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Best podcasts about Persian

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Latest podcast episodes about Persian

The Ancients
Alexander the Great & the Persian Thermopylae: Part One

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:37


In January 330 BC, Alexander the Great faced one of his most difficult challenges to date. A small Persian force, entrenched in a formidable defensive position that blockaded Alexander's route to the Persian heartlands. A narrow pass through the Zagros Mountains that has gone down in history as the Persian, or Susian, Gates. Although nowhere near the size or scale of Alexander's previous pitched battles against the Persians at the Granicus, Issus and Gaugamela, this clash in the mountains deserves its moment in the spotlight. A clash where the tables were turned and the Persians were outnumbered by their Macedonian counterparts. A battle that has been dubbed the Persian Thermopylae. From the immediate aftermath of Alexander's victory at Gaugamela to his army's antics at Babylon. From a merciless, punitive campaign in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains to a detailed run down of the Persian stand the Gates, enjoy as Tristan talks you through the events of late 331 / early 330 BC.In this first part, Tristan covers the events that followed Alexander the Great's victory at Gaugamela and how these culminated with Alexander's army approaching the Persian heartlands deep in the winter of 331/0 BC.Preorder Tristan's book today: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Perdiccas-Years-323320-BC-Hardback/p/20188Jona Lendering article: https://www.livius.org/articles/battle/persian-gate-330-bce/If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit. To download, go to Android or Apple store. If you're enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating The Ancients content then subscribe to our Ancients newsletter. Follow this link.Quick note: We do hear a small detail about what happened to Bagophanes. Alexander assigned him to become one of Mazaeus' adjutants in the new Babylonian administration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Art of Manliness
The Rise and Fall of Athens

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 58:49


In a period of only about 100 years, Athens went from relative obscurity, to becoming an influential empire, to collapsing into ruin.My guest today will guide us through the dramatic arc of this city-state and the larger-than-life characters that contributed to it. His name is David Stuttard, and he's a classicist and the author of Phoenix: A Father, a Son, and the Rise of Athens, and Nemesis: Alcibiades and the Fall of Athens.We begin our conversation with the rise of Athens and why its aristocratic families decided to institute a radically democratic form of government. David then walks us through how the Persian invasion catapulted Athens to power in Greece. Along the way, David explains how a father and son named Miltiades and Cimon led Athens to power. We then shift our attention to the fall of Athens and how it was precipitated by the Peloppensian War with their one-time ally, Sparta. David introduces us to the made-for-Hollywood character that would play a pivotal role in Athens' fall — the handsome and charismatic aristocrat and serial traitor, Alcibiades. We end our conversation with the lessons we moderns can take from the rise and fall of Athens.Resources Related to the PodcastAoM Podcast #461: The Spartan RegimeAoM Podcast #710: The Spartans at ThermopylaeMiltiadesBattle of MarathonCimonAlcibiadesConnect With David StuddardDavid's Website

AJIL | آجیل
EP68- آجیل- ۲۰۲۲ در مِتاوِرس

AJIL | آجیل

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 28:14


سلام به همراهان عزیز آجیل ما بعد از یک استراحت نسبتا طولانی با یک اپیزود خودمونی برگشتیم. توی اولین اپیزود از فصل ۳ درباره این مدتی که نبودیم حرف زدیم، گفتیم که توی زندگیمون چه خبرایی بوده و همینطور پروژه جدید فیسبوک یا متاورس صحبت کردیم دوست داریم از شما بشنویم که توی این مدت چه خبرا بوده؟ از کدوم اپیزود فصل قبل بیشتر لذت بردید و درآخر بگید که نظرتون درباره متاورس چیه؟ اگر دوست دارین اسپانسر آجیل شوید با ما تماس بگیرید Contact us: ajilpodcast@gmail.com Persian, Modern Life

Persian Girl Podcast's Podcast
Persian Girl Loveline

Persian Girl Podcast's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:34


PGP answers listener submissions related to interracial relationships and how to bounce back in a relationship when you've been kept a secret and their family dislikes/disapproves of you. They also answer some questions related to physical attributes Persian women are attracted to, what cars they like to drive, and if they bring their boyfriends to their family dinners&parties. Lastly they give advice to a Black Jew whose type is Persian Jewish girls. Intro song:Mary Jane- Arash Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/persiangirlpodcast)

