Podcasts about ragnarok

End times in Norse mythology

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SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 537 Ragnarok S03E06 Ragnarok

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2023 65:42


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Netflix series Ragnarok. This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss the series finale and whether we view the “it was all in Magne's head,” as a clever narrative twist or total copout. Despite the problems inherent with this approach, the visual aspects of the battle sequences somewhat make up for any shortcomings. In our What We're Watching segment, Dave recommends the Spanish Netflix thriller Holy Family, and Wayne watches the finale of Doom Patrol with mixed feelings about its quality. In Listener Feedback, Fred from the Netherlands laments encountering spoilers about the series finale, and Alan in England, like Dave, notices the counselor's reluctance to tell Ran what's really on his mind. Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: Dave B+  Wayne B- Series Grade: Dave B+  Wayne A-

Lore Watch
Is Azeroth heading to a Ragnarok reset?

Lore Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 59:38


Join us this week as we delve deeply into the idea that Azeroth's races may be programmed to protect the planet by the Titans and if they fail, the Titans will reset the world and let it play out all over again. Plus, the possible impact of non-druid classes entering the Emerald Dream. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Lore Watch
Is Azeroth heading to a Ragnarok reset?

Lore Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 59:39


Join us this week as we delve deeply into the idea that Azeroth's races may be programmed to protect the planet by the Titans and if they fail, the Titans will reset the world and let it play out all over again. Plus, the possible impact of non-druid classes entering the Emerald Dream.

SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 536 Ragnarok S03E05 Farewell to Arms

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2023 57:23


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Netflix series Ragnarok. This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss the possible transformation of Magne's personality after Wotan takes him into nature for a wake-up call. Will a battle to the death occur, or will the peace Magne brokers actually hold, giving the new world order a chance to change the lives of Edda's populace? In our What We're Watching segment, Dave gives the Polish Netflix coming of age tale Absolute Beginners high marks, and Wayne returns to the comedy series Ghosts. In Listener Feedback, Fred from the Netherlands speculates about a possible connection between Wotan and Hod. Alan in England gives Dave the motivation to finally check out the UK crime drama Shetland.  Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: A-

Comic News Insider
Episode 1464 - Thought Bubble Festival: Emma Vieceli!

Comic News Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2023 32:01


Jimmy did several interviews before Thought Bubble Festival that he had planned on doing there. This way, his interview schedule wouldn't be too busy at the show. He met up with his friend Emma Vieceli in Cambridge for lunch, shopping and dinner. They did a fun interview in her home with the family cat Ragnarok making a couple of appearances. They talked about her hit webcomic BREAKS, her run on LIFE IS STRANGE, musical theater and more. Thanks to Emma and Pud for having Jimmy over for the night. Always a blast! Also, get a hold of us! Thanks for listening!

SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 535 Ragnarok S03E04 My Precious

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2023 61:01


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Netflix series Ragnarok. This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss Saxa's plan for the hammer that she briefly possesses and who will be left standing at the series' end. Is it the end of the world or maybe something else? In our What We're Watching segment, Wayne finds Our Flag Means Death provides a nice light diversion from the heavier shows he ordinarily watches. Meanwhile, Dave finishes the Scandi series The Blood Pact and checks out the new Apple TV+ show The Buccaneers. In Listener Feedback, Alan in England sticks with the Chinese version of Three Body Problem, and Fred from the Netherlands vows to move ahead with Orphan Black: Echoes. Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: Dave B+  Wayne A-

Réalité Augmentée
Réalité Augmentée - Episode #398

Réalité Augmentée

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2023 92:26


Cette semaine Luc est accompagné de Steve Levesque. Au menu; Call of Duty Modern Warfare 3, les séries Loki Saison 2, Ragnarok saison 3 et le Films The Marvels.

History Extra podcast
Norse myths: everything you wanted to know

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2023 58:21


What myths did the Norse believe, and what influence did they exert on daily life? Was the trickster god Loki really that bad, and was Odin really that wise? And why is Christianity a crucial part of the story? Speaking to Kev Lochun, historian and broadcaster Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough answers listener questions about the pantheon of Norse myths, from the yawning void of Ginnungagap to the end of days, Ragnarok. The HistoryExtra podcast is produced by the team behind BBC History Magazine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

speaking christianity myths loki norse ragnarok everything you wanted bbc history magazine ginnungagap eleanor rosamund barraclough
Jon Solo's Messed Up Origins Podcast
The Messed Up Origins of RAGNAROK

Jon Solo's Messed Up Origins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2023 30:11


Head to https://squarespace.com/jonsolo to save 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain using code JONSOLO ! Thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring this episode!

SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 534 Ragnarok S03E03 Losing My Religion

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2023 53:00


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Netflix series Ragnarok. This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss the Giants' plans to bring down Magne, and whether Saxa has any genuine feelings for the hammer wielding god. Has there been a bigger episode ending scene than the serpent swallowing Molinjor?  In our What We're Watching segment, Wayne finishes up Lower Decks and Bodies, while Dave makes an attempt to watch the Chinese version of Three Body Problem. In Listener Feedback, Alan in England brings up the lyrics to an ABBA song and how it relates to the episode, and Fred from the Netherlands coins the phrase “the snake in the lake.” Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: Dave B  Wayne A-

Our Numinous Nature
ICELANDIC FOLKLORE, SORCERERS & A SACRIFICIAL STONE | Museum Manager | Anna Björg

Our Numinous Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 105:12


Anna Björg Þórarinsdóttir is the manager of The Museum of Icelandic Sorcery & Witchcraft in The Westfjords region of Iceland.  We begin on the country's origins as a Viking settlement, followed by life in the traditional turf houses. From there we learn that belief in elves is still relevant today and how spirits in the land have shaped not only Icelandic legends, but the ethos. We hear of a nearby farm built over a heathen temple where an ominous Viking-era stone was discovered. In story form, Anna tells the rich history of the island's 16th-to-17th-century sorcerers: the religious temperament of the time, their persecution, and her own ancestral involvement. This opens up further synchronicities around her position at the museum & growing up in a New Age household. For the remaining time, it's an all out deluge of folklore and magic: spirit guides called Fylgja, hunting & farming folk magic, The Helm of Awe, the Yule Lads, a pair of human skin pants, and finally, a grotesque milk-stealing wool-worm known as the Tilberi! Learn more about The Museum of Icelandic Sorcery & Witchcraft & follow Anna on Instagram.Reading excerpt from Icelandic Folk Legends: Tales of Apparitions, Outlaws and Things Unseen by Alda Sigmundsdóttir  Music Credit:"Ragnarok" [The End of the Gods]Performed by Ensemble: SequentiaCourtesy of

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E95 - Sam and Amadeo on Sheep, Wolves, and Climate Change

