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How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass - The Moving Elegies For Abraham Lincoln

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 42:06


I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.  And I am Garry Shriver.  This is the How to Love Lit Podcast. This is our second episode discussing the bard of democracy, the great Walt Whitman.  Today we will feature one of his four poems honoring President Abraham Lincoln, but in order to understand why Whitman and many of us admire this great man, we want to revisit the  original 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass and listen to some of Whitman's observations of African Americans and slavery.  Christy, let's start this episode by reading and discussing two extracts from “I sing the Body Electric” , the ones where Whitman describes an African man and then an African woman at auction.    A man's body at auction,  (For before the war I often go to the slave-mart and watch the sale,)  I help the auctioneer, the sloven does not half know his business.    Gentlemen look on this wonder,  Whatever the bids of the bidders they cannot be high enough for it,  For it the globe lay preparing quintillions of years without one animal or plant,  For it the revolving cycles truly and steadily roll'd.  In this head the all-baffling brain,  In it and below it the makings of heroes.  Examine these limbs, red, black, or white, they are cunning in tendon and nerve,  They shall be stript that you may see them.  Exquisite senses, life-lit eyes, pluck, volition,  Flakes of breast-muscle, pliant backbone and neck, flesh not flabby, good-sized arms and legs,  And wonders within there yet.  Within there runs blood,  The same old blood! the same red-running blood!  There swells and jets a heart, there all passions, desires, reachings, aspirations,  (Do you think they are not there because they are not express'd in parlors and lecture-rooms?)  This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,  In him the start of populous states and rich republics,  Of him countless immortal lives with countless embodiments and enjoyments.  How do you know who shall come from the offspring of his offspring through the centuries?  (Who might you find you have come from yourself, if you could trace back through the centuries?)    8    A woman's body at auction,  She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers,  She is the bearer of them that shall grow and be mates to the mothers.  Have you ever loved the body of a woman?  Have you ever loved the body of a man?  Do you not see that these are exactly the same to all in all nations and times all over the earth?  If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,  And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,  And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful than the most beautiful face.  Have you seen the fool that corrupted his own live body? or the fool that corrupted her own live body?  For they do not conceal themselves, and cannot conceal themselves.  Whitman was raised a New York democrat, but his sympathies were with the Free Soil party that condemned the extension of slavery as a sin against God and a crime against man.  The Republican party would not exist until 1854, and Lincoln would be their presidential candidate in the election of 1860.  Of course, bear in mind, that the issues of those days are different than the issues of today, so the party names shouldn't be taken to represent modern day politics.      For Whitman it was undeniable for anyone with eyeballs that all men are born human and that implies certain things regardless if they are born  free or slave- of any race, creed or gender.  It is obvious to a man so aware of the physical body, that we are of the same atom-  the magnificence of the body proclaims our humanity- and ironically where on earth could this magnificence be most easily seen than at a slave auction like what he witnessed during his New Orleans days. In all of its ruthless degradation it ironically showcased the magnificence of the human body.  It's why Whitman could say, almost sarcastically- I am a better salesman of slaves than the auctioneer-I know and understand the beauty and value of what you are selling and you don't- you fool.   Whitman was the poet of the democratic soul- we are after all leaves of grass, but he was also the poet of the body- that physical form we are all chained to.  For Whitman, to be a human was to understand and be okay with one's physical body- and it is a holy thing. Our souls inhabit a sanctified space on earth- that of the body- be it man or woman- the pigmentation of flesh was just one of many individual and unique features- for Whitman our bodies is the starting point for equality- we are all wedded to one.      It doesn't seem radical to us now, but at that time in history- even talking about the body like that was revolutionary- almost vulgar- Whitman democratically equates the man with the woman with the black with the white.  In 1855, this was not self-evident anywhere else in the United States of America or really anywhere on planet earth.      By 1855, Walt Whitman knew his country was falling apart.  He understood that the ideals on which the great American experiment were founded were being overwhelmed by all kinds of forces, not least of which was plain ordinary corruption.  In his mind, what the world needed was repentance- a total course correction- a return to the original ideals and this was going to happen through conversion to a different set of moral ideals- he wanted to convince America to revisit and embrace all these original self-evident democratic ideals by reading and absorbing Leaves of Grass.  He really truly believed if people would just read his book, they would stop hating each other.    Well, it's a nice thought, however slightly unrealistic…especially in light of the single digit sales of that first edition.  But even if he had gotten everyone to read his book, it was a tall order.  By 1860, any kind of peaceful coming together seemed unrealistic.  America was on the brink of war and violence was springing up.  John Brown is one notable example; in an attempt to free slaves through violence he and a small gang stormed Harper's Ferry.  They were captured, tried and condemned to death, but this event inflamed the country and raised the stakes for the upcoming presidential election.  A few months after Brown was executed, the democratic party, split between pro and- anti- slavery factions, was to confront a new political party- one that had never existed before, the Republican party. It had nominated a Southern born anti-slavery man from Illinois, a lawyer who had never attended school but who was known as honest Abe.  A newspaper in South Carolina put it this way “the irrepressible conflict is about to be vised upon us through the Black Republican nominee and his fanatical diabolical Republican party.”    Walt Whitman did not see Lincoln as an instigator of a conflict.  Whitman saw him almost as an extension of himself- a mediator.  He really believed Lincoln was going to bring healing  and unity through politics something he had tried and failed to do through poetry.      I'm not sure which is the greater challenge= trying to unify  a group of people through poetry or politics!!      Ha! True but Whitman was paying attention to what Lincoln was saying and he identified with him.  He saw himself in Lincoln.  They both came from poor families. Neither had formal education.  One thing that is interesting, Lincoln was from the West, and Whitman believed the hope of America was in the West.  Both men believed in democracy to the core, but also- both believed in unity.  Whitman saw Lincoln as America's hope.    Although, he was likely the most hated man of his age in some corners, but the only hope of America in others.  Lincoln wanted first and foremost to be a unifier.  He had been elected with only around 40% of the popular vote, although he did get a majority of the electoral college votes.  There was no question America was deeply divided.  He wanted not just to save the physical boundaries of America, but he wanted to heal the wounds that were making people hate each other.  Lincoln's father was anti-slavery and raised in an anti-slavery Baptist congregation.   Lincoln But his mother was from a Kentucky slaveholding family.  Lincoln later recalled that the reason his father left Kentucky and the South because of his strong feelings about slavery. Lincoln himself saw many cruel things while visiting his grandparents, not the least of these being once when an African-American family was separated on a boat and sold to different owners.  He later recalled that ‘the sight was a continual torment to me…having the power of making me miserable.”  However, Lincoln's mother's family were people he knew intimately, and somehow he understood how someone could support slavery and not be an evil person.  This sounds crazy to us and difficult to understand, but Lincoln expressed on more than one occasion to men across the North that if they had been born in those circumstances in that place and in that world, they likely would have had those same views.  This way of seeing one's fellow man is more radical than most of us can even comprehend.  It's a strange idea to assert that a person could believe something is morally wrong so strongly that he would be willing to lead a nation to war to end it, but simultaneously judge the perpetrators of this evil redeemable human beings.  95% of humans today can't think like that-       Well, it's something Whitman could do as well.  Whitman didn't fight in the Civil War, but his brother George did.  His brother fought for the Union.  Whitman's significant other fought for the Confederacy at one point.     The first shots of the Civil War were fired by the South on Fort Sumter in Charleston, SC, in April of 1861.  Lincoln had been president for just a few weeks.       In December of 1862, Whitman saw his brother's name on a list of casualities.  He got on a train and headed South to look for him. He ended up in Fredericksburg.  The good news was his brother had only suffered a flesh wound.  But outside the hospital Whitman saw something that struck horror and terror into his being.  Let me read his words after he came to the building being used as a hospital, he saw, “a heap of amputated feet, legs, arms, hands, etc….a full load for a one-horse cart…human fragments, cut bloody, black and blue, swelled and sickening…nearby were several dead bodes each covered with its brown woolen blanket.”  Now you have to remember, think about Leaves of Grass and “I sing the Body Electric”.  