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

پادکست – جادی دات نت | کیبرد آزاد
رادیوگیک – شماره ۱۳۴ – شاه مکانیکی

پادکست – جادی دات نت | کیبرد آزاد

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


رادیوگیک این هفته به ماجرای هکرهای روسی و چینی نگاه می‌کنه و ناامنی URl رو بررسی می‌کنه اما با نگاهی وسیع‌تر. همچنین به حق فراموشی در ایران می‌پردازیم و صندوق سرمایه حمایت حقوقی از توسعه دهندگان بیت‌کوین و بررسی می کنیم ببینیم می‌شه شاه رو با یه ماشین جایگزین کرد یا نه. متاسفانه براوزر شما … ادامه خواندن رادیوگیک – شماره ۱۳۴ – شاه مکانیکی ←

Learn Languages with Steve Kaufmann
Language Learning Activity Goals For 2022

Learn Languages with Steve Kaufmann

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 5:19


In acquiring a foreign language, reading is often underrated as a goal, and as a learning activity. When I learned Chinese, over 50 years ago, I did a lot more reading than I'm doing now in Arabic and Persian. Today I rely on the audio to help me read. In 2022 I plan to focus more on reading, even in sentence mode, but without the constant help of audio.

Your World Within | Life Stories By Eddie Pinero
TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR MIND (2022 New Year Motivational Speech)

Your World Within | Life Stories By Eddie Pinero

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 10:44


“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” - Emerson In today's episode, I discuss King Leonidas and the battle of Thermopylae, where 300 Spartans took a stand against a massive Persian invasion. When asked to submit and put down their weapons, the Spartans famously responded, Molon Labe, which translates to "come and take them." In this speech I explore the areas in your life where you can become bolder and relentless with regard to your convictions. As the world seeks to push you away from who you really are and what matters most, this motivational speech delves into the power of staying true to yourself, taking control of your mind, and when asked to trade what matters most for the fleeting relief of temporary comfort, to stand tall and pronounce, "come and take it."

Combat and Classics Podcast
Ep. 60 Xenophon's "Anabasis" Book 4

Combat and Classics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 66:50


Xenophon and the Greek host begin their march north, out of the Persian king's territory, through the icy highlands of Armenia, until at last, from a mountain, they catch sight of "the sea! the sea!" So how do the demands of the terrain and weather impose necessities on the Greeks, and how does Xenophon deal with these necessities? Is this easier, or harder, than dealing with human beings, who can be rougher than the terrain and colder than the snow? Do we see evidence of Xenophon's humanity in this book, or of his inhumanity? Join Brian, Shilo, and Jeff as they discuss these questions, and attack the gaps rather than the surfaces! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brian-wilson5/support

James Acaster's Perfect Sounds
Isy Suttie & International Prog Folk

James Acaster's Perfect Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 29:01


With music inspired by improvisational Jazz, Persian and African folk and vocals in a myriad of languages, it's hard to tie Léonore Boulanger to a specific genre. Will Isy Suttie, with her background in jazz and prog rock bands, be won over?

ژرفا - Zharfa
شماره بیست و یکم - مدفون در یخ

ژرفا - Zharfa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 64:06


در این اپیزود ماجرای سفر اکتشافی دریانورد معروف بریتانیایی جان فرانکلین رو به گذرگاه شمال غربی در شمالگان تعریف می کنیم. جان فرانکلین معروف به مردی که کفشهایش را خورد... صفحه حامی باش ژرفالینک کمک مالی پی پَلاسپانسر این شماره ژرفا: ماجرا زی ماجرازی برگزارکننده سفرهای گروهی گردشگری با تمرکز بر ژانر گردشگری آبیه. نزدیکترین توری که در برنامه دارن سفر به سریلانکاست معروف به اقیانوس هند.پی دی اف حاوی اطلاعات سفر به سریلانکاصفحه اینستاگرام حامد ادونچررصفحه اینستاگرام ماجرازیآدرس اینستاگرام ژرفاآدرس وبسایت ژرفاکانال تلگرام ژرفاموسیقی زمینه: "بازسازی خاطرات" از سهیل پیغمبریموسیقی ابتدایی:The Rolling Wave/Chahar Mezrab Navaدستیار و طراح گرافیک: افسانه قضاویدستیار و طراح وب: میلاد پایندهگوینده: علیرضا پایندهSupport the show (https://www.instagram.com/zharfa.podcast/?igshid=16uoac4rkv4xw)

