Podcast appearances and mentions of John Brown

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Best podcasts about John Brown

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Latest podcast episodes about John Brown

The Gist of Freedom   Preserving American History through Black Literature . . .
Mary Ann Shadd Black Militant Abolitionist |Attorney | Newspaper Publisher |

The Gist of Freedom Preserving American History through Black Literature . . .

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 30:00


The Life of Black Abolitionist Mary Ann Shadd as told by her descendant Scholar Irene Moore Davis! A ceremony unveiling the statue of Mary Ann Shadd took place Thursday, May 12, 2022, at Windsor University in Canada.  Sculpted by local artist Donna Mayne. Watch it on the University of Windsor'sYouTube channel. Shadd a black abolitionist was one of the first Black female newspaper publishers and female journalists in Canada. Shadd founded The Provincial Freeman in 1853.  Shadd also helped her cousin, Osborne Perry Anderson pen the book “Sole Survivor, A Voice From Harper's Ferry” which is an account of his extraordinary and courageous role in John Brown's Harper's Ferry Raid! The event was live-streamed from the University of Windsor's downtown campus for the greater community.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Ryan Busse and Tim Wise Episode 605

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 81:00


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Ryan Busse is a former firearms executive who helped build one of the world's most iconic gun companies, and was nominated multiple times by industry colleagues for the prestigious Shooting Industry Person of The Year Award. Busse is an environmental advocate who served in many leadership roles for conservation organizations, including as an advisor for the United States Senate Sportsmen's Caucus and the Biden Presidential Campaign. He remains a proud outdoorsman, gun owner, father, and resident of Montana. About the book.... A long-time former executive at one of the country's top gun manufacturers reveals how his industry radicalized a large swathe of America, and explains how it must change before we can reduce gun violence and heal as a nation. Ryan Busse has traveled a long, circuitous path along the American gun journey. As an avid hunter, outdoorsman, and conservationist–all things that the firearms industry was built on–he rose to the highest ranks of the rapidly growing, multibillion-dollar firearms industry. But replacing self-imposed decency with rampant fear-mongering, racism, hardline conservative politics, massive profits from semi-automatic weapons sales, and McCarthyesque policing have driven Busse to do something few other gun executives have done: he's ending his 30-year career in the industry to tell its secrets. He watched the industry change from its smaller, less corporate and far-less-powerful form to the partisan, power-hungry entity it is today. He thought he could go up against the power of the industry from within, and over the years had made small inroads toward sensible gun ownership and use. But that's simply not possible anymore. This book is an insider's call-out, a voice-driven tale of personal transformation, and a fast ride through wild times and colorful characters that populate a much-speculated-about, but little-known industry. It's also a story of how authoritarianism spreads in the guise of freedom, how voicing one's conscience becomes an act of treason in a culture that demands sameness and loyalty. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Follow and Support Gareth Sever  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

The Brion McClanahan Show
Ep. 633: George Washington vs. John Brown

The Brion McClanahan Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:16


John Brown has resumed his "mythical" status among some Americans, both on the left and the "right." For years, he was rightly regarded as a homicidal maniac. On the other hand, the left is trying to cancel George Washington. Do you see the problem? If you don't, I'll explain it to you. https://mcclanahanacademy.com https://brionmcclanahan.com/support http://learntruehistory.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/support

The Dispatch Podcast
The Inflation Game

The Dispatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 58:33


The economic state of America, which technically may be improving according to the latest inflation numbers, is still not good. The gang (with deputy managing editor Michael Scott Reneau stepping in for Steve) discuss it and home in on why that's bad news for Democrats. Plus, Tim Alberta of The Atlantic just wrote a profile of evangelical churches in America and it is so good Sarah, David, Jonah, and Michael had to talk about it and the state of evangelicalism on today's episode. And finally, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer held a vote on abortion access in America which failed miserably. What the heck was he thinking? Finally, what is the legacy of John Brown? Show Notes:-TMD on the latest inflation numbers and baby formula shortage-Tim Alberta on the evangelical church-Politico: Senate Democrats' imaginary majority

Old Time Radio Listener
Arch Oboler's Plays - Crazy Town

Old Time Radio Listener

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:27


No man has a duty to do what he knows is not right so the cowardly bomber pilot is destined for the crazy town where people live and love and kill as their fancy strikes. Duration: 27:27 Starring: Edmond O'Brien, Charlotte Manson, Paul Stewart, John Brown, Betty Caine Broadcast Date: 20th May 1939

Business Innovators Radio
Interview with John Brown, Creator of the BEI Exit Planning Process for Financial Professionals

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 23:32


John is the founder of BEI, started his career in Exit Planning 30+ years ago as an estate-planning attorney. He created The BEI Seven Step Exit Planning Process™ and successfully tested it on hundreds of his own business-owner clients. In 1990, he wrote How to Run Your Business So You Can Leave It in Style and in 2008 wrote Cash Out Move On: Get Top Dollar—and More—Selling Your Business. With hundreds of thousands of copies sold, John is the No. 1 selling author on Exit Planning for business owners. In 2016, John released his newest book, Exit Planning: The Definitive Guide, which lays out the steps business owners must take to achieve all of their aspirations as they exit their businesses. John started BEI in 1996 for the express purpose of helping owners benefit from their lives' work by supporting business advisors who share the same vision.Learn More: http://www.exitplanning.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-john-brown-creator-of-the-bei-exit-planning-process-for-financial-professionals

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with John Brown, Creator of the BEI Exit Planning Process for Financial Professionals

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 23:32


John is the founder of BEI, started his career in Exit Planning 30+ years ago as an estate-planning attorney. He created The BEI Seven Step Exit Planning Process™ and successfully tested it on hundreds of his own business-owner clients. In 1990, he wrote How to Run Your Business So You Can Leave It in Style and in 2008 wrote Cash Out Move On: Get Top Dollar—and More—Selling Your Business. With hundreds of thousands of copies sold, John is the No. 1 selling author on Exit Planning for business owners. In 2016, John released his newest book, Exit Planning: The Definitive Guide, which lays out the steps business owners must take to achieve all of their aspirations as they exit their businesses. John started BEI in 1996 for the express purpose of helping owners benefit from their lives' work by supporting business advisors who share the same vision.Learn More: http://www.exitplanning.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-john-brown-creator-of-the-bei-exit-planning-process-for-financial-professionals

Teach Me Communism
Episode 102: Who Was John Brown?

Teach Me Communism

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 103:33


What are the do's and don'ts of leading a slave rebellion? How many sons does this guy have, anyway, and why is one of them named Salmon? What do trains have to do with Bleeding Kansas? Find out the answer to these questions and more!   Check us out on social media: Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/teach-me-communism?ref_id=10068 Instagram: @teachmecommunism Twitter: @teachcommunism Gmail: teachmecommunism@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/teachmecommunism  And like and subscribe to us at Teach Me Communism on YouTube!   Solidarity forever!

The Daily Zeitgeist
Zeit Want My TDZ 5/9: Hacked, Kendrick Lamaar, Avatar, Disney, Nikola Jokic, John Brown, HODL

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 24:25


In this edition of Zeit Want My TDZ, Jack and Miles discuss Russian TV getting hacked with anti-war messages on V-Day, the new Kendrick Lamaar video, the 'Avatar: The Way Of Water' trailer, Nazi flags flying at Disneyworld, Nikola Jokic winning MVP for second straight season, abolitionist John Brown's birthday, protesters pulling up at Brett Kavanaugh's house, and a crypto-dip for all the HODLers! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fate of Fact
May 9th: The Abolitionsist John Brown Is Born

Fate of Fact

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 6:00


On May 9, 1800, in Torrington, Connecticut… the abolitionist John Brown is born. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast
Thursday Red Pill Diaries-The Demonic Left WILL Escalate War If The The Threat Of Roe's End Remains, BELIEVE Them!

Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 10:55


HEADLINE: The Scotus Leak: Cui Bono? by Rod Dreher Scenario One: The fact that what's been leaked is a draft from months ago might suggest that a leaker on the conservative side hopes to freeze a wavering justice — Kavanaugh being the obvious candidate — into their initial vote, by making it seem like the very credibility of the court rests on their not being perceived to cave under external pressure. Scenario Two: As the court has moved rightward, the climate in the left-leaning part of the elite legal world (which is to say, most of it) has become much more self-consciously activist and anti-institutionalist than the climate among, say, Federalist Society types — meaning that if you were betting on a big act of institutional sabotage right now, you would bet on it coming from the left. Scenario Three: You can imagine various possible rationales for a liberal leak. At the most basic level, there might be the hope that seeing the inevitable backlash unfold now, while the ruling can still change, could make a figure like Kavanaugh waver further, rather than locking in his vote. So how do you prevent the CLERKS from leaking information? We know the judges all takes oaths.  Inside the court building there are 67 people that could have possibly leaked this draft. Or a modern day equivalent of a Non-disclosure Agreement. Now that is a BINDING agreement - they couldn't get out of that if it was in-fact signed by the 67 people in that building. The left has been wanting this to all come to a head. This is going to lead to a shooting war. 330 million souls now have a stake in this ordeal. Whether you like it or not, the person that leaked this believes that the over turning of Roe is so profound that 330 million people should fight over it. This is profound, it is Biblical. “Who Benefits” = Cui Bono (latin) John Brown failed - who was Lincolns sneaky leaker?  He sent a fleet of Navy sailing vessels down to SC Charleston Harbor.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Tim Wise and Dr Dana Suskind Episode 595

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 130:39


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more NEWS DUMP. Recap of the BREAKING NEWS of SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ABORTION   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Dana Suskind, MD, is a pediatric otolaryngologist who specializes in hearing loss and cochlea implantation. She directs the University of Chicago Medicine's Pediatric Hearing Loss and Cochlear Implant program. Recognized as a national thought leader in early language development, Dr. Suskind has dedicated her research and clinical life to optimizing foundational brain development and preventing early cognitive disparities and their lifelong impact. She is founder and co-director of the TMW Center for Early Learning + Public Health, which aims to create a population-level shift in the knowledge and behavior of parents and caregivers to optimize the foundational brain development in children from birth to five years of age, particularly those born into poverty. Her book "Thirty Million Words: Building a Child's Brain" was published in 2015. Dr. Suskind has received several awards for her work, including the Weizmann Women for Science Vision and Impact award, the SENTAC Gray Humanitarian Award, the LENA Research Foundation Making a Difference Award, the Chairman's Award from the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in 2018, and the John D. Arnold, MD Mentor Award for Sustained Excellence from the Pritzker School of Medicine. Connect with Dr. Dana Suskind at @drdanasuskind. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

The Open Mike Podcast
Episode 88 - Chirpin' & Dirpin'

The Open Mike Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 75:57


Here is another hilarious episode filled with debauchery, crime, and lots of idiocy! This week we feature the hilarious comedian, John Brown. We had a blast hanging out with John and it shows! This edition is filled with a ton of laughs and we cover a crime story where a Chicago man buries his mother and sister in his backyard and continues to cash his mother's social security checks for six years. This is a wild ride that you will enjoy, and after you do don't forget to follow, like, subscribe, leave a comment, hit that bell up top to receive notifications, and tell everyone you come across to come check us out. Twitter: @OPENMIKE5000 Facebook: FACEBOOK.COM/THEOPENMIKEPODCAST Instagram: @THEOPENMIKEPODCAST Mikey B. Instagram: @MIKEYBTHECOMIC John Brown's Instagram: @HAHAJOHNBROWN --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-open-mike-podcast/support

Capital Literature
Madison Dividend Income Fund 1Q22

Capital Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 7:18


Madison Dividend Income Fund, 1st Quarter 2022 Letter by John Brown and Drew Justman Companies discussed: $BHBFX $MDMIX $MADAX $MADRX $BKR $EOG $NUE The Capital Literature Podcast brings you investment letters in audio. Capital Literature is a Sebids Capital service for the investment community. Follow @sebidscap and @CapitalLit on Twitter and become part of our community. Disclaimer: This podcast is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be relied upon as a basis for investment decisions. All rights belong to the respective owners.