This is a man who had been trying to convince America to celebrate our bodies- all of our bodies- we read just the excert about African-Americans, but he celebrated all bodies and wanted us to see ourselves in other people's bodies- to recognize the sanctity in all bodies- and here he's staring at these body parts scattered around, cut off and thrown into piles.  I can't even imagine how things would smell.      Whitman's reaction to what he saw on the battlefields and field hospitals of Frederickburg, led him to a decision that altered the course of his life.  It would lead him to move to Washington DC and honestly, his war actions to me make him something of a saint.  Just in Frederickburg, he stuck around to visit and help bury the dead of the over 18,000 dead soldiers that were just lying on the ground.  But, then he started visiting hospitals.  These visits deeply affected him.  He had planned on going back to New York after he found his brother, but he couldn't do that anymore.  Instead he changed courses and went to Washington DC.  He got a job as a clerk where he would work during the day, but then he would spend the rest of his time in the hospitals.  And he would just sit with soldiers.  He didn't care if they were union of confederate.  He brought  with him bags of candy.  He wrote letters to their parents.  He played twenty questions.  If they wanted him to read the Bible, he read the Bible.  If they wanted a cigarette, he'd scrounge up a cigarette. Many of them were teenagers.  He kissed  and hugged them; he parented them in their final moments of life.  For many, he was the last tender face they would see on this earth.  The numbers range, but documentation reveals he visited and helped anywhere from 80-100,000 soldiers.      Let me interrupt you for a second to highlight how bad it was to be in a hospital during this time period.  No one at this time understood the importance of anticeptics or the need to be clean.  The Union Army lost 300,000 lives in combat.  But, they experienced an estimated 6,400,000 cases of illnesses, wound and injuries.  Hospitals were filthy and dangerous places.      For many of those young men, Whitman was the last touch of kindness they would ever experience on this earth.  He said later that those years of hospital service were and I quote, “the greatest privilege and satisfaction..and, of course, the most profound lesson of my life.”  He usually left the hospital at night and slept in a room he rented but if a soldier needed him or asked him to stay, he would often stay up all night with wounded and dying men and then head from the hospital to the office.  Here are his words "While I was with wounded and sick in thousands of cases from the New England States, and from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and from Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and all the Western States, I was with more or less from all the States, North and South, without exception… "I was with many rebel officers and men among our wounded, and gave them always what I had, and tried to cheer them the same as any. . . . Among the black soldiers, wounded or sick, and in the contraband camps, I also took my way whenever in their neighborhood, and did what I could for them.”        Well, let me also say that Washington DC was a nasty place to be living at that time.  Physically, it was a construction zone, nothing like the beautiful collection of buildings and streets designed by the French architect Pierre L Enfant that we see today.   It was muddy; it noisy; it was full of the noises of building and killing.  It was political.  Abraham Lincoln stated that during those days, “If there is a worse place than Hell, I am in it.”      Dang, because DC, the city, was so bad?    Because being president in the Civil War was so bad.  Lincoln had a different view of his role of leadership than most people today understand.  And we need to go back to when he was elected in 1860.  The country was divided- and even if you didn't believe in slavery, the question of how to get rid of it wasn't something people agreed on.  Many thought it should just be abolished. Others thought you should just keep it from expanding and let it die slowly.   Lincoln was surrounded by people on all sides who all wanted him to have “bold leadership”- do radical things- whatever those were to them- but Lincoln liked to respond to his critics by referencing an entertainer who was known for tight walking over water.  Sometimes, he even would push a wheelbarrow across these ropes; one time he stopped in the middle of the river to eat an omelete on his tightrope, sometimes he'd carry someone on his back- all crazy stunts that didn't seem survivable.  Lincoln had seen him perform walking a tight rope across Niagara falls and he thought it was a perfect metaphor for how he saw himself.  Let me quote Lincoln here- the artist went by the name Blondin. Suppose,” Lincoln said, “that all the material values in this great country of ours, from the Atlantic to the Pacific—its wealth, its prosperity, its achievements in the present and its hopes for the future—could all have been concentrated and given to Blondin to carry over that awful crossing.” Suppose “you had been standing upon the shore as he was going over, as he was carefully feeling his way along and balancing his pole with all his most delicate skill over the thundering cataract. Would you have shouted at him, ‘Blondin, a step to the right!' ‘Blondin, a step to the left!' or would you have stood there speechless and held your breath and prayed to the Almighty to guide and help him safely through the trial?”    Lincoln saw himself on a tight rope and going too far one way or the other would make the entire thing collapse.  He wasn't trying to crush and destroy his fellow man, even his Southern brother,  although he was trying to win the war and emancipate the slaves, which he did do.  He was trying to heal a nation- to bring brother back to brother.  And we must never forget that brothers WERE literally killing their brothers.  Uniting and building a country that was this morally divided was a seemingly impossible task- and he could see from his perch in Washington that this was hell.    Whitman would stop to see him going in and out of the White House.  This was in the days when you could do that.  They didn't even have secret service for the president. Whitman looked at Lincoln and saw sadness in his eyes.  But Whitman always believed Lincoln was the right man.  If anyone could bring America together, it was Lincoln. Lincoln didn't hate his enemy.  He loved his enemy.  Just like Whitman.  This was the attitude where Whitman saw hope and a future as he sat with both confederate and Union soldier, black soldiers and white soldiers, mending their wounds, writing their final farewells.      But make no mistake, Lincoln was committed to emancipation and as the war came to the end and reconstruction was in sight, he was preparing America to grant full citizenship that included voting rights to All American males- including African-American ones.  In one letter he said, “I am naturally anti-slavery.  If slavery is not wrong; nothing is wrong.  I cannot remember when I did not think so, and feel so”.     And yet this is the same man who could say during his second inaugural address, one month before General Lee will surrender at Appomatox and 41 days before he will be murdered…     With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan -- to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with the world. to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with the world. all nations.    There was one man in the crowd that day, who was actually so close to Lincoln he shows up in the inauguaration picture.  This man heard those words and was committed to stopping Lincoln from fulfilling this pledge.  John Wilkes Booth was standing not far from Lincoln that day.  On April 11, what we now know was to be his last speech, Lincoln called for black suffrage.  Booth was in the audience that day as well, after hearing Lincoln make that statement Booth is known to have said, “that is the last speech he will ever make.”    On that fateful day, April 15, 1865 Whitman was visiting his family.  However, his significant other, Peter Doyle was in Washington DC and heard that the president was going to Ford's theater to see a performance of the comedy “My American Cousin.”  It was Good Friday, the sacred day where Christians celebrate the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.  This is what Peter Doyle  said later about what happened that evening.     I heard that the President and his wife would be present and made up my mind to go. There was a great crowd in the building. I got into the second gallery. There was nothing extraordinary in the performance. I saw everything on the stage and was in a good position to see the President's box. I heard the pistol shot. I had no idea what it was, what it meant—it was sort of muffled. I really knew nothing of what had occurred until Mrs. Lincoln leaned out of the box and cried, "The President is shot!" I needn't tell you what I felt then, or saw. It is all put down in Walt's piece—that piece is exactly right. I saw Booth on the cushion of the box, saw him jump over, saw him catch his foot, which turned, saw him fall on the stage. He got up on his feet, cried out something which I could not hear for the hub-hub and disappeared. I suppose I lingered almost the last person. A soldier came into the gallery, saw me still there, called to me: "Get out of here! we're going to burn this damned building down!" I said: "If that is so I'll get out!"     Whitman used Doyle's account to help pen the only poem that I know of where Whitman  used traditional poetic forms.  It is an Elegy for the death of Abraham Lincoln, titled “O Captain My Captain”.  He actually wrote two elegies- one speaking for the nation- in the voice of a common sailor- it he wrote in a formal style of poetry acceptable to the people of his day.  The second, in some ways more personal because it is in a style similar to what we see in the rest of Leaves of Grass.  The second poem, When Lilacs …”is often thought be be written after O Captain” Although I'm not sure it is.  It is more epic in its feeling- it uses symbols that are more archetypal and timeless- although that term wasn't invented in his day.  In O Captain my Captain, Whitman takes on the persona of a soldier, a sailor.  In the second, he uses his own voice- that universal “I” like we see in Song of Myself.  We don't have time to read the entirely of “O Lilacs When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom' , it has over 200 lines, but we can Read a little bit of it.  