Unfiltered with Sahar
Ep. 41 - PERSIAN GIRL POWER

Unfiltered with Sahar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 66:50


In this episode the GIRLS ARE IN TOWN! Yasi, Sahar and Melieka came to Toronto to visit me and we all went to Atoussa's house one night to drink, bond and record this podcast for you. We cover lots of deep topics and open up to each other about our upbringings, our culture, our grievances and our best memories of 2021 ALL WHILE getting progressively more drunk minute by minute. I literally died by the end of it and spent the rest of the night hugging the toilet bowl but NO REGRETS! Love these girls and LOVE our sisterhood!Follow them all on social:@yasimuse@madgalmusic@sahar_ghorishi.x@melieka_fathi

Modern Persian Food
Pistachios | Pesteh

Modern Persian Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 15:02


Are you ready to get nutty?! In this single ingredient episode, co-hosts Bita and Beata get excited about “pesteh” which is Farsi for pistachios, specifically how to add vibrance, texture and color to everyday dishes and beyond.     Before the Beats dive into ways to incorporate this rich, decadent nut into Persian recipes and beyond, let's explore a few questions.   Why are Persian pistachios special?  Roasted and seasoned - marinated in citrus, salt, and saffron  How do Persians eat them?  Plain, served in a big bowl or with ajeel, garnished on foods/rice dishes and desserts    Garnish on savory dishes  Tahchin Jeweled rice | Shirin polo Adas polo Reshteh polo Salads Roasted veggies   Garnish on desserts  Persian ice cream, akbar mashti Persian milk pudding, shir berenj Ice in Heaven, yakh dar behesht Baklava Halva Sholeh Zard   Roasting pistachios Marinate in citrus (optional) Add saffron and or spices Be careful not to burn!   Ask the Beats! What are the top 3 things you pick up from the Persian market?   Bita's response: Jam (cherry, rose, and quince), Dough, and Ready made food such as kebabs and khoresh   Beata's response: Sour Cherry (Albaloo) Jam, barbari bread, and dried omani lemons (limoo omani)   Episodes referenced: Episode 34: Bastani | Persian Ice Cream Episode 55:  Persian Nuts   All Modern Persian Food episodes can be found at: Episodes Co-host Beata Nazem Kelley blog: BeatsEats – Persian Girl Desperately Addicted to Food! Co-host Bita Arabian blog: Oven Hug - Healthy Persian Recipes | Modern Persian Recipes   Recipes:   Beata's: Persian Jeweled Tahchin Beata's: Pomegranate Glazed Chicken Wings Bita's:  Tah-cheen Baked Chicken and Rice Casserole Bita's:  Persian Crispy Rice Cups | Tahchin Bites Bita's:  Persian Jeweled Rice | Shirin Polo Bita's:  Milky Persian Rice Pudding | Shir Berenj Bita's:  Ajeel | Persian Trail Mix Bita's:  Persian Nice Cream | Bastani Podcast production by Alvarez Audio

Circle Round
The Wiser Adviser feat. Elaine Hendrix, Devyn McDowell, Mark Pellegrino

Circle Round

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 22:58


Elaine Hendrix (Dynasty, The Parent Trap), Mark Pellegrino (Supernatural, American Rust), and Devyn McDowell (Annette, The Good Nurse) star in this Jewish and Persian tale about how fortune can change in the blink of an eye.