The Opperman Report'
Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 by Donald Jeffries

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 63:07


Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963What they didn't teach you in school about Benjamin Franklin, The Freeemasons, John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, the Spanish American War, Prohibition, and more.For far too long, American history has been left in the unreliable hands of those that author Donald Jeffries refers to as the court historians. Here he fights back by scrutinizing the accepted history on the assassination on everything from the American War of Independence to the establishment reputation of Thomas Jefferson and the other Founding Fathers, the Civil War, the Lincoln assassination, both World Wars, US government experimentation on prisoners, mental patients, innocent children and whole populated areas, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping and much, much more.Secular saints like Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt are examined in a critical way they seldom have been.Jeffries spares no one and nothing in this explosive new book. The atrocities of Union troops during the Civil War, and Allied troops during World War II, are documented in great detail. The Nuremberg Trials are presented as the antithesis of justice. In the follow-up to his previous, bestselling book Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics, Jeffries demonstrates that crimes, corruption, and conspiracies didn't start with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.History should be much more than cardboard villains and impossibly unrealistic heroes. Thanks to the efforts of the court historians, most Americans are historically illiterate. Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 is a bold attempt at setting the record straight.

The Opperman Report
Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 by Donald Jeffries

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 63:07


Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 What they didn't teach you in school about Benjamin Franklin, The Freeemasons, John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, the Spanish American War, Prohibition, and more. For far too long, American history has been left in the unreliable hands of those that author Donald Jeffries refers to as the court historians. Here he fights back by scrutinizing the accepted history on the assassination on everything from the American War of Independence to the establishment reputation of Thomas Jefferson and the other Founding Fathers, the Civil War, the Lincoln assassination, both World Wars, US government experimentation on prisoners, mental patients, innocent children and whole populated areas, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping and much, much more. Secular saints like Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt are examined in a critical way they seldom have been. Jeffries spares no one and nothing in this explosive new book. The atrocities of Union troops during the Civil War, and Allied troops during World War II, are documented in great detail. The Nuremberg Trials are presented as the antithesis of justice. In the follow-up to his previous, bestselling book Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics, Jeffries demonstrates that crimes, corruption, and conspiracies didn't start with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. History should be much more than cardboard villains and impossibly unrealistic heroes. Thanks to the efforts of the court historians, most Americans are historically illiterate. Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 is a bold attempt at setting the record straight.

The Opperman Report'
Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 by Donald Jeffries

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 159:32


Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963What they didn't teach you in school about Benjamin Franklin, The Freeemasons, John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, the Spanish American War, Prohibition, and more.For far too long, American history has been left in the unreliable hands of those that author Donald Jeffries refers to as the court historians. Here he fights back by scrutinizing the accepted history on the assassination on everything from the American War of Independence to the establishment reputation of Thomas Jefferson and the other Founding Fathers, the Civil War, the Lincoln assassination, both World Wars, US government experimentation on prisoners, mental patients, innocent children and whole populated areas, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping and much, much more.Secular saints like Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt are examined in a critical way they seldom have been.Jeffries spares no one and nothing in this explosive new book. The atrocities of Union troops during the Civil War, and Allied troops during World War II, are documented in great detail. The Nuremberg Trials are presented as the antithesis of justice. In the follow-up to his previous, bestselling book Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics, Jeffries demonstrates that crimes, corruption, and conspiracies didn't start with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.History should be much more than cardboard villains and impossibly unrealistic heroes. Thanks to the efforts of the court historians, most Americans are historically illiterate. Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 is a bold attempt at setting the record straight.

The Opperman Report
Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 by Donald Jeffries

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 159:32


Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 What they didn't teach you in school about Benjamin Franklin, The Freeemasons, John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, the Spanish American War, Prohibition, and more. For far too long, American history has been left in the unreliable hands of those that author Donald Jeffries refers to as the court historians. Here he fights back by scrutinizing the accepted history on the assassination on everything from the American War of Independence to the establishment reputation of Thomas Jefferson and the other Founding Fathers, the Civil War, the Lincoln assassination, both World Wars, US government experimentation on prisoners, mental patients, innocent children and whole populated areas, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping and much, much more. Secular saints like Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt are examined in a critical way they seldom have been. Jeffries spares no one and nothing in this explosive new book. The atrocities of Union troops during the Civil War, and Allied troops during World War II, are documented in great detail. The Nuremberg Trials are presented as the antithesis of justice. In the follow-up to his previous, bestselling book Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics, Jeffries demonstrates that crimes, corruption, and conspiracies didn't start with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. History should be much more than cardboard villains and impossibly unrealistic heroes. Thanks to the efforts of the court historians, most Americans are historically illiterate. Crimes and Cover-ups in American Politics: 1776-1963 is a bold attempt at setting the record straight.

This Is Nashville
'It's how we used to do it' — natural burial and walking toward the end

This Is Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 50:33


Death is something that's sure. It's also something many of us avoid. Certain people, though, have made facing death part of their everyday life. In an opening feature, we visit Larkspur Conservation – one of the only conservation burial grounds in the country as we say goodbye to one man's son. Then we speak with a woman who recently buried her dad at Larkspur as well as ordained ministers from different traditions about how they are plugging into, and guiding us through, the dying time. First up: @ Us!  We answer a couple of questions about our Native Roots episode and talk about a poem our guest Anita Smith shared with us after our recent episode on domestic violence, "He Gave Me Flowers Today." Guests:  Lindsey Baydoun, photographer who recently lost her father, Cory Fite Becca Stevens, speaker, social entrepreneur, author, priest, founder of 10 nonprofit justice initiatives including Larkspur Conservation, and president of Thistle Farms Chaplain Omarán Lee, pastoral counselor, chaplain at Nashville General Hospital at Meharry Rev. Jeannie Alexander, co-founder and co-director of No Exceptions Prison Collective, death doula in training More: A documentary on Larkspur will be available on PBS beginning April 18. Learn more here. See more photos of Cory Fite's burial ceremony that is featured in the documentary here. Photos by John Brown and courtesy Lindsey Baydoun.

Backdoor podcast
Basketmercato: il colpo John Brown, i disastri al Real e Djordjevic...

Backdoor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 21:15


Questi i temi:John Brown il colpo playoff per BresciaJordan Parks rinnova con Napoli per altre due stagioniMikael Hopkins vicino al rinnovo con Reggio EmiliaChe succede al Real Madrid? Coach Djordjevic in bilico dopo la sconfitta contro il Galatasaray

daily304's podcast
The History Project - John Brown & the Raid on Harpers Ferry

daily304's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 2:21


Factions in both the North and the South had reached a stalemate; the South would keep its practice of slavery and the North would mostly turn a blind eye. Abolitionist John Brown went after the abomination with such a vengeance that it was impossible for the nation to continue ignoring an atrocity they had accepted as fact.   First in Kansas and finally in Harpers Ferry, John Brown let loose a battle cry with an echo that reverberated to the launch of the Civil War.

Why We Plan
The Longer the Runway, the Bigger the Plane

Why We Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 21:14


John Brown, Founder of BEI, sits down to speak with Kaitlyn Carlson, Founder of Theory Planning Partners, to discuss the difference between working with millennial and baby boomer business owners. Working with business owners for many years now, Kaitlyn has come to realize that it can be difficult to plan with the end in mind, especially for young entrepreneurs just starting their careers. But no matter if your client is a baby boomer who has built the company from the ground up for the last 45 years or a millennial entrepreneur who starts a new business every other year, a wise business owner must plan for the exit of the business one day. Planning takes time, but the earlier you start having these conversations with owners, the better the chance of a successful exit. The most important suggestion Kaitlyn can give to advisors working with business owners is to do business valuations on an annual basis. This process will get your business owner clients into the mentality of selling their business every year. Like the saying goes, the longer the runway, the bigger the plane.

The Beston and Greenway NBL Podcast
NBL - Sydney Kings Reign, Perth Wildcats struggle/John Brown III, Illawarra Hawks flying, Melbourne United, NBL Free Agency & Picks of the Week

The Beston and Greenway NBL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 58:59


Join Beston as he breaks down the big issues in the NBL heading into Round 19, including: - The Sydney Kings reign supreme winning their 11th straight, what makes them so good and is there a way in which they can be stopped? - Perth Wildcats take their 3rd L in a row at home, where do the problems lie both on and off the court. - Wildcats' John Brown III exemption request denied by NBL. - The Illawarra Hawks are flying, are they being overlooked as a championship contender? - Melbourne United have an up and down weekend. What are United's keys to finals success and what are their weaknesses? - The South East Melbourne Phoenix's horror show in Cairns. Where to from here? Can they respond in The Throwdown? - Free Agency: Lamar Patterson, Keanu Pinder and Bul Kuol discussions in the media. - NBL Round 19 Picks of the Week --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bestonandgreenwaypodcast/message

Maxwell's Kitchen
Episode 67 - Bryan Kim & Zave Forster

Maxwell's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 79:10


Bryan Kim is a 34-year-old Yellow American revolutionary from Shingle Springs, CA. He is the co-founder and Financial Director of the People's Housing Project, a grassroots organization that provides emergency shelters and support services like trash/needle pickup and toilets to houseless camps in Portland. He also serves as the Political Director for Decriminalize Nature Portland, an organization dedicated to decriminalizing the cultivation and personal ceremonial use of psychedelic plants and fungi for mental health and spiritual growth. Since his start with climate justice at Greenpeace in 2011, Bryan has been a leader and organizer for social and housing justice. In 2013, he founded Moderate Majority Foundation, which gave grants to veterans in San Diego on the edge of homelessness to keep them in their housing, and for which he served as Executive Director for 4 years. In 2018, he ran for Congress in CA-53 as an independent progressive. The work of his life is to elevate the consciousness of oppressed peoples in such a way that will result in them taking concrete action towards the end of their oppression. His political inspirations are Huey P. Newton and John Brown. His spiritual inspirations are Miyamoto Musashi and the historical Jesus. "In His House at Lake Merritt Dead Huey Waits, Dreaming"In this episode, Bryan and Zave talk to Maxwell about houseless, homeless, peoples housing project, emergency shelters, shelter is a human right, mental health issues, hard to get identification, sweeps destroy important documents, city wastes money, handing out tents and sleeping bags, job interviews, high rate of queer youth, capitalist politics, Kaiser, Blue Cross, Phizer, Andrew Carnegie, banning the feeding of the homeless, and addiction support. All production by Cody Maxwell. Artwork by Cody Maxwell. Opening graphic assets by UlyanaStudio and Grandphic.sharkfyn.com/maxwells-kitchen-podcast

Backdoor podcast
Basketmercato: ribaltone a Treviso, torna Vildoza e John Brown?