Instead we will focus on the only poem anthologized during Whitman's lifetime- O Captain my Captain.    The one I know from that famous scene in Dead Poet's Society where the students stand for their fallen teacher, John Keating, immortalized by Robin Williams.     Agreed- I can't read this poem without thinking of Robin Williams, but we should probably try since we spent quite a bit of time setting up the image of Lincoln.       O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,  The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,  The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,  While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;                           But O heart! heart! heart!                              O the bleeding drops of red,                                 Where on the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;  Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,  For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,  For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;                           Here Captain! dear father!                              This arm beneath your head!                                 It is some dream that on the deck,                                   You've fallen cold and dead.    My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,  My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,  The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,  From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;                           Exult O shores, and ring O bells!                              But I with mournful tread,                                 Walk the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    As we have clearly expressed, Whitman the defender of the common man, does not usually elevate one person over another- but For Lincoln he makes a notable exception.  O Captain my Captain is written from the point of view of an insider. We can imagine a young soldier, a sailor.   He's on the ship- Of course, the captain is President Lincoln- the ship is the country.  The tone is one of exultation then distress.  We had finished- the fearful trip was done!!!  We had made it then….    Christy, and it's important to note that it WAS done.  Lincoln did bring that ship to harbor.  On April 2, right before he died on the 11th The confederacy vacated Richmond.  On April 4, President Lincoln together with his ten year old son Tad walked through the streets and into Jefferson Davis' office.  “Admiral Porter who was with him had this to say, “No electric wire could have carried the news of the President's arrival sooner than it was circulated through Richmond.  As far as the eye could see the streets were alive with negroes and poor whites rushing in our direction, and the crowd increased so fast that I had to surround the President with sailors with fixed bayonets to keep them off.  They all wanted to shake hand with Mr. Lincoln or his coat tail or even to kneel and kiss his boots.”  Later on Admiral Porter said this, “I should have preferred to see the President of the United States entering the subjugated stronghold of the rebel with an escort more befitting his high station, yet that would have looked as if he came as a conqueror to exult over a brave but fallen enemy.  He came instead as a peacemaker, his hand extended to all who desired to take it.”  Christy, at one point, it is said that an older African American gentleman bowed before Lincoln and Lincoln went to the man, took him by the hand and raised him up and told him he didn't need to kneel to anyone, he was a free man.  I cannot imagine the emotion.    And so we try to imagine the emotion – after so much carnage, who could walk the tightright and heal the utter hatred still inherent in the heart of both victor and defeated.  Notice there is meter, each stanza is composed of iambs which may or may not mean anything to you.  It just means there's a beat- like a drum beat, like a heart beat- “The ship has wethered every rack, the prize we sought is won.  The people are exalting.    But then he dies…in the first two stanzas, the boy addresses the captain as someone still alive, but by the third stanza he has accepted the reality.  And of course, this is exactly has grief strikes.  We never accept it initially, at least I have that problem.  I'll share my personal experiences in a different episode, but it's natural.  He says, “Rise up, Father.”  We feel a sense of desperation- the idea- of = no,  no, no, this can't be happening.  It's not possible.  Not now. Not after all of this.   But by the third stanza, the sailor unwillingly switches to the third person.  My captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still.”   There is a sense of intimacy, “MY father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will”.  We also see that that formality of the meter breaks down in that last line, “Fallen cold and dead”.  The sailor has broken down.   America is not just devastated because their leader is dead, but they are now vulnerable- what's going to happen to us.  Who can lead us?  Who can walk the tightrope?    And that of course, is the ultimate tragedy.   We will never know what might have been had he lived to complete his second term, but one statesman grasped fully the tragedy when he predicted that “the development of things will teach us to mourn him doubly.”  And of course he was right, even Jefferson Davis, the leader of the conferederacy, although I point out that Lincoln never one time acknowledged him as preside,  bemoaned Lincoln's death after losing the war and for good reason.  After Lincoln''s death, profiteers, corruption and all kinds of chaos descended on America.  Grant, who was a sincere and an incredible advocate for African Americans, was able to defeat the confederate armies but not able to contain the host of corruption that plagued our nation during reconstruction.    And so we end with Whitman's final poem- his most personal tribute to Lincoln and the one that many consider the better if less famous work, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom”.  In this poem, Whitman reverts to his usual style of free verse and strong metaphors.  It's beautiful and for me, it's where we see the universal truth of lost moral leadership and grief emerge- he expresses loss well beyond the moment of Lincoln.  Let's read just the first little bit.  It's long, and references the journey of Lincoln's casket to its final resting place without ever mentioning Lincoln's name.     When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd,  And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,  I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.    Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,  Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,  And thought of him I love.    2  O powerful western fallen star!  O shades of night—O moody, tearful night!  O great star disappear'd—O the black murk that hides the star!  O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me!  O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.    There are three big symbols in this poem= the lilacs, the sun and then a bird.  But since we read only the first two stanzas, I want to focus on those.  Lilacs are flowers that have a strong smell and were blooming at the time of Lincoln's death.  They are beautiful, but they also return every spring.  The star is an obvious symbol for Lincoln.  I want to point out that Whitman never really used stars as positive images for leaders because he didn't like the idea of a ruler just hoarding over us- but again, in this case, he made an exception.  Lincoln was the powerful star- and of course, we are left to answer, why would a man, so bent on equality of humans, elevate this one man- the only man he would elevate- it wasn't just because he was the president.  It was because he embodied what a great leader truly was- and this is the nice idea that I think resonates through the ages.      Agreed, average leaders and I will say most leaders give lip service to serving all people, but we can see by their actions, that a lot of that is propaganda.  Most are in it to win it.  It's easy to get to the top and view oneself as better than the rest of us.  It's just natural to do what's best for me or my team, so to speak.  It's natural to want to put enemies in submission- prove own own power and greatness.  But Lincoln was different- his compassion for his enemy, his unwavering commitment to integrity, his ability to see beyond his current moment, is a star- something that outlasts us all.  The South as well as the North mourned deeply Lincoln's loss.  The procession described in this poem where the casket was taken from Washington DC back to Illinois was something that had never happened in the history of the United States and has not happened since.      It is a legacy of leadership that Whitman not only admired but also immortalized.  It's also a legacy that I find inspiring no matter how great or small our little ships are, if we are ever called to be a captain.  It's something to think about when we smell lilacs in the Spring.  For Whitman every time we smelled those flowers, we grieve, but also we remember- because just as lilacs return every Spring, so does a new opportunity- the end of the Lilac poem looks to the future.  In another of Whitman's great poems, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” he says this, “We use you, and do not cast you aside-we plant you          permanently within us,       We fathom you not-we love you-there is perfection in          you also,       You furnish your parts toward eternity,       Great or small, you furnish your parts toward the soul.”  It's a nice idea, Lincoln was a man, but for Whitman he embodied an ideal we can all aspire to: integrity, humility, compassion and grace- in defeat and death but also in victory.  Whitman believed in those ideals in leadership- leadership that embraces those things can lead a ship to harbor in scary waters.  Perhaps, when we smell the lilacs, we can be reminded that those ideals are also planted in us.     Thanks for listening.  We hope you enjoyed our discussions of Walt Whitman.  Next episode, we will look farther into the American past to even deeper roots of democracy on the American continent, the Iroquois constitution.  So, thanks for listening, as always please share a link to our podcast to a friend or friends.  Push it out on your social media platforms via twitter, Instagram, facebook or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend, and if you are an educator, visit our website for instructional resources.  Peace out.                 