The Tragedy Academy
Special Guest: Amir Yassai - Just Be Kind

The Tragedy Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 43:20


SummaryIn this episode of the Tragedy Academy, we sit down with Amir Yass, digital creator, and LGBTQ activist. As a queer Muslim man, Amir has faced discrimination from all sides - even from other LGBTQ individuals. This discrimination inspired him to affect change and begin a series of panels that address biases within the queer community. As host of "The Take On" podcast, Amir continues his work tackling the big topics while interviewing some of Bravo TV's brightest stars. Today, Amir lives out his authentic, unapologetic self, bringing him closer to his faith and reaffirming his belief that orientation and religion are not mutually exclusive. Through candor and humor, Amir paints how standing up for equality of all facets is how we bring about change. Key Points

Unreached of the Day
Pray for the Persian in Iran

Unreached of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 1:01


People Group Details:  https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/14371 Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians

Half-Arsed History
Episode 185: The Battle of Thermopylae

Half-Arsed History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 46:09


In this episode of Half-Arsed History, hear the tale of the Battle of Thermopylae, when a small force of Greek hoplites held off and fought a brave last stand against an overwhelmingly large Persian army as part of the Greco-Persian Wars.

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
January 8: Genesis 8; Matthew 8; Ezra 8; Acts 8

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 17:06


With family: Genesis 8; Matthew 8 Genesis 8 (Listen) The Flood Subsides 8 But God remembered Noah and all the beasts and all the livestock that were with him in the ark. And God made a wind blow over the earth, and the waters subsided. 2 The fountains of the deep and the windows of the heavens were closed, the rain from the heavens was restrained, 3 and the waters receded from the earth continually. At the end of 150 days the waters had abated, 4 and in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. 5 And the waters continued to abate until the tenth month; in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen. 6 At the end of forty days Noah opened the window of the ark that he had made 7 and sent forth a raven. It went to and fro until the waters were dried up from the earth. 8 Then he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters had subsided from the face of the ground. 9 But the dove found no place to set her foot, and she returned to him to the ark, for the waters were still on the face of the whole earth. So he put out his hand and took her and brought her into the ark with him. 10 He waited another seven days, and again he sent forth the dove out of the ark. 11 And the dove came back to him in the evening, and behold, in her mouth was a freshly plucked olive leaf. So Noah knew that the waters had subsided from the earth. 12 Then he waited another seven days and sent forth the dove, and she did not return to him anymore. 13 In the six hundred and first year, in the first month, the first day of the month, the waters were dried from off the earth. And Noah removed the covering of the ark and looked, and behold, the face of the ground was dry. 14 In the second month, on the twenty-seventh day of the month, the earth had dried out. 15 Then God said to Noah, 16 “Go out from the ark, you and your wife, and your sons and your sons' wives with you. 17 Bring out with you every living thing that is with you of all flesh—birds and animals and every creeping thing that creeps on the earth—that they may swarm on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.” 18 So Noah went out, and his sons and his wife and his sons' wives with him. 19 Every beast, every creeping thing, and every bird, everything that moves on the earth, went out by families from the ark. God's Covenant with Noah 20 Then Noah built an altar to the LORD and took some of every clean animal and some of every clean bird and offered burnt offerings on the altar. 21 And when the LORD smelled the pleasing aroma, the LORD said in his heart, “I will never again curse1 the ground because of man, for the intention of man's heart is evil from his youth. Neither will I ever again strike down every living creature as I have done. 22 While the earth remains, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.” Footnotes [1] 8:21 Or dishonor (ESV) Matthew 8 (Listen) Jesus Cleanses a Leper 8 When he came down from the mountain, great crowds followed him. 2 And behold, a leper1 came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you will, you can make me clean.” 3 And Jesus2 stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I will; be clean.” And immediately his leprosy was cleansed. 4 And Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” The Faith of a Centurion 5 When he had entered Capernaum, a centurion came forward to him, appealing to him, 6 “Lord, my servant is lying paralyzed at home, suffering terribly.” 