Backdoor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 18:30


Torna il nostro classico appuntamento settimanale sul basketmercato con Orazio Cauchi per parlare di tutti i temi importanti, trattative e rumors.Questi i temi:Olivier Hanlan-Valencia, c'è la firma John Brown si libera dall'UNICS ma è troppo tardi per la firma in Australia Luca Vildoza torna in NBA e firma con i Milwaukee BucksTreviso, via Menettti, arriva Marcelo NicolaMosse in Serie A: Reggio Emilia tessera Artjoms Butjankovs, Tortona prende Fridriksson

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Afrs 016 - This Is The Story - Reluctant Fighter - John Brown

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 30:26


The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Tim Wise and Bill Boyle Episode 575

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 73:28


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Bill Boyle is a well sourced and connected businessman who lives in Washington DC with his wife and son. Bill is a trusted friend and source for me who I met after he listened and became a regular and highly respected caller of my siriusxm radio show. Bill is a voracious reader and listeners love to hear his take. I think his analysis is as sharp as anyone you will hear on radio or TV and he has well placed friends across the federal government who are always talking to him. As far as I can tell he is not in the CIA. Follow him on twitter and park at his garages. 40 mins  Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Classic Radio Theater
My Friend Irma Ep. #34

Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 65:13


Enjoy two comedy episodes of My Friend Irma A) 1/3/49 The Double Date w/ Marie Wilson B) 3/7/49 Will Al Marry Irma w/ Marie Wilson Some might remember My Friend Irma as a 1949 movie that served as the launching pad for Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. Others recall a television show of the same name but My Friend Irma originated as a radio sitcom, created by Cy Howard, that aired on CBS from 1947 to 1954. Talented comedienne Marie Wilson became synonymous with the character of Irma Peterson, the archetypal “dumb Dora.” Dragging her roommate, the sensible and often exasperated Jane Stacy (played by Cathy Lewis and later by Joan Banks), into a series of hilarious misadventures, Wilson managed the role with the skill of a Gracie Allen. Irma worked as a stenographer for a lawyer, Mr. Clyde (played by Alan Reed), and was fired on many occasions … but always re-hired within hours because the filing system made no sense to anyone other than Irma. Irma's scatterbrained character was certainly a source of comedy but she had a warmth and openness that endeared her to radio audiences. Irma's boyfriend, Al (played by John Brown), was the deadbeat most mothers preferred their daughters to avoid at all costs, but Irma was crazy about him. Jane dated her millionaire boss, Richard Rhinelander III (played by Leif Erickson), and dreamed of one day marrying him. The radio sitcom was popular enough to warrant a motion picture starring Marie Wilson and Diana Lynn, produced by Hal Wallis, followed by a sequel, My Friend Irma Goes West (1950). A newspaper comic strip (scripted for a time by Stan Lee of Marvel fame) and a series of comic books soon followed. It also made a transition to TV (1952-1954).

Backdoor podcast
Basketmercato: il colpo di Napoli, il rinnovo di Hines e il nuovo Maccabi

Backdoor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 28:45


Torna il nostro podcast di mercato con Orazio Cachi per parlare di tutte le trattative e rumors della settimana.Questi i temi:Gudaitis-Napoli, ufficiale il colpoMaccabi Tel Aviv, parte l'operazione per coach Xavi Pascual, piace anche Mateusz PonitkaMilano: saluta Moraschini, partite le trattative con Hines per il rinnovo, ma ora c'è la grana MitoglouReal Madrid, il mercato degli esterni: Raul Neto un'alternativa? Cavalli di ritorno: Satoransky e Cancar potrebbero tornare in Europa? Il futuro di John Brown: forte interesse di Barcelona e Anadolu Efes

Millennials In Ministry
Transfiguration Sunday: Jesus and John Brown (The Embodied Witness) | @kaleophx

Millennials In Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 22:11


I believe John Brown was an embodied witness of Jesus because he looked at the scriptures and saw liberation and a God of love…. And then embodied in practice what he believed the spirit of God wanted for the people of his time…FREEDOM. Now, not everybody agrees with his method of violence, and you don't have to agree with it… click here to read more. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/erin-lashley/message

History Storytime - For Kids

Sophie (age 8) and Ellie (age 6) tell the story of the inspirational life of Harriet Tubman. She was an enslaved person in America who escaped to freedom and then helped others escape too. She later fought to free other enslaved people in America.----more---- Harriet was born in the South of the United States 150 years ago. Her parents were enslaved so she too was enslaved. She was forced to work for a white family and help raise their children. When she made a mistake she was beaten. She was even beaten when the baby she had to look after cried. When she got older she was forced to do hard work in the field. Once a metal block was thrown at her head and it badly hurt her. When Harriet was older she got determined to escape. She managed to escape using a secret route called the underground railroad. At first she was in the north of the United States. However, after a while even that was not safe. So she went to live in British Canada. Although she was safe there she worried about the black people, including her family, who she had left behind. Thirteen times she journeyed back to the south to rescue people. She had lots of adventures and was nearly caught several times. However, she helped 70 enslaved people to escape. She later helped a man called John Brown who wanted to start a war to free the black enslaved people. He failed and was executed. However, a few years later a war did start. The North of the United States and the South of the United States fought. The South wanted to have their own country so they could carry on having slaves. The North did not want this. Harriet helped the North in the fighting. At first she worked as a scout for the army, using the skills she had learned helping people escape. Later she helped attack a plantation and rescued hundreds of enslaved people. The North won the civil war and the enslaved people were freed. Harriet then settled down to enjoy her retirement. In her lifetime she was mostly forgotten. She died of old age aged 90 years old. After she died she became famous as people remembered how brave she had been.   PATRONS' CLUB If you liked this episode you might like to join our Patrons' Club. We have exclusive episodes there. 

Old Time Radio Listener
The Adventures 0f Ozzie and Harriet -Retreat From Civilization

Old Time Radio Listener

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 29:27


Ever since Ozzie Nelson was a little boy his parents taught him courage, determination and a sense of honor. These are the virtues it takes to keep a promise. The Ozzie Nelson of today has the same grim determination to keep his promise to take his kids on a woodland hike even though he'd rather go to the game. David and Ricky too don't want to let their father down even though they also would rather go to the game. Harriet has a plan so that they can all go to the game without anyone breaking their promises. Duration: 29:27 Starring: Ozzie Nelson, Harriet Hilliard Nelson, John Brown, Tommy Bernard, Henry Blair, Janet Waldo, Lurene Tuttle Broadcast Date: 12th October 1947

Why We Plan
Ingredients for Business Growth: People and Process

Why We Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 25:05


In this episode of Why we Plan, John Brown, Founder of BEI, sits down with Spencer Hilligoss, CEO of Madison Investing, to discuss the importance of scaling a business. Spencer started working at a very young age working for his father and learned some hard life lessons a lot sooner than most business owners. He discusses how he used the knowledge he learned from the mistakes he made scaling his own business over a 10–15-year span. Spencer explains that even business owners without any experience scaling a business only need to focus on two things: people and process.

Thought For Today
The Clay

Thought For Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 3:14


And a very good morning to you! It is Friday, 18th March, the year 2022. And this is your friend, Angus Buchan with a thought for today. “Woe to him who strives with his Maker!”Isaiah 45:9“But now, O Lord,
 You are our Father;
We are the clay, and You our potter;
And all we are the work of Your hand.”Isaiah 64:8And then the last scripture:"For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand that we should walk in them."Ephesians 2:10Why do we contend with our Maker? How can the clay criticise the potter, the arrogance of it! It is like an ant trying to argue with an elephant. I remember an old story I heard many years ago, one of my favourite stories actually about a cowboy preacher and circuit rider. He would ride from town to town, preaching the Gospel.He was a wise old preacher, one day as he was riding along and a big dust storm came up from the west. So he stopped, he hobbled his horse, took off his saddle, put his head down on the saddle, put the saddle blanket over him and waited for the storm to pass. As he lay there he went to sleep and he had a dream. He dreamt that the angel Gabriel was standing before him, holding the Book of Life and the angel asked him, “What is your name?”And he said, “John Brown.”And he said, “I am sorry your name is not here.' John Brown was absolutely angry. He said, “I demand to speak to God.” And the angel said, “Well, I don't know if I can organise that but I will try my best. Jump on my back.” And the angel flew him to Heaven – it was amazing! He put him down on a solid floor of gold, shining gold and he lay on his face. As the preacher was going to get up he heard a voice like thunder, like raging rivers, like a hundred rivers. “Who are you and what do you want here?” With that, the petrified preacher just lay shaking on the floor of pure gold. He tried to raise himself up again and he heard the voice again: “I said, who are you? And what do you want here?" Absolutely petrified, he just lay there. He heard some steps coming behind him, wearing sandals, and then the swishing of a robe. And beautiful, big, strong hands picked him up and hugged him and a voice said, “It's okay Father, he is one of Us. John Brown is my friend.” And that wonderful voice of God said, “Okay, let him in!”Folks, we can't argue with God. We need Jesus. Go out and don't question God because He loves you very much!Have a wonderful day.God bless you and goodbye.

Be Still and Go
From Inheritance to Glory (Minister Charlene Wingate)

Be Still and Go

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 8:36


"What happens when our inheritance is the fruit of stolen land and lies, built on a history of selective truths?"There's nothing simple about it.//This episode was written and recorded by Minister Charlene Wingate. It was produced by Rev. Jim Keat. Background tracks include Button Mushrooms by Podington Bear, Battle Hymn of the Republic by Bob Minner, John Brown's Body by Gloria Jane, and Rivers by Makenna Susan.Visit www.trcnyc.org/BeStillAndGo to listen to more episodes from all five seasons of Be Still and Go.Visit www.trcnyc.org/Donate to support this podcast and other digital resources from The Riverside Church that integrate spirituality and social justice.

Fire the Canon
Optimism vs. Hope: How to Build a Better Future, with Historian Ada Palmer

Fire the Canon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 67:35


The return of our wonderful guest, author and historian Ada Palmer! (If you haven't listened to our first episode with her, scroll back a bit and listen to Romeo & Juliet & Everything else.)  This time we talk about the Black Death, Covid-19 as a historian sees it, and helping each other make a better world.  Topics include: Titus Andronicus, Romeo & Juliet, Petrarch, tranquil souls, the gayest city in Europe, cuneiform tweet tablets, jelly baby models of the Battle of Helm's Deep, Prometheus, the correct way to time travel, Machiavelli, Beethoven, Rosalind Franklin, John Brown, and hopepunk. Note: we briefly talk about autoimmune disorders, and the science is of course much more complex than we were able to get into.  If you want to read up a little, here are a couple articles: https://www.science.org/content/article/black-death-left-mark-human-genome https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6925958/

How To Love Lit Podcast
Abraham Lincoln - The Gettysburg Address - The Great Task Remaining Before Us.