Destination Marketing Podcast
169: Words of Wisdom from Sports ETA Hall of Fame Inductee Denny Gann

Destination Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:32


This week on the Destination Marketing Podcast, Adam is joined by 2021 Sports ETA Hall of Fame inductee Denny Gann. Listen to hear his advice on how to bring profitable sports events to your destination as well as how to know what kinds of events are a good fit for your community. "Always design your events with athletic eyes. Look at it through John Brown's eyes if you want to sell it to John Brown. Look at it as the soccer player. What's he going to see? What is the volleyball player going to do? Structure your event for that athlete and the rest will follow." -Denny Gann Explore Sioux City Denny Gann Hall of Fame Tourism Media Mayhem The Destination Marketing Podcast is a part of the Destination Marketing Podcast Network. It is hosted by Adam Stoker and produced by Relic. If you are interested in any of Relic's services,  please email adam@relicagency.com or visit https://www.relicagency.com/ To learn more about the Destination Marketing Podcast network and to listen to our other shows, please visit https://thedmpn.com/. If you are interested in becoming a part of the network, please email adam@relicagency.com.

Breaking Walls
Hold Em Yale With The Damon Runyon Theater

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 34:50


There are few homecoming traditions bigger than a football game. Harvard and Yale have been playing an annual game since 1875. It's so steeped in our culture that American icon Damon Runyon incorporated Yale football into a story. This story, “Hold Em Yale” made it into a syndicated episode of The Damon Runyon Theatre airing out of NBC's KFI in Los Angeles on Sunday, March 27th, 1949. The show starred character actor John Brown as Broadway. Brown was born on April 4th, 1904 in Yorkshire, England. He emigrated to New York and began finding work on the stage. His first radio credit was in 1932. By 1949 he was an esteemed veteran. The Damon Runyon Theatre was one of Alan Ladd's Mayfair productions. Ladd was an admirer of the late-Runyon's long-running “Brighter Side” newspaper column. Damon Runyon had passed away on December 10th, 1946. He'd spun fascinating, tongue-in cheek tales of gamblers, actors, gangsters, and beautiful women. He gave his characters colorful names like “Harry the Horse Thief,” “Good Time Charlie,” and “The Lemon Drop Kid.” Ladd tapped John Brown to play Broadway. Brown was already playing a similar character on My Friend Irma. The transcribed Damon Runyon Theatre first aired over the independent station KSEL, in Lubbock, Texas. Because it was a syndicated show, it wasn't beholden to network lines. It aired over NBC's KFI Los Angeles beginning in January of 1949. The following June, it began airing over Mutual's WOR in New York. Supporting Brown were Hollywood's radio regulars like Herb Vigran, Jack Moyles, William Conrad, Gerald Mohr, and Anne Whitfield. Richard Sanville directed. Fifty-two shows were produced on records. Unfortunately for John Brown, just as television was coming in and his career was cresting, trouble was around the corner.

MAKE IT
Swallow Your Pride, Be The Real You, and Stop Judging Yourself

MAKE IT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 112:10


Hello, Indie Film Creatives! In this episode, we have a conversation with the Documentarian, Author, Poet, and Nephew of ‘Roots' author, Alex Haley, Chris Haley. We talk about John Brown's place in history, how his life changed after Roots premiered on television, the trials of growing up related to Alex Haley, his documentary ‘Unmarked,' his poem books ‘Obsessions' and ‘Until the Right One Comes Along,' and his annual film Festival, ‘Utopia.' Enjoy! Listen+Subscribe+Rate = Love Questions or Comments? Reach out to us at contact@bonsai.film or on social and the web at https://linktr.ee/BonsaiCreative Love Indie Film? Love the MAKE IT Podcast? Become a True Fan! www.bonsai.film/truefans www.makeit.libsyn.com/podcast #MAKEIT More About Chris Haley Actor, Archivist, Filmmaker, Writer, Chris Haley wears many hats. Director, The Study of the Legacy of Slavery at the Maryland State Archives, Director of the Utopia Film Festival, and Annapolis Pride, Annapolis Film Festival, Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation Board member, he is a recent recipient of the Anne Arundel County Arts Council 2021 Literary Arts Award recipient and co-director of the Capital Region Emmy nominated documentary, 'Unmarked', and author of two books of poetry currently available on Amazon, 'Until The Right One Comes Along', and, 'Obsessions'. Having also appeared on screen and stage on among other productions: The Wire and Ain't Misbehavin' at the Claridge Casino in Atlantic City, Chris is also a nephew of author Alex Haley and direct descendant of Kunta Kinte. If I Could (As read during the conversation)   If I could die For just a little while, And briefly take a break, If I could close my mind, My consciousness, Meditate on a lake. If I could dial down the volume Of voices Screaming daily woes, If I could gently close my eyes, No tears, no cries, No nightmares to hide, I think I would feel better. My passion would return. I'd breathe a life renewed, My candle not all burned.  And dreams would reawaken me To the future I'd once yearned, of  Grand occasions, Oscar nominations, Standing ovations, Devoted fans –  A beloved man – Beautifully free of strife. If I could wake to that  I'd beat this desperate rap, Dash my suicidal sway; I'd drink life's sap I'd safely nap I would not end today -Chris Haley   Links: Website Instagram Twitter FaceBook LinkedIn   Unmarked (documentary) Utopia Film Festival Until The Right One Comes Along (book) Obsessions (book) The Study of the Legacy of Slavery in Maryland Alex Haley (website) Roots: The Saga of an American Family by Alex Haley (book) Roots (tv mini series) Autobiography of Malcom X by Alex Haley (book) Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation   Howard University Chadwick Boseman (actor) The Wire (tv series) Tyler Perry (writer) Slave Trade Database Enslaved.org  (database) Measuring Worth (database) Ibram X. Kendi (author)  

MAKE IT
Swallow Your Pride, Be The Real You, and Stop Judging Yourself - A Conversation w/ Documentarian and Author Chris Haley

MAKE IT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 112:10


Hello, Indie Film Creatives! In this episode, we have a conversation with the Documentarian, Author, Poet, and Nephew of ‘Roots' author, Alex Haley, Chris Haley. We talk about John Brown's place in history, how his life changed after Roots premiered on television, the trials of growing up related to Alex Haley, his documentary ‘Unmarked,' his poem books ‘Obsessions' and ‘Until the Right One Comes Along,' and his annual film Festival, ‘Utopia.' Enjoy! Listen+Subscribe+Rate = Love Questions or Comments? Reach out to us at contact@bonsai.film or on social and the web at https://linktr.ee/BonsaiCreative Love Indie Film? Love the MAKE IT Podcast? Become a True Fan! www.bonsai.film/truefans www.makeit.libsyn.com/podcast #MAKEIT More About Chris Haley Actor, Archivist, Filmmaker, Writer, Chris Haley wears many hats. Director, The Study of the Legacy of Slavery at the Maryland State Archives, Director of the Utopia Film Festival, and Annapolis Pride, Annapolis Film Festival, Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation Board member, he is a recent recipient of the Anne Arundel County Arts Council 2021 Literary Arts Award recipient and co-director of the Capital Region Emmy nominated documentary, 'Unmarked', and author of two books of poetry currently available on Amazon, 'Until The Right One Comes Along', and, 'Obsessions'. Having also appeared on screen and stage on among other productions: The Wire and Ain't Misbehavin' at the Claridge Casino in Atlantic City, Chris is also a nephew of author Alex Haley and direct descendant of Kunta Kinte. If I Could (As read during the conversation)   If I could die For just a little while, And briefly take a break, If I could close my mind, My consciousness, Meditate on a lake. If I could dial down the volume Of voices Screaming daily woes, If I could gently close my eyes, No tears, no cries, No nightmares to hide, I think I would feel better. My passion would return. I'd breathe a life renewed, My candle not all burned.  And dreams would reawaken me To the future I'd once yearned, of  Grand occasions, Oscar nominations, Standing ovations, Devoted fans –  A beloved man – Beautifully free of strife. If I could wake to that  I'd beat this desperate rap, Dash my suicidal sway; I'd drink life's sap I'd safely nap I would not end today -Chris Haley

Faithfully Podcast
Black Harper's Ferry Raider Shields Green With Louis A. DeCaro Jr

Faithfully Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 68:40


In this episode of Faithfully Podcast, you'll hear Managing Editor Nicola A. Menzie's conversation with Dr. Louis A. DeCaro Jr. about his most recent book, "The Untold Story of Shields Green: The Life and Death of a Harper's Ferry Raider." DeCaro is associate professor of Church History at Alliance Theological Seminary in New York City. He is the author of several books, including biographical works on Chrisian abolitionist John Brown and Muslim activist Malcolm X. | The book: https://amzn.to/3kwB8Qo; Learn more: faithfullymagazine.com.