7 And he said to him, “I will come and heal him.” 8 But the centurion replied, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof, but only say the word, and my servant will be healed. 9 For I too am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. And I say to one, ‘Go,' and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,' and he comes, and to my servant,3 ‘Do this,' and he does it.” 10 When Jesus heard this, he marveled and said to those who followed him, “Truly, I tell you, with no one in Israel4 have I found such faith. 11 I tell you, many will come from east and west and recline at table with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, 12 while the sons of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” 13 And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you as you have believed.” And the servant was healed at that very moment. Jesus Heals Many 14 And when Jesus entered Peter's house, he saw his mother-in-law lying sick with a fever. 15 He touched her hand, and the fever left her, and she rose and began to serve him. 16 That evening they brought to him many who were oppressed by demons, and he cast out the spirits with a word and healed all who were sick. 17 This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.” The Cost of Following Jesus 18 Now when Jesus saw a crowd around him, he gave orders to go over to the other side. 19 And a scribe came up and said to him, “Teacher, I will follow you wherever you go.” 20 And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” 21 Another of the disciples said to him, “Lord, let me first go and bury my father.” 22 And Jesus said to him, “Follow me, and leave the dead to bury their own dead.” Jesus Calms a Storm 23 And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. 24 And behold, there arose a great storm on the sea, so that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. 25 And they went and woke him, saying, “Save us, Lord; we are perishing.” 26 And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, O you of little faith?” Then he rose and rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was a great calm. 27 And the men marveled, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even winds and sea obey him?” Jesus Heals Two Men with Demons 28 And when he came to the other side, to the country of the Gadarenes,5 two demon-possessed6 men met him, coming out of the tombs, so fierce that no one could pass that way. 29 And behold, they cried out, “What have you to do with us, O Son of God? Have you come here to torment us before the time?” 30 Now a herd of many pigs was feeding at some distance from them. 31 And the demons begged him, saying, “If you cast us out, send us away into the herd of pigs.” 32 And he said to them, “Go.” So they came out and went into the pigs, and behold, the whole herd rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the waters. 33 The herdsmen fled, and going into the city they told everything, especially what had happened to the demon-possessed men. 34 And behold, all the city came out to meet Jesus, and when they saw him, they begged him to leave their region. Footnotes [1] 8:2 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [2] 8:3 Greek he [3] 8:9 Or bondservant [4] 8:10 Some manuscripts not even in Israel [5] 8:28 Some manuscripts Gergesenes; some Gerasenes [6] 8:28 Greek daimonizomai (demonized); also verse 33; elsewhere rendered oppressed by demons (ESV) In private: Ezra 8; Acts 8 Ezra 8 (Listen) Genealogy of Those Who Returned with Ezra 8 These are the heads of their fathers' houses, and this is the genealogy of those who went up with me from Babylonia, in the reign of Artaxerxes the king: 2 Of the sons of Phinehas, Gershom. Of the sons of Ithamar, Daniel. Of the sons of David, Hattush. 3 Of the sons of Shecaniah, who was of the sons of Parosh, Zechariah, with whom were registered 150 men. 4 Of the sons of Pahath-moab, Eliehoenai the son of Zerahiah, and with him 200 men. 5 Of the sons of Zattu,1 Shecaniah the son of Jahaziel, and with him 300 men. 6 Of the sons of Adin, Ebed the son of Jonathan, and with him 50 men. 7 Of the sons of Elam, Jeshaiah the son of Athaliah, and with him 70 men. 8 Of the sons of Shephatiah, Zebadiah the son of Michael, and with him 80 men. 9 Of the sons of Joab, Obadiah the son of Jehiel, and with him 218 men. 10 Of the sons of Bani,2 Shelomith the son of Josiphiah, and with him 160 men. 11 Of the sons of Bebai, Zechariah, the son of Bebai, and with him 28 men. 12 Of the sons of Azgad, Johanan the son of Hakkatan, and with him 110 men. 13 Of the sons of Adonikam, those who came later, their names being Eliphelet, Jeuel, and Shemaiah, and with them 60 men. 14 Of the sons of Bigvai, Uthai and Zaccur, and with them 70 men. Ezra Sends for Levites 15 I gathered them to the river that runs to Ahava, and there we camped three days. As I reviewed the people and the priests, I found there none of the sons of Levi. 16 Then I sent for Eliezer, Ariel, Shemaiah, Elnathan, Jarib, Elnathan, Nathan, Zechariah, and Meshullam, leading men, and for Joiarib and Elnathan, who