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 40:09


Abraham Lincoln - The Gettysburg Address - The Great Task Remaining Before Us.   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I am Garry Shriver, and this is the How to. Love Lit Podcast.  This episode we will focus on one more American document very much connected to the Letter from Birmingham jail, but in a very special way.  This document is memorized every year by students all across the United States. It's a two minute, ten sentence speech of only 272 words.  In fact, it wasn't called a speech at all, but instead it a “few appropriate remarks” given at the conclusion of a  full day of ceremony dedicating America's first national cemetery.  Today it is called the Gettysburg Address given by the 16th American president, President Abraham Lincoln.  Lincoln, very unusually accepted the invitation extended to him by a young lawyer by the name of David Wills who had been tasked with organizing the event.  One unusual thing was that on the day of the speech, although he diidn't know it yet, he had an early stage of small pox and was sick. His speech wasn't even the highlight of the event.  That honor would go to former governor and renowned orator Edward Everett.  It was received by the press with typical reviews- the democratic press denounced it, the republican papers praised it- as Lincoln was a Republican, that was to be expected.  However, today the Gettysburg Addressed is engraved inside the Lincoln Memorial, and the Lincoln Memorial has become the most visited location in the United States Nation's capital.  Over 7 million people from around the world are expected to visit it next year.  It is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and everyone who visits it will read the words spoken on that day.      The question we want consider today is why?  Is it because it's such a brilliant example of sophisticated parallelism- it is that, btw- containing ten sentences of complex structure organizing and juxtaposing complicated idea after idea- in simplified single syllable prose that was both easy to listen to and highly understandable.      Christy, as interesting as that is for an English teacher, I'm sure that's not that reason.      True- a second idea I've heard thrown away is that it's famous just because it is short and we like Lincoln.  It was easily printed that day, and newspapers carried it in its entirety around the world.  It's something easy to make kids memorize in school, and we've just gotten used to memorizing it.      Well, of course that's true too, and in that case, and by that logic, it elevatates this speech to the level of Shakespeare.  Many of us were forced to learn, “But soft what light through yonder window breaks” from Romeo or Juliet or the the lines I've seen you force on students from Julius Caesar, “Friends, Romans, Countrymen, Lend me your ear”.  But, of course, as a historian, I just don't think the literary reasons are enough to account for its enduring and even transcendental appeal.      Okay, well, we could look at the history.  Of course, there are historical reasons that it's famous.  The Battle of Gettysburg was the bloodiest engagement in the entire Civil War.  The statistics speak for themselves, after only three days of fighting, over 170,000 casualities- of those 53,000 soldiers lay dead on the ground.  It's unimaginable the level of death.    And, I guess, even I must adeit,  that's more compelling than parallelism.  But of course, that really is only interesting to those of us who are American.  Those are signicant to the history of this country, and of course that matters, but we would like to suggest that the reasons for reading and thinking about the Gettysburg Addres are much more transcendental.- This document, although an American one is belongs not only to the American continent.  The words are universal and it is because of their universality are worthy of our attention and analysis.  The Gettysburg address, although over 150 years old, resonates with practicality even in regard to today's political and philosophical discourse.  So Garry, before we address the transcendent qualities of these two paragraphs, let's begin by putting the Gettysburg address in its original historical context.     For sure, and, of course, I agree completely that it is very much transcendental in its appeal- and I want to to suggest that from the moment it was uttered, the audience knew immediately that it was important and perhaps even immortal.  There are many myths surrounding the origins of this address.  There's one that says he composed it on the train on a napkin; another that he wrote it on an envelope- both totally untrue.  Lincoln likely started writing it not long after the battle ended in July.  There's also stories that no one cared about it at the time or recognized its greatness.  That's also not true.  On November 19, 1863, the day Lincoln delivered these words, he got up to speak, and began to read his two minute speech very slowly.  However, he was interrupted five times by spontaneous applause. (by most accounts, the number of interruptions is still in dispute), but regardless- he's literally being stopped as people considered each idea.     Well, if that's the case, I don't understand why anyone would suggest, he wasn't good or well-received.      The first reason is because it's generally believed that when Lincoln finished speaking, in typical Lincoln fashion,  he turned to Marshal Lamon, a US marshal there, and said,: "Lamon, that speech won't scour! It is a flat failure and the people are disappointed."       That sounds brutal,     Well, it does but if you study Lincoln, you quickly see that self-depricating comments like that are normal for him.  He was always underselling his rhetoric, even though he was extremely skilled at it, to the point that he had famously took down the more educated more renowned Stephen Douglass in their famous debates ..  So, you can't go by Lincoln.  Instead of going by Lincoln's off handed remark, a better judge would be the opinion of the key note speaker of the event, Edward Everett- the man man universally considered the undisputed greatest orator of his generation.  Everett had been center stage for the entire day and had been given two hours to speak., but his opinion of Lincoln's appropriate remarks could be summarized by a comment Everett himself made to Lincoln a bit later, "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes."- and yes- Everett's speech was all of two hours.        Wow. Clearly, Lincoln made an impression on his immediate audience.  So, let's remember who that audience was,- obviously there were politicians, dignitaries and journalists- this was the first time in the United States that the federal government had built a cemetery, so that was a big deal.  But beyond the VIP guests, there were thousands of Union soldiers, relatives of soldiers, and regular people who lived in the town of Gettysburg- which was actually a bustling county seat, even if only 2000 residents today seems small.  There were people there whose friends and family members were literally buried in the dirt before them. Of the 15,000 people in attendance that day, none would escape the personal pain of loss represented by that cemetery.  For many of us today, it's strange to think of 15,000 people coming out to a cemetery dedication, even an important one, even one where the president would be at.  In fact, the American Civil War itself is difficult to understand.  Of course, we know it was about slavery, we also know that most of it was fought in the South, but realistically, and almost all of the casualities were white men.  This is not an uprising of people liberating themselves at all- it's not a revolution or a rebellion.      No, there had been a few slave rebellions, notably Nat Turner, but he'd had no weapons. More recently and more realistically and more frightening to the South was the one John Brown almost pulled one off at Harper's Ferry in 1859.      But those events were before and  not part of Civil War  It was the South that succeeded, not the North.  Lincoln was in favor of preserving the Union, not splitting it up, and although he was against slavery,  he was willing, at least in the beginning to be satisfied by just keeping it from expanding.      True, he was also in favor of compensated emancipation.  His idea was to emancipate the slaves by buying them from slave owners for $400 a person- but this was something the Southern States rejected.      Well and because Gettysburg isn't even in the South; you'd image that slavery would feel far away.- the way slave labor feels today.  We don't actually see it, so we tend to dismiss it.  There were no slaves in Gettysburg.  And finally, a  fact, I learned when moving to the the South but interesting to understand, even to this day many in the South don't claim that the Civil War was a war over slavery.    True- there is a lot to be confused about the Civil War in general and the Battle of Gettysburg particularly.  Let's go with the easy stuff than get to the most complicated.  First of all- location- Gettysburg is in Pennsylvania.  Pennsylvania, if you look on a map is between Maryland to the South and New York to the North.  It's 82 north of Washington DC.   BTW, just for a reference Washington DC, which of course is the capital of the North is basically halfway between Gettysburg and Richmond, the capital of the South is in Virginia- Gettyburg is a little under a two hour drive to DC and Richmond a little over two hours- depending on the traffic, of course.       So if DC is halfway between Richmond and Gettysburg, it seems kind of out of the way for the. South to be invading it.      Well, that's true too, but let's go back to  the issue of why they were fighting to begin with.  For a Long time, on both sides of the Atlantic that was up for debate.     On December 20, 1860, a special convention in South Carolina unanimously voted to succeed. Now remember, the Gettysburg address isn't until 1863, but even after 1863, the US will fight for two more years.  Not long after that, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana left and eventually a total of 11 Southern states seceded from the United States.      If you had asked any Southern farm boy fighting on the ground why he was fighting, he would have likely told you he was fighting for “States Rights”- and of course that was true.    Most of the young men fighting in the field were not Slave holders, nor would ever be.  But the aristocratic Southern leaders who did own slaves and who controlled all of the money, the media, and the assets wanted the right  to control their way of life.  They preached that democracy itself- was under siege because of the election of the radical Republican anti-slavery Mid-western uneducated redneck lawyer Abraham Lincoln.  Lincoln's election marked the first time that a president had been elected without the vote of a single Southern State, and it was foreseeable that the South would never again be represented as they had been in the past- after all there were more states now and that trend was growing.      So, Lincoln was the threat to slavery.      Yes- but it went beyond that really, if you can believe that.  We can't just look at the Civil War from an American perspective- the entire world was watching- and monarchies across the ocean were watching nervously.  And this is where our arrogance of the presence really has a difficult time conceptualizing a world 150 years.  In 1860, there weren't democracies around world, and in fact, the whole idea  of democracy seemed ridiculous for most of the world.  It is true that African-Americans could not vote in America, nor could women, but most American men were given a voice as to their future- and America was the only place this had happened up to this point.  Otto von Bismarck who led the great nation of Germany during their reunification days and beyond voiced the general opinion of many leaders on the continent when he said that in his early life his tendencies were all toward republicanism, but he had discovered when you have governed men for several years , that a liberal will be transformed from a Republican to a monarchist.”  He, along with most on planet earth on that time, believed you could not build a great nation or build prosperity without authority.  Leaders had to be authoritarian to be successful- and many great leaders who had built great kingdoms around the world over the course of human history- had proven that to be true.  The generally accepted idea, of the inhabitants on our planet,  to quote Orwell is that some people really are are more equal than others, and those who are the most equal are entitled to commensurate wealth and power.  The reason I reference Bismarck and European history is that the European experience of the 1840s seemed to confirm this.  Democratic uprising after uprising faltered. - Of course, most of us are familiar with the French Revolution which sadly descended into chaos and then tyranny with Napoleon.  That's a predominant example, but it's not the only one.  Spain and Russia had both had democratic uprisings come and fail.  The Revolutions of 1848 had seen Republican uprisings all over the continent, but they all failed.  Monarchs held the authority- monarchs knew what was best.  Regular people were not smart enough, not informed enough, nor disciplined enough to rule themselves.  Average people needed to be told what to do and what to think- and most importantly they needed to stay in their place.  And so…The European monarchs were filled with schadenfreude to watch the red-neck, ill mannered, uncouth average under-educated Americans blow up their entire democratic experiment with war not even 100 years after Thomas Jefferson arrogantly pronounced to the European aristocracy the new idea that all men were created equal and they were going to build a country on that principle.  The Spanish ambassador wrote back to Queen Isabella, “The Union is in agony and Our mission is not to delay its death.”      And the very idea that President Lincoln, would risk the entire experiment  under the banner of equality and the equality of African-Americans- slaves- no less- was absurd to consider, and to watch the ship wreck would be a relief.  