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2023 53:53


Episode Summary This week on Live Like the World is Dying, Margaret talks with Sam and Amadeo about their experiences shepherding in the Swiss Alps. They talk about the problems that shepherds are facing in Switzerland with wolves, climate change, city mentalities, and right-wing propaganda. Host Info Margaret (she/they) can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Transcript Live Like the World is Dying: Sam and Amadeo on Sheep, Wolves, and Climate Change **Margaret ** 00:16 Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the times. I'm your host today, Margaret Killjoy and this is an episode about sheep...and sheep farming. Shepherding, I believe we might want to call it, in the Alps. I'm really excited about it. We've been planning this episode for a while, because we are going to be talking to two sheep farmers in the Alps about climate change and about the return of wolves and about ecology and about why the right-wing picks all the wrong talking points and a bunch of other stuff. But first, we are a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show on the network.  **Margaret ** 01:52 Okay, we're back. So if y'all could introduce yourselves with your name...your names, your pronouns, and I guess just a little bit about your background with shepherding. **Sam ** 02:05 All right, Hi, I'm Sam, my pronouns she/her and we are in Vienna right now. And yeah, I'm an artist and also a bit of a writer, filmmaker. I do a lot of that kind of stuff. Lately I have been working a lot with metal and smithing And yeah, I went with Amadeo on a sheep farm and Alps in Valais in Switzerland. And we want to tell you a bit about our experience. **Amadeo ** 02:38 Yeah, my name is Amadeo. He/him. I'm 38. Actually, I started to work as a teacher now. I teach biology and some other stuff, politics, and so on. And yeah, This was my third year...third summer, not third year, third season to work as a shepherd but the first time with sheep, actually. Before that I worked with cows and milking and so on. Yeah, and for me it was also the first time with sheep and the first time in this area of Switzerland. I'm Austrian. But the payment in Austria is really bad so we went to Switzerland. So we are also the working migrants. Or what do you call it in English? **Margaret ** 03:31 Migrant workers, I guess.  **Amadeo ** 03:34 Yes.  **Margaret ** 03:36 Okay, so what brought you all to sheep farming or to farming in general as like the thing to go do with your summers for work?  **Amadeo ** 03:47 Should I?  **Sam ** 03:48 Yeah, you can. **Amadeo ** 03:50 So, I had this experience in 2020 and 21, I think, and I really liked it in a way. It was very hard work back then, but I learned a lot. And we met after that, actually, and decided we would like to go together. And then we just hit up the internet and looked for work and places to go and then we found this place that sounded pretty ideal for us because it was sheep farming and no milking, which is nice. I didn't want to do the milking job and do cheesemaking and so on again, I wanted to stay outside mostly, like the whole day under the sky and not in the staple. And yeah, we found this place where you don't need your own dogs, which is nice. We were working with blacknose sheep, they're called. It's like a breed that is only bred in this area. Or not only but traditionally there. And yeah, we tried to get the job and we got it. **Sam ** 05:08 I guess we also got in because Amadeo also already had a lot of experience. And yeah, they were looking for two people there and without dogs. And yeah, I also got...I was really lucky that I was with Amadeo because, you know, like some very daily stuff, he already was prepared for this job. Like, you need a lot of some equipment and know what to take. And yeah, I was really.... **Amadeo ** 05:36 The thing was that, of course, the owners of the sheep, they want someone who has some experience because it happens often that you think, "Oh, it's nice. It's in the mountains. It's beautiful." And then people after two weeks, three weeks, they say, "No way. I can't work here. It's way too hard." I mean, it's like pretty hard work. It's outside all day. With rain, with snow sometimes. And you work from sunup to sundown every day, seven days a week. And many people underestimate it because there's like, I don't know, this idea drawn of what it's like to work in the mountains and it's always beautiful. And it is. But it's also very hard work, actually. **Margaret ** 06:22 It seems really hard. It wouldn't immediately occur to me that I could just go run out and become a shepherd like tomorrow. But I have two questions. And they're related. And one is, what does an average day look like for a shepherd in an Alpine Valley? And the second question that's related is, do you get a shepherd's crook? **Sam ** 06:42 Yeah, well, the day starts with sunrise. Around five was when the summer started. We got there in mid of June. I stayed till mid of September. Amadeo had to leave a bit earlier. And the day ends with sunset. And yeah, you bring the sheep back into the night pen. You say, "pen," huh? Like a space where there is electricity on. Pen? [Said with air of not being sure if it's the correct word] **Amadeo ** 07:15 Do you know what that is? Or, did we get the right word?  **Margaret ** 07:17 Like an animal pen? Or is it a barn? **Amadeo ** 07:19 Yeah, it's like it has no roof. It's not a barn. It has no roof. It's just a fence. An area fenced. A fenced in area with strong electricity because of the wolves. **Margaret ** 07:35 Oh, yeah. Okay, it has an electric fence. Yeah, **Sam ** 07:37 yeah, exactly. And yeah, we would move every two weeks to a new pasture with the sheep. And there were 12 farmers or sheepherders. They're not all farmers. They also have another life. Most of them have another job. They work as bus drivers in heavy industry. And yeah, they also are doing a lot of work. So they're working with us there. We were there most of the time alone, but they come on weekends. They bring us food. They set up the pastures, lines, the fences too. Yeah. And so then we stay out with the sheep all day, any weather. And yeah, also, when we moved the pasture, they came for help because it's hard to change the pasture. You sometimes have to cross a river. And.... **Margaret ** 08:29 Wait, how do you cross the river? Do you just like drive them through the river? **Amadeo ** 08:33 Yes.  **Margaret ** 08:35 Like , "Go swim!"  **Amadeo ** 08:38 It was not such. It was more like a stream than the river. A river sounds bigger than it was.  **Sam ** 08:48 It was like this, like we always make a plan in the evening. Even a drawing. We were five people planning this. And then it always ends up in pretty much chaos and completely different. And in the end they were screaming, "Sam! Go! Go!" And I was like, I even had shoes on and the first sheep I was pulling, just one sheep, with all my strength through the river. And then all the sheep follow. **Margaret ** 09:14 Okay, okay. I have friends who keep sheep but in the city. And they just keep like six of them or something. And it's just a very different thing than like a free ranging sheep. And so it's hard for me to conceptualize.  **Amadeo ** 09:30 We had 400. **Margaret ** 09:32 Yeah, that's more than six. I'm good at numbers. That's amazing. Okay, cool. **Sam ** 09:38 So part of the daily routine is also to do the basic medical care. So we were introduced to that. Sometimes they have claw problems. [Claws are sheep toes] **Amadeo ** 09:38 Problems with the claws.  **Sam ** 09:39 Problems with claws. So this was a regular thing. And sometimes using antibiotics against.... **Amadeo ** 09:58 Yeah, and we had to clean the pen every day, which was like three to four hours of work for one of us. Like shoveling shit. **Margaret ** 10:09 Yeah, okay. But you didn't answer the second question. Did you have a shepherd's crook? Do you know what that is? [Laughing] **Amadeo ** 10:17 Not a real one. We had like umbrellas. Big ones that were very useful against the sun. And so preparedness thing number one, if you stay in the high alpine areas, the altitude of the higher pastures were 2500 meters [8,200ft], you need something to cover you against the sun and against the rain. So big umbrellas were pretty handy. **Sam ** 10:46 And also the sheep have horns so it's easier to catch them. You have to learn this also, but you throw yourself on the sheep and then you tackle them down. I got really good at this. And also the blacknose sheep in the valleys, they have very long hair. And, I mean, it's breeding, right? They do it for breeding, the sheepherders. So the wool, it doesn't get any money. It's nothing. It's not worth anything anymore. But for the beauty contests that the sheep go to it's really important. It's a tradition. And they let it grow.... **Amadeo ** 11:26 They have very long face hair so some of them are basically blind. Most of them have like, how do you say something that rings? What is it? A bell? Yes.  **Sam ** 11:39 Yeah, but they get lost because they don't see anything and our job was also to make them hair ties and to tie the hair. And also the sheepherders would come to do this because we could not do this for 400 sheep. Yeah, so that was also part of the job, Yeah, it adds up. There are some different tasks. And yeah, since we would move with the sheep, maybe also that.  So also the moving is part of. You're always packing your stuff. You need to think, okay, how much food we need to...how much will we eat and how much do we need to take to the next hut. So organizing this is part of it. And then we had a small hut that was flied in with a helicopter. It was... **Amadeo ** 12:12 Flown in. Flown with the helicopters for the most remote places where we would stay with the sheep because otherwise you would have to walk a long way, like 45 minutes to the cabin every day. So they brought in a tiny hut for one person, actually.  **Margaret ** 12:47 For you all?  **Amadeo ** 12:49 Yeah, yeah. Flown with the helicopter so we could stay next to the sheep.  **Sam ** 12:55 But it was so small. Like one was sleeping on the floor, the other on this little bed. And also you always need to organize this hut when you come with very wet clothes. You have no space in there. We had a little solar panel. So this was doing.... We had a fridge at least. Very high tech. I guess 20 years before, we would not have a fridge. And some light even in the cabin and a stove. A wood stove. It got crazy hot because it's so small and yeah. So organizing this hut was also not so easy. And we were lucky because there was a lot of water in this valley. Like it's full of water. And so we would get water from the... **Amadeo ** 13:43 From the springs around.  Wells? How you say? **Margaret ** 13:48 Well, I mean, a well is a hole dug in the ground and then a spring is usually a natural spring or it's like a pipe stuck in the side of a hill that the water comes out of. **Amadeo ** 13:57 Yeah, it was a natural spring. No pipe, though. Just some moss and it was nice. **Margaret ** 14:04 And so you can just go straight from that or do you have to filter it? **Amadeo ** 14:08 It depends. We had, at some points, we could just drink it from there. We didn't filter it. At the cabins we had covered springs, wells. Or springs? So we could...it was okay. But the open ones, we had to take care of where the sheep were. If the sheep can go around then it's not so good. It was better if it was higher up where they wouldn't go. **Sam ** 14:42 Yeah also good that there were a lot of springs so the sheep would get water. They need to drink. And sometimes there were pastures where they could only drink one time in the day, so they also learn when they have to drink in the morning because we had really hot days also where these blacknose sheep with all the wool, they really get hot. And yeah, then also we learned how the sheep walk in every pasture. They have the same kind of routine that follows the sun also. And you kind of learn their ways. And also maybe when it's time to act to get the sheep back, I mean, without a dog. Yeah, you need to learn this also, I guess, when it's time. **Amadeo ** 15:33 I always said, if you want to move against their will, you are the dog, you have to run around like crazy. They have their rhythm and they have their ways, you know? **Margaret ** 15:46 So, did you all use dogs? Like also? Or is it sometimes dogs, sometimes no dogs? **Amadeo ** 15:54 No, we had none. The thing is that this kind of race [breed of sheep] is very used to people and they're not moving that far. So you can walk with them. It's okay. It's just the problem is you can have two kinds of dogs, right? You can have dogs to protect against wolves, for example. Then they live with the sheep. They're inside of the flock all the time. But it's a problem with hikers and so on. Because they attack everyone that comes near, right? **Margaret ** 16:33 This explains a little bit about my dog.  **Amadeo ** 16:36 Yeah, and so you can really have them there because it's also like a recreational area. This area, like a lot of people go hiking there and so on. So you can't have dangerous dogs. And the other thing would be like dogs that help you move the flock.  **Margaret ** 17:01 Herding dogs?  **Amadeo ** 17:02 We didn't really need it, right? Because we would have not.... I mean, it was big areas but still we would stay in one area for two weeks and then we would move on to the next area. So you didn't really need dogs to guard them the whole day. **Sam ** 17:23 But it's really a calm.... The blacknose sheep are really really calm sheep. We learned this also because like certain sheep breeds, you say, right, they run way more. They run all day. And you really need dogs there. Yeah, so we.... **Amadeo ** 17:40 But with the blacknose, no, they are kind of calm. Yes. And they have a long...during the day they have a long break time.  **Sam ** 17:48 Resting time.   **Amadeo ** 17:49 Yeah, because if it's getting hot up there, the sun is very strong. It can be like, I don't know.... Like I mean the degrees don't get up that much like in the flat areas but the sun, how you say...the sun rays are really strong. **Margaret ** 18:11 Yeah, because when you're at a higher altitude there's less atmosphere to protect you, right? I know what I mean. But I don't know the words for it. **Amadeo ** 18:22 Yeah, the sheep have some...if it's a hot day, they rest for four hours during midday. They try to find, you know, shady spots and just rest. And so at that time, you can also rest. If it's rainy, you can't rest because then they are moving too. Yeah. **Margaret ** 18:48 It makes me...the no dog thing, I'm like.... My dog was bred to have a million different jobs. My dog is just a complete mutt of a lot of different working breeds. And so Rintrah, my dog, is never quite sure whether he's supposed to be herding, or chasing, or retrieving things. He just wants to do all of it all the time. And one of the proudest things I've ever had, my proudest dog mom moment, was staying with my friend who has goats and sheep and one of the baby goats just got out of the pen and was running around the yard. And so Rintrah just herded it into a corner and then like calmly barked to inform us that he had trapped the goat. And I was just like, no one taught you how to do that. He wasn't a year old. He just was like , "This is what I do." And so like, I imagine how happy my dog would be as a sheepdog, a herding dog, which isn't necessarily true because he has adhd. This is a complete tangent. I just like talking about my dog. But you all, one of the reasons I want to talk to you, you talked about how a lot of this ties into preparedness and how it feels you've learned a lot about preparedness that you're like taking into the rest of your life by having done this work. I was wondering if you wanted to talk more about that. As a complete, look how expertly I tangented...pivoted from one topic to another. **Sam ** 20:11 Yeah, yeah, actually your podcast was really a bit with us in this time. It was cool, the topic of preparedness. And yeah, for me in this way, thinking about preparedness, what's also weighed in with this work was to get somehow familiar again with the conditions of doing this work, of ways of living in this open environment, of existing there with the sheep and in this non-human environment. And also, maybe, in this threatened environment that somehow you would.... And also the organization structures, how this work is possible, that it needs a lot of people and it needs a lot of people who do this. I mean, there's the farmers or sheepherders, they do this because they love this work. Because they have done this all the time. It's tradition. And yeah, that they somehow save something. **Amadeo ** 21:17 I mean, to talk about the practical side, if you stay outside the whole day, every day, seven days a week, you learn a lot of what you really need and what you don't need. I think that was big. Yeah, it was like very valuable to me to see what I really need. And I remember listening to your podcast, and you talk a lot about being prepared in a way, like having podcasts on your phone, for example. Because if you have to stay with sheep for 10 hours a day, you need to...you had a lot of time to think. And I loved having a good book because I could read and then think for hours about it and have like, I think, yeah, more time than in the city where you are distracted from one topic to another. So this really is good to have more, I don't know, space in my head. This was a good thing. And yeah, I think looking at, how you say, like, being outside in nature everyday and witnessing all these little changes from day-to-day. This was very, very, very special. And I think I learned so much about life and also about survival because all the animals and the plants there, they are...like, they have to survive in a very harsh environment with very short growing period, for example. I mean, lots of snow during.... Winter lasts, I don't know, for 10 months, or like, let's see, nine maybe? You know what I mean? Like when we came mid June, there was still snow. And in August before we...the end was the 16th, I think, of September, but we had to leave the higher pastures at the end of August because it was starting to snow heavily. And yeah, it's like very different too.  **Sam ** 23:30 But still to also learn about the fears and the sheepherder have. And also, yeah, it's an environment that's threatened and that will change through climate change for sure. Like it is changing. And I thought also on some days that it gets hotter and hotter every summer. And also last year, the grass was really dry. So the sheep would get this disease called, in German, Lipinkin [cannot translate], which is little bit like herpes. Yeah. And yeah, they had to be treated, every sheep, and give some.... **Amadeo ** 24:05 Some cream. But do that for 400 sheep, man. **Margaret ** 24:11 Yeah, that sounds like it would take a while.  **Sam ** 24:14 Medication for 400 sheep. So yeah, they have struggles they face. And then the wolf, of course, is a new topic. And yeah, they have to deal with a lot of stuff. Yeah. **Margaret ** 24:27 Well, let's talk about wolves. Let's talk about--you all mentioned beforehand when we were getting ready to talk about how wolves have maybe either been reintroduced or are coming back in that area to a certain degree and how that threatens this way of life but like not as much as climate change does and how it all ties into the right-wing and I kinda wanna to hear about it. **Amadeo ** 24:51 Yeah, since a few years, since I was like.... 2020 was really when I was first introduced to this life, to these people in Switzerland. First of all, I came from the city and I didn't know that it's such a big topic already. Because in Austria, we have a few wolves. But not to mention, you know, maybe a dozen. But I learned that in Switzerland since the last, I don't know, 20 years, from a dozen they now have, I think, 250. Around 250. And, like, I don't know, 25 packs or something, or something like this. Which doesn't sound so much, but it's like...it's not such a big country. And they are a lot in these areas. For example, in Valais where we stayed, we knew that the nearest wolves are just two kilometers away. And they have offspring. So for them, they need meat and so on. And I mean, the sheep are puffy, you know. It's like, go get them. **Sam ** 26:01 Also, on the other side of the mountain, actually, there was another shepherd with a, I think, also around 400.... Fuck, I don't know exactly how many sheep. And there the wolf came. And he killed, I think, seven sheeps. And also one of his dogs was attacked. So it was really close. And also the fear that we might face an attack was also really with us. And also there was a guy who takes care of the area.  **Amadeo ** 26:34 A ranger.  **Sam ** 26:35 Yeah, and he came and told us, "Hey, you really have to watch out. They're really close." So yeah.  **Amadeo ** 26:42 But the thing is, the crazy thing for me is that, of course, this threatens, in a way, people that are used to putting their cattle, putting their sheep just in a meadow and leaving them, you know. Have a look once a week or something. Of course now with the wolves, it's not possible because a wolf would kill many. They start to, you know, get into like.... If they can they kill 10 and then just take one, you know. They just.... If they [sheep] don't run away and they don't run far, you know, 100 years of, I don't know, living with humans and being petted and so on, they don't have--you know what I mean? They don't have it in them anymore to really run. Because normally, if a wolf attacks a  deer, for example, the pack can't find any deer for another week or something because they're all alert. They're alert as soon as there is an encounter. With the sheep, it's not so much. So now it's a problem, of course, but there would be solutions. You just, you need to adjust. You need to change the way it works. Yeah, you need protection. You need people to look after the sheep and so on. And for many areas, this is really hard. Because if you have an alpine pasture that is very remote, steep hills everywhere, you know, it's so hard to really fence it off or something. It's not possible. So I can understand it for the farmers. It's hard. And when we talked with them about it, they were always like, "We have to kill the wolf," you know? And it's now protected. It's under national protection. You cannot just shoot them. Even if they kill some of your sheep, you can't. And there was a big--in Switzerland you have more, how you say, basic democracy. So many of the laws are decided by a vote of everyone. So there was a big vote about if the protection status of the wolves should be loosened in a way. Not that you can just hunt them but loosen in a way that you can, I don't know, shoot some if they're attacking cattle or.... **Margaret ** 29:11 Can you shoot them if they attack you? **Amadeo ** 29:13 No, we had no gun. I mean, they won't attack  humans but... **Margaret ** 29:20 I'm an American, so I'm like....Okay, so like, I think about this a lot. Okay. I'm really...the wolf thing is so interesting to me for a thousand reasons. And one is that the destruction of wolves is such a emblem of civilization. It is such an emblem of the conquest of nature, right? And you have, for example, the no wolves in Ireland thing. You know? And that the British were very into killing all the wolves in Ireland and part of that even.... Like, so you even have the Irish rebels who would be to a certain degree, would be like, "Oh, we are the wolves. Like we are the people that they're trying to conquer," because it's like they are the unconquered, you know, wild folk, or whatever fucking bullshit colonial thing that gets thrown at them, you know? But at the same time, it's like.... So I'm kind of rooting for the wolves here with what you're describing, right? I like sheep. I don't specifically want the sheep to die. And where I live, we have coyotes, right. And we don't really have wolves where I live, but we have coyotes. And they kill, you know, they kill livestock. And they also kill dogs, right? And I have a dog. And I very actively want my dog to not be killed by coyotes. And apparently coyotes will do this thing where they'll befriend a dog, and be like, "yeah, totally, come hang out with us," and then kill and eat that dog, right? And so I have a neighbor who oversees about 400 acres. And he's from France. And he carries around a handgun. And he's so confused by this. He's like, "I came to America and now I have to carry around a handgun." But he carries around a handgun in case he's attacked by coyotes. Right? And it's like, interesting to me because it's like.... The urge to be like, "Oh, we should kill all the wolves so we can happily raise our sheep in peace," like fuck that, right? That, to me, is like the example of a negative form of peace, where you have conquered and like flattened everything. Sorry, it's a little bit of a rant, but I'm going somewhere with it. I promise. And then, but at the same time, there's this balance, right? Like, I'm not going to let a coyote kill my dog. Or if I was around wolves, I wouldn't let the wolves kill me, right? I mean, whatever I...as much as I can control that, you know? The coyotes are kind of on the other side of the hill. So I don't carry a gun around my property. But that would be a thing that I would need to consider in certain circumstances. So, it's just really interesting to me that, like, I get why the sheep farmers are like, "Oh, we got to get rid of all these wolves." But I'm also like, "Whatever. Fuck you. Let the wolves be." But then I'm also like, it's complicated. And I get why you have to defend the sheep. But I don't know. Anyway, that's where I'm going with it. I guess I wasn't going anywhere with it after all. **Sam ** 32:15 Yeah, no, I think it's a really complex situation. Yeah, there is not an easy answer to like kill the wolf or.... Yeah, I'm also pro Wolf. And there needs to be a different solution. And yeah, like to see what the sheepherders really face, what kind of struggles they face with this was really interesting. And also, I think the problem is that it's super instrumentalized [wonders if that's the right word]...instrumentalized by right-wing people politically.  **Margaret ** 32:55 Weaponized? [Offering a different word] **Amadeo ** 32:58 Yeah. In a way. I mean, the thing is, it also turned in Switzerland, for example, into a city versus countryside. Because at the vote, most people from the cities would vote for the wolf for what keeps the protection. But many people in the countryside, with also more like conservative political beliefs--and the conservative parties--said, "No, no, no, we have to change that because it threatens our way of living around in the remote areas in the countryside. And so this is somehow so stupid because.... **Sam ** 33:37 Yeah, that's also covering certain other threats, right, like climate change. They don't talk about climate change. The only thing they speak about is the wolf and the wolves. And yeah, that's really.... So it's somehow a weird thing that it's so taken over by this discourse, which is, yeah.... **Amadeo ** 33:57 Yeah, you can shoot climate change. That's the thing. It's easy to say, "Oh, it's all the wolf. We have to kill the wolf. And then we get rid of this problem." But on the other hand, climate change.... [interrupted] **Margaret ** 34:11 I can think of some ways to solve climate change with guns, but.... Anyway.... **Amadeo ** 34:16 I mean, I got so sad up there because it's so special. I mean, this area was a natural reserve too. And it has golden eagles. It has vultures, it has marmots, it has like.... **Sam ** 34:35 A lot of marmots. Everywhere. [Laughing] **Amadeo ** 34:38 And some protected bogs, some plants that are really like really rare, like at the brink of extinction. And I know, I stood there and I saw this, I don't know, this beauty and I know in 50 years from now it will be gone. Probably. It's very, very likely. Because.... I mean, some species can move.... Like, seen on a global level, they move north because it's getting warm. But on the on fucking mountain, there is an end. There is no moving more up. Because at 4000 meters or something, it's....stops, you know? Like there's nothing there. And all the farmers there, for example, if you ask them, they see these changes. They witness it. They say, "Yes, it's so much different than it was when I was a kid." And the glaciers, for example, in Switzerland--I read about it--there were since the 70s, 800 glaciers are gone. And there is still 1400 glaciers in Switzerland. And they say 2100 [year], they will be probably most of them, like 95%, will be gone. And it's so sad. But still, if you say something like, "Climate change," even those farmers there, that witness it every fucking day, they say like, "Well, you know, I don't know if you can call it that." It's ridiculous. And it's because the discourse, the political discourse, is framed by conservatives mostly. And they say, "Your problem is the wolf. We can shoot the wolf." So.... [Margaret starts talking and apologizes] No, no, it's, I'm, I'm done with ranting. **Margaret ** 36:40 No, this is so interesting for a thousand reasons. And one of them is that we always.... It goes back hundreds of years that leftists will be like, "Oh, the countryside are all right-wing. Fuck them." And this is not true, right? This is like.... The most interesting leftist revolutions have generally involved also the rural folks, right? I mean, like, famously, the fucking Russian Revolution was all rural people. And to be fair, Marx was.... I think he owned up to getting that wrong, because he was one of the people who started this myth that "The peasant is not the revolutionary subject, only the proletarian worker in the city is," right? "And the peasants are always reactionary." And I think he owned up to, when he looked at Russia, he was like, "Oh, I got that one wrong. Okay, cool." You know. It's true if we let it be true, because you have this thing where.... I think it is actually a flaw that we have to be careful with in democracy--and majority rule in general--is if people in the cities make the rules for the people in the countryside, and they don't understand the people in the countryside and they don't understand their way of life. And so it's like, really easy--even though I'm still on the wolf's side--I see it as complicated. Whereas it's like really easy to live in a city and be like, "Whatever. Fuck it," you know, because it's not their livelihood, or dog that is being threatened, right? And so I feel like, to me, it's this thing where we can't cede that ground to the right-wing, you know? And I really, I think it's cool that you all.... And that's one reason I want to talk to you about it is that there's like all of these.... It doesn't have to be this inherently conservative space to be in the countryside, to be in a rural area. And then the other thing that I was thinking about with what you're talking about, about mountains and how things retreat, is that mountains are so interesting to me because they're always where people run to, right? And you look at.... I mean, you look at Switzerland as a country and as the history of the country is people fleeing there in order to--well, I don't know enough about how Switzerland was formed--but in World War II, every time I'm like reading about Dutch revolutionaries, or whatever, they're like, "Fuck!" and they all run over to Switzerland and climb up the glaciers with their bare hands, or whatever the fuck. I don't know. I clearly know what I'm talking about. And in the United States, you have. where I live in Appalachia, that is the place that people would retreat to. That is the place where people losing wars against the conquest of the United States would go to. And it is. It's that weird thing where you're always free in the mountains, but there's only so far you can run. And that's just so heartbreaking to think about, you know? There's only so far up the mountain that these plants can migrate. On the other hand, I have a feeling that's what we're all going to be living. We're all gonna be in Antarctica. Antarctica bloomed this year, I think. I think we're being on Antarctica and on the mountains. So...  **Sam ** 39:39 Yeah, but it's interesting how it's idolized and romanticized. I mean, we had like...and how extreme, actually, the weather really changes. I really didn't know. I had never lived for three months so high up. And yeah, but also, they're so romanticized. There's this huge hype around survivalist shows, at the moment on TV, which is also really interesting and comes with this. And on the opposite for me the...Yeah, the question was how does being there in the Alps, what does this really change with me and what does it do to experience this? And yeah....  **Amadeo ** 40:20 Yeah, what does it do?  **Margaret ** 40:23 We're asking.   **Sam ** 40:23 It's still settling in. And it's about reconnecting and really realizing what it takes to do this work. And I have a lot of respect.... Also, to be in a very patriarchal space where the shepherds were only older men. Yeah, they have their ways of acting. They have their ways of being. And for me, this was really difficult. Yeah. And still, somehow to not say, "Hey, I won't enter this space," but to go there and.... Yeah, also see what community they have, you know. Yeah, to also go beyond this, I think, that they have their tradition and they have to face this, but yeah, it was also.... [Interrupted] **Amadeo ** 41:11 Maybe you can maybe explain a little bit this, I don't know, this group of people we worked for, because it was actually pretty interesting because it's a conservative area, but they were very working class and very, very nice to us. I think. They treated us really respectfully. And I know, in my other place where I worked as a shepherd, it wasn't like that. I was treated, actually, a little bad. And that's...I don't know. **Sam ** 41:45 Yeah. And to see how they are with the animals. I mean, for them, that's...they are their life. And it's this encounter.  **Amadeo ** 41:50 They love them. **Sam ** 41:51 And for us, to get to know every sheep personally, it's really interesting what connection you get. You watch them all the time. You learn, hey, they are totally different. They have totally different characters.  **Margaret ** 42:09 Yeah. Okay, my question to you is how do you, when you're working with people who are seeing this climate change happen, how do you--but but can't acknowledge it--do you have any insight or thoughts about how to connect with people about that, about how to talk to people, you know, who want to focus on the wolf instead of the bigger wolf, the climate wolf? What's the name of that wolf that's gonna eat the sun and Germanic paganism? Wow, how do I not remember that.  Anyway, whatever, at the start of Ragnarok. Someone's gonna get really mad at me for not knowing this. Fenrir! **Amadeo ** 42:51 I think we had some very good discussions at times. Right? With the guys.... Sorry? [Margaret interrupting] **Margaret ** 43:01 No, no, no, I was just...I remembered the name of the wolf that eats the sun and starts Ragnarok. It's Fenrir. Anyway, or Fenris? Oh, God, no people gonna get mad at me. Anyway, please continue. Tell you something.  **Amadeo ** 43:13 I think also, even though some of them were a little bit panicky about wolves, and so on, I think the system with the night pens and with having shepherds like us, since a few years, to look after the sheep, day and night, basically, it works pretty well. I mean, they told us they have one to five, maybe, sheep per year that are getting killed by the wolf. But that's okay. I mean, they're realistic about it, right? And when we talked about climate change, of course, it was--I mean, for me, it's not much different--I mean, they acknowledged that things are changing. They didn't use the, I don't know, scientific vocabulary or whatever. And they acknowledged in a way--or some of them at least--that there are new problems that we have to face. For example, it's too dry, and so on. Water issues.  Dying out of certain plants, animals in certain areas, and so on. They all see this. More avalanches in the winter. All of this. But, I mean, they were a little helpless. And I mean, we are also often a little helpless, because it's getting individualized. How should you react? Not drive a car? Great. I mean, we have to, you know, rise up and change all of the economy, you know, and this is hard to do. **Sam ** 44:53 But I guess, I mean, I also came there with my artistic background and as an artist and I also was filming a lot--more some of the sheeps but also us--and I think for me to show as someone coming there with a city background, but also with our backgrounds as biologists and artists, and showing how this encounter happens maybe from us as city people with also another perspective in encountering this world. I think I find this really interesting. Also showing some part of this being not exactly in this. I think that's an interesting perspective, also, for other people to see. And yeah, I'm probably cutting a bit of a movie out of this. And I think it can.... Yeah, it's good to go to this place and to show our perspective.  **Amadeo ** 45:53 I mean, I'm so grateful for what these people taught us, right, and that we were accepted and we did this job. And I think we did a good job. But also they trust us, right? **Sam ** 46:06 And what the sheep teach us.  **Amadeo ** 46:08 Yeah, the human and non-human individuals that trusted us. And it was, I think.... I'm very, very grateful. But on the other hand, also, for them, I think it was kind of interesting to have unorthodox people there, people who didn't grow up around the corner with animals, and sheep, and so on. Because for them, they all grew up with this. They inherited this from their parents and grandparents. And we came.... Actually it was a meeting of different worlds, right? We came....  **Sam ** 46:45 And I want to show this, also, this discrepancy that there is some dialog or some encounter that needs to happen. And I mean, many people are so disconnected to this world and don't know. They have lived in Switzerland all their life and they don't have so much connection to this work. Yeah. And it's cool to....  **Amadeo ** 47:05 I think, yeah, it was really...like we came from 1000 kilometers away. But even what made more of a difference was that we live in a city of 2 million people and they live in tiny mountain villages. But we came. We had a good time together, right? They were like helping us. We were helping them. It worked out. And I mean a lot of prejudicism, I had also, as a young radical from the city, dogmatic, and so on, about people back in the days. I mean, it changed over the years, but more and more when I encountered these, I don't know, social places, I have to say, yeah, they were very social with us and very helpful and very, I don't know, cool. Very cool also. Even though they have like strange habits like drinking coffee that isn't coffee but.... [Laughing] **Margaret ** 48:04 Wait, what do they drink that isn't coffee? **Amadeo ** 48:07 It's called Lupinion. It's made out of Lupin, I think. I don't know the English word, like some grain. And it has no caffeine at all. And they always say, "Let's have a coffee and then they drink this." **Sam ** 48:21 But with a lot of schnapps.  **Margaret ** 48:24 I don't drink caffeine. So I'm like, I want to drink that shit. That sounds great. **Sam ** 48:28 That would be the place for you to go.  **Amadeo ** 48:32 They put Apple booze inside like apple schnapps instead.  **Margaret ** 48:38 Okay, well, are there any last things that we didn't cover that you wish we had? Or things that you're really excited to say about sheep and climate change? Oh, does it make you want sheep? That's my...that was like the question. Like, are y'all gonna get sheep? Do you have a yard? I don't know where you live. **Amadeo ** 49:00 We live in the city. But we are planning to move in the coming years. And actually, I would love to have some sheep.  **Sam ** 49:10 Maybe not 400. **Amadeo ** 49:16 Some 20 or something? 15. **Sam ** 49:18 Or we will continue doing this work. It's cool to also work with them and then for a long time be with them. I guess we're.... And then also say, "Hey, gratz [congratulations], that was the summer." . And give them back. **Amadeo ** 49:35 Yeah, like sometimes it's nice to play with kids but having your own kids it's kind of a different cup of tea. **Sam ** 49:42 Like co-parenting. [Laughing] **Amadeo ** 49:45 Maybe some sheep co-parenting? Yeah. Right. **Margaret ** 49:51 Alright, well, is there anything that you want to plug, that you want to direct people towards, either your work or something else that's going on that you want to draw attention to.  **Amadeo ** 50:01 I wanted to say, because I always said while I was there, that it needs more people to help the little farmers deal with the wolves, because if we don't help them then they will always tend to the parties that say, "Oh, let's just get rid of the wolves." And I found out that there are some NGOs to do that, that come from an environmental side. There's one group called Au Pair. I think they're in the French speaking part of the country, mostly. And they actually sent volunteers to alpine pastures where there are wolves nearby, to help, to guard, and also monitor the wolf activities. So it's for research and also to help the farmers. And if I can't go next year to work as a shepherd, I will volunteer there. And I think it's a great, great thing and somehow a solution for how ordinary people can get in touch with the small farmers and help with maintaining the alpine pastures that are also so important for biodiversity. Yeah. And to help save the wolf from people. **Margaret ** 51:22 Yeah. No, that's so good. Because instead of just abandoning people to being like, "Whatever, the wolf is good and you suck," just being like, "Hey, what will it actually take? Like what resources do you actually need in order to be able to continue to do your work in a world full of wolves?" That's cool. **Amadeo ** 51:40 Yeah, I think it needs a lot of growing together, the countryside and the cities, in understanding and talking and like supporting each other. **Sam ** 51:51 Hey, thanks for having us, Margaret.  **Margaret ** 51:54 Yeah, thanks so much. And good luck next year with the sheep season. And I'll talk to y'all at some point soon I hope. Thanks so much for listening. If you enjoyed this episode, go try to convince sheep and wolves to be friends. No, that's not going to work. Hang out with sheep and then separately hang out with wolves. Actually, you probably just shouldn't even hang out with the wolves. You should probably leave them alone. That's pretty much what we want. But that's what you can do. You can also support this podcast. You can support this podcast happening by helping us pay our transcribers and our audio editors. I say this is if there's a plural of each, but there's actually one of each. And thanks to those editors. And thanks to everyone who helps us do that. And the way we do that is through Patreon. This podcast is published by Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness. We have several other podcasts, including one called Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness, as well as one called Anarcho Geek Power Hour. And if you support us on Patreon, we'll send you a monthly feature that we put out. We'll send it anywhere in the world. And if you pay us $20 a month, I'll read your name out right now. In particular, I'd like to thank Eric, Perceval, Buck, Julia, Catgut, Marm, Carson, Lord Harken, Trixter, Princess Miranda, BenBen, Anonymous, Funder, Janice & O'dell, Aly, paparouna, Milaca, Boise Mutual Aid, theo, Hunter, S.J., Paige, Nicole, David, Dana Chelsea, Staro, Jenipher, Kirk, Chris, Machaiah, and of course, Hoss the Dog. I hope everyone is doing as well as you can and don't let the people divide us along cultural lines because we just shouldn't let that happen. Talk to you all soon.

SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 533 Ragnarok S03E02 Til Death Do Us Part

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2023 63:26


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Netflix series Ragnarok. This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss the relationship between Saxa and Magne and how his treatment of Signy could come back to haunt him. We also revisit the possibility that Saxa has been or will become pregnant with Magne's child. In our What We're Watching segment, Wayne finishes up with Sex Education and gets started with the Netflix mystery series Bodies, while Dave admits that he may be done with Doctor Who in the near term.  In Listener Feedback, Alan in England and Fred from the Netherlands both find fascinating allusion in the episode. Alan points out the hammer's similarity to the ring in Lord of the Rings, and Fred sees a connection between Cassian Andor and Hober Mallow. Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: B+

The Glacially Musical Pouredcast
Glacially Musical 155: GWAR - "Ragnarok" Reviewed and the First Five GWAR Albums Ranked

The Glacially Musical Pouredcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2023 64:39


Glacially Musical reviews the fifth album from  @gwar  - "Raknarok!" Possibly the most metal of all the early GWAR albums! This is our final GWAR album of this run! New series announced in the podcast! Is this the best GWAR album? Drop a comment! Order GWAR music and merch: https://amzn.to/48tJ5gL For Rock and Metal news: https://www.ghostcultmag.com For vinyl porn: https://www.instagram.com/Glacially_Musical To support the Pouredcast: https://linktr.ee/GlaciallyMusicalPouredcast Invest In Vinyl mylar inner sleeves https://amzn.to/3pPLQaA Check out our just-completed series on @cannibalcorpse https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpHaaolFKt7OV3026TIdwpzmiuXomA9-P Check out Keefy's interview with Blothaar: https://youtu.be/3iyIWjgKWOQ?si=gP5qIUstplxW24hx Check out one of the last interviews Dave Brockie ever did about GWAR, with Omar Cordy ("Omar...cut this") of Ghost Cult https://ghostcultmag.com/podcast-episode-41-dave-brockie-oderus-urungus-tribute-episode/ Timestamp: 0:00 Intro 1:58 Beer ✅ Nik -  @GooseIslandBeer  xmas IPA, Keefy - Almanac Brewing Mexican Lager 4:02 Vinyl ✅ Nik - 20 Watt Tombstone vs Left Lane Cruiser, Keefy - Today Is The Day 9:47 News ✅ Keefy - RIP Damien Danavall, Rolling Stone Top 250 Guitarists list is a fraud, Nik - Mick Mars debut single and video, reflections of John 5 Kirk Hammett new guitar line, 13:09 Shirt ✅ Nik - Un - Keefy - @DirkManning 28:01 Meat ✅ 1995, GWAR - "Ragnarock," super metal riffs, and the first 5 GWAR album ranked 103:00 Outro - Please finger-fudge the "Like" button This is the "finger fudge pour: https://www.youtube.com/shorts/rTtqjPgZZ7s #podcast #vinyl #vinylcollecting #craftbeer #rocknews #metalnews #beer #glaciallymusical #gwar #oderusurungus#ripdavebrockie#punkrock #art #slavepit#gorgor #bohabs

