusiast.Joining us on the podcast is our dear friend, and Morocco Expert, Azdean whom you can learn more about on his podcast Destination Morocco. Want to book a tour with his company check out his website here. Follow us on InstagramContact us at thetravelagentsakron@gmail.comorVia our websiteFollow the show and never miss an episode on:Apple - Spotify - Google - AmazonLike the show and want to support us? You can book a trip with us here at Chima TravelSupport the show

The John Batchelor Show
6/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 6/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 8:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 6/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 8/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 6:59


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 8/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 7/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 13:39


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 7/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 1/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 9:04


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 1/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 2/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 9:31


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 2/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 3/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 12:36


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 3/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 4/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 7:56


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 4/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 5/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 10:23


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8:What an armor-dominated escalation might look like, NATO vs Russia. 5/8: Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day, by James Holland   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08YS123SZ/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 In the annals of World War II, certain groups of soldiers stand out, and among the most notable were the Sherwood Rangers. Originally a cavalry unit in the last days of horses in combat, whose officers were landed gentry leading men who largely worked for them, they were switched to the “mechanized cavalry” of tanks in 1942. Winning acclaim in the North African campaign, the Sherwood Rangers then spearheaded one of the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944; led the way across France; were the first British troops to cross into Germany, and contributed mightily to Germany's surrender in May 1945. Inspired by Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the acclaimed WWII historian James Holland memorably profiles an extraordinary group of citizen soldiers constantly in harm's way. Their casualties were horrific, but their ranks immediately refilled. Informed by never-before-seen documents, letters, photographs, and other artifacts from Sherwood Rangers' families—an ongoing fraternity—and by his own deep knowledge of the war, Holland offers a uniquely intimate portrait of the war at ground level, introducing heretofore unknowns such as the Commanding Officer Stanley Christopherson, the squadron commander John Semken, Sergeant George Dring, and other memorable characters who helped the regiment become the single unit with the most battle honors of any ever in the British army. He weaves the Sherwood Rangers' exploits into the larger narrative and strategy of the war, and also brings fresh analysis to the tactics used. Following the Sherwood Rangers' brutal journey over the dramatic eleven months between D-Day and V-E Day, Holland presents a vivid and original perspective on the endgame of WWII in Europe.

Football Daily
Morocco make history to keep World Cup miracle alive

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 24:40


Kelly Cates, Alistair Bruce-Ball and Pat Nevin react to Morocco's sensational 1-0 win over Portugal as they become the first African side to reach the World Cup semi-finals. We hear from Morocco midfielder Sofyan Amrabat and North African football journalist Maher Mezahi on what this achievement means for Morocco and Africa.

The Fifth Floor
The Arab world and the war in Ukraine

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 41:48


Hisham Yezza of BBC Monitoring has been observing the impact in the Middle East and North Africa of the war in Ukraine since the invasion nearly ten months ago. He tells us how the war is reported and discussed in the region, and how at a political level, traditional alliances with the West are shifting. A sweet treat that could help the Amazon People from Brazil's Amazon region enjoy many dishes made with the local cupuaçu fruit, but they make less use of the seeds. These can be processed to make "cupulate", which has some similarities to chocolate. BBC Brasil's Monica Vasconcelos tells us how cupulate could help livelihoods and the environment. Preserving Rai dancing Essra Warda is an Algerian American dancer, working to preserve North African women-led dance traditions. Fethi Benaissa from BBC Arabic spoke to her about her love of these dances. Life in Lulu Lulu is a fictitious village in rural South Sudan, the setting for a popular radio drama created by the BBC's international charity Media Action. For 10 years, it's been tackling a wide range of issues experienced by ordinary people, from violence against women to peace-building. Production manager Zuhur Noah and scriptwriter Kululu Elgebana introduce us to some of the characters and stories. What is 'pancasila'? Indonesia's national ideology, 'pancasila', or 'five principles', has been in the news this week. Parliament approved a revised criminal code, which covers many areas of life - from sex and relationships, to insulting the president or criticising state ideology. Endang Nurdin of BBC Indonesian explains more about the meaning of pancasila. (Photo: Sixth CICA Summit. Credit: Getty Images)

The Joint Venture: an infrastructure and renewables podcast

The Joint Venture: inspiratia insightsThe team look over the past week of news, and put the most promising North African renewable market under the spotlight From the news desk, Rob bring us the latest updates; including major European solar acquisitions, huge steps forward in green hydrogen for aviation and green steel, and BayWa's move towards the Irish market.  Capucine also tells us about the how Morocco is really starting to flourish as the investment environment becomes more attractive. With help from inspiratia's riskwatch index. Hosted by:Oliver Carr - Senior Hydrogen AnalystRobert Leeming - Head of NewsCapucine Guillet - Energy and Infrastructure AnalystReach out to us on: podcasts@inspiratia.comFind all of our latest news and analysis at inspiratiaSubscribe and listen to all our episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other providers.