For most of the world, the Southern model of aristocratic control of resources, the authority and rule of those who know better was the proven model- and even though most European countries did not support slavery up until the Emancipation Proclamation and then the Gettysburg address, they didn't see the Civil War as entirely about that.  The south was very much an oligarchy that was directly descended from European style feudalism.     So, by States rights, we mean more than slavery but including slavery.      For sure at the beginning of the war, but by 1863, and really through the rhetoric of the Gettysburg Address- Lincoln shifted the war from being about states rights.  He made the central issue one of human equality.  If America was to be a land of liberty, it would be about every man's God-given right to be who can make himself to be before a just and omniscient God.  It made no sense for half of it to own slaves.  It's not about the states at all- it's about the people- the people who inhabited the land of liberty.     And had this always been Lincoln's personal belief- in the equality of every human before God?    That's always been the question, although, I don't even know if it's a fair question.  When we think about Thomas Jefferson who wrote the Declaration of Independence, for example, we think about his personal inconsistency of owning slaves.  But, I think, and I recommend going back and listening to our episode on the Declaration of Independence, that even Jefferson's ideals evolved and though he never fully realized them in his personal life, he did believe them, If Jefferson and Washington can be called the Founding Fathers of the American experiment, which they are, Lincoln  led the country to make the personal sacrifices to establish it.        In 1861, Lincoln became the 16th president of the United States.  If we look at his ideas on slavery and equality from those early years, we can see that he always hated the idea of owning people, and he always believed in economic equality.        What we can't see for sure is that he believed in social equality like we understand it today. But. he always hated human bondage.  He believed that African-Americans should be allowed to work and have financial freedom to build their own lives.  He spoke of African-Americans as citizens and as humans.  But, at the same time, as president, Lincoln did not believe, he had the authority to simply abolish slavery simply based on his personal convictions.  It was protected by the US constitution.  For Lincoln, it would take a constitutional amendment to free them-     Which is what eventually happened.      Yes, but by 1863, we can see through Lincoln's public statements, that he was willing to walk back the idea that he couldn't single-handedly free slaves.  He had given African-Americans equality under military law- they had the right to serve the country- and over 200,000 of them would do so by the end of the war.  The. Southern States were in rebellion, and because of that, the North had the right to seize property as a wartime concession.  If slaves were property, he would seize them and free them.  And, so he did.  In September of 1862, five days after the battle of Antietam- the first Union non-loss and the single deadliest day of the Civil War, Lincoln makes the statement that as of January 1, 1863, “all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free."  It is called the Emancipation Proclamation. The language was charged , but in reality, it had no real authority.  It only applied to the states in rebellion, and there wasn't any real way of enforcing it besides the war they were already waging,  But what it did do, was signal what was coming, should the South fail to succeed things would change drastically.     And so we finally get to Gettysburg.  The Battle of Gettysburg would come in July after the Emancipation Proclamation.  So, how  and why does the Southern Army get all the way to Pennsylvania?.       General Robert E Lee, who was the most important leader of the South, the leader of the notorious Southern Army decided time was not on the side of the South  They needed the people in the North to feel the pain of the war;  they needed to face the North on Northern soil.      And, an election year was coming up. There was northern opposition to the war called the copperhead movement. Lee believed a quick strike victory in northern territory would fuel the anti-war copperheaad movement, so there was a political motivation as well.    The Southern Army had better leadership and their troops were more skilled.  The problem was that the North had more of everything- else more men, more guns, more food, more resources.  The war was going on too long.  Lee felt he must bring the war to the homes of the people in the North, so they would demand that Lincoln relinquish.  It was a gamble, but he marched his army of 75,000 well-trained battle hardened soldiers onto Pennsylvania soil.  General George Meade was Lincoln's choice to lead the Union Army of the Potomac to confront them- although they didn't really know for sure they would be meeting in Gettysburg, they knew there was going to be a clash.  The Union Army had around 85,000 soldiers.      After three days of fighting, the confederates lost 23,000 men; the Union lost 28,000- but the confederate army was forced to retreat out of Pennsylvania.  So, in theory Gettysburg was Union victory, but in reality who wins with so much death- it was a pyrrhic victory at best.    Exactly, and we must understand that the losses were felt.  12 Southern states and 18 northern states sent troops to Gettysburg.  Every family at this point in the war had experienced personal loss to some degree.  In fact, just to put the entire Civil War in perspective, more Americans died in the Civil war than in World War 1, 2, Vietnam, Korea, and Afghanistan combined.  At the time there was an estimated 620,000 deaths out of a population of 31 million, modern day historians, however, looking back at the historical record claim that number is likely closer to 820,000- in other words 1 out of every 10 white American males was dead within those four years.     And so standing at that cemetery dedication in November of 1863 looking out at the ones who had survived was the man mostly responsible for the carnage- and not just the carnage of Gettysburg, but for all of it and for the more that was to come.  Lincoln wanted to be at that cemetery dedication and he felt compelled to put in words the WHY.  He had been thinking on what to say for a while.  How could he ever explain what was worth so much death?  For an answer like that, one must think transcendentallym and so what he began to speech, he uttered familiar words,  words  easily recognizable  as coming from the diction and speech patterns of the commonly read and understood King James version of the Bible.     “Four Score and Seven Years ago, our Fathers brought forth on This Continent a New nation conceived in Liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”      Psalm 90:10 in the Bible reads “ The days of our years are threescore years and ten;  and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years,”     The subtext may be lost on us, most who have never even opened the King James Version of the Bible, but in 1863, there is no one who would have not immediately recognized the phrase “score” meaning 20 years- that's how the bible talked.  The allusion and subtext is obvious.    Our lives our short- counted in scores—the life of our country is too- four score- a human life- but when we came to this country, when our fathers came here, they came here on a Biblical principle that every man was created by God and by virtue of God's creation we are all of equal value.  I am of value- and therefore- so are you.  It's about African-American slaves- yes- but it's about all of us- if they are not equal- than no one is.  That's the subtext.    And let me add this, it wasn't just the founding fathers that came to America.  Immigration to America during the Civil War years was in full throttle, which is strange if you think about it.  1 out of every 4 Union soldier was a first generation immigrant.  Think about that, thousands came to America, got off the boat,  picked up a gun, and fought for a country they had barely met.  Why do that? Why did they leave Europe?  Was it because of that very promise of equality?  I think it's likely. Many came because of a promise- this promise.    Now we are engaged in a great Civil War, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure.     See, he's addressing the idea of republicanism or democracy in general.  They told us it wasn't possible.  Is it true that a bunch of under-educated rednecks carving out their own lives on their own terms- on the terms that every one is truly equal, is it true that such a group of people can exist?      We are met on a great battlefield of that war.  We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live.  It is all together fitting and proper that we should do this.    Let me add, this, if you go to the Gettysburg Cemetery today, you will see there is the official cemetery where all the soldiers are buried, but near it, still in the park, is another cemetery- a normal one.  This cemetery at the time of the dedication was called Citizens Cemetery.  Like most cemeteries, it has beautiful headmarkers of every shape and size- some big because the deceased is an important person, some smaller- we've all seen a cemetery- but if you look across from Citizens cemetery to the one Lincoln was dedicating,  the military one- you will see that every burial marker is the same.  The men that are buried there are not distinguished by class, status or anything- no one is more equal than the other- the 15,000 there on that inaugural day would have seen this distinction.   They would have understood that those markers represented the idea for which their loved ones died.    But, in a larger, sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground.  The Brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.      The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.    And of course, those are the most ironic lines of the entire speech.  After Lincolns' assassination in April 1865, Senator CharlesSumner of Massachusetts wrote of the Gettysburg address, “That speech, uttered at the field of Gettysburg…and now sanctified by the martyrdom of its author, is a monumental act. In the modesty of his nature he said ‘the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; but it can never forget what they did here.' He was mistaken. The world at once noted what he said, and will never cease to remember it.”    And of course, it is at this point that he changes directions in the speech.  It is not about looking back anymore.  It's not about honoring anymore- it's about moving forward.  What is this war about?  What is worth so much carnage and personal loss.  Here is the answer.     It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”    We must not quit.  We must not quit.  We must not quit.      You know, the words “under God” were not in the manuscript Lincoln used on the day.  It wasn't part of the prepared remarks.  We know he said under God because it was in the transcripts and in the copies made later, but it was not in the original version of the text.  It was spontaneious but it was not casually uttered.  In fact here at the end there are other intentional phrases that a Biblical church-goer would recognize- the idea of a new Birth is a New Testament idea from the words of Jesus Christ- the promise that every sinner can have a second chance- a redemptive moment to start again.  The phrases “resting place” , “might life”, “in vain”, “shall not perish from the earth”, are all taken from different parts of Biblical text that were recognizable.  So, why do that?  Why harken to Biblical language.  I think it's because of that last phrase- the one where he repeated the same word three times- three different way' of the people, by the people, for the people- it is about the dignity and worth of every human- you plus I.  It is the shared belief of the crowd that day, that life, liberty, freedom- it was one thing- and it was a gift from God- something the state or no person- no matter how great or powerful- had the right to take from another.  There IS something greater than any great man or human institution- and that is a creator God.  For the monotheistic audience of that day, in that crowd, Lincoln was declaring that it was not by his authority, but it was by virtue of God's authority that they gave their lives.  They had a fighting chance, if they would defend it, that their children, their neighbors and all the people of this land would indeed be free.      And of course, it is for the transcendency of this reason that when Dr. King got up to give his I Have a Dream Speech 100 years later, he would start with his own reference to that Biblical language      Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.    Yes, and when President Barak Obama got up to give his first inaugural address in 2009, he references Gettysburg, and ends his speech with these words, and I quote President Obama, “Let it be said by our children's children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God's grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.”     And of course, it is transcendent; this is not just an American ideal or even just a Christian one- although that was the exigence of Lincoln's moment .  Today, almost half the countries of the world are democracies of some sort.  Today, only a little over half of the residents of the United States claim to be Christian.  But the ideal of a government of the people, by the people and for the people- resonates in the human heart.  The proposition that all men are created equal- as limited as we have understood it at times, is still the heartbeat of many human souls.      Christy, you're starting to sound like a preacher.    HA!!  If I can sound like Lincoln, that would be a compliment.    Indeed, it would be- thank you for listening.  ladeedadeeda   