Button Bashers Podcast
Podcast 112: Wat gaan we spelen in 2023? (BB Dag, Activision Blizzard)

Button Bashers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2023 210:57


00:00:14 - Introductie Zoals de laatste paar afleveringen gewoonlijk is geworden wordt eerst uitgebreid bijgepraat. Zo heeft Niels weer een nieuwe hobby om in te duiken, legt Karel uit hoe hij zijn gamingleven heeft ingericht, en heeft Michael deelgenomen aan de TV Quiz Fifty Fifty. 00:45:08 - Button Bashers Dag 2023 Dit jaar werd er sinds lange tijd weer een Button Bashers Dag georganiseerd, dit maal door OK Impala in Den Bosch. 00:53:23 - Dit was het nieuws Het onderwerp heeft al vaak de revue gepasseed in de podcast maar eindelijk is de overname van Activision-Blizzard-King door Microsoft definitief. Sony komt met een iets kleiner model van de Playstation 5, met en zonder disk drive. 01:07:43 - Game Talk Karel heeft in drie weken tijd Baldurs Gate 3 uitgespeeld en een paar honderd uur in Starfield gestoken (01:07:52), Niels speelde Titan Quest opnieuw uit (01:45:50) en dit keer met de Immortal Throne en Ragnarok expansions, en Michael speelde onder andere Lords of the Fallen (01:59:38). 02:10:52 - Hoofdonderwerp Dit jaar zijn o.a. Zelda Tears of the Kingdom, Baldurs Gate 3 en Spider Man 2 uitgekomen, maar dat is slechts het topje van de ijsberg. Op welke wijze verdiepen de Button Bashers zich in de games die dit jaar zijn uitgekomen, en waarom speelt de een dan bijvoorbeeld Starfield en de ander dan Sea of Stars? Muziek: - Sleipner RAGNAROK A-Dash MIX - Starfield - Atelier Firis

Mitolojik Ä°nciler
(İskandinav Mit) Kıyamet Alametleri - Ragnarok Başlıyor

Mitolojik Ä°nciler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2023 16:43


Cambly hakkında detaylı bilgi almak ve bize özel indirimden faydalanmak için: https://cambly.biz/60mitolojik %60 indirim kodu: 60mitolojik --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/mitolojik-inciler/message

SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 532 Ragnarok S03E01 War is Over

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2023 57:13


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Netflix series Ragnarok.   This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss the disappointing season three premiere which is short on action as well as length, checking in at barely over thirty minutes. We both agree that Turid's wedding does not bode well for the boys' mother, and it's certainly time for Magne to initiate some hammer time.  In our What We're Watching segment, Wayne is really enjoying the final season of the Netflix series Sex Education and looks forward to Ncuti Gatwa as the new Doctor. Dave finally gets around to checking out Andor and is fairly positive in his assessment.  In Listener Feedback, Alan in England and Fred from the Netherlands both manage to find some positives in the season three premiere. Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: Dave C+  Wayne C

The Podcast Chronicles (an Attack on Titan Podcast)
(S1:E10) Vinland Saga - Ragnarok

The Podcast Chronicles (an Attack on Titan Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2023 51:21


JOIN OUR PATREON FOR MORE SILLY & FUN CONTENT:  https://www.patreon.com/ronnyandchad   Twitter: @ronnyandchad  https://twitter.com/podcastchronic   Instagram: @ronnyandchad https://www.instagram.com/ronnyandchad/   TikTok: @ronnyandchad2 https://www.tiktok.com/@ronnyandchad2?_t=8eQliyAXP0l&_r=1   JOIN OUR DISCORD:  https://discord.gg/KrE6HNrc7M   Email us at:  thepodcastchronicles@gmail.com    Youtube: Ronny and Chad  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuuXdI0JGac2moPm_LzaQ0A   Please subscribe, rate, and review!   Thanks for watching!

That JORVIK Viking Thing Podcast
How to Train Your Ormr: Dragons in the Viking Age

That JORVIK Viking Thing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2023 37:01


Join us as we delve into the intriguing world of Viking dragons. Unlike the majestic winged fire-breathing dragons of modern fantasy, these creatures from Old Norse mythology are a diverse and enigmatic bunch. Miranda and Lucas discuss some of the best known examples of Dragons in the myths and Sagas (some of which have featured in recent episodes), and talk about Dragons' role in Ragnarok!Join us on this journey through Viking dragon lore, where these creatures are as mysterious and diverse as the myths themselves.Listen and enjoy, and please consider leaving us a 5 star review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen!

TOXIC SICKNESS RADIO SHOWS & LABEL RELEASES
RAGNAROK / TOXIC SICKNESS RESIDENCY SHOW / OCTOBER / 2023

TOXIC SICKNESS RADIO SHOWS & LABEL RELEASES

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2023 65:44


RAGNAROK / TOXIC SICKNESS RESIDENCY SHOW / OCTOBER / 2023 by TOXIC SICKNESS OFFICIAL

On the Turnbuckle
We chat to Ed Gamester - Producer, writer and director of Mythos: Ragnarok

On the Turnbuckle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2023 58:03


Wrestling has been taken to many levels over the years, but this sets the bar high. Mythos: Ragnarok is a show based on a story of the Nordic Gods fighting by way of Professional Wrestlers. Writer, producer and director Ed Gamester tells us all about the show, how the idea became a reality and just how tough it it to run a "promotion" like this. And as normal heaps of other stuff as well. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Litteraturhusets podkast
Sammenvevde skjebner Lars Mytting og Marie Aubert

Litteraturhusets podkast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2023 63:49


«Du ska reinne vidt og e ska reinne trongt og når veven e vové ska oss tu kåmmå att.»Med Skråpånatta avslutter Lars Mytting den storslåtte trilogien om Hekne-slekta. Trådene fra Søsterklokkene og Hekneveven knyttes sammen, og profetiene som de myteomspunne tvillingene Halfrid og Gunhild vevde inn i Hekneveven, er i ferd med å fullbyrdes. Er det vi som skaper historien, eller historien som skaper oss?Hekne-trilogien trekker lange linjer i moderne historie fra starten av 1600-tallet, gjennom Det store hamskiftet, industrialisering, og to verdenskriger. Et moderne samfunn vokser fram samtidig som det tradisjonelle beholder sin plass: folketro, nedarva kunnskap og bygdemenneskets styrke gis like stor verdi som kristendommen, ny vitenskap og europeiske stormakter. Når fortellingen nå kulminerer i Skråpånatta, den lokale versjonen av Ragnarok, er det nettopp dette samspillet som virker: er det det individenes handlinger eller skjebnevevens spådommer som leder vei?Lars Mytting debuterte med romanen Hestekrefter i 2006, som i likhet med de fleste av bøkene hans er satt til Gudbrandsdalen. Sakprosaboka Hel ved fra 2011 ble en internasjonal suksess og settes i høst opp som teaterforestilling ved Det norske teateret, og romanen Svøm med dem som drukner fra 2014 ble tildelt Bokhandlerprisen. Mytting har nå skrevet seg inn i norsk litteraturhistorie med Hekne-triologien, som har blitt folkelesning både nasjonalt og internasjonalt. Litteraturen hans kjennetegnes av stor detaljkunnskap om sagn, lokalhistorie og håndverksmetoder, og hyppig bruk av dialekt og lokale begreper gir et på samme tid enkelt og poetisk språk.Forfatterkollega Marie Aubert er en av Myttings mange entusiastiske lesere, og møtte ham på Litteraturhuset til samtale om episk historieskriving, lokalkunnskap og folketro. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

er acast sv ragnarok skr aubert litteraturen litteraturhuset gunhild gudbrandsdalen lars mytting og marie bokhandlerprisen
3 Wise DMs
Let's Give ‘Em Something To Talk About: Our Best Tips To Get Your Players Roleplaying And Talking Amongst Themselves In Your D&D Game

3 Wise DMs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2023 50:50


Roleplay. It's commonly understood to be one of the three pillars that make up the game of D&D. But, roleplaying between the DM and player is one thing… how do you get your players roleplaying amongst themselves?In this episode, Tony, Chris, and Dave discuss their best tips in getting players to roleplay amongst themselves, drawing from their games in Tomb of Annihilation, Shadow of the Dragon Queen, Journey to Ragnarok, and their homebrew world of The Further.A game full of great roleplay can get you super jazzed… so how do you get to bed when it's a school night? Dovetailing into a listener question from Dr. DM, Tony, Chris, and Dave discuss strategies to deal with late night games during the week and how to decompress and “turn your brain off”, so that it doesn't lead to DM burnout.As always, check out our affiliate link at Fanroll Dice to get 10% off your entire order!1:05 Will Ferrell Scene from Stepbrothers.2:20 Giving the player some stakes or secrets to approach their fellow adventurers with.4:25 What to do when the players will only engage with the DM.5:25 Fireside chats, campfire tales, and other story prompts to assist your players.10:30 Using story prompts and roleplay to create more immersive Hexcrawls.14:00 Prompting a player who's not engaging with more concrete examples other than abstract roleplay.16:25 Supporting players and teaching them how your game works.17:45 Ending roleplay scenes that have gone too long.26:20 A listener question.28:50 Find an activity to decompress from the session and reset.31:00 Not the best advice: don't run late games on weeknights.33:00 Lean into your strengths to focus your prep and not overwhelm yourself.34:00 Plot is a couple of paragraphs. The story is what happens when your players meet it.39:15 If your players are interacting amongst themselves, you don't have to be the battery all the time.44:00 Final Thoughts.

Swanner & Judd Film Reviews
Podcast: SJ 437: Live on Pride48 2023

Swanner & Judd Film Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2023


Swanner and Judd talk about: Big Brother; The Challenge; Only Murders; Reservation Dogs; Ragnarok; One Piece; Shane Gillis: Beautiful Dogs; Humanoids of the Deep; and more! Left Click To Listen, Right Click Here To Download

The Grimerica Show
#621 - Dr. Narco Longo - Old World Florida - Atlantis and the Crystal Sea - Ancient Sea Faring

The Grimerica Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 110:31


Interview starts at 33:50 Dr. Narco Longo joins us for a chat about Old World Florida, Atlantis, ancient sea faring and the protected Gulf of Mexico. Is America's history way older than we thought? What about the Bok Saga?   We chat about the Moors, the slaves, political motivations, the cover up, the gulf stream, The Finnish/Phoenicians, Vero Man, the Saxer Stones, the giant orators, timeline flips, pole shifts, cataclysm, Tampa Bay hurricane blessings, electortherapy, and Pocahontas. Dr. Narco Longo - Florida Department Of Magick   https://www.youtube.com/@oldworldflorida/about https://www.instagram.com/old_world_florida/   In the intro we chat about #UFOtwitter, the Peruvian aliens, Greer going after the black sites, and Darren's hunting escapades.   If you would rather watch. https://rokfin.com/stream/38925   https://rumble.com/v3h8mhk-dr.-narco-longo-old-world-florida.html   https://youtube.com/live/RDce4zZVs7Q?feature=share   Help support the show, because we can't do it without ya. If you value this content with 0 ads, 0 sponsorships, 0 breaks, 0 portals and links to corporate websites, please assist. Many hours of unlimited content for free. Thanks for listening!!   Support the show directly: http://www.grimerica.ca/support https://www.patreon.com/grimerica   http://www.grimericaoutlawed.ca/support www.Rokfin.com/Grimerica   Check out our next trip/conference/meetup - Contact at the Cabin www.contactatthecabin.com Our audio book page: www.adultbrain.ca Adultbrain Audiobook YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@adultbrainaudiobookpublishing Grimerica Media YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@grimerica/featured Darren's book www.acanadianshame.ca Grimerica on Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-2312992 Join the chat / hangout with a bunch of fellow Grimericans  Https://t.me.grimerica https://www.guilded.gg/i/EvxJ44rk Get your Magic Mushrooms delivered from: Champignon Magique  Mushroom Spores, Spore Syringes, Best Spore Syringes,Grow Mushrooms Spores Lab Buy DMT Canada Other affiliated shows: https://grimericaoutlawed.ca/The newer controversial Grimerica Outlawed Grimerica Show Leave a review on iTunes and/or Stitcher: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/grimerica-outlawed http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/grimerica-outlawed Sign up for our newsletter https://grimerica.substack.com/ SPAM Graham = and send him your synchronicities, feedback, strange experiences and psychedelic trip reports!! graham@grimerica.com InstaGRAM https://www.instagram.com/the_grimerica_show_podcast/  Tweet Darren https://twitter.com/Grimerica Can't. Darren is still deleted. Purchase swag, with partial proceeds donated to the show: www.grimerica.ca/swag Send us a postcard or letter http://www.grimerica.ca/contact/ Episode ART - Napolean Duheme's site http://www.lostbreadcomic.com/  MUSIC https://brokeforfree.bandcamp.com/ - Lemonfade Felix's Site sirfelix.bandcamp.com - Hyperdrive

UNITEDcast
UNITEDcast #636 - A BATALHA DOS DEUSES VOLTOU! (Record of Ragnarok)

UNITEDcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2023 63:47


Olá pessoas do UNITEDcast, no episódio dessa semana nossos casters comentaram a volta da guerra entre os humanos e os deuses em record of ragnarok! Vem ver essa batalha também!   Podcast da 1ª temporada: Aqui!   Participantes: Ds, Ana, Eric, Wagner.   Edição: Ana Paula   Recrutamento da United: Aqui! – CANAL TELEGRAM: https://t.me/animeunitedbr – Mande seu Email: Email: podcast@animeunited.com.br – Apoie o UNITEDcast: Manda um PIX!!: podcast@animeunited.com.br Seja um FODEROSO do nosso Apoia-se: https://apoia.se/unitedcast Assista ao vivo no nosso Canal do Youtube! Compre na AMAZON pelo Nosso Link: https://amzn.to/2WjH5kM – Assine o UNITEDcast: Spotify: Segue a gente por lá! iTunes: Adiciona a gente lá! Google Podcasts: Assine Agora! – Links do Episódio: Twitch do DS: https://twitch.tv/dsunited Canal da Ana: https://www.youtube.com/c/CulturaAnime Grupo do Kurt https://www.facebook.com/groups/actionsecomics2 – Nos Siga: Twitter do DS: https://twitter.com/odaltonsilveira Instagram do DS: https://www.instagram.com/odaltonsilveira/ Fabebook da United: https://www.facebook.com/animeunitedoficial Twitter da United: https://twitter.com/animeunitedBR Instagram da United: https://www.instagram.com/animeunitedbr/

Doctor Who: Prepare the Timelash!!
Episode 39 - The Greatest Show in the Galaxy

Doctor Who: Prepare the Timelash!!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2023 71:13


It's the Greatest Show, in the Galaxy, the Galaxy, the Galaxy ... yeah. If Ken and Mike are talking about terrible cringe-inducing rapping in Doctor Who, then they must have arrived in the Seventh Doctor era to discuss "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy"! There's a lot of good stuff to talk about (Ace! The Chief Clown!), as well as some less-than-good stuff (the weird fruit stand lady, and the Gods of Ragnarok). Also, it's yet another story where the behind-the-scenes problems of its actual making are more bizarre than the story itself. 