Hard Fried History
Episode 111: Frederick Douglass p1: America's Jeremiah

Hard Fried History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 58:17


What's the biggest personal obstacle you've had to overcome? This week we cover the first 39 years of the life of Frederick Douglass, discussing his escape from enslavement, the evolution of his ideas and his eventual connection to the conspiracy around John Brown.

The Dave Glover Show
11-5-21 Hour 3 John Brown

The Dave Glover Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:07


We talk to John Brown about his new book! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Appodlachia
#106: John Brown Part 2: LinkedIn influencing the Harper's Ferry Raid

Appodlachia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:42


We finish our series on John Brown with part 2, covering the Harper's Ferry raid and aftermathTAKE OUR ANONYMOUS FEEDBACK SURVEY! https://forms.gle/k3fPokcgwp5YJcYd8Ad-free episodes, bonus content, live events, and more for as little as $5 a month - http://www.patreon.com/appodlachia

Sports on a Sunday Morning
October 31st, 2021, 11-12, NFL Picks, David Freese, Oli Marmol

Sports on a Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 36:22


NFL picks with Lauren Lovett. 2011 World Series MVP joined Ackerman earlier in the week on the 10 year anniversary of game 6 to talk about the memories. New Cardinals manager Oli Marmol joined Ackerman n Monday after he was named new manager and hear his philosophies and more. Former Fox 2 anchor John Brown talks about his book “Missouri Legends: Famous People From the Show Me State.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
ITK Ray John Brown 10 27 21

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 22:16


John Brown: Author- Famous Missourians (Fall 2021 Release) Former KTRS and Fox 2 Personality/Anchor

Erindale Bible Chapel
The God Who Is Outside Our Box - October 24 2021

Erindale Bible Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 44:03


Series: Gripped by the Greatness of God (Part 2) Scripture: Romans 11:33-36 Speaker: Dr. John Brown

It Could Happen Here
Community Self-Defense with The John Brown Gun Club

It Could Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:31


A roundtable discussion on armed community self-defense. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Having Funlessness with Jen Kirkman

This week: Jen's talking about how riled up people are getting defending Chappelle, how men get paid millions to do open mic jokes on Netflix, watching a woman ruin her friend's birthday party at a restaurant, the non-drunk history of John Brown, and can C02 sucking machines save us?Get the ad-free video version (with bonus content) of this episode here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/57270742To get the bonus episode about Justin Bieber's pre-rolled joints go here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/57146638Buy tickets to Jen's five shows in December 2021 (album tapings) in Brooklyn here: https://unionhallny.comTo subscribe to Jen's You Tube Channel, Anxiety Bites podcast, buy merch, albums, books, or coffee for Jen click here: jenkirkman.bio.link“No Fun: the Jen Kirkman Podcast” is part of the Misfit Toys Comedy Network. To find all of the other great podcasts on the network go here: https://art19.com/networks/misfit-toysSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast

Today we'll be talking about John Brown, a man who was so fervently anti-slavery that at one point even Frederick Douglass was all, "Damn, bro. You're pretty extreme." John Brown is famous for a small paragraph we all had to read one time in our history books in school but they just don't do his whole bonkers life justice with that little coverage. Enjoy!

Classy Dinner Podcast
Joe Biden is the Weird One ft. John Brown

Classy Dinner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 80:29


https://goldenoxstudio.com/ (Golden Ox Studio) or die. patreon.com/wirr for video episodes.

Appodlachia
John Brown: American Abolitionist (Part 1)

Appodlachia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:43


We cover the legendary abolitionist John Brown - viewed by many as an essential catalyst for the Civil War. This is part 1. Part 2 will be coming out soon. Ad-free episodes, bonus content, live events, and more for as little as $5 a month - http://www.patreon.com/appodlachia

Author Conversations
Haunted Shenandoah Valley

Author Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 26:25


The abolitionist John Brown still roams the West Virginia panhandle—and beyond. In Lexington, a statue sheds real tears, mourning Virginians killed in battle. Decades of abuse at a sanatorium unleashed malevolent entities in Staunton. Spirits of Native Americans, Civil War soldiers and children frequent natural springs in Frederick County and caves near Strasburg. Ghosts stay free of charge at the nation's oldest inn in Middletown, and at the Natural Bridge Hotel, phantom children play in the halls. Visitors from beyond the grave enjoy live performances at several theaters in the region, while spectral soldiers gather for combat in the battlefields scattered throughout the area. Join Denver Michaels as he delves into folklore, eyewitness accounts and urban legends to bring you the best ghost stories from the Shenandoah Valley.   https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Products/9781467149426 

Erindale Bible Chapel
The Extravagance of Our God - October 17 2021

Erindale Bible Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 43:18


Series: Gripped by the Greatness of God - Part 1 Scripture: James 5:13-16 Speaker: Dr. John Brown

Today in the History of Freedom
Episode 16: John Brown

Today in the History of Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 4:16


The tree of liberty was indeed watered.

That's Good Broncos
That's Good Broncos: Raiders vs. Broncos: Predictions

That's Good Broncos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 17:30


The Broncos signed wide receiver John Brown. The Raiders lost head coach Jon Gruden who resigned. Mike Shanahan will be inducted into the Ring of Fame. Teddy Bridgewater & Derek Carr look to get their team back on track after both the Broncos and Raiders started the season 3-0 and then lost the last two games.  The Game Day: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheGameDay ThatsGoodBroncos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTdqUGmAyPoo0BcgNbNBoFA 

Huddle Up Podcast's show
HU #776: Shurmur Hints at Week 6 Plan for WR John Brown

Huddle Up Podcast's show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 68:09


Zack Kelberman and Scott Kennedy preview the #Broncos Week 6 bout with the #Raiders and analyze what OC Pat Shurmur hinted at for newly-signed WR #JohnBrown. SHOW NOTES Merch: http://huddleuppod.com/ Zack Kelberman: https://twitter.com/KelbermanNFL Scott Kennedy: https://twitter.com/ScoutKennedy Slam it here for more Broncos coverage: http://milehighhuddle.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Nights with Steve Price: Highlights
Crime File: The Legend of Ben Hall

Nights with Steve Price: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:16


Think of Australian bushrangers and Captain Thunderbolt, Ned Kelly, Captain Moonlite and the subject of today's Crime File, Ben Hall, come to mind.  Ben Hall was born near Forbes in western NSW on 9 May 1837, to ex-convict parents Elizabeth Sommers and Benjamin Hall. Raised to work on the land, in his youth Ben worked as a stockman for ex-convict John Walsh of Wheogo Station near Forbes.   In 1856, the strikingly handsome Ben Hall married Bridget Walsh, one of John Walsh's daughters and settled down in a partnership with another son-in-law, John McGuire, to run 7000 hectares at Sandy Creek, near Wheogo. When John Walsh died in 1858, the two men helped his widow Elizabeth, her daughter Kitty, and Kitty's husband, John Brown, to run Wheogo Station as well.   The ambitious Ben Hall came to be known as an honest trader and a reliable friend to his neighbours in the district. It was a life that Ben Hall loved, and he was content to spend it as a hard-working husband and father and keeper of the land.  But it was not to last and a series of events in his life saw him turn to become the most wanted bushranger in Australia's history.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Writer and Speaker Tim Wise and Comedian and Cultural Commentator Christian Finnegan Episode 455

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 92:08


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. 53:00 Christian Finnegan  is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor based in New York City.   BUY HIS NEW ALBUM--- "Show Your Work: Live at QED"   Finnegan is perhaps best known as one of the original panelists on VH1's Best Week Ever and as Chad, the only white roommate in the “Mad Real World” sketch on Comedy Central's Chappelle's Show. Additional television appearances as himself or performing stand up have included “Conan”, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson”, "Would You Rather...with Graham Norton", “Good Afternoon America” and multiple times on The Today Show and Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and on History's I Love the 1880s. He hosted TV Land's game show "Game Time". As an actor, Finnegan portrayed the supporting role of "Carl" in the film Eden Court, a ticket agent in "Knight and Day" and several guest roles including a talk show host on "The Good Wife". In October 2006, Finnegan's debut stand up comedy CD titled Two For Flinching was released by Comedy Central Records, with a follow-up national tour of college campuses from January to April 2007. “Au Contraire!” was released by Warner Bros. Records in 2009. His third special "The Fun Part" was filmed at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston on April 4, 2013 and debuted on Netflix on April 15, 2014. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Locked On Broncos - Daily Podcast On The Denver Broncos
How John Brown can help transform the Denver Broncos offense, Kareem Jackson misses Wednesday practice