Classic Radio Theater
The Life of Riley w/ William Bendix Ep. #23

Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 64:34


Enjoy two free comedy episodes of The Life of Riley w/ William Bendix A) 10/8/48 Better Husband w/ William Bendix B) 12/8/50 Lawn-mowing Business w/ William Bendix Created by Irving Brecher, the popular family sitcom The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of Chester A. Riley, an inept blue-collar factor worker and father of two, played by screen actor William Bendix. Riley's wife, Peg, tried in vain to prevent her hot-headed husband's interventions, which only made matters worse and usually ended in an embarrassing revelation. With a tendency to try and solve non-existent problems, Riley sought advice from his best friend and next-door neighbor, Gillis, but this only led to misunderstandings. Help came from Digger O'Dell, the “friendly undertaker,” who offered gruesome theories laced with repetitive puns, brilliantly delivered by John Brown. In 1949, Universal Studios released a Life of Riley motion picture and later that same year NBC produced a TV version with Jackie Gleason playing Riley (Bendix was unable to play the role due to a contract dispute).  After 26 episodes, Gleason left the series for greener pastures and William Bendix resumed the role he'd made famous.

The Godfather and Gorney
Famous fathers: John Brown & Sheva Branch

The Godfather and Gorney

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 20:25


Adam Gorney sits down with the father of wide receivers Equanimeous, Osiris and Amon-Ra St. Brown, John Brown to discuss the successes of his three sons. He also catches up with Sheva Branch, father of USC commits Zion and Zachariah Branch, to discuss their future with the Trojans. Open - John Brown 09:19 - Sheva Branch