RogueWatson - D&D Live Play
Empire of the Ghouls Chapter 3: Episode 4 - The Cult of Ragnarok

RogueWatson - D&D Live Play

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2023 173:30


With the Huldra's aid, the party ambush and attack an evil fey cult. Welcome to Patron DnD, where Platinum-level patrons and I get together to play Dungeons & Dragons via Discord and Roll20. Empire of the Ghouls is designed by Richard Green, and takes place in Kobold Press' fantasy world of Midgard. Chapter 3: The Blood Marriage Episode 4: The Cult of Ragnarok Active Party: Alaric, level 6 dhampir Death Domain Cleric/Bard Lucian Drago, the dhampir clockwork soul sorcerer I/O, the gearforged circle of the moon druid Lucian, level 6 dhampir Clockwork Soul Sorcerer Nahm Sune, level 6 minotaur Oath of Vengeance Paladin Chat with us in the Official Discord Server: https://discord.gg/Ajvtemj Support the channel at https://www.patreon.com/Roguewatson

Swanner & Judd Film Reviews
Podcast: SJ 436: Big Brother; The Challenge; Only Murders; Reservation Dogs; Ragnarok; One Piece; Shane Gillis: Beautiful Dogs; Humanoids of the Deep; and more!

Swanner & Judd Film Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2023


Swanner and Judd talk about: Big Brother; The Challenge; Only Murders; Reservation Dogs; Ragnarok; One Piece; Shane Gillis: Beautiful Dogs; Humanoids of the Deep; and more! Left Click To Listen, Right Click Here To Download

Board Game Hot Takes
Spirit Island

Board Game Hot Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 58:46


In Episode 160 we provide our hot take review of Spirit Island covering the mechanisms, the production, and our overall feelings of the game. We also celebrate our 3 year anniversary of the podcast by sharing some of our listener's favorite episodes. Then we discuss some board games on our table including Lancaster and Lords of Ragnarok. Timestamps:00:00 Introduction00:23 3 year anniversary! Listener's favorite episodes08:18 Expeditions Description17:10 Gameplay and Mechanisms34:27 Production and Theme40:00 Final Thoughts47:36 Lancaster53:39 Lords of Ragnarok56:31 Listener Shout-out

Marvel Cinematic Universe Podcast
Is Ragnarok deeper than Matt thinks?

Marvel Cinematic Universe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 43:41


Another lovely feedback episode brought to you by Matthew and Ashley. We get into a lot of fun topics. We revisit Ragnarok's criticism of colonialism, what might have been with AOS characters in Secret Invasion, and how awesome Loki was.Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/mcucast Join The Stranded Panda Community!https://www.strandedpanda.com/Facebook Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/spchatThis show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/3200822/advertisement

Gamer Como A Gente > > > Podcasts
GCG Podcast #162 - God of War Ragnarok

Gamer Como A Gente > > > Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2023 162:04


Olá Amigos e Amigas Gamers! Sejam bem-vindos a mais um podcast do Gamer Como a Gente! Neste episódio analisamos a última aventura de Kratos e seu filho Atreus rumo ao Ragnarok. Apertem o play e vamos lá! Este episódio foi transmitido ao vivo no nosso canal do Youtube. Querem saber como foi? É só clicar aqui e conhecer. www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdp6DAXROi4 Já conhecem a nossa forja de armaduras? Mande o seu email ou uma DM no instagram que a gente disponibiliza uma camiseta bem maneira para vocês! Dúvidas, sugestões, xingamentos, desafios ao mestre platinador é só chamar a gente no email: gamercomoagente@gmail.com Podem também deixar seus comentários nas postagens e não se esqueçam de acessar o nosso Instagram e Twitter. Arte da vitrine: Rodrigo Estevão Edição: Rodrigo Estevão

Spirits
351: Ragnarok

Spirits

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2023 49:08


This is the end - or is it the beginning? - of It's Norse, Of Course. We break down the events of Ragnarok, the fall of the realms, rivers of drool, and the worst nap ever! It's a cycle, gang!   Content Warning: This episode contains conversations about or mentions of violence, animal attacks, death, and apocalypse.    Housekeeping - Recommendation: This week, Julia recommends audiobooks from your local library! - Books: Check out our previous book recommendations, guests' books, and more at spiritspodcast.com/books - Call to Action: Check out the MultiCrew!    Sponsors - BetterHelp is an online therapy service. Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/spirits - Shaker & Spoon is a subscription cocktail service that helps you learn how to make hand-crafted cocktails right at home. Get $20 off your first box at shakerandspoon.com/cool   Find Us Online - Website & Transcripts: spiritspodcast.com - Patreon: patreon.com/spiritspodcast - Merch: spiritspodcast.com/merch - Instagram: instagram.com/spiritspodcast - Twitter: twitter.com/spiritspodcast - Tumblr: spiritspodcast.tumblr.com - Goodreads: goodreads.com/group/show/205387   Cast & Crew - Co-Hosts: Julia Schifini and Amanda McLoughlin - Editors: Brandon Grugle - Music: Brandon Grugle, based on "Danger Storm" by Kevin MacLeod - Artwork: Allyson Wakeman - Multitude: multitude.productions   About Us Spirits is a boozy podcast about mythology, legends, and folklore. Every episode, co-hosts Julia and Amanda mix a drink and discuss a new story or character from a wide range of places, eras, and cultures. Learn brand-new stories and enjoy retellings of your favorite myths, served over ice every week, on Spirits.

spirits merch tumblr goodreads norse ragnarok of course danger storm action check shaker spoon
TOXIC SICKNESS RADIO SHOWS & LABEL RELEASES
RAGNAROK / TOXIC SICKNESS RESIDENCY SHOW / REAL HARDCORE PODCAST / AUGUST / 2023

TOXIC SICKNESS RADIO SHOWS & LABEL RELEASES

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 65:58


RAGNAROK / TOXIC SICKNESS RESIDENCY SHOW / REAL HARDCORE PODCAST / AUGUST / 2023 by TOXIC SICKNESS OFFICIAL

P3morgen
Intervention av Karsten

P3morgen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2023 55:34


Tete og produsent Johannes er bekymra for Karsten, "Ragnarok"-skuespiller Jonas er innom og FpU-leder Simen Velle må svare på kjappe spørsmål. Hør episoden i appen NRK Radio

Streaming Into the Void
What's New in Streaming - August 19, 2023

Streaming Into the Void

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2023 8:49


Highlights of what's new in streaming for the week of August 19, 2023: Hulu Trap Jazz (Aug. 23) Netflix Untold: Swamp Kings (Aug. 22) Destined with You, Season 1 (Aug. 23) The Ultimatum: Marry or Move On, Season 2 (Aug. 23) Ragnarok, Season 3 (Aug. 24) Who Is Erin Carter?, Season 1 (Aug. 24) Killer Book Club (Aug. 25) You Are So Not Invited To My Bat Mitzvah (Aug. 25) Disney+ Ahsoka, Season 1 (Aug. 23) Max BS High (Aug. 23) Peacock Never Too Late to Celebrate (Aug. 20) MGM+ The Winter King, Season 1 (Aug. 20) Apple TV+ Invasion, Season 2 (Aug. 23) Wanted: The Escape of Carlos Ghosn (Aug. 25)

The Secret Cabal Gaming Podcast
Episode 279: Expeditions and Tactics vs Strategy

The Secret Cabal Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2023 214:49


Hark, noble Cabalists! Gather 'round as the minstrels of the Cabal Founders regale you with tales of tabletop wonder! This day, our merry band embarks on a grand quest through realms like Lords of Ragnarok, Ark Nova, AHAU, Castles of Burgundy: Special Edition, Wandering Towers, and a saga unfolds in the feature review of Stonemaier Games' Expeditions. With the wisdom of Tony T, a bard of gaming lore, we unravel the most splendid newsworthy tidings of the tabletop gaming realm. Lastly, hear ye a debate betwixt our fellowship, pondering the ancient enigma of tactics versus strategy! Expeditions Review 00:56:41, News with Tony T 01:44:59, Tactics vs Strategy 02:51:23

Hair of the Dogcast
Raw Dogs 90 - God of War Ragnarok: Weekend at Sindri's

Hair of the Dogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2023 142:23


Fun-loving spartan, Kratos and his son, Atreus are invited by their dwarven friend, Sindri, to stay at their posh between realm home. Little do they know that Sindri is the perpetrator of a fraud they've uncovered and is arranging to have Odin killed. When the plan backfires and SPOILER is actually SPOILER, the duo decide not to let a little death spoil their fimbulwinter. They pretend everything is okay, leading to hijinks and corpse desecration galore. Hair of the Dogcast is a proud member of the Tokyo Beat Podcast Network! Contact Us: Twitter: @HOTDogcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hairofthedogcast  Instagram: hairofthedogcast To see how you can support us and access a bunch of cool, exclusive perks, visit our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/hairofthedogcast We appreciate your support! 

The Whomst Podcast
They cloned Tyrone [ACOB #51]

The Whomst Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2023 53:14


-Support the shows you love today with $1 a month on Patreon www.patreon.com/regularasspodcasts This episode The blerdz are back and talking about Netflix's They Cloned tyrone. And later in the episode give an update on the apartment, Shows they are watching like Zom 100, Record of Ragnarok, One Piece Luffy's Gear 5 / Joyboy Thoughts and Walking dead Dead city This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit whomst.substack.com/subscribe

The Discussion Phase
Ep. #113: Lords of Ragnarok

The Discussion Phase

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2023 76:26


The time has come, Ragnarok is finally upon us! After nearly 2 years of waiting, the much anticipated Lords of Hellas has finally arrived. We share our initial thoughts on the game and whether or not it falls into obscurity as yet another viking game, or stands out on its own. We also review recent plays of Twilight Inscription and the newest edition of Castles of Burgundy. We finish our alphabet draft of the letters Y, Z, and #. Make sure to join us on Discord and get in on the discussion with us! https://discord.gg/WKZkT2DDNs Geek Group App: https://geekgroup.app/groups/yvhedwg8/collection Make sure to add your BGG profile to the Discussion Phase group!

Knights of the Night Actual Play Podcast
564 - KotN Actual Play DFRPG - Something Unusually Bad is Happening, Not our Usual Bad

Knights of the Night Actual Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2023 65:33


The horn is heard -  Armageddon and Ragnarok have both begun? 

The OrangePhoenix Podcast
Erskmac's Mad Tech Haul & Anime Chat with Vievo: Talking Baki, Record of Ragnarok & DBZ Movies

The OrangePhoenix Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2023 31:30


Join the eccentric Erskmac as he unveils his latest tech treasures in this episode of mad science extravaganzas! Not just a feast for tech-enthusiasts, this episode also promises a deep dive into the world of Anime with Vievo. We're talking Baki, Record of Ragnarok, and a massive scoop about Dragonball Z making a triumphant return to Crunchyroll! Tune in for hearty discussions, fresh insights, and the joy of sharing our geeky passions. Don't miss out on this ultimate tech-anime mashup!" Amazon Hauls for you! MASTER and DYNAMIC MH40 Heaphones- https://amzn.to/3rXPY98 MIFA WildCamping Bluetooth Speakers with Camping Lantern- https://amzn.to/45tvvYD NEBULA Anker Capsule 3 Laser Projector- https://amzn.to/3OGz3kF Orange Phoenix Merch and Magazine Magazine Subscription and support- https://www.patreon.com/orangephoenix For Apparel link and single issue purchases- https://www.orangephoenix2017.com/ Join our Community! Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/groups/orang... Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/orangephoen...  

Miscelánea Supernova
356 - Now, I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds

Miscelánea Supernova

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2023 78:51


Episodio donde Wisto piensa que tiene diferentes tonos de voz entre su vida real, Miscelánea y su Twitch, a Pari también le sale una espinilla, el karma al reirte de alguien y que te pase lo mismo, las exageraciones y mitos de los papás para educar a sus hijos como: meterte a la alberca después de comer, la carne pegada al hueso es la más rica, manchas en la ropa que no se quitan, etc. El ataque de las lechuzas después de mentarles la madre, la secuela de Link to the Past que nos perdimos, el Huracán Ramírez vs la Piñata Enchilada, The Strange Thing About the Johnsons, las series de Siren y Records of Ragnarok, reseñas SIN SPOILERS sobre Oppenheimer y Mision: Impossible 7!! Escúchanos: Spotify / Apple Podcasts / YouTube Apóyanos: patreon.com/holamsupernova Síguenos: Instagram/ Twitter/ TikTok @holamsupernova

CLASH!: The Sibling Rivalry Podcast
Next Mario game LEAKED! - 171st Encounter

CLASH!: The Sibling Rivalry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2023 135:01


This episode the siblings start the show by discussing Pikmin 4, PS2 games, netflix anime like Baki and Record of Ragnarok, and the new Transformers Rise of the Beasts. Then we discuss the latest Switch 2 rumors before moving into anime corner! Send us questions, comments, and feedback to: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠siblingrivalryclash@gmail.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ We want to read some of your questions and comments at the end of each episode! Follow and hit us up on Socials: Youtube - youtube.com/@srclash Twitter - @SRClash_Pod TikTok - @SRClash_Pod Background Music: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Naruto Trap Remix (Prod. by Blasian Beats)

The Anime Virgin
Record of Ragnarok - Buddha vs Zerofuku

The Anime Virgin

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2023 39:39


Featuring Gozen from AnimeUproar & Briggs from BriggsADANext week: Zom 100This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/4770083/advertisement

Don't Miss This Podcast
#211 - Torn Abdominals

Don't Miss This Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 84:19


This week on DMT, Sam and Jack riff about childhood tv, quarterbacks, Jack's injury and more - Don't Miss This Podcast!

The Game Pit
Episode 205 - Picking Over the Bones

The Game Pit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2023 100:57


Sean and Ronan return to ramble through ten games they have been exploring recently. On the slate are; Marvel D.A.G.G.E.R., La Famiglia, Darwin's Journey, Heat, Lords of Ragnarok, Revive, Carnegie, TMNT: Shadows of the Past, Tipperary and Vengeance: Roll & Fight. Head to www.dicetower.com for great gaming coverage. 

El Rant de Ax
Ranteo S3 E28: Record of Ragnarok

El Rant de Ax

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2023 13:50


Hablo de las ultimas series que he visto. Sinceramente es un episodio bien chapusiao.