The New Arab Voice
Qatar 2022 World Cup: It's Comin' Home and Free Palestine!

The New Arab Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 20:02


This week on The New Arab Voice we're looking at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. Middle Eastern and North African teams have made history during the tournament, causing major sporting upsets like Saudi Arabia's win over Argentina and Morocco's victory against Belgium. While Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Tunisia didn't progress to the knock-out stages, Morocco remains in the running for the coveted trophy - just three games away from footballing glory. During the tournament, we've witnessed a tidal wave of support from fans across the region, not just for their national teams but for fellow Arab and African nations. This pan-Arab solidarity has been expressed through mass celebrations inside and outside the stadiums, as well as the waving of the Palestinian flag. On the episode, The New Arab Voice speaks to Moroccan football fans Amine Hafed (@amine.elhafid) and Mehdi Merin (@yomehdi4reel) about their experiences after the Atlas Lions clinched a spot in the final eight. We asked them what lies behind this success and whether having a World Cup in the Middle East has made a difference for Arab teams on the pitch. Joining them are Algerian football journalist Maher Mezahi (@mezahimaher) and The New Arab's Shahla Omar (@shahlasomar), who assess the football we've seen so far, displays of pan-Arab solidarity and give their predictions on what we'll see happen next. Finally, we spoke to Emile Badarin, a Palestinian research fellow based at the College of Europe, Natolin Campus in Warsaw about the visibility of the Palestinian cause during the tournament and the football fans who refused to speak to Israeli journalists. You can sign up for our newsletter here. This podcast is written and produced by Rosie McCabe, with help from Hugo Goodridge and Basma Elatti. Theme music by Omar al-Fil. Other music by Blue Dot Sessions. To get in touch with the producers, follow then tweet us at @TheNewArabVoice or email hugo.goodridge@alaraby.co.uk 

New Books in History
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Military History
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Italian Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Italian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/italian-studies

New Books in Jewish Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in German Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in French Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in African Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books Network
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Genocide Studies
Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, "Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:38


Aomar Boum and Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book Wartime North Africa: A Documentary History, 1934-1950 (Stanford UP, 2022), the first-ever collection of primary documents on North African history and the Holocaust, gives voice to the diversity of those involved--Muslims, Christians, and Jews; women, men, and children; black, brown, and white; the unknown and the notable; locals, refugees, the displaced, and the interned; soldiers, officers, bureaucrats, volunteer fighters, and the forcibly recruited. At times their calls are lofty, full of spiritual lamentation and political outrage. At others, they are humble, yearning for medicine, a cigarette, or a pair of shoes. Translated from French, Arabic, North African Judeo-Arabic, Spanish, Hebrew, Moroccan Darija, Tamazight (Berber), Italian, and Yiddish, or transcribed from their original English, these writings shed light on how war, occupation, race laws, internment, and Vichy French, Italian fascist, and German Nazi rule were experienced day by day across North Africa. Though some selections are drawn from published books, including memoirs, diaries, and collections of poetry, most have never been published before, nor previously translated into English. These human experiences, combined, make up the history of wartime North Africa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Sports and Society in the Maghreb (Webinar)