Locked On Broncos - Daily Podcast On The Denver Broncos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:04


John Brown adds dangerous dynamic to Broncos offense SUBSCRIBE NOW: https://www.youtube.com/c/LockedOnBroncos Cody Roark and Sayre Bedinger discuss Wednesday's practice report for the Denver Broncos that includes Kareem Jackson missing practice due to a back injury, Vic Fangio's comments on Ronald Darby and Kyle Fuller, and Justin Simmons shared an important message with fans. The Broncos also signed veteran wide receiver John Brown to the team's practice squad. How can he impact the Broncos offense and help them be more effective? How can his presence transform what the Broncos offensive unit can do? WANT MORE DAILY DENVER BRONCOS CONTENT? Follow & Subscribe to the Podcast on these platforms…

That's Good Broncos
That's Good Broncos: NFL Week 6 Game Picks & Broncos Sign John Brown

That's Good Broncos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:40


The Broncos sign wide receiver John Brown, and say running back Mike Boone is ready to play a Raiders team that no longer has Jon Gruden as head coach. The Buccaneers and Eagles play Thursday Night. Some of the key games this week include Chargers @ Ravens, Raiders vs Broncos, Cardinals vs Browns, and Seahawks @ Steelers. 

Huddle Up Podcast's show
HU #775: Titans Plunder Broncos' P.S. | WR John Brown Signed

Huddle Up Podcast's show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 70:21


Chad Jensen and Zack Kelberman analyze a flurry of roster moves at #Broncos HQ that saw WR #JohnBrown come & LB #AveryWilliamson go like two ships in the night. SHOW NOTES Merch: http://huddleuppod.com/ Chad Jensen: https://twitter.com/ChadNJensen Zack Kelberman: https://twitter.com/KelbermanNFL Slam it here for more Broncos coverage: http://milehighhuddle.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Afternoon Drive
Tuesday Oct. 12: Hour 1 - Jon Gruden out as Raiders HC, Teddy Bridgewater, Avalanche already injury bitten? Magic Johnson

Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:55


Jon Gruden out as Raiders HC, Will Bridgewater be back? Avalanche already injury bitten? Magic Johnson's rookie year, John Brown, The Match: DeChambeau vs Koepka

Bizarre Buffet
S2E48: Butcher Brown: The Dr. Frankenstein of Sex Changes

Bizarre Buffet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 63:20


WARNING! This episode of Bizarre Buffet goes into graphic detail about gruesome surgical procedures gone very, very, wrong, as well as discussions on topics some may find disturbing. You've been warned, and hope you enjoy! By the early 1970s, Brown was carrying out sex reassignment surgery on transgender patients[1] at a small clinic he set up in San Francisco.[2] He would later claim to have performed 600 such surgeries during the course of his career.[2] Most of his patients were trans women who were too poor to afford the fees of reputable surgeons.  This episode features many accounts of former patients who suffered as a result of the infamous Butcher Brown.  Support the show!: https://patreon.com/bizarrebuffet See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Teatre Radiofònic
Radioteatre. Luz de gas 02/10/2021

Teatre Radiofònic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 101:50


Nascut al comtat de West Sussex, a Anglaterra, el 1904, Patrick Hamilton és un novel·lista i dramaturg força popular en la seva època. Era el petit de tres germans fills de pare i mare ambdós amb pretensions literàries, però no va tenir una infància gens fàcil, ja que el seu pare va dilapidar la seva fortuna en alcohol i dones i la mare era una dona infeliç amb tendències suïcides, motiu pel qual va passar força anys en cases d’hostess i pensions sòrdides, que més endavant li servirien com a inspiració dels escenaris de les seves novel·les. Als disset anys va començar a treballar en el món del teatre coma a actor i assistent d’escena i dos anys més més tard es va iniciar com a escriptor amb ‘Monday morning’ (1925), a la que ben aviat li seguiren ‘Craven House’ (1926) i ‘Two pence coloured’ (1928). Lèxit aconseguit amb aquest primers textos li van fer guanyar una bona reputació tant a Europa com als Estats Units, i, així, el 1929 va aconseguir un gran ressò amb el seu primer títol teatral: ‘La soga’ (Rope), portada al cinema per Alfred Hitchckok anys més tard. A partir d’aquí, la seva carrera literària va anar in crescendo amb novel·les com ‘The midnight bell’ (1929), ‘The Siege of pleasure’ (1932) o ‘The plains of cement’ (1934) i obres teatrals com ‘John Brown’s body’ (1930), ‘Gas light’ (1932) o ‘The man upstairs’ (1954); o fins i tot guions expressos per a radioteatre, entre els que destaquen, sobretot, ‘To the public danger’ (1939) o ‘This is imposible’ (1941). En l’àmbit de la seva vida privada, però, les coses no li anaven tan bé. Hamilton vivia en un triangle amorós que formaven ell mateix, la seva esposa Lois Martin, i la seva amant Ursula Stewart, també escriptora, i amb la que mantenia una relació extramatrimonial des de feia força anys fins que el 1953 es va divorciar de la seva esposa. A partir d’aquest moment, les obres de Hamilton van començar a tenir una acollida força més freda i amb diversos fracassos, i els darrers anys van ser difícils i improductius, i va caure en una profunda crisi depressiva que el va portar a l’alcoholisme, com a conseqüència del qual va patir una cirrosi hepàtica i problemes renals que el van portar a la mort el 1962. D’ençà d’aleshores, la seva obra ha caigut gairebé en l’oblit. ‘Luz de gas’ és un thriller que narra la història al voltant dels Manningham, un matrimoni de classe mitjana i acomodat que viu a Londres. L’harmonia conjugal va enterbolint-se a mesura que l’esposa posa de manifest algunes manies que provoquen un cert recel al seu marit. A certes hores del dia, i sempre en absència del marit, els llums de la casa pateixen fluctuacions i queden a les fosques per la manca del gas que les alimenta, un misteri que acabarà per resoldre un àvid inspector de policia que entra en escena per descobrir quin secret s’hi amaga al darrera. L’obra va ser estrenada a l’Estat espanyol el 3 d’abril de 1948, al Teatro Español de Madrid, sota la direcció de Cayetano Luca de Tena i Mercedes Prendres i Enric Guitart com a intèrprets principals. La versió radiofònica que avui posem en antena és un enregistrament del Quadre de Veus de Radioteatre de l'any 2004 segons l’adaptació de Marta Plaza, sota la direcció de Joan Garrigó, i amb les veus de Maria Glòria Farrés en la Senyora Manningham, Marta Plaza en Nancy, Laura Castillo en Elisabeth, Ricard Pagès en el Senyor Manningham, i Ismael Majó en l’inspector Rof. La narració és de Crisol Tuà, el Muntatge Musical és de Nina Mataix i la realització tècnica de Joan Borràs.

Heirloom Radio
Damon Runyon Theater - The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown - Feb. 6, 1949 - Comedy

Heirloom Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 29:02


The Broadway and film hit "Guys and Dolls" (Photo - Jean Simmons and Marlon Brando) was based on Damon Runyon's short story "The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown" - narrated by John Brown (as Broadway)... this is a love story of a high class gambler named "Sky" who has fallen in love with a Missionary, Miss Sarah Brown... and he is doing everything he can to earn her approval. Intro gives background on the series and introduces the story. This episode of The Damon Runyon Theater lives in the Playlist on this Soundcloud.com podcast "Damon Runyon Theater"... This is the 11th episode in the series.