were men of insight, 17 and sent them to Iddo, the leading man at the place Casiphia, telling them what to say to Iddo and his brothers and3 the temple servants at the place Casiphia, namely, to send us ministers for the house of our God. 18 And by the good hand of our God on us, they brought us a man of discretion, of the sons of Mahli the son of Levi, son of Israel, namely Sherebiah with his sons and kinsmen, 18; 19 also Hashabiah, and with him Jeshaiah of the sons of Merari, with his kinsmen and their sons, 20; 20 besides 220 of the temple servants, whom David and his officials had set apart to attend the Levites. These were all mentioned by name. Fasting and Prayer for Protection 21 Then I proclaimed a fast there, at the river Ahava, that we might humble ourselves before our God, to seek from him a safe journey for ourselves, our children, and all our goods. 22 For I was ashamed to ask the king for a band of soldiers and horsemen to protect us against the enemy on our way, since we had told the king, “The hand of our God is for good on all who seek him, and the power of his wrath is against all who forsake him.” 23 So we fasted and implored our God for this, and he listened to our entreaty. Priests to Guard Offerings 24 Then I set apart twelve of the leading priests: Sherebiah, Hashabiah, and ten of their kinsmen with them. 25 And I weighed out to them the silver and the gold and the vessels, the offering for the house of our God that the king and his counselors and his lords and all Israel there present had offered. 26 I weighed out into their hand 650 talents4 of silver, and silver vessels worth 200 talents,5 and 100 talents of gold, 27 20 bowls of gold worth 1,000 darics,6 and two vessels of fine bright bronze as precious as gold. 28 And I said to them, “You are holy to the LORD, and the vessels are holy, and the silver and the gold are a freewill offering to the LORD, the God of your fathers. 29 Guard them and keep them until you weigh them before the chief priests and the Levites and the heads of fathers' houses in Israel at Jerusalem, within the chambers of the house of the LORD.” 30 So the priests and the Levites took over the weight of the silver and the gold and the vessels, to bring them to Jerusalem, to the house of our God. 31 Then we departed from the river Ahava on the twelfth day of the first month, to go to Jerusalem. The hand of our God was on us, and he delivered us from the hand of the enemy and from ambushes by the way. 32 We came to Jerusalem, and there we remained three days. 33 On the fourth day, within the house of our God, the silver and the gold and the vessels were weighed into the hands of Meremoth the priest, son of Uriah, and with him was Eleazar the son of Phinehas, and with them were the Levites, Jozabad the son of Jeshua and Noadiah the son of Binnui. 34 The whole was counted and weighed, and the weight of everything was recorded. 35 At that time those who had come from captivity, the returned exiles, offered burnt offerings to the God of Israel, twelve bulls for all Israel, ninety-six rams, seventy-seven lambs, and as a sin offering twelve male goats. All this was a burnt offering to the LORD. 36 They also delivered the king's commissions to the king's satraps7 and to the governors of the province Beyond the River, and they aided the people and the house of God. Footnotes [1] 8:5 Septuagint; Hebrew lacks of Zattu [2] 8:10 Septuagint; Hebrew lacks Bani [3] 8:17 Hebrew lacks and [4] 8:26 A talent was about 75 pounds or 34 kilograms [5] 8:26 Revocalization; the number is missing in the Masoretic Text [6] 8:27 A daric was a coin weighing about 1/4 ounce or 8.5 grams [7] 8:36 A satrap was a Persian official (ESV) Acts 8 (Listen) Saul Ravages the Church 8 And Saul approved of his execution. And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles. 2 Devout men buried Stephen and made great lamentation over him. 3 But Saul was ravaging the church, and entering house after house, he dragged off men and women and committed them to prison. Philip Proclaims Christ in Samaria 4 Now those who were scattered went about preaching the word. 5 Philip went down to the city1 of Samaria and proclaimed to them the Christ. 6 And the crowds with one accord paid attention to what was being said by Philip, when they heard him and saw the signs that he did. 7 For unclean spirits, crying out with a loud voice, came out of many who had them, and many who were paralyzed or lame were healed. 8 So there was much joy in that city. Simon the Magician Believes 9 But there was a man named Simon, who had previously practiced magic in the city and amazed the people of Samaria, saying that he himself was somebody great. 10 They all paid attention to him, from the least to the greatest, saying, “This man is the power of God that is called Great.” 11 And they paid attention to him because for a long time he had amazed them with his magic. 12 But when they believed Philip as he preached good news about the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women. 13 Even Simon himself believed, and after being baptized he continued with Philip. And seeing signs and great miracles2 performed, he was amazed. 