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 61:56


This panel, co-organised with the Society for Algerian Studies, explored the relationship between sports and society in the Maghreb. Panellists from across academia and the media discussed the historical development of sport in the region, as well as the relationship between gender and sport. With Morocco and Tunisia qualifying for the 2022 Men's World Cup, and Morocco qualifying for the 2023 Women's World Cup, panellists also charted the contemporary development of football in the region, and how the societies of the Maghreb understand their politics and identities through the sport. Mahfoud Amara is Associate Professor in Sport Social sciences and Management at Qatar University. Amara has published on sport, business, culture, politics and society in the Arab region. In 2012, he published a book with Palgrave Macmillan titled Sport Politics and Society in the Arab World. Maher Mezahi is an independent football journalist based between Marseille and Algiers. He examines the relationship between sport and politics, and his research interests include North African politics and the history of colonial sport in Africa. He covers North African football extensively, and his work has been published by the BBC, The Guardian, ESPN Africa and Al Jazeera English. Aziza Nait Sibaha is a Senior TV anchor and Executive Editor at France24. She has worked as a journalist in Morocco and France for the last 25 years. Nait Sibaha is also the Founder of Taja Sport, a media platform dedicated to women's sports in the MENA region. She has also directed the documentary Atlas Lionesses: Hear them Roar! on Morocco's women's national football team.

Bleav in The Comedy Bureau Field Report
Ep. 140: Lynn Maleh & Making Space for All Shades of Brown

Bleav in The Comedy Bureau Field Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 88:34


Whether it be MENA, MENASA, or SWANA or any other acronym, the several Middle Eastern, African, and Asian countries that constitute a version of "brown", so to speak, are coming more and more in prominence. This is evidenced with LA local favorite Lynn Maleh and her MENA based stand-up show Hilarious Habibis that she runs with Gena B. Jones at the Hollywood Improv. We talk with Lynn about working her way through producing beloved house shows in LA for years to making space and highlighting Middle Eastern and North African comedians and working towards being inclusive of even more shades of "brown". Follow Lynn @heylynnmolly on IG and get tickets for the upcoming Hilarious Habibis on Dec. 5th at The Hollywood Improv that will benefit The Abdorrahman Boroumand Center for Human Rights in Iran. The Comedy Bureau @thecomedybureau across platforms and please, please support TCB via GoFundMe, Patreon, or on Venmo (@jakekroeger). Produced by Jake Kroeger Music by Brian Granillo Artwork by Andrew Delman and KT Photo by Kelly Dwyer @kellydwyerphotographer

Independent Music Podcast
#393 – Thought Forms, T5UMUT5UMU, Dr Pete Larson, Slumberland & Sainkho Namtchylak, Bea Brennan, KONKURS - 28 November 2022

Independent Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 39:00


Our last regular episode of the year leaves you with some absolute crackers from all corners of the sonic spectrum. We're delighted to open with the first record from new Moroccan label L'Amme, which has been set up to celebrate music of Amazigh heritage. Other than North African footwork, elsewhere we check in with Dr Pete Larson's nyatiti project, have a taste of Japanese gqom from T5UMUT5UMU on Kampala's Hakuna Kulala label, and we also touch upon Chilean oceanic music, mutant body techno, and an absolutely spectacular collaboration between Belgium's Slumberland and Tuvan throat singer Sainkho Namtchylak. Tracklisting Gj Leith – Who dis ⵎⴰ ⵜ ⴳ ⵉ ⵜ (L'Amme, Morocco) Dr Pete Larson – Loss (Dagoretti Records, USA) Bea Brennan – All At Once (Old Technology, UK) T5UMUT5UMU – Fireball (Hakuna Kulala, Uganda) Slumberland & Sainkho Namtchylak – Zarja Zakat Zarja (Morphine Records, Germany) Bahía Mansa – Costa Del Sol (Colony Collapse, Canada) Ryterski – Omega Weapon (Pointless Geometry, Poland) KONKURS – Proteus (X-IMG, Germany) Chooc Ly – Exaltation Onirique (Chinabot, UK) Thought Forms – Burn Me (Lava Thief, UK) This week's episode is sponsored by The state51 Conspiracy, a creative hub for music. Head to state51.com to find releases by JK Flesh vs Gnod, Steve Jansen, MrUnderwSood, Wire, Ghost Box, Lo Recordings, Subtext Records and many more Produced and edited by Nick McCorriston. Produced and edited by Nick McCorriston

The afikra Podcast
CHRISTOPHER SILVER | Jews, Muslims & Music | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 55:05


Christopher Silver talked about the history of music in North Africa, notably in Tunisia and Morocco. He outlined the contributions of famous Jewish and Muslim North African musicians to our current knowledge of modern-day music. Christopher Silver is the Segal Family Assistant Professor in Jewish History and Culture at McGill University. He is the founder and curator of the website Gharamophone.com, a digital archive of North African records from the first half of the twentieth century.Created and hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikraEdited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com