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
Nordic Animism - Interview with Rune Hjarnø

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2023 77:32


https://linktr.ee/nordicanimism https://shop.nordicanimism.com/shop/9-books-and-calendars/   Remember, we welcome comments, questions, and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com. S4E21 TRANSCRIPT:----more---- Mark: welcome back to the Wonder Science-based Paganism. I'm your host, mark, Yucca: And I'm Yucca. Mark: and today we are excited to have Rune Hjarnø with us who is a thinker and podcaster and pagan animist Norse Animist coming to us from Scandinavia. So welcome Ro Rune: Thank you very much. Super happy to be here. Mark: Rune was suggested to us by one of our listeners who had been listening Toro's work and said that we could have a very interesting conversation. So we are here to have a very interesting conversation. Rune: Totally. Yucca: Yeah. Thank you for coming on. I'm really excited. So. Rune: thanks for having me. It's gonna be super interesting. Yucca: Yeah, do you wanna go ahead and start by just, you know, letting our listeners know a little bit about who you are and what your background and interests are? Rune: Yeah, let me, let me try yeah. My name is Rune I'm a Danish anthropologist of religion. And I, what I'm trying to do on my general platform, which is called Nordic Animism is that I'm trying to use indigenous knowledge scholarship and new animist thinking to look at our own cultural heritage as Euro ascendants because there's this weird assumption in our time that These are ways of thinking about our own culture that are only available if you belong to an indigenous colonized groups. And that assumption is there seemingly in popular culture and in scholarship and, and in all kinds of ways, in spite of the fact that what a lot of indigenous peoples are actually doing is that they're encouraging us as majority populations to start thinking like this about ourselves. But it's a difficult, for a number of reasons to do with cultural politics. It's a diff difficult step to take. So a lot of, not a lot of people are doing it. It's spite of the fact that indigenous knowledge is becoming a big thing. Anyway, so yeah. So that's basically what I'm doing. And I also feel that when I'm doing that I'm, I'm being brought through dealing with a lot of these problems of cultural politics because when you. When you look at, for instance, our culture as euron and people, and also the ways that our traditional culture has been sometimes co-opted then you are necessarily faced with issues such as well, racism, whiteness, the construction of whiteness, the rejection of animism actually as a part of construction of whiteness and these sort of things. So, and therefore it becomes a very, I think a very intersect intersectional work that is basically becomes a form of, of decolonizing. So yeah, and I'm then trying to do this to sort of bring this into popular spaces because one thing is that, you know, I can sit online and I can go blah, blah, blah in my highbrow, you know, academic language and nobody's gonna understand the stand a bloody thing, but what what actually. Or to come out of something like this is popular culture stuff that can be communicated to real people. Stuff that that can also attract actually real people. So, I've launched symbolism of totemic kinship with the world around us. I've written a book about the, the turning of the seasons and I've, yeah. Different, different projects like that. And then I'm continuously communicating on my channel. Yeah. Did that kind of sum it up or did I speak too lo too long? Yucca: No, that's great. And I have to say, I'm so excited to hear you talking about indigenous European cultures because so often the ideas that, that there isn't. And that that's the, that European is the opposite of indigenous, rather than seeing that there's indigenous all over the world, not just from specific groups. And I think that that's really valuable that you're bringing this to light. Rune: Thanks and I, I'll just add one little. Have it at there. And that is that when I'm talking about traditional European culture, I actually don't use the word indigenous. And the reason is that when we talk about indigenous peoples, we mostly talk, or we are generally talking about people who have been exposed to colonialism. That means that if you are in Wyoming and there's a group of Shoshone living there, you know, then when they can then the word indigenous, that to them, that's also a legal category. That it, it means access to fishing rights and land rights and hunting and access to funding, to first language teaching and all these kind of things that we don't need as majority populations. So what, so what I'm basically. This is just, I'm, I'm just saying this as, because this is an important little addition that, that is important to not actually when we talk about indigenous knowledge I mean, and I give you at some level you could call it indigenous knowledge, traditional knowledge, and in majority traditional knowledge and indigenous knowledge are basically the same kinds of knowledge, but the word indigenous is just a little bit touchy. And it's touchy for the indigenous people. So it's important to sort of, move around it a little bit. But like, I, I, I definitely get you a sentiment. We need to be able to speak about our our own heritage in exactly the same, or with those categories that, you know, authors like Robin Kimara and these kind of people are using to understand their culture. Mark: Yes. Yes. I, I think the, the first thing that strikes me as, as you speak is that we are definitely on the same page from a value standpoint. You know, we're, we're very, very adamant about the need for decolonization and the the importance of indigenous and traditional understandings of the nature of the world of development, of reciprocity in our ecological relationships, all of those kinds of values. So, I, I think maybe that's a good place to start from. Our work has been in building community around a science rooted. Understanding of the nature of the world, but a transformation of the value system that informs the way society operates. And it sounds like at least the transformation part of it is very similar ru to what you, you are focusing on. Rune: Totally. And I think I would probably also say the science routing. I'm, I'm not a natural scientist. I'm, I'm, More of a historical religion, anthropologist type. But but I don't perceive and this may be where we differ, I'm not sure, but I don't perceive necessarily a contradiction between, for instance religious languages or animist mythologies, a way of understanding the world and a scientific way of understanding the world. If you look at how an animist mythology, for instance, is typically structured, then you'd find that there are, it's. It's not one package, it's not one worldview that some people kind of buy into. And then to kind of adopt that whole thing as if they're in installing a new operative system on a computer. It's more like a, a, a jumbled up toolbox with a lot of kind of stuff lying in it. And, and then you can use it in different ways and it's kind of combined in different ways for different purposes. And some of these different tools can be contradictory and they can be radically contradict, contradictory. So the same, for instance, animist way of talking about, say, deities can be contradictory from one ritual situation to the next. And this also count, this counts on many levels in religious practices. So if you have a scien, a scientific perception of the world, then in a sense that's also just one toolbox. So if you move out of the, the, the monolithic. Ways of understanding the world that have characterized Abrahamic traditions particularly Christianity where, you know, there's ki there's kind of one worldview and you have to buy into that if, if you, when, when, and I think that would be a pagan step to move out of that. And then science just is just this incredibly beautiful, powerful, deep knowledge system, which in itself is like a web of, of, of roots that, that come from all kinds of different places in the world and kind of come together in, in Occidental science. And then, then that, that does not necessarily need to be in any conflict with creating tali talismans and seagulls and stuff like that, for instance. Yucca: Absolutely. Yeah. Mark: and we do all that stuff. Rune: Yeah. Mark: yeah. And I mean, we understand it as influencing ourselves at a psychological level and transforming our perspective on the world. We've been talking about animism and throwing the word around a lot, and I think it might be valuable for us to visit what we mean by that. I just wrote a blog post this week about naturalistic animism, and I think that one of the things about the, the traditional western colonizers view of animism is that it is a supernatural idea that there, that a rock has a soul in it. And I think that's a very dualistic, very Christian informed way of understanding animism. I see animism as being about what are, what is my relationship with the rock? Do I relate to the rock as a person or do I relate to the rock as an inanimate thing that I can exploit? And that's, that's kind of my take on, on a naturalistic approach to animism. What, what do you think animism is and how does it Rune: I agree and with some of what you say, but not all of it. I think the relationship is absolutely foundational to animism and in a sense, I think that the relating with the rock is more foundational than if there is any sort of faith or belief in whatever figure that lives inside the rock. Like, be and, and that's because the relationship is important. So if you, if you look at how, for instance, new animist theory and, and also the philosophers who are doing panist thinking and all these things. When, when you look at these ways of thinking, then being becomes predicated on relating, I, I relate where, where Decart, the kind of quintessential modernist thinker would say, I think therefore I am. So the world is enclosed in the human thinking space. The, the animist position would, would be, I relate or we relate, therefore we are, and that means that, so that, but, but if, if I should tie that to what you say with supernatural, then in a sense it's, it's extremely sort of, mundane. Like we are we are in a relation right now and we're trying to understand each other and we are sitting in different continents and, you know, we, we have different positions and it's interesting and blah, blah, blah, that defined, but there's also an exchange of value between us. You have a podcast, I'm coming on your podcast. Perhaps some of my followers would go over there and the other way around. And so there's an exchange going on in that, in the relation that we are in right now, our subjectivities are defined in that, in this encounter that we are in now, our subjectivities are defined by that, right? So the con the current perception of a lot of anthropological scholarship would be that, that this relation is inhabited by subjectivity. So subjectivity is not only inside our minds or inside our brains, it's actually in our relation. Now, that means that when the inu eat are relating with the C, which is an all life defining factor in Inuit life, then their relation with the sea is inhabited by subjectivity. That sub subjectivity, that inhabits, that relating, that is the, the, the sea mother sna, the inwar, they would call it the inwar, the relational subjectivity of the sea. So, and whether that should be called supernatural or not, I'm not really sure, but like. I'm not, actually, I'm not really sure about the word supernatural, if it's because it, it, I think it has a heavy, heavy baggage somehow. But an Inuit shaman can actually interact with Sedna, the sea mother, and thereby engage that subjectivity that inhabits the the relation between a group of Inuit and the sea. And that's the same with a stone or with, if, if you have a farmstead in Northern Europe 200 years ago, the stone could be kind of a relational hub for the way that the people in that farm state relates to their land. So it becomes inhabited by, I'm not sure what the word would be in English, but these sort of g like or elf like beings that would typically work as a patron spirit protecting specific farm. Or ensuring basically the positive and mutually giving reciprocal relating between that group of people and the agrarian life sustenance that they are living with and living from. Yucca: So that that spirit would be the relationship itself. Am I understanding correctly? Rune: Yeah. Or the subjective, the the subject, the subjective relationship. Yeah. So, and this is sometimes called the individual. So we are individuals from a moderna's perspective that there's an inside us with. But if you take away the, the, the in Yucca: Mm-hmm. Rune: then we are evi right now because we are producing relating with each other from Yucca: delightful word. Rune: Yeah, it's a lovely word, isn't it?  Yucca: that. Rune: And. Mark: Yeah. Rune: And then what many animists would would say, or animist thinkers would say that that that divi is a central purpose of religion, basically. And that it individuates a relation. So if you have a Santa Priestess who's being possessed by the storm, gods ysa and she's dancing around, then that human being is dividing ysa in a number of ways. One of them is portraying Younga. People see younga in front of their eyes dancing. Another part of the dividuation is that she's initiated, she's crowned as a San Priestess, so, so there's deep mystical individuations that are connected with that and that whole thing. But it's basically about producing. Relating and, and ch challenging that subjective relating into the world. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yeah. Rune: that make sense? Am I, Mark: it. It, oh, it absolutely does. Yeah. It, it, it absolutely makes sense. And that this, this focus on, on the relationship, as I said, I think is very core to the at least to my idea of animism. And so the, the question about the reality of the, the gnome elf figure doesn't really even enter into it. It's, it's not, you know, because this is all subjectivity. It objectivity is not, is is not a part of that model. It's all about what do you see? What do you think about it, and how do you feel in relation to it? Rune: Yeah. Something like that. I would say that the reality or the what, what, you know, post-Christian, it's called the belief in the el that that is it's secondary to the relation. Like if, if you, if you say you have a shamanic perception and you could and you, you bring yourself into a trance and you speak to the elf and you ask the elf so what would you prefer the most? Would you prefer that I cultivate an abstract transcend belief in your transcendent existence? Or would you prefer a ball of porridge? The, the elf is gonna prefer the ball of porridge because that is act that is an actual exchange of of material. And the what, what you could almost call the revelation of that relationship is. That is core, I think, to producing an animist way of being in the world. So that's not only you giving the ball of porridge to the stone that is perhaps inhabited by a stone ina or an elf or what we can call it. But it's also then perceiving the gift being given back from the world now that then you are in a reciprocal relationship with the world around us. Mark: Yeah, and, and it's that, you know, a as you say, as with Robin Wall Kemmerer and you know, writers like that, it's that reciprocity that is so important the. And, and the hardest, I think for us, as, you know, modern Westerners to get our minds around because we are taught as Christianity teaches that the world is essentially inanimate and it's a pile of resources here for us to mine. And that is the diametric opposite of what we're talking about here. Rune: Exactly. Mark: you know, the, the idea that, that we can't just dig a hole in the ground and take minerals out and then leave the hole is completely foreign to the way capitalism works. Rune: exactly. Exactly. And. If you look at how traditional knowledge and tales and traditional knowledge and folklore and the like they actually express and analyze the rupture of these relationships in euros and populations. So, and you see this in a, like, in a wide kind of array of tales, like the most monumental in northern Europe is the Ragner rock, which is the, basically the collapse of the relational cosmos in this kind of e eco cosmos, social complete crashing. Now, some of the scholars who have been working on the Ragnar Rock, they say that this. Myth may have occurred or may have, may have been inspired by the experience of climate change in Northern Europe in the, the mid sixth century. And often when people are relating mythology to natural history events, you should always be a little bit cautious because sometimes it's just like weird, oh shit. But but this exact example the, the emergence of this myth and this event, they're actually historically very close to each other. It's a couple of hundred years, and the event was cataclysmic. It ba in Scandinavia populations collapsed. And there would've been complete social breakdown. So it was a very, very violent event. And what happened was basically that it was a global cooling that lasted I think four or five years and. In Northern Europe, that global, global cooling just meant that summer didn't come for a, a, a, a short period for, for a couple of years. And if you're living in an agrarian subsistence, agrarian community, then that just means that everybody's gonna die. And which is what you see that happened in some areas of Scandinavia. So, so anyway, so, so, when you look at the Ragnarok myth, what you see is that it's, it's very much a myth about loss of connectivity. So the main spark of the myth is a, a divine FRA side. There's God brothers who are killing each other. And then what happens is that the relations between the guards, kind of the forces of order and social coherence and the yna, the giants, the. Forces of nature who are related in all these problematic and crazy and fertile ways, and Nordic mythology, that relation crashes completely. And then they start behaving like Christian angels and demons and basically going into like the state of cosmic total war. So that's perhaps the most iconic tale of losing animist kinship. But you find them by all the way down to today. You see that fairy tales and different stories are sort of this struggling, but also people's experiences. Some farmer, you know, walking up a home from his fields and then he meets a little, meet a little group of elves and they're leaving. So he asked them, why are you leaving? And he, they say, there's too much noise here and too many church bells, so we are moving to Norway. Something like that, you know? And and that is of course a traditional knowledge perspective of basically ruptured relation because this relational subjectivity, which are these Ls that are, that is sub subjectivity, inhabiting human being, human relating with the land, that when that is torn, then that can be experienced as the elves packing, packing their bags and, Mark: Or, or as the magic going away, Rune: Yeah. Mark: which is another, you know, repeated trope in many, many stories about how there used to be magic. You know, we, we used to have, you know, this relationship, right? And now it's drained away, it's gone. And many of those stories are actually specific about Christianity driving the magic away, Rune: Yes. Yes. There, there there's a tension. There's a tension. Like I, I'm not, I'm, I'm generally, I'm, I'm, I'm trying to not, you know, go into this sort of Christianity bashing and all those  Mark: Uhhuh.  Rune: but but there is a tension. The, there's a tension between and sometimes it's, it is pretty intense, like, churches in the landscape in Northern Europe, the, if they're big stones lying in the landscape, then typically people, local people would say it was trolls who were throwing the stones at the churches and all when they were building the churches. So there's almost like a conflict between the, the churches and the, and the landscape itself. Mark: Hmm. Hmm. Yucca: So one of the expressions that I've heard you use a few times is new animism. So how does new animism differ from our understanding of some of the traditional forms? Or what does that mean when you're speaking about new animism? Rune: animism that is a little bit of. It's a scholarship position more than it's a kind of a religious position out in the world. May, but things are also related. But when, when I say new animism, it's because anim, like animism was invented by actually the guy who invented anthropology and cultural scholarship. A guy called Edward Burnett Tyler, who was this sort of Victorian British armchair scholar. And he. Invented cultural evolutionism in which people are first living in these barbers, state of superstition, where they are animist, infantile animists. And, and, and, and that was, that was, that was what he thought of animism. And then you then he kind of developed how humans would develop on gradually improving stages until they became almost like, Victorian, England English people of his own time. Exactly, exactly. That, that was a paradigm for, for the end of history. So, so, so that was, and, and at that point, the idea of animism was just that everything is sort of animate. However up through the 20th century there was the, the, the most progressive anthropologists were the American School of Anthropology, who were at a very early point starting to be permissive to other other cultures, cultural realities and saying, okay, so there are different cultural realities and perhaps they're equally good. And there was a guy named, oh shit, I forgot his name right now. Oh damn. Really important guy whose name I should be able to remember at any given point of time who went and, and learned from the the Jiwei Irving, hallow Hallowell was his name. Yucca: Okay. Rune: So he went and and started learning the philosophy of jiwei indigenous Americans in, in the Great Lake areas. I think he went into Canada a little bit. And he, I think he was the first who was kind of saying, well, he was looking, he was looking at their, their language and saying that they have different grammatical categories and some of these categories indicate animated personal beings. And some of them are like what we talk about. If I talk about this book, then the word book is in, in English is, is just an it, you know. And he noticed that what was called animate and inanimate by the Ojibwe was different. So Stones, for instance, and thunder and number of different things were adamant to the Ojibwe. And he started developing this language where he was like, okay, so these are people, they have a different philosophy about what, where, where there's personhood and where there isn't. So from that came. New animist thinking, which is kind of relieved from or dealing with the this bigoted evolutionist heritage of seeing animist as a animism, as as something inferior. And today, the, this has then become the whole position where where the, the, the understanding of what animism is and how it works is, is then updated. For instance, animism is incredibly complex. It's not infantile at all, and it's certainly not primitive. It's many societies that have animist knowledge systems in them. not something necessarily that children practice, it's something that elders practice. It's something that it takes lifespans to, to understand that at, at a, at a very high level. So, so, so yeah. So that's sort of what's in, in new animism. Yucca: Mm. Thank you. Mark: Thank you for explaining that. Yeah, that's good. So, you mentioned before we started recording that that you sort of take issue with the atheism of our movement or that you have questions about it or whatever that is. So I thought that I would raise that topic and we could discuss it. Rune: I've been sort of thinking about it, kind of atheism. Atheism. No, I, it, it ki I think my, sort of, my, my question. Kind of springs from the whole idea of decolonizing if we have what is called the modern epistemology, like the, the epistemology is the perception, how we perceive the world. Then the modern fundamental to the modern epistemology would be a seclusion between human subjectivity and personhood. An agency which is inside our skulls, and then the, the dead outside. And I can't help seeing an and i atheism as perhaps related to that and that therefore co like actual actually practicing a a decolonizing would be. To say, okay. But subjectivity and agency is not only inside humans goals, it's also, it is something that inhabits the world in a, in a wider in a wider sense. It's something that inhabits our interactions and perceptions in a much wider sense. And yeah, I just had, I just had tr part of my, my problem was to that I have, I have tr, I have trouble reconciling that with, with an, with an atheist position. Mark: Hmm. Yucca: I can certainly say that for my part, my perception of the outside world, I. Is, I don't think that that necessarily reflects my idea that there's this dead outside world, the living me, but rather seeing self as part of this larger system. I'm coming from the perspective of, of an ecologist looking at, you know, my body is an ecosystem that is an open system and things are coming in and going out. I don't see the need to have a, a, a deity or a God or a conscious spirit that needs to be there for me to be part of a, of a living vibrant world. Rune: Makes a lot of sense. Mark: Yeah, that's well said. I, I feel very much the same. Yeah, because yeah, that hard line between the, the inner living world and the outer dead world is definitely not something that I embrace at all. To me it's all living. Right. But because, but just because it's living doesn't necessarily mean that it's conscious or that it's animated by something that one could actually at some point identify and measure. You were talking about toolkits before and I think that it's, it's y part of what we do as Ethiopia, pagans, and, and naturalistic pagans is we understand that in the context of the symbolic world, we suspend whatever disbelief we might have in, in the, the literal reality of supernatural phenomena in order to have a symbolic, metaphorical, psychological, emotional, impactful experience. And that is what brings me into deep relation with the rest of the world. Did that make Rune: Cool. Yes, it does. However, when you are focusing on psychology, then psychology is a space that is characterized by being. Inside human human minds and, and what I would, I don't know fear or my, I think my, my question would then be, if it's psychology, I, you then actually extending that perception of, of personhood to the world, or, I does. Because like when you speak to a lot of, say, scholars today, often psychologies would, or psychology would be a language where, for instance, mythology can be given a space. But that actually maintains the, the the the enclosure. Try to compare this with. With I had this debate with, with a friend of mine who also he was criticizing the literalist idea of mythology. So he was saying, he was talking about, I, I believe Irish mythology, and he was saying, but who, who, who would believe such an grotesque idea as if Ireland were literally plowed with the, the fertility guard dog does penis in a right. And yeah, innocent. But what if you, if we think about relation, if we take relationships as our, our fundamental way of thinking about these things then, and we understand if we understand the plow that the farmer is using when he's plowing his land as imminent with. Dha. See then, then when, when it's imminence, if we understand the the materiality of the plow as n n not as culturally imbued with, but in the materiality, DDA is there right then, then we have actually, then we have crossed out of the modern paradigm and into a this enchanted perception of the world. And I think we, like, I think that is the step, the, that, that's where it becomes real in a sense. And, and there, there, there's a number of co contemporary philosophers and, and, and thinkers who make that, that, that enchanting possible. Bruno Laur the sometimes they call it the ontological turn thinking or the Cambridge School, and they're so difficult to read that it's almost, it's almost impossible to understand what they're saying, but which, which is part of a I think it's, I think it's part of a safeguarding strategy because if you wanna say that ELs and g nos are real, then it's, it's, it's then, you know, scholars are gonna, you know, it's much, much better to say, well, relational ontologies are possible on the basis of you know, concatenated hops of individual re networks or something like that. You know, then people get, get busy nodding and looking like they are trying to look like they look clever, right? But but the idea of imminence that, for instance that that objects act chairs, Invite us to sit on them balls do hold strawberries, they act. And the, the example with plow and DDA would, in that sense be a, a imminent in that sense. Damn, it's, it's difficult for me to to, to get to these things. But does, does it make sense my, Mark: It, it, it Rune: questioning. Mark: it, it does make sense. I do see it somewhat differently, and some of that is because my understanding of the way humans relate with the world is that we create a model of the world in our minds. And we re and we relate to that. We, we perceive, we receive perceptual input, we filter that and massage it, and in some way invent it to some degree. And then, you know, so, all right, I receive all this input and I filter it and I decide what it is. And okay, there it is. There's, there's the bowl, right? And so I can relate in a, in an I vow sort of way with the bowl whether or not the bowl actually has any sort of supernatural el or metaphorical, symbolic, literal nature. Rune: Yeah, Mark: And it's, it's about what's on me to enchant the world. And us as a culture to develop the habits of enchanting the world. So that's, that's how I look at it. And I, I, I mean, I think the way that you look at it is, is perfectly legitimate and useful. It's just, I don't look at it quite the