The Irish Bears Show
Chicago Bears v Cleveland Browns Week 3 Preview - The Irish Bears Show

The Irish Bears Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 80:34


SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHANNEL. Welcome Back to The Irish Bears Show. Your First Stop to the Chicago Bears! We Provide Coverage every week on our beloved Bears! This Week We are delighted to be joined by John Brown from The Cleveland Sports Collective Podcast to Preview the Week 3 Matchup Topics: - Cleveland Browns Strength in Depth! - Baker Mayfield Proving Doubters Wrong - Justin Fields Finally to Start on Sunday! - Bears Defense Dominant vs Bengals - Browns Legit Super Bowl Contenders - How Good are the Browns - Bears Weaknesses vs Browns Strengths - Keys to the Game - Predictions - Bears Thoughts and Quick Fire Questions Make Sure You Like the Video and Subscribe to the Podcast!! #NFL #NFLUK #ChicagoBears #Bengals #Bears

Velshi
The Fight Ahead

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 86:00


Anand Giridharadas, in for Ali Velshi, is joined by Congresswoman Gwen Moore, Congressman Sean Casten, Rev. Dr. William Barber, Politico's Betsy Woodruff Swan, the Washington Post's Philip Bump, Center for Reproductive Rights President & CEO Nancy Northup, former U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade,  the New York Times' Katie Benner, Brittany Packnett Cunningham, venture capitalist Nick Hanauer, Professor Dorothy Brown, and John Brown, a Missouri man who was evicted from his home and is traveling to Washington to help make the case for a federal eviction moratorium. 

USA Classic Radio Theater
Classic Radio Theater for September 18, 2021 Hour 2 - Broadway and the Brakeman's Daughter

USA Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 49:23


The Damon Runyon Theater starring John Brown as Broadway, originally broadcast September 18, 1949, The Brakeman's Daughter. practical joke backfires in several directions. Also Bob and Ray, originally broadcast September 18, 1959, Wally Ballou watches a Navy Ship Contest. "Your Army Amateur Hour." One contestant places his head in an empty artillery shell and imitates a tunnel traffic policeman. An admiral plays, "Smiles" on a weather balloon. Mary McGoon talks about the menu at her new inn, located at Turhan Bey, Maine. Wally Ballou reports from Long Island Sound "watching a boat die."

USA Classic Radio Theater
Classic Radio Theater for September 11, 2021 Hour 2 - Broadway and The Melancholy Dane

USA Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 49:23


Damon Runyon Theater starring John Brown as Broadway, originally broadcast September 11, 1949, The Melancholy Dane. An actor crossed by vengeful critic enacts his revenge under most unusual circumstances. Also Lum n Abner, originally broadcast September 11, 1946, how to pay for the piano.

Dynasty Fantasy Football | Married to The Game | The FF Dynasty

As NFL teams finalize their 53 man rosters we run through a slew of cuts to see whose fantasy value took a bump Detailed Timestamps for your pleasurrre: 3:46 - The Patriots rip the Cam Newton band aid right off, stock up NE RBs? 7:13 - Wayne Gallman cut by the Niners, opens the door for Elijah Mitchell 9:38 - Josh Palmer's stock gets a boost as the Chargers cut Tyron Johnson 10:52 - The Raiders cut John Brown, Henry Ruggs & Bryan Edwards stock up 12:27 - The Rams cut Xavier Jones and Sony Michel's trade window opens 16:14 - Dez Fitzpatrick cut from the Titans, Josh Reynolds gets some life 17:03 - Kerryon & Jordan Howard cut by the Eagles, Kenneth Gainwell baby! To see our marvelous faces check out the video on Youtube, there's also content there that can't be found anywhere else And as always, if you  want to show your support for the show then hit us up on Patreon for exclusive content you can't find anywhere else!  For just 5 dollars a month you get direct access to us like never before with the Discord channel, Mock drafts, and extra shows...for your pleasurrre And as always, if you  want to show your support for the show then hit us up on Patreon for exclusive content you can't find anywhere else!  For just 5 dollars a month you get direct access to us like never before with the Discord channel, Mock drafts, and extra shows...for your pleasurrre Shout out to our main sponsor Revelry Brewing Company  If your local to Charleston or just visiting, their rooftop bar and sour tasting room are a must! If you are looking for a great place to host your Fantasy Football draft in lovely Charleston, SC be sure to hit up thealleycharleston.com or email Lucy directly at lucym@bowlthealley.com Find us on the Facebooks, Instagrams, or the Twitters @TheFFDynasty Casey @IamCMyers  |  Big Co @DynastyBigCo  |  Jay Wayne @JayWaynesWorld The FF Dynasty  – An easy way to listen to fantasy football –

For the Ages: A History Podcast
The Zealot and the Emancipator: John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, and the Struggle for American Freedom Featuring: H.W. Brands

For the Ages: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 26:49


Two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist H.W. Brands discusses the early days of the American struggle to end slavery using the stories of two men who were at its forefront: Abraham Lincoln and John Brown. Recorded September 4, 2020 

Succession Stories
62: Owner-Centric Exit Planning | John Brown @BEIexitplanning

Succession Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 30:22


Listen in as Laurie Barkman talks with John Brown about taking an owner-centric approach to exit planning to achieve your financial goals and be rewarded with the lifestyle you desire. Only 20% of business owners have a formalized plan to transition ownership, but 100% will exit their company one day. John Brown, best selling exit planning author, started BEI in 1996 for the purpose of helping owners benefit from their lives' work by supporting business advisors who share the same vision.   Listen to learn more about: Working with a financial advisor for future planning What builds business value Why exit planning is business planning How an owner-centric approach to exit planning can help you achieve your transition goals Assessing obstacles to the exit scenario you've envisioned How to prevent transition plans from falling through   Show Links: BEI website: https://www.exitplanning.com/ Podcast website: SuccessionStories.com   About: The Succession Stories podcast is hosted by Laurie Barkman, Founder of SmallDotBig. We'll help you maximize business value, plan your exit transition, and get rewarded for all of your hard work by finding the right buyer. Visit https://smalldotbig.com for more value building resources and subscribe to our newsletter!

The Buffalo Beat: A show about the Buffalo Bills
Breaking down the Bills 53-man roster

The Buffalo Beat: A show about the Buffalo Bills

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 57:50


Who is in? Who is out? Joe Buscaglia and Matthew Fairburn weigh in on the Bills initial 53-man roster. They discuss the decision to cut Jacob Hollister, the trade sending Darryl Johnson to the Panthers and the questions that remain at guard. Plus, could John Brown make his way back to Buffalo? They talk about all of that and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

State of the Nation: A show about the Oakland Raiders
Raiders set their initial 53-man roster & what is the outlook and expectations for the season

State of the Nation: A show about the Oakland Raiders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 38:50


Jimmy, Vic & Tashan break down the Raiders initial 53-man roster and talk about the outlook & expectations for the team this season. Raiders made their final cuts before NFL cutdown day and the guys talk about if their were any surprise moves or if there were any guys they were surprised made the team. John Brown was 1 of the big names that was cut by the Raiders and they talk about how that will affect the rest of the WR crew. The give their outlook and expectations for the team this season and health to the 2 lines is 1 of the biggest keys to making it to the playoffs. And the guys take some questions... Save 50% on a subscription to The Athletic at theathletic.com/stateofthenation Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Most Accurate Podcast
Roster Cutdowns with Holden Kushner

The Most Accurate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 51:10


SummaryHolden Kushner from RunPureSports and SportsGrid joins Jen and Brandon to discuss the fantasy-relevant roster cuts from final cutdown day. Holden also debates his first two picks in a redraft league and pounds the table for a certain sophomore running back.Topics DiscussedQuarterbacks (4:30)Running Backs (17:50)Wide Receivers (32:15)Tight Ends (42:00)Kickers (45:30)LinksRunPureSportsUnderdog Fantasy PromoSubscribe to 4for4Guests: Holden KushnerHosts: Jen Eakins, Brandon NilesFollow UsTwitter - https://www.twitter.com/4for4footballFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/4for4footballYouTube - https://www.youtube.com/4for4footballDiscord - https://discord.com/invite/4for4Email: hello@4for4.comMailbag: brandon@4for4.com

Raiders Podcast Network
John Brown and Karl Joseph released. Plus, WR depth and more takeaways from the Raiders' initial 53-man roster | Upon Further Review

Raiders Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 33:25


Raiders.com's Eddie Paskal and KSNV News 3 Las Vegas' Jesse Merrick breakdown the Raiders' initial 53-man roster for the 2021 season, discuss tight end Nick Bowers, depth at linebacker and more on this edition of Upon Further Review.