51 Percent
#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 31:57


On this week's 51%, we speak with University at Albany professor Dr. Janell Hobson about the life and work of Harriet Tubman, and a new project with Ms. magazine to mark Tubman's 200th birthday. We also speak with author Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts about her book Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Guests: Dr. Janell Hobson, UAlbany professor and editor of the The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project; Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You're listening to 51%, a WAMC production on women's issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I'm Jesse King. When you think of prominent women in American history, who comes to mind? Susan B. Anthony? Rosa Parks? Harriett Tubman? Well, hopefully all three and more – but Harriet Tubman is perhaps one of the most popular female figures in American history, particularly Black history. In fact, the abolitionist won a popularity contest of sorts in a 2015 poll gaging which historic woman should be the new face of the $20 bill. A redesigned bill with her likeness is set to rollout by 2030. Growing up, I was primarily taught about Harriet Tubman's work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad – but like all of us, there were many sides to her: a liberator, a nurse, a veteran of the Civil War, spy, suffragist, daughter, sister, mother, and friend. I thought it'd be nice to learn a little more about Tubman's work, who she was, and her legacy. Of course, it's Black History Month, but we're also circling Tubman's 200th birthday: she was believed to have been born Araminta Ross in late February / early March 1822. Dr. Janell Hobson, a professor of women's, gender, and sexuality studies at the University at Albany, is the impetus behind an initiative to commemorate the “Tubman 200.” The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project is a special collection of essays, poetry, artwork, and interactive pieces honoring Tubman in Ms. magazine through March 10. Hobson has been studying Tubman for years, and told me more about the magazine's guest of honor. Her story starts in Dorchester County, Maryland, when she was born - or maybe we can even go further than that. Because I know in my introductory essay, I talk about her maternal grandmother, who came from the Gold Coast of West Africa, what we now call Ghana. And her maternal grandmother was called Modesty, and she was from the Asante Tribe in Ghana, and she was brought over to Eastern Shore, Maryland through the transatlantic slave trade sometime during the American Revolutionary War period, in the 18th century. And that grandmother gave birth to her mother, who was also called Harriet - actually, Harriet Tubman renames herself when she married. She named herself after her mother, although everyone called her her mother “Rit” for short. So that is where I would start with her story, just thinking of how slavery was a kind of matrilineal heritage. And by that, I mean, most slave laws in the United States actually stipulated, they required that all children that are born to enslaved women would themselves be enslaved. So it doesn't matter who the father is - the father could be enslaved, or the father could be a free Black person, or the father could even be a white man, but if the mother is enslaved, that child will be enslaved. And that's kind of how we get this idea of race, as well as race shaped by gender politics. So what I like about Harriet Tubman's story is that she rejects that birthright outright.  And so how exactly did she work to liberate herself, and what were the driving forces of her becoming a conductor on the Underground Railroad? In 1849 is when Harriet Tubman attempts to escape from slavery. And she actually attempts to escape twice - the first time, September 17, she tries to run away with two of her brothers, but they lose their way, so they end up returning. And part of the reason why she wanted to run away is because she was being threatened with sale further south. Her owner had died earlier that year in March, and his widow was contemplating selling off her slaves to settle whatever debts she accrued in her widowhood. Harriet Tubman got wind of this and decided that, you know, if she's to go further south, she's not going to see anybody, any of her loved ones, ever again. That already happened, because she had already lost three sisters to the auction block. So she tries the first time with two brothers, they end up returning, and then sometime later on in the fall, she runs away on her own this time. She's able to kind of follow some of the instructions she had gathered about the Underground Railroad, so she's hiding out by day and follows the North Star by night. She does this 100-mile trek to Philadelphia, and that's when she's able to reach freedom. But she makes the choice to go back because she was all alone, and she could not feel herself being free when her family and friends are back in slavery. So that was very much the motivation for going back over and over again. So she made roughly 13 trips back to the south for the decade of the 1850s, and she rescues around 70 people, and was able to also pass instructions on to an equal number of other people who were able to follow her instructions to get to freedom. It does require you to think about the skills that she had. That's one of the things that I liked about the different essays we've been able to highlight in the series for this project. For example, one of our earlier articles was by Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, who is a theorist of astrophysics, and she writes about Harriet Tubman being a great astronomer. For example, being able to follow the North Star - she learned these skills from people like her father, Ben Ross, and others in her community who learned to live off the land, who learned to navigate by the night sky, navigate through the forest, being able to use the forest as a way to be able to track your way and find your way around. She's also disabled. She was severely injured when she was an adolescent, sometime between 1834 and 1836. She's on an errand to a neighborhood store, where she's actually struck accidentally - there was an overseer striking this two pound lead weight at a runaway slave, and she got in the way, and she was struck in the head and she nearly died. But from this injury, she experienced debilitating seizures, epileptic seizures, and based on some of the descriptions of what she experienced, you know, visions and strange dreams - she had out of body sensations. So some historians, I'm thinking of someone like Kate Larson, for example, who contributed, believe that she suffered from temporal lobe epilepsy. And those are some of the conditions [she faced]. So we also have to imagine, not only did she have great skill in being able to navigate her way through the night, navigate her way from Maryland to Pennsylvania, but she's also doing this as a disabled Black woman. Wow. And she also helped organize a raid, correct? Yes, Actually, because of her skills as an Underground Railroad conductor, there were those who - and that's the interesting thing about Harriet Tubman, she seems to have known so many important people. So the governor of Massachusetts immediately recommends her as someone who should be volunteering to provide service for the Union forces in the Civil War. She gets involved in the Civil War in 1862, when she is sent down to Beaufort, South Carolina, where she's working as a spy, as a scout, as a nurse, also as a cook. And so that's part of the work she was doing when she started scouting the Combahee River, South Carolina.  In 1863, June 2 1863, she becomes the first woman in U.S. history to actually lead troops and their commander in this military raid, and they're able to free 756 people. It's amazing. And that's an interesting question, I think, in terms of why is it more people don't know that about her? I think one of the ironies of that is, we know who Harriet Tubman is precisely because she agreed to dictate a biography about her life to make up for not getting paid for her services as a Civil War veteran. You mentioned in your introduction a description of Harriet Tubman by biographer Milton Sernett, saying she is a “litmus test” for diversity and inclusion. Can you tell me what you mean by that, or what he meant by that? OK, so Milton Sernett was actually referring to multiculturalism, we now call it diversity and inclusion, so I just updated that - but he actually was referring to the ways in which, when Harriet Tubman is introduced into the curriculum, we then have debates about the appropriateness for having that. And I think that it's apropos to what we're dealing with now with the different kinds of conversations we're having about inclusive education, or even the ways that a term like critical race theory gets bandied about and means different things to different people, based on their own ideas about what race and racial history means in this country. So Harriet Tubman is an interesting, I think, “litmus test,” precisely because she's the most popular Black woman in American history - right alongside Sojourner Truth and Rosa Parks, obviously, but she's definitely one of the most recognized women. So when you bring her into the conversation, it's an invitation to bring in other aspects of Black history and Black women's history. So she's a gateway in some way. And I think what's interesting about Harriet Tubman is her story ends in freedom - not only ending in freedom, it ends in liberation. She's liberating other people, whether we're talking about her going back to the slave south multiple times, or with what she was able to do during the Civil War, and free in 756 people. So she's actively engaged in fighting for freedom. She's a freedom fighter. It also forces us to see Black women, Black people in general, who have had a hand in their own freedom and in their own liberation. So that that changes the kind of narrative that you create about American history, where it's no longer about, “Oh, President Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves through the Emancipation Proclamation.” That obviously needs to be complicated when you realize, actually, if you look at those who were enslaved and who were able to free themselves, they had a hand in their own freedom. They had a hand in their own liberation. We need to recognize that, and someone like Harriet Tubman, she's living proof that people did not just passively accept the status quo. I think you might have already just touched on it, but I was gonna ask you, what do you hope readers most get out of this project? What's interesting is that for Ms. Magazine, this year is also a milestone for them. It's their 50th anniversary. They we're very much involved in the use of journalism and media for the frontlines of the feminist movement. I think it's important to recognize that, in addition to Harriet Tubman's importance to Black history, she's also important to women's history as well. She was part of the women's suffrage movement. So issues of voting rights is also part of that legacy. The week before she died - she died March 10, 1913 - the week before, March 3, was the women's national suffrage march that they had in Washington D.C. And she was already too ill to attend, but she did deliver a message through Black suffragists, specifically Mary B. Talbert, and she told the women suffragists, you know, to stand together: “Tell the women to stand together for God will not forsake us.” Now, granted, the women did not stand together - there were quite a few racist white suffragists who refused to unite with the Black women who attended, and even tried to insist that they get at the back of the line of the parade. Which is unfortunate, because that is so against the kind of message that Harriet Tubman put forth - because what's interesting about Harriet Tubman is she is very much a leader within Black communities, she's able to organize and work within her own community, but she also did really good solidarity work with other people. And there are other white abolitionists and white supporters of Black rights that she was able to work with. She was able to work with John Brown, she was able to work with William Lloyd Garrison, she was able to work with Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott. And it's because of her ability to work across those racial lines, and across the gender lines, that I think why we still know her, because so many people were willing to write about her. In addition to the series of essays, in which you can learn more about Harriet Tubman, you can also explore her whole life history - we have a very comprehensive timeline. We also have an interactive calculator to figure out just how much we actually owe Harriet Tubman for her enslaved labor. We have poetry, we have a public haiku tribute. So the public is actually invited to submit a haiku in tribute to Harriet Tubman's bicentennial. It is a birthday celebration, so we're trying to celebrate her, and to show that is part of history, but it's also very much a history that is still very living, it's very present. I think we can think of our time in 2022 as a crossroads moment, where we could either go back in time to doing things in an oppressive way, or we can actually move forward towards a more equitable future that is based on a firmer foundation of justice for all. Harriet Tubman is somebody who can actually help us in terms of getting into the right direction. Dr. Janell Hobson is the editor of the Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project out now in Ms. magazine, both online and in print, through March 10.  Our next guest is celebrating a milestone of her own. Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts has been writing professionally for roughly 20 years. She's published at least 15 works, teaches English and Black Studies at the Community College of Philadelphia, and is the founder of HeARTspace, a community to help those dealing with trauma via storytelling and the arts. To mark her 20-year career, she released her latest book at the start of Black History Month, titled Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Throughout 36 autobiographical essays, Lewis-Giggetts explores the restorative strength of joy in Black culture, and the ways in which it can be used for both personal and communal healing. “You know, Black Joy kind of came out of my personal experience. It came out of me wrestling with what joy felt like in my body, going to therapy and my therapist, like, literally asking me, ‘What does joy feel like?'  And I, you know, being 40 some-odd-years-old and like, ‘I don't know.' And so beginning to unpack that work, and then using it, really, as an entry point for looking at how Black people in general have been able to use joy as a way to resist, but also, I think, to heal from some of the trauma and some of our historical and even present day experiences.” You make it a point in the beginning of the book to differentiate between happiness and joy. So to start off, how do you define joy, and especially Black joy? Absolutely. I think happiness is, you know, that moment - let's just say I'm on the roller coaster at Six Flags, and like, I'm excited, and I'm with my family, and I'm having a good time. It tends to just show up in particular moments. I think joy is something that is ever present, even if we don't feel it, so to speak. It is always accessible to us, if we know how to access it, right? It's like, you know, how does an enslaved person still laugh, when laughter literally could have been a potential for death? It doesn't mean that they were happy about their situation, it meant that there was an underlying, almost like a spiritual undercurrent. Black joy is simply all of that human stuff within the context and the experience of Black people in America, but also globally. And so Black joy looks a little different, because it lives in the same container, if you will, of grief and trauma and all of the other experiences that are maybe not the same as other groups.  You lay out early on that Black joy can be a “mechanism for resistance, a method of resilience and a master plan for restoration.” Can you elaborate on that a little more for me? Sure. I mean, Black joy as resistance, I think, is the catchphrase that we've been hearing especially over the last couple of years or so. I think what that just means is that in the midst of protests, in the midst of the fight for rights and equality, and equity, and all those things, there are also opportunities for our joy to stand as a way of saying, “I am human.”  It is a way to fight the dehumanization that comes with racism, and discrimination, and white supremacy, and all those kinds of things. Like the protests of summer 2020, there was two things happening there: there was the confrontations with police, there was the chanting, there was the faces we saw on the media - but then there were also dancing and singing. And in Philly, there was a couple who got married right in the middle [of the protest]. So there were these, you know, this undercurrent, as I said before, of joy that was ever present. But I think that it's also the way that Black folks have always healed. When we get to resilience and restoration, what I mean is that there has always been, especially somatically in our bodies, ways that we have been able to move that trauma out of us so we can live another day. So we can take care of our family. So we can do what we need to do. So it's a resistance, but it's also the way we have always healed. I like how you also pointed out that joy should be founded on self love and compassion. Why do you think that? I think the biggest thing is it spurs longevity. That fine line between happiness and joy that I talked about, it gets really gray if joy is only experienced on a moment-by-moment basis, or we can only feel it on a moment-by-moment basis. And I think having a foundation of self-compassion, of grace, of self-love, allows for you to be always aware of where joy is, even if you're grieving and not actively able to call it up, so to speak. You're aware that it's there. The only way you know that is if you are able to see yourself differently, and I think that's what I kind of get into, especially early on in the book. Like, I want Black folks to maybe eschew or get rid of the gaze of what maybe white people, or what the government, whoever else might be thinking, and focus internally, look at our community and say, “We love each other. We love us.” And in doing so, our joy becomes more prominent. And I feel like it will add to our movements, it will make our movements have more longevity. Even more so than what it already has. So I know you touched on it a little bit earlier, but how did you personally access or discover your joy? As I said, I had a therapist who asked me, like, “What does it feel like?” And I was like, “I don't know.” So I had to begin that work. And I tell the story in the book, that I just happened to be watching a very popular television show, and I was just grinning and laughing. I'm a storyteller, so I just was happy because or, you know, experiencing joy, I think, because I was excited about the characters and the way it was being written, and the layers, and all those kinds of things. And my husband walks in, and he's like, “Something weird is going on. Let me leave.” But in that moment, I think I'm self aware enough to say, “Wait a minute, my hands feel weird. My chest is heaving, like, I'm excited, I'm happy. Ah, okay. This is what joy feels like in my body.” And not so that I can run around, I guess, telling people that - although I guess that's what I'm doing in this book - but so that when I have, as I've had recently, back-to-back losses in my family, when I am experiencing frustration or anger at the Voting Rights Act not being passed, I can call upon [it]. It's like a screenshot or a snapshot, right, that I can remember what joy felt like in my body, and I can go get it - not so that I can push the pain aside, but so I can create some balance so that I can, again, live another day. I'm very sorry to hear about your losses. Now that you are able to more easily access your joy, what are some of the other ways that you nurture it and practice self-love and self-compassion? Did writing this book open up new ways for you to do that? I think one of the things is resting. I love the Nap Ministry that's online, and how she really emphasizes rest as a way to counter the colonization, white supremacy mindset that's out there. It's a form of defiance, right? [To think that] it's not something that you earn, it's something that is your right. And I feel like I think of joy in the same way, and I think of self-love in the same way. And so, for me, it's about my morning rituals, it's about my practices - you have meditation and prayer - it's about the ways I decide to say no. And I'm still working on it, but I try to be OK with saying no. And the way I snuggle with my daughter, and I look at her, and I see myself - the free version of myself - and I take that in and sit with it, so that it becomes one with me, right? Like, I then become just as free as she is, even though I have all the stuff and all the bags. So yeah, writing the book, I think helped me to explore additional ways, things that I wasn't doing beforehand that I do try to make a conscious effort to do now.  I feel like there are a lot of conversations going on right now about mental health and self-care and self-compassion. Is there anything that you feel is sort of missing from that conversation at the moment, or something that you would like to add to that conversation? I mean, I love the fact that we're talking about it more. I love that in a lot of ways we are removing the stigma of things like therapy or therapeutic interventions, or even medication, or any of that. I love that that's happening. I think there's some decolonization work that still has to happen. There's also issues around access and privilege. I recognize my privilege as someone who can go to a therapist every week - not everybody has access to health insurance, or access to that. And you can destigmatize it all you want, but if I can't get to it just because of economic reasons or whatever…that's a barrier that I think needs to be talked about even more. I know there are people talking about it, but like, even more, and I gravitate toward that, because it disproportionately affects Black and brown folks, you know? The people who are experiencing this generational trauma, if you will, as a result of white supremacist systems, also are being limited in being able to access one of the many ways [to address it] - which, by the way, is the reason why we've come up with our own tools, including joy, to heal. Because we didn't have access to that. So I think that's probably the conversation I would like to see more of. While you were writing this book, was there a part that was particularly special or therapeutic to you? I think the thread that moves me the most, when I think about the essays, are the ones where I talk about my grandmother, and my great grandmother, and just my ancestors in general. You know, it's easy - and necessary, in a lot of ways - to talk about the hardships and the trauma, and what maybe they didn't have access to, or didn't know. But what I loved was being able to explore what they did know, and what they passed down that wasn't trauma. The generational joy that they gave me, the ways to see the world. Writing about my grandmother, and how she traveled the world working for this family - but really retained her sense of self, right? She wasn't going to buy into any stereotypical images of who she should be as a caretaker for a prominent white family. She was very much herself, and taught me how to reinvent myself over and over again. So those were the stories I'm grateful to have written, that I had the chance to write.  Overall, what do you hope readers take away from your book? I hope that by reading my story, they will be able to turn inward and unpack their own story, and begin to think about, or figure out, what joy feels like in their own bodies. And, you know, begin to work at accessing it when they need it to counter the grief - or, you know, not even to counter, but to allow that joy to live alongside all the other emotions that they have. So, if people are doing that kind of work as they're processing my essays, then I think my job is done. Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts is the author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration, out now on Gallery Books.  You've been listening to 51%. 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by me, Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is “Lolita” by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. A big thanks to Dr. Janell Hobson, Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, and you for tuning in. You can also find us on Twitter and Instagram @51percentradio. Let us know what you think or if you have a story you'd like to share as well. Until next week, I'm Jesse King for 51%.