same way. Rune: but I think, I think, I think what you say there makes a lot of sense. Like, and it's important to, to, I might also be hashing it out in a little bit extreme. Terms here, because of course, humans do create models of the world, and we are imaginary beings that we have this capacity of, for instance, imagining stuff that doesn't exist already. And then by this insane capacity of projection, we are able to, to create stuff in the world that, that no other creature is, is capable of. And, and that capacity is in a sense, I think related to also the story of Dhada and all this. However, when you are then talking about the bowl and you're talking about. What its literal external nature is then what you're doing, I think, is that you are actually, you're reaching across the divide and you're talking about it in this, what can't would call the ding, the, the, you're talking about it in itself as, as completely detached from human perception. And and I I would say that that is probably so difficult to talk about that, that we almost can't. So perhaps there only is a cultural reality available, and then enchantment becomes then it kind of becomes a, a question of do we want a boring, interesting a boring uninteresting reality? Or, or do we want a reality where, you know, We have sex on rock car rings and dance around meadows and wear their elves and trolls and, and stuff like that is enchantment. It becomes more of, of a kind of enchantment or no enchantment than a, a question about that. There isn't exterior truth that defies in. Gentlemen, oh man, I feel I'm have trouble speaking in state terms here. Mark: No, you're, you're absolutely making sense. The place where I think we may differ is that, I find the world as revealed by science to be utterly enchanting. It is miraculous the nature of the universe. It is so inspiring and wonder and humility and awe and inspiring that I feel that without that, even without populating it, with those kinds of figures, I can still just be in this kind of open-hearted wondering, loving relationship with the nature, with the world itself in a way that demands that I have reciprocal relationships with things rather than rather than object, defy relationships with things. And so, you know, that may just be the path by which I got here. Which was through a lot of science. But yeah, I mean that's, that's the world that I inhabit is just, you know, that this world is just knocked down, drag out amazing. And I still want to dance around stones and have sex on beaches and all that kind of stuff. Rune: No, man. Thanks for that. That, yeah, that's, it's, it's, it's beautiful. And I totally, I totally follow what you're saying. I think, I think science is, is an incredibly beautiful and powerful way of looking at the world. And, and it has. And part of, I think part of what I'm, what fascinates me with science is that it, it has a trickster nature. Science, that thing about always questioning things. That thing about always being critical and being inherently critical of power, for instance. And also being playful proper science. Like a lot of contemporary scholarship, you know, a lot of contemporary cultural, cultural and social scholarship. It isn't playful for shit. It's just boring ass. They should, they should, yeah. They should do something else, like pick strawberries or something. But but but, but scholarship when it's real science, when it's real, it has a playful or in it. And and that's something that, that that yeah. But I then what I also think is that if we talk about atheism then I would say that if we look at research, history, history, It's probably a very fairly brief bleep in the history of science that science have understood itself as particularly atheist. And today with, for instance, new animus scholarship and these things, it's kind of, we're kind of, we're kind of moving theves back into the beauty of the scientific perception, so, Mark: Well that's, that's interesting. I mean, one of the reasons that. I mean, science is young for one thing, science other, other than just sort of the standard trial and error that leads to discovery, which all people have always done the  Yucca: in our instinctual way of understanding the world. Right. But  Mark: but formalized, the scientific method is only a few hundred years old and during most of that time, there has been a domination by Christianity mostly in the West, such that you couldn't actually say that you were an atheist, whether you, you whether your work pointed in that direction or not. So I think that, you know, the liberty, I mean, to be honest, it wasn't really until Richard Dawkins and the, you know, the four horsemen who I have many problems with, let me. Say to start with many problems. But it wasn't until they started standing up and saying, yes, we're atheists at the end of the 20th century, that it really became sort of more acceptable for a part of the population to start to express that. So it's new. It is. It's, it's a new thing. But when you look like at ancient Greece, there were people that were questioning whether the gods existed in any meaningful sense. Yucca: And I Rune: you, and you. Yucca: oh, I was just gonna say that I think that the, the common perception of what atheism is, is dominated by that very recent, very vocal and kind of, very negative kind of, no, no, no take on the world instead of a, a yes. Embracing take on the world. Mark: Yes. Rune: I wanna add one specific perspective to the to the understanding of history of religions in relation to this. And that is that if you look at the history of religions of Europe, then you have what you call like, normative knowledge forms. And and then what you also have is a. Considerable space of rejected ways of knowing all kinds of ideas that have been there through history, and they gone in all. And, and that's what's sometimes called esotericism. So Esotericism is this label that basically sort of gives an umbrella term for all the weird shit that's been happening for the last 2000 years outside of the normative knowledge hierarchy. So all the Astrologies and the Kabbalah and the spiritists and the, the philosophers and all that stuff, that, all that stuff is, is esotericism. And when you look at European history, a lot of a a lot of is, people are always like when we talk about intellectuals, that there will always be this sort of at least a kind of a consciousness that. Esoteric, non-normative ways of knowing are there, but sometimes also direct practice. I think that Darwin was an esoteric I think that a lot of the and I don't remember, I think he was Alchemist or something like that, and practicing some  Yucca: Newton certainly was. Rune: Newton new. Sorry. Yes, you are. You are, you are right there. That was the important name I was looking for. No Darvin yeah, that was a different story with him. But I think that that part of the, like if you look at the last 150 years is that, that I think in the eight late 19th century, you started having positivism. If I remember correctly. And that's sort of where you get the very strong split between or where science starts to see itself as in some sort of opposition to other ways of of thinking. And yeah, like, the there, there was an old Icelandic professor at the University of Coing in and my old professor remembered him from his student years. And he had, had, he had had this this Christmas lecture about gnomes and that was early 20th century. And as these sort of learned, super white scholars were sitting there and they were listening to him and he was talking about gnomes, at some point, they, it, it dawned on them that, That he he believed in grunes and he told about how he had met them when he was a, he was a child and these kind of things. And so that was sort of the, a, a clash between an early 20th century scholar from ICE Iceland, which is a bit of a particular story in these things. It's a little bit of kind of a insular bobble in in some respects. And in Copenhagen they were like, but, but about, about this Icelandic professor talking about G norms. But yeah. Yucca: Well, one of the things before we started recording that you had mentioned was that I'm trying to figure out how quite how to word this but you're very interested in to today and some of the political implications of some of the work that you're doing. Is that something you wanna speak to a little bit? Rune: Yeah, it's, I mean, when, when I started working on Nordic animism, I well, I knew all the time that it was important and that it's something that you can, like, you can never, you turn your face away from it, you have to look it straight in the eye, just all the time. I just, the word these words, Nordic Norse, Viking stuff, you know, all that kind of stuff, it just has a load of having been co-opted by all kinds of, Horrid political movements and, but it's actually deeper than not just that, like, it's not just hillbillys who are, you know, driving around in pickup trucks with guns and calling themselves some militia and waving Thor hammers and these kind of things. It, it's, it's, it's on, I think it's on deeper layers of our self image and, and self perception as people racialized as white and and yeah, and, and I, I, I feel that I'm getting new realizations of this more or less all the time. No, not all the time, but, but often reckon with a certain regularity that that when you are thinking with Euro traditionalism, then. Then it's just there. For instance, I, I think that today I think that that whiteness is almost like shaved, like a ball just talking about balls. It is almost as if whiteness is shaped a little bit like a ball. So if you wanna move out of it, then you come close to the borders and then it intensifies and scares you back in. So if you wanna if you wanna basic, yeah. Basically move out of the, the whiteness complex, then you're gonna have to start looking to Euro traditionalism. And as soon as you come in contact with that, you, you will start seeing ruins and. May Pires and stuff that has been co-opted by Nazis or other nasty people. So, so that, and that is sort of a, an inherent paradox, which is a condition for working with these things if you're a white person. And realizing that that paradox, realizing the nature of it and, and starting to cope with it, is an important feature. So that's one rea fairly reason realization. I also encounter policing actually where most non-white peoples would be like, well, decolonizing white people. What's not to like and what took you guys so long? Then scholars, white scholars, they, they often have this sort of they, they, they don't like that whole idea. And and, and then they often frame it as, oh, there's an inherent potential for nationalism in what you're doing. Or something like that, you know? And which there might be, there might be, and I'm fucking dealing with that all the time. And, and in the dealing with it, That's when the stuff becomes very applicable actually for, for thinking about how to be a respectful, kind, contemporary human. So today there are actually I'm familiar with two, perhaps perhaps even three, like systematic programs that use Nordic animism thinking for Deradicalizing right. Extremists in, in prison systems and, and these kind of things. So, so, so, so you see that, I think that when you're moving close to some stuff that feels dangerous and feel problematic, then you're also finding the solu, you're finding solutions on that path. Mark: Hmm. Hmm. It, it's, it's interesting as, as I listen to you, because what you say makes absolute sense to me in the context of Europe. In the United States, it's a little different because here we are in this completely colonized place, and many of us, like, you know, I've, I've had my d n A study done. I'm English, English, English, English, English. Nobody ever stepped out of their lane. And actually, you know, even married an Italian for God's sake. And, but my people have been here for 400 years. I have no ancestral or familial memory of any kind of tradition from England. And so my approach has been I need to create this anew. I need to, I n I need to start from values. Values like inclusiveness and kindness and you know, those compassion, those kinds of values reverence for the earth. And then from there, build a practice which can draw on some of the symbols and and, you know, folkloric practices like maypoles and things like that, but is fundamentally about not stealing from the indigenous people of this place. And instead creating my own understanding of a sacred landscape that I inhabit, that I can share with other people that derive from the same kind of lineage that I do. And with everybody else who wants it. I mean, you know anybody who wants it, but I understand that people who have been marginalized, they probably want to reach back to their ancestry, right. And pull that forward. I really don't, I, I don't feel a kinship with England. So it, it, it's just, I, I'm just struck by the difference. I don't have any firm fast conclusions about it. I just, it, it is a d a different experience. Rune: No, I think, I think what you're doing is probably very important and, and give like, like I. I'm kind of operating in this field where, where as an old world, I sometimes feel a little bit like a target for sort of old world nostalgia and these kind of things. I'm probably wearing a kilt and speaking all Gaelic all the time and all these things. But but what I actually think is that, that over there in Turtle Island, the cultural situation is such an intense mix of and, and it's as if the, the problems of our age are intensified on your side of the pond. The fact of, of living on genocided land in a highly cre and cre realiz culture. With the, the, the descendants of, of victims of colonization in your living space, probably every single day. Maybe not for all of you, but for many of you probably, right? And also immersed in, I I I perceive Americans as very immersed in ideological structures that are that are sort of connected with the problem. Now, that means, I think that means that, that the, the real answers in a sense are, are, are, are gonna probably come from, from America and, and, and stuff like what you are doing when you're thinking like this, mark. I think it's beautiful and, and it's, and I think it has an aspect of. Playfulness in it to say, Hey, I've been listening a little bit to your, your, your podcast and how you are thinking with different things, and you also like playing with seagulls and, and, and have been working on wheels of season like me and these sort, sort of things. And I think that playfulness will be an important voice in producing the answers that will bring us to a to a a decolonial future. I also think that one question that I meet a lot and which you also touch a little bit here is the question of cultural exchange. And I think that the ways that people have been talking about cultural exchange in American spaces in the last couple of years have a, have a problematic aspects. When we are not allowed to or when, if, if all cultural exchange is universally cri criticized at as cultural appropriation for instance, that is an essentially nationalist idea, which I've tried to criticize it which is difficult because you also have minorities. Who have been sitting there and their traditional culture has been completely overrun with like swarms, like locusts of white hippies. And they've been giving statements like, please stay away from our traditional spirituality. And of course, when that is the case, then that makes things fairly easy. You stay away. That's the respectful thing to do. But but there's also stories that, that I'm hearing a lot and I'm hearing 'em sort of in direct personal ways and that I'm not seeing so much in public space. And that is stories about mors who are perhaps in very, they're perhaps white Americans or Canadians, and they're in very deep and respectful rela learning relationships with, for instance, indigenous elders. Now, if that's the case, then that transfer of knowledge, if there is a teacher present, Then that knowledge is legitimate. Because if you wanna challenge that knowledge, then you're challenging the legitimacy of the teacher. And that is a, is, is a that can very easily be a colonizing practice. If you say, no, no, no, that Arapahoe elder there, he doesn't have the legitimacy to teach a white kid how to give tobacco to a stone because that's cultural appropriation or something like that. Then you're actually challenging the, the, the author, the ownership of the Arapaho elder. See what I'm saying? Mark: Yes, Rune: So, so, and, and I, I think, yeah. So anyway, I just wanted to mention that because you mentioned appropriation now. I think it's, it's important that, that the, the way that we are thinking about cultural exchange is, is is relieved from. What I think is, is a bit too unambiguous condemnation in, in the appropriation discourses. Mark: I, I really agree. It's, it's nuanced and Americans are not good at nuance. We, we just, we really are not, we're very, very black and white thinkers, most of us. And you know, a lot of good and bad, and usually we are good and somebody else is bad, and it's, it's an unhelpful way to approach the world. But certainly, I mean, if I were welcomed into a space where an indigenous person wanted to teach me some aspect of their culture, I would feel given permission absolutely entitled to incorporate that into my practice. I wouldn't feel entitled to teach it but I would feel entitled to incorporate it into my practice. That hasn't happened to me yet. So, Rune: But if you, if you, if you were part of that practice for 25 years and and then the person said, now you are a teacher. Mark: well then, yeah, Rune: You see? Yucca: But we run into the tricky problem of the outside perception and other people trying to gate keep that. And, and it's just such a very, it's a very raw, it's like when you, when you've been wounded and it hasn't healed yet. And there's just so many feelings and the nuance and it's, it's really, it's something that we, you know, we are just grappling with all the time. And I think that there's in certain directions that, you know, the pendulum swung really far in some ways, but it's not just one pendulum, right? There's so many pendulums going in every single direction at once, and you're just trying to sort through all of this generational trauma and guilt, and it's just a really heavy topic. Rune: No, thanks for that. Thanks for that. You okay. That was, that was really well said. And, and I sometimes also feel a little bit like an elephant in a porcelain shop when I'm, I'm, I'm talking to Americans about these things because I'm sitting on this side of the pond. And when you're interacting with Americans specifically, you, you get the feeling that, that, because these things are so intense, then you're talking to people where every single individual is on an MA level in, you know, critical race studies. Be because it, because, because it's so intense. Or, and that also means that, you know, I need to be a little bit careful when I'm kind of throwing out my state. Ah, come on. You guys need to calm down a little bit on the, on the, on the critical,  Yucca: it's good to have an outside perspective too, though, right? It's very valuable to hear that. And just hear w you know, what it looks like from the outside because we don't see ourselves from the outside. We just see ourselves in the midst of it going, oh, my ancestors murdered and raped my other ancestors. And you know, I don't know what you are feeling. And you're feeling and everybody's angry at each other. And you know, sometimes it's good just to have that outside perspective going, Hey, this is what I see from the outside, you know, Mark: and particularly in the United States, we have been so adamant about denying our responsibility for the Gen, the American genocide, the enslavement of Africans. We're still denying those things, and to the degree that in right wing states, they're banning teaching about them. And what that means is that because we won't acknowledge the wound, we can't heal it, and. And so the, the subject becomes very, because it's an open wound, it's very sensitive, you prod at it at all. And immediately people have these really vehement reactions. Rune: Yeah. Mark: And my hope is that as we go forward, I mean, this younger generation seems to have more comprehension about these issues. My hope is that as we go forward into the next generation, we'll start to come to grips with some of that horrible history. But it's very difficult to come to some kind of reconciliation with people who have been horribly colonized and abused when you won't even admit that you did it. Rune: Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. And I think also like with these sort of processes, I think the, the kind of cultural spaces that we are inhabiting today, primarily the internet cultural spaces I think they're probably also doing some unfortunate things to us, like, A tendency such as narcissism on social media platforms, speaking as a person who has a social media platform. Mark: me too. Yucca: that's all of us here, right? Yeah. Rune: it's like, it, it's, Yucca: double-edged. Yeah. Rune: it's a very dominating feature about how how people are reacting and or how people are, are interacting. And, and, and like I feel that, that, I almost feel that if we have the, the modernist subject here, the modernist idea of the subject that I spoke about before where, where humanity is inside a case, and if you, if you move into a if you move back in time where people would meet a group of elves that are moving away, that's because. Their subjectivity is not as encased as ours today. It's a little bit more fluffy like that then it is as what has it is as if what happens today is that these, these shells, they become hotter. They become like crystal, they become brittle. And it's as if I, if they touch each other, then it just goes. And, and then we have these, the, these so it's almost as it's almost as a kind of an in intensification of the, the modern subjectivity. And I don't know what's gonna happen, but I hope that what's gonna happen is that it's gonna open somehow again and hopefully in a way where it doesn't explode and then everybody just go mad. Which actually sometimes I feel that's what you're seeing. I, I've, sometimes I feel there's quite a lot of madness going around, like rather crazy reaction patterns. Mark: Mm-hmm. Rune: And unfortunately not only on the right wing, I mean, of course the right winging is like supreme when it comes to madness. Like, I mean now here in 2023, it feels as if, if it's such a long time ago that Donald Trump was the president in the us. But when I think about how, how was even, I'm not living over there. I'm living here, and it just feels like, oh fuck, you don't know if there's gonna be a civil war in America and what's that's gonna do to the world. Like the, eh, it was such a madness dominated situation, such a madness dominated situation, and it just felt like. It just felt like, it really felt like madness had had just taken up this gigantic space in the world that, that it, it, it didn't use to have and like, yeah. Anyway, you, you probably Yucca: Absolutely. Yeah. Rune: agree even. Yeah. Mark: Yeah. Rune: And I thought it was something I wanted to say about this whole thing with yeah. But, but I also think that like, with these strong reaction patterns and these intensifying subjective borders Then I also think it, that it's important to be a little bit like, okay, so now I'm just gonna say it, you know, all cultural exchange is not cultural appropriation. And sometimes when people shout cultural appropriation, it's actually not legitimate. Yucca: Yeah, Rune: they, there are many cases where, where it's super legitimate, but there are also cases where people are shouting it, where it's not legitimate. And there are legitimate cases of cultural exchange even within, between white and indigenous groups. You. Mark: Sure. And, and there are, there are over claims. I mean, I read a rant by an indigenous man who argued that no one should be allowed to use feathers in any kind of religious or ritual context except for indigenous Americans. People have been using feathers and seashells and pine cones and other  Yucca: we were humans. Mark: since, since before we were humans. That is a birthright of every homo sapiens. And I mean, I, I mean, I understand the person's outrage about cultural appropriation, but that's just a little much. Rune: yeah. It becomes, it it like I spoke on my channel to this Irish, amazing Irish guy called Monan. Magan who and he was telling about how his ancestors was a Phyla, a a poets an Irish poet. And that, that he was the last person to legitimately carry a feathered cloak, a specific cloak with made with crimson feathers that were part of their tradition, their and and I later I heard Monon there, he spoke with an. Aboriginal Australian author that I'm quite fascinated by, Tyson, young Porter. I really recommend his book, sand Talk. And Tyson, he was telling him, Hey man, you should go to you should go to New Zealand because the Maori, they have actually feather cloaks. They make feather cloaks. And that is a specific it's a specific sign of, of specific status among the Maori. So if you want to. Recover this ancient Irish symbol of a specific cultural status as a, as a poet, a speaker of which, which is also cosmologically super important in, in moron's tradition there. Then he might be able to learn some of that from or he might be able to learn something about it or rebuild it with inspiration from the Maori. Now I think that something like that would be an that, like if something like that would become possible, that would be very, very good. Very, if people are ha have wounds that are too deep for it to be possible, then of course, you know, Respecting people's feelings is it's a condition of building positive relations, which is the whole thing is about. Mark: Right? Rune: So, but but if stuff like that could be possible, that would be, I think, very beautiful to reach that point. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: And so, can we talk about your book for a moment? Because it seemed your book is something that you have Done digging into the literature in many different languages and, and brought forward some some traditions to that people might be really interested in. Rune: Yeah, I don't know if I've been digging in literature in many different languages, Yucca: well,  Rune: I, but like, I'm a  Yucca: least two and it's in English, so we got three languages Rune: yeah. Yeah. Well, yeah, I'm, I'm a, I'm a Skiddish movie and so, so, so I read read Danish and Swedish, and, and that's, that, that's an advantage of course, because a lot of the re and I'm a scholar, you know, I'm a nerd already, so, so that means that reading these kind of old, weird folklore compilations is, is available to me, but it is, or more available to me than for perhaps to you. Right. So, so what I did with this calendar book here, which is called, it's called the Nordic Animist Year, was that yeah, I was in, there was a couple of different Cal Calend traditions that I was interested in communicating. One of them was the ROIC calendar, where every day, around the year used to have two runes attached to it. And these runes, like from a, from one perspective, they just place the day in, in relation to a week. So if there's one specific room and in a given year, then it means it's a Tuesday and next year, perhaps it, that same room would be a Monday. But then you can look at your room staff and you can see if, if it's a Monday tomorrow, right? And the other then marks. There is a line of ruin that where one of the ruins marks the new moon. So you know when the lunar month begins and those two. The weeks they're fixed on our year. So that means that it represents a solar and the lunar moons then represents the lunar cycle. So that was a beautiful, beautiful example of an animist tradition that nobody, it seemed to me that nobody really sort of was so aware. Yeah, yeah. You know, you could meet scholars who knew that it was there and a couple of nerds here and there, but it wasn't really communicated into, into public space that that system even existed. So, so I took that system and then I sort of worked through also a number, a bit of scholarship on on all the different holidays around the year because the The the traditional animist year used to be actually rather dense with all kinds of traditions. And and so, so I was, I was also kind of inspired again by indigenous scholarship where these people are often, they at least in North America and also in Australia they sometimes work with calendars as a way of getting back or maintaining or getting back into, into connection with traditional ways of knowing. And that partic I think it's just a very strong intuition and like you've done it yourself. Mark and I, you know, you can see on your podcast that you were talking a lot about sewing and Belton and, and, and all these different holidays. So, so I basically, yeah, did, did this, this little book as a, as a. Kind of a cursory introduction to the the entire year in the, in the Nordic in Nordic area. Mark: Hmm. Yucca: Wonderful. Mark: Well, we'll definitely put a link to where people can buy it in the show notes for the, for the podcast. I wanna read it myself. It sounds, sounds great. Yeah. Yucca: And so where else can people find you? Rune: Oh my God. Yeah. I'm on, I'm on, I'm on all those social media platforms that I can't be bothered to mention. But, but, but particularly, particularly look for my, for Nordic animism on my YouTube, because my YouTube channel that's kind of the, the backbone, but then I'm also on, you know, Facebook and Instagram and even on TikTok and Yucca: well, we'll include the links in that then in the show notes for everybody. Yeah, and thank you so much. This was really amazing. You gave us so much to think about. I'm gonna be thinking about this for a long time, so really, really value you coming on and spending this time with us. Thank you. Rune: Thank you very much. It was so nice to meet you guys. And and, and have a chat here. Mark: Yeah. Really enjoyed it. Thank you so much. I. Rune: You're welcome.