Raiders Podcast Network
John Brown and Karl Joseph released. Plus, WR depth and more takeaways from the Raiders' initial 53-man roster | Upon Further Review

Raiders Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 33:25


Raiders.com's Eddie Paskal and KSNV News 3 Las Vegas' Jesse Merrick breakdown the Raiders' initial 53-man roster for the 2021 season, discuss tight end Nick Bowers, depth at linebacker and more on this edition of Upon Further Review.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Tim Wise and Infectious Disease Expert Dr Meghan May Episode

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 120:33


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. I have one sponsor which is an awesome nonprofit GiveWell.org/StandUp for more but Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls. I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Dr. Meghan May was appointed in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of New England College of Medicine in 2013. She was previously appointed in the Department of Biological Sciences at Towson University from 2010-2013, and held the Fisher Endowed Chair of Biological Sciences from 2012-2013, and was appointed as a postdoctoral fellow and then a research assistant professor in the Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology at the University of Florida. Dr. May earned her B.S. degree in Microbiology from the University of New Hampshire, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Pathobiology and Bacteriology (respectively) from the University of Connecticut. Her research focus is on the evolution of virulence, not only to determine how new diseases appear and where they come from but also how to predict what new disease might arise next — pathogen forecasting Follow her on Twitter  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Mean Streets with Chris Meaney
Gus Edwards, Week 3 Takeaways & Undervalued WRs

Mean Streets with Chris Meaney

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 18:07


Chris Meaney (@chrismeaney) discusses his new fantasy football ranking for Gus Edwards of the Baltimore Ravens. Edwards' stock has skyrocketed with the J.K. Dobbins injury in Week 3. Meaney discusses his outlook and NFL rushing prop. He also highlights his Week 3 NFL Preseason takeaways. He touches on a few risers such as Tyrell Williams and Nico Collins, and a few fallers such as John Brown and Giovani Bernard. Meaney wraps up by sharing 10 undervalued wide receivers. 2021 Fantasy Football Rankings https://www.ftnfantasy.com/nfl/rankings2021 FTN Fantasy Football Draft Guidehttps://www.ftnfantasy.com/pricingiTunes: https://apple.co/3jJmGBC​​​​​​Spotify: https://spoti.fi/34L0kez​​​​​​Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3efh9S1​​​​​​iHeart Radio: https://ihr.fm/3kMkZEM​​​​​​Get a discount (10% off) at FTN Fantasy with Code “MeanStreets” https://www.ftndaily.com/pricing​​​​​​Get a discount (10% off) at FTN Daily with Code “MeanStreets” https://www.ftnfantasy.com/pricing​​​​​​Get a discount (10% off) at FTN Bets with Code “MeanStreets” https://www.ftnbets.com/pricing​​​​​​Check out the FTN Network:* Daily Fantasy Sports - https://ftndaily.com​​​​​​* Season Long Fantasy - https://ftnfantasy.com​​​​​​* Sports Betting - https://ftnbets.com​​​​​

Conservative Review with Daniel Horowitz
Ep 942 | Are We Headed for a John Brown Moment?

Conservative Review with Daniel Horowitz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 67:28


What our government has done to us on every important issue that matters is unforgivable. Yet, as my colleague Steve Deace recently wrote, it has foreclosed all political avenues to redress our grievances and is creating an inflection moment. I explain how officials have let out hundreds of thousands of criminals who now terrorize our neighborhoods, but prevent us from defending ourselves, just as they have made this virus worse but prevent us from treating it.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Steve Deace Show
Kristi Noem Is a Shameless Corporatist Shill | Guest: Brian Festa | 8/26/21

Steve Deace Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 95:03


In light of South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem's repeated refusal to protect her citizens from vaccine mandates, Steve explains how no man (or attractive woman) can rise above his or her worldview. Then, Steve teaches a history lesson on the rise and fall of one John Brown. In Hour Two, Brian Festa from We the Patriots USA joins the program to talk about his organization's litigation efforts against COVID vaccine mandates. Finally, Theology Thursday is a call to action for everyone faced with COVID tyranny. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Lincoln Project
The Zealot and the Emancipator with H.W. Brands

The Lincoln Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 49:37


Host Reed Galen is joined by Dr. H.W. Brands (Professor of History and Bestselling Author) to discuss the vastly different approaches John Brown and Abraham Lincoln took to confront the issue of slavery in their time and what parallels we can draw to the political landscape of today. For more on this topic be sure to check out Dr. H.W. Brands' The Zealot and the Emancipator, and don't forget to pre-order his upcoming book, Our First Civil War, available on November 9th.

Fantasy Fullback Dive | Fantasy Football Podcast
2021 NFL Preseason Fantasy Football Watch List: Storylines & Positional Battles ft. Sam Factor of WalterPicks | Fantasy Football Podcast

Fantasy Fullback Dive | Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 82:54


2021 NFL Preseason games have arrived! The Wolf welcomes Sam Factor, creator of the great WalterPicks AI Fantasy Football App and TikTok page, to dive into the Positional Battles and Storylines that Fantasy Football owners need to watch this preseason and training camp. We'll dive into the following players and battles: QB Battles / Storylines (01:55) Deshaun Watson Saga Rookie QBs climbing way to starter-dom- Trey Lance & Justin Fields Saints QB Battle: Taysom vs Jameis Pats QB Battle: Mac Jones vs Cam Newton RB Battles / Storylines (24:09) 49ers: Raheem Mostert vs Trey Sermon (v. Wayne Gallman & Elijah Mitchell??) Cardinals: James Conner v. Chase Edmonds Jets: Michael Carter vs Trash Rookie Workloads & Fits for Travis Etienne & Javonte Williams Travis Etienne in JAX Javonte Williams in DEN Can Sophomore standouts Antonio Gibson, JK Dobbins, and D'Andre Swift become bell-cows? WR Battles / Storylines (42:02) Mecole Hardman (and Chiefs No.2 & No.3 WR battles) Elijah Moore (and Jets Battle) Terrace Marshall - in slot?! Marquez Callaway (And Saints No.1 without Michael Thomas) Ravens WR1 (Sammy Watkins v. Marquise Brown v. Maybe Bateman?) Can Bryan Edwards hold off John Brown? Then we wrap up with some WalterPicks talk. How it works, why you should download it, and much more. (01:04:03) Get the latest on these 2021 NFL Training Camp storylines and positional battles you must watch for Fantasy Football season! ----------------------------------------------------------- CONNECT WITH THE WOLFPACK: Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/RSJSubscribe Visit Roto Street Journal: https://www.rotostreetjournal.com/ Fantasy Fullback Dive Homepage: https://www.ffbdpod.com/ Download our App: https://bit.ly/RSJAppDL Instagram: https://bit.ly/RSJIG Twitter: https://bit.ly/RSJTwitter Facebook: https://bit.ly/RSJFacebook

The Most Accurate Podcast
AFC West Division Preview with Evan Silva

The Most Accurate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 66:32


SummaryEvan Silva drops by the pod to talk with Chris and Brandon about the AFC West Division. Also hear Evan pound the table for a certain unsung wide receiver, and tell us all why Aaron Jones is better than his ADP. Topics DiscussedGreen Bay Run Game (2:58)Kansas City Chiefs (12:27)Los Angeles Chargers (27:37)Denver Broncos (41:10)Las Vegas Raiders (53:52)LinksEvan's Team PreviewsEstablish the Run PodcastUnderdog ADP ToolUnderdog Fantasy PromoSubscribe to 4for4Guests: Evan SilvaHosts:  Chris Allen, Brandon NilesFollow UsTwitter - https://www.twitter.com/4for4footballFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/4for4footballYouTube - https://www.youtube.com/4for4footballDiscord - https://discord.com/invite/4for4Email: hello@4for4.comMailbag: brandon@4for4.com