51 Percent
#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 31:57


On this week's 51%, we speak with University at Albany professor Dr. Janell Hobson about the life and work of Harriet Tubman, and a new project with Ms. magazine to mark Tubman's 200th birthday. We also speak with author Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts about her book Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Guests: Dr. Janell Hobson, UAlbany professor and editor of the The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project; Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You're listening to 51%, a WAMC production on women's issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I'm Jesse King. When you think of prominent women in American history, who comes to mind? Susan B. Anthony? Rosa Parks? Harriett Tubman? Well, hopefully all three and more – but Harriet Tubman is perhaps one of the most popular female figures in American history, particularly Black history. In fact, the abolitionist won a popularity contest of sorts in a 2015 poll gaging which historic woman should be the new face of the $20 bill. A redesigned bill with her likeness is set to rollout by 2030. Growing up, I was primarily taught about Harriet Tubman's work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad – but like all of us, there were many sides to her: a liberator, a nurse, a veteran of the Civil War, spy, suffragist, daughter, sister, mother, and friend. I thought it'd be nice to learn a little more about Tubman's work, who she was, and her legacy. Of course, it's Black History Month, but we're also circling Tubman's 200th birthday: she was believed to have been born Araminta Ross in late February / early March 1822. Dr. Janell Hobson, a professor of women's, gender, and sexuality studies at the University at Albany, is the impetus behind an initiative to commemorate the “Tubman 200.” The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project is a special collection of essays, poetry, artwork, and interactive pieces honoring Tubman in Ms. magazine through March 10. Hobson has been studying Tubman for years, and told me more about the magazine's guest of honor. Her story starts in Dorchester County, Maryland, when she was born - or maybe we can even go further than that. Because I know in my introductory essay, I talk about her maternal grandmother, who came from the Gold Coast of West Africa, what we now call Ghana. And her maternal grandmother was called Modesty, and she was from the Asante Tribe in Ghana, and she was brought over to Eastern Shore, Maryland through the transatlantic slave trade sometime during the American Revolutionary War period, in the 18th century. And that grandmother gave birth to her mother, who was also called Harriet - actually, Harriet Tubman renames herself when she married. She named herself after her mother, although everyone called her her mother “Rit” for short. So that is where I would start with her story, just thinking of how slavery was a kind of matrilineal heritage. And by that, I mean, most slave laws in the United States actually stipulated, they required that all children that are born to enslaved women would themselves be enslaved. So it doesn't matter who the father is - the father could be enslaved, or the father could be a free Black person, or the father could even be a white man, but if the mother is enslaved, that child will be enslaved. And that's kind of how we get this idea of race, as well as race shaped by gender politics. So what I like about Harriet Tubman's story is that she rejects that birthright outright.  And so how exactly did she work to liberate herself, and what were the driving forces of her becoming a conductor on the Underground Railroad? In 1849 is when Harriet Tubman attempts to escape from slavery. And she actually attempts to escape twice - the first time, September 17, she tries to run away with two of her brothers, but they lose their way, so they end up returning. And part of the reason why she wanted to run away is because she was being threatened with sale further south. Her owner had died earlier that year in March, and his widow was contemplating selling off her slaves to settle whatever debts she accrued in her widowhood. Harriet Tubman got wind of this and decided that, you know, if she's to go further south, she's not going to see anybody, any of her loved ones, ever again. That already happened, because she had already lost three sisters to the auction block. So she tries the first time with two brothers, they end up returning, and then sometime later on in the fall, she runs away on her own this time. She's able to kind of follow some of the instructions she had gathered about the Underground Railroad, so she's hiding out by day and follows the North Star by night. She does this 100-mile trek to Philadelphia, and that's when she's able to reach freedom. But she makes the choice to go back because she was all alone, and she could not feel herself being free when her family and friends are back in slavery. So that was very much the motivation for going back over and over again. So she made roughly 13 trips back to the south for the decade of the 1850s, and she rescues around 70 people, and was able to also pass instructions on to an equal number of other people who were able to follow her instructions to get to freedom. It does require you to think about the skills that she had. That's one of the things that I liked about the different essays we've been able to highlight in the series for this project. For example, one of our earlier articles was by Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, who is a theorist of astrophysics, and she writes about Harriet Tubman being a great astronomer. For example, being able to follow the North Star - she learned these skills from people like her father, Ben Ross, and others in her community who learned to live off the land, who learned to navigate by the night sky, navigate through the forest, being able to use the forest as a way to be able to track your way and find your way around. She's also disabled. She was severely injured when she was an adolescent, sometime between 1834 and 1836. She's on an errand to a neighborhood store, where she's actually struck accidentally - there was an overseer striking this two pound lead weight at a runaway slave, and she got in the way, and she was struck in the head and she nearly died. But from this injury, she experienced debilitating seizures, epileptic seizures, and based on some of the descriptions of what she experienced, you know, visions and strange dreams - she had out of body sensations. So some historians, I'm thinking of someone like Kate Larson, for example, who contributed, believe that she suffered from temporal lobe epilepsy. And those are some of the conditions [she faced]. So we also have to imagine, not only did she have great skill in being able to navigate her way through the night, navigate her way from Maryland to Pennsylvania, but she's also doing this as a disabled Black woman. Wow. And she also helped organize a raid, correct? Yes, Actually, because of her skills as an Underground Railroad conductor, there were those who - and that's the interesting thing about Harriet Tubman, she seems to have known so many important people. So the governor of Massachusetts immediately recommends her as someone who should be volunteering to provide service for the Union forces in the Civil War. She gets involved in the Civil War in 1862, when she is sent down to Beaufort, South Carolina, where she's working as a spy, as a scout, as a nurse, also as a cook. And so that's part of the work she was doing when she started scouting the Combahee River, South Carolina.  In 1863, June 2 1863, she becomes the first woman in U.S. history to actually lead troops and their commander in this military raid, and they're able to free 756 people. It's amazing. And that's an interesting question, I think, in terms of why is it more people don't know that about her? I think one of the ironies of that is, we know who Harriet Tubman is precisely because she agreed to dictate a biography about her life to make up for not getting paid for her services as a Civil War veteran. You mentioned in your introduction a description of Harriet Tubman by biographer Milton Sernett, saying she is a “litmus test” for diversity and inclusion. Can you tell me what you mean by that, or what he meant by that? OK, so Milton Sernett was actually referring to multiculturalism, we now call it diversity and inclusion, so I just updated that - but he actually was referring to the ways in which, when Harriet Tubman is introduced into the curriculum, we then have debates about the appropriateness for having that. And I think that it's apropos to what we're dealing with now with the different kinds of conversations we're having about inclusive education, or even the ways that a term like critical race theory gets bandied about and means different things to different people, based on their own ideas about what race and racial history means in this country. So Harriet Tubman is an interesting, I think, “litmus test,” precisely because she's the most popular Black woman in American history - right alongside Sojourner Truth and Rosa Parks, obviously, but she's definitely one of the most recognized women. So when you bring her into the conversation, it's an invitation to bring in other aspects of Black history and Black women's history. So she's a gateway in some way. And I think what's interesting about Harriet Tubman is her story ends in freedom - not only ending in freedom, it ends in liberation. She's liberating other people, whether we're talking about her going back to the slave south multiple times, or with what she was able to do during the Civil War, and free in 756 people. So she's actively engaged in fighting for freedom. She's a freedom fighter. It also forces us to see Black women, Black people in general, who have had a hand in their own freedom and in their own liberation. So that that changes the kind of narrative that you create about American history, where it's no longer about, “Oh, President Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves through the Emancipation Proclamation.” That obviously needs to be complicated when you realize, actually, if you look at those who were enslaved and who were able to free themselves, they had a hand in their own freedom. They had a hand in their own liberation. We need to recognize that, and someone like Harriet Tubman, she's living proof that people did not just passively accept the status quo. I think you might have already just touched on it, but I was gonna ask you, what do you hope readers most get out of this project? What's interesting is that for Ms. Magazine, this year is also a milestone for them. It's their 50th anniversary. They we're very much involved in the use of journalism and media for the frontlines of the feminist movement. I think it's important to recognize that, in addition to Harriet Tubman's importance to Black history, she's also important to women's history as well. She was part of the women's suffrage movement. So issues of voting rights is also part of that legacy. The week before she died - she died March 10, 1913 - the week before, March 3, was the women's national suffrage march that they had in Washington D.C. And she was already too ill to attend, but she did deliver a message through Black suffragists, specifically Mary B. Talbert, and she told the women suffragists, you know, to stand together: “Tell the women to stand together for God will not forsake us.” Now, granted, the women did not stand together - there were quite a few racist white suffragists who refused to unite with the Black women who attended, and even tried to insist that they get at the back of the line of the parade. Which is unfortunate, because that is so against the kind of message that Harriet Tubman put forth - because what's interesting about Harriet Tubman is she is very much a leader within Black communities, she's able to organize and work within her own community, but she also did really good solidarity work with other people. And there are other white abolitionists and white supporters of Black rights that she was able to work with. She was able to work with John Brown, she was able to work with William Lloyd Garrison, she was able to work with Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott. And it's because of her ability to work across those racial lines, and across the gender lines, that I think why we still know her, because so many people were willing to write about her. In addition to the series of essays, in which you can learn more about Harriet Tubman, you can also explore her whole life history - we have a very comprehensive timeline. We also have an interactive calculator to figure out just how much we actually owe Harriet Tubman for her enslaved labor. We have poetry, we have a public haiku tribute. So the public is actually invited to submit a haiku in tribute to Harriet Tubman's bicentennial. It is a birthday celebration, so we're trying to celebrate her, and to show that is part of history, but it's also very much a history that is still very living, it's very present. I think we can think of our time in 2022 as a crossroads moment, where we could either go back in time to doing things in an oppressive way, or we can actually move forward towards a more equitable future that is based on a firmer foundation of justice for all. Harriet Tubman is somebody who can actually help us in terms of getting into the right direction. Dr. Janell Hobson is the editor of the Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project out now in Ms. magazine, both online and in print, through March 10.  Our next guest is celebrating a milestone of her own. Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts has been writing professionally for roughly 20 years. She's published at least 15 works, teaches English and Black Studies at the Community College of Philadelphia, and is the founder of HeARTspace, a community to help those dealing with trauma via storytelling and the arts. To mark her 20-year career, she released her latest book at the start of Black History Month, titled Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Throughout 36 autobiographical essays, Lewis-Giggetts explores the restorative strength of joy in Black culture, and the ways in which it can be used for both personal and communal healing. “You know, Black Joy kind of came out of my personal experience. It came out of me wrestling with what joy felt like in my body, going to therapy and my therapist, like, literally asking me, ‘What does joy feel like?'  And I, you know, being 40 some-odd-years-old and like, ‘I don't know.' And so beginning to unpack that work, and then using it, really, as an entry point for looking at how Black people in general have been able to use joy as a way to resist, but also, I think, to heal from some of the trauma and some of our historical and even present day experiences.” You make it a point in the beginning of the book to differentiate between happiness and joy. So to start off, how do you define joy, and especially Black joy? Absolutely. I think happiness is, you know, that moment - let's just say I'm on the roller coaster at Six Flags, and like, I'm excited, and I'm with my family, and I'm having a good time. It tends to just show up in particular moments. I think joy is something that is ever present, even if we don't feel it, so to speak. It is always accessible to us, if we know how to access it, right? It's like, you know, how does an enslaved person still laugh, when laughter literally could have been a potential for death? It doesn't mean that they were happy about their situation, it meant that there was an underlying, almost like a spiritual undercurrent. Black joy is simply all of that human stuff within the context and the experience of Black people in America, but also globally. And so Black joy looks a little different, because it lives in the same container, if you will, of grief and trauma and all of the other experiences that are maybe not the same as other groups.  You lay out early on that Black joy can be a “mechanism for resistance, a method of resilience and a master plan for restoration.” Can you elaborate on that a little more for me? Sure. I mean, Black joy as resistance, I think, is the catchphrase that we've been hearing especially over the last couple of years or so. I think what that just means is that in the midst of protests, in the midst of the fight for rights and equality, and equity, and all those things, there are also opportunities for our joy to stand as a way of saying, “I am human.”  It is a way to fight the dehumanization that comes with racism, and discrimination, and white supremacy, and all those kinds of things. Like the protests of summer 2020, there was two things happening there: there was the confrontations with police, there was the chanting, there was the faces we saw on the media - but then there were also dancing and singing. And in Philly, there was a couple who got married right in the middle [of the protest]. So there were these, you know, this undercurrent, as I said before, of joy that was ever present. But I think that it's also the way that Black folks have always healed. When we get to resilience and restoration, what I mean is that there has always been, especially somatically in our bodies, ways that we have been able to move that trauma out of us so we can live another day. So we can take care of our family. So we can do what we need to do. So it's a resistance, but it's also the way we have always healed. I like how you also pointed out that joy should be founded on self love and compassion. Why do you think that? I think the biggest thing is it spurs longevity. That fine line between happiness and joy that I talked about, it gets really gray if joy is only experienced on a moment-by-moment basis, or we can only feel it on a moment-by-moment basis. And I think having a foundation of self-compassion, of grace, of self-love, allows for you to be always aware of where joy is, even if you're grieving and not actively able to call it up, so to speak. You're aware that it's there. The only way you know that is if you are able to see yourself differently, and I think that's what I kind of get into, especially early on in the book. Like, I want Black folks to maybe eschew or get rid of the gaze of what maybe white people, or what the government, whoever else might be thinking, and focus internally, look at our community and say, “We love each other. We love us.” And in doing so, our joy becomes more prominent. And I feel like it will add to our movements, it will make our movements have more longevity. Even more so than what it already has. So I know you touched on it a little bit earlier, but how did you personally access or discover your joy? As I said, I had a therapist who asked me, like, “What does it feel like?” And I was like, “I don't know.” So I had to begin that work. And I tell the story in the book, that I just happened to be watching a very popular television show, and I was just grinning and laughing. I'm a storyteller, so I just was happy because or, you know, experiencing joy, I think, because I was excited about the characters and the way it was being written, and the layers, and all those kinds of things. And my husband walks in, and he's like, “Something weird is going on. Let me leave.” But in that moment, I think I'm self aware enough to say, “Wait a minute, my hands feel weird. My chest is heaving, like, I'm excited, I'm happy. Ah, okay. This is what joy feels like in my body.” And not so that I can run around, I guess, telling people that - although I guess that's what I'm doing in this book - but so that when I have, as I've had recently, back-to-back losses in my family, when I am experiencing frustration or anger at the Voting Rights Act not being passed, I can call upon [it]. It's like a screenshot or a snapshot, right, that I can remember what joy felt like in my body, and I can go get it - not so that I can push the pain aside, but so I can create some balance so that I can, again, live another day. I'm very sorry to hear about your losses. Now that you are able to more easily access your joy, what are some of the other ways that you nurture it and practice self-love and self-compassion? Did writing this book open up new ways for you to do that? I think one of the things is resting. I love the Nap Ministry that's online, and how she really emphasizes rest as a way to counter the colonization, white supremacy mindset that's out there. It's a form of defiance, right? [To think that] it's not something that you earn, it's something that is your right. And I feel like I think of joy in the same way, and I think of self-love in the same way. And so, for me, it's about my morning rituals, it's about my practices - you have meditation and prayer - it's about the ways I decide to say no. And I'm still working on it, but I try to be OK with saying no. And the way I snuggle with my daughter, and I look at her, and I see myself - the free version of myself - and I take that in and sit with it, so that it becomes one with me, right? Like, I then become just as free as she is, even though I have all the stuff and all the bags. So yeah, writing the book, I think helped me to explore additional ways, things that I wasn't doing beforehand that I do try to make a conscious effort to do now.  I feel like there are a lot of conversations going on right now about mental health and self-care and self-compassion. Is there anything that you feel is sort of missing from that conversation at the moment, or something that you would like to add to that conversation? I mean, I love the fact that we're talking about it more. I love that in a lot of ways we are removing the stigma of things like therapy or therapeutic interventions, or even medication, or any of that. I love that that's happening. I think there's some decolonization work that still has to happen. There's also issues around access and privilege. I recognize my privilege as someone who can go to a therapist every week - not everybody has access to health insurance, or access to that. And you can destigmatize it all you want, but if I can't get to it just because of economic reasons or whatever…that's a barrier that I think needs to be talked about even more. I know there are people talking about it, but like, even more, and I gravitate toward that, because it disproportionately affects Black and brown folks, you know? The people who are experiencing this generational trauma, if you will, as a result of white supremacist systems, also are being limited in being able to access one of the many ways [to address it] - which, by the way, is the reason why we've come up with our own tools, including joy, to heal. Because we didn't have access to that. So I think that's probably the conversation I would like to see more of. While you were writing this book, was there a part that was particularly special or therapeutic to you? I think the thread that moves me the most, when I think about the essays, are the ones where I talk about my grandmother, and my great grandmother, and just my ancestors in general. You know, it's easy - and necessary, in a lot of ways - to talk about the hardships and the trauma, and what maybe they didn't have access to, or didn't know. But what I loved was being able to explore what they did know, and what they passed down that wasn't trauma. The generational joy that they gave me, the ways to see the world. Writing about my grandmother, and how she traveled the world working for this family - but really retained her sense of self, right? She wasn't going to buy into any stereotypical images of who she should be as a caretaker for a prominent white family. She was very much herself, and taught me how to reinvent myself over and over again. So those were the stories I'm grateful to have written, that I had the chance to write.  Overall, what do you hope readers take away from your book? I hope that by reading my story, they will be able to turn inward and unpack their own story, and begin to think about, or figure out, what joy feels like in their own bodies. And, you know, begin to work at accessing it when they need it to counter the grief - or, you know, not even to counter, but to allow that joy to live alongside all the other emotions that they have. So, if people are doing that kind of work as they're processing my essays, then I think my job is done. Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts is the author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration, out now on Gallery Books.  You've been listening to 51%. 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by me, Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is “Lolita” by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. A big thanks to Dr. Janell Hobson, Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, and you for tuning in. You can also find us on Twitter and Instagram @51percentradio. Let us know what you think or if you have a story you'd like to share as well. Until next week, I'm Jesse King for 51%.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
William H. Johnson, Elizabeth Alexander

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 69:11


Episode No. 538 features curator Virginia Mecklenburg and artist Elizabeth Alexander. Mecklenburg is the curator of "Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice," which is at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston through August 7. The exhibition features a series of paintings Johnson made in the 1940s. It shows mostly Black activists, scientists, and educators, and spotlights their impacts on their communities and on the American nation. Johnson's subjects include Crispus Attucks, Harriet Tubman, Marian Anderson, and John Brown. The series also the international heads of state who brought an end to World War II. The exhibition was organized from the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which holds over 1,000 Johnsons within its collection. Mecklenburg is a senior curator at SAAM. The exhibition will travel to SAAM in 2023-24; a significant national tour is in development. Elizabeth Alexander is included in "Reckoning and Resilience: North Carolina Art Now" at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. The exhibition features over 100 works by 30 artists working across North Carolina. Alexander's sculptures and installation are often made from deconstructed domestic materials and address America's history, especially the construction and memory of white supremacy. She's been included in exhibitions at the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; and the Museum of Art and Design, New York. Museums such as the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Ark., and the Mint Museum, Charlotte hold her work in their collections.