14 Now when the apostles at Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent to them Peter and John, 15 who came down and prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit, 16 for he had not yet fallen on any of them, but they had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. 17 Then they laid their hands on them and they received the Holy Spirit. 18 Now when Simon saw that the Spirit was given through the laying on of the apostles' hands, he offered them money, 19 saying, “Give me this power also, so that anyone on whom I lay my hands may receive the Holy Spirit.” 20 But Peter said to him, “May your silver perish with you, because you thought you could obtain the gift of God with money! 21 You have neither part nor lot in this matter, for your heart is not right before God. 22 Repent, therefore, of this wickedness of yours, and pray to the Lord that, if possible, the intent of your heart may be forgiven you. 23 For I see that you are in the gall3 of bitterness and in the bond of iniquity.” 24 And Simon answered, “Pray for me to the Lord, that nothing of what you have said may come upon me.” 25 Now when they had testified and spoken the word of the Lord, they returned to Jerusalem, preaching the gospel to many villages of the Samaritans. Philip and the Ethiopian Eunuch 26 Now an angel of the Lord said to Philip, “Rise and go toward the south4 to the road that goes down from Jerusalem to Gaza.” This is a desert place. 27 And he rose and went. And there was an Ethiopian, a eunuch, a court official of Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was in charge of all her treasure. He had come to Jerusalem to worship 28 and was returning, seated in his chariot, and he was reading the prophet Isaiah. 29 And the Spirit said to Philip, “Go over and join this chariot.” 30 So Philip ran to him and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet and asked, “Do you understand what you are reading?” 31 And he said, “How can I, unless someone guides me?” And he invited Philip to come up and sit with him. 32 Now the passage of the Scripture that he was reading was this:   “Like a sheep he was led to the slaughter    and like a lamb before its shearer is silent,    so he opens not his mouth.33   In his humiliation justice was denied him.    Who can describe his generation?  For his life is taken away from the earth.” 34 And the eunuch said to Philip, “About whom, I ask you, does the prophet say this, about himself or about someone else?” 35 Then Philip opened his mouth, and beginning with this Scripture he told him the good news about Jesus. 36 And as they were going along the road they came to some water, and the eunuch said, “See, here is water! What prevents me from being baptized?”5 38 And he commanded the chariot to stop, and they both went down into the water, Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him. 39 And when they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord carried Philip away, and the eunuch saw him no more, and went on his way rejoicing. 40 But Philip found himself at Azotus, and as he passed through he preached the gospel to all the towns until he came to Caesarea. Footnotes [1] 8:5 Some manuscripts a city [2] 8:13 Greek works of power [3] 8:23 That is, a bitter fluid secreted by the liver; bile [4] 8:26 Or go at about noon [5] 8:36 Some manuscripts add all or most of verse 37: And Philip said, “If you believe with all your heart, you may.” And he replied, “I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.” (ESV)

Christian Natural Health
Daniel and the Lion's Den: A Meditation and Retelling of Daniel 6

Christian Natural Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 6:02


Today's podcast comes from Daniel 6. Introduction: I've known the story of Daniel and the lion's den since I was a kid in Sunday School classes, but I never really considered before what Daniel was thinking at the time. As I wrote some of these retellings, it was obvious that the heroes were actually terrified and full of doubts, like Gideon. Samson wasn't at all fearful, but he'd placed his confidence in himself, rather than in God. It was only very rare individuals that seemed to be completely confident in the Lord. David and Jonathan clearly had this mentality, because the things they said to those around them just before their exploits revealed their thoughts. With Daniel, it's not quite so clear, until you put this event in chronological context with the rest of the book of Daniel.    The first half of the book of Daniel is historical, telling events that transpired during Daniel's lifetime as the kingdom changed rulership. The second half, from chapter 7 through 12, is prophetic, in which Daniel is treated to a series of profound visions which encompass the “silent” years of the Old Testament through the coming of Christ, and then apocalyptic visions that harmonize with John's account in Revelation. We're told in Daniel 5:31 and 6:1 that this episode of the lion's den occurred during the reign of King Darius, and historians say he only reigned for two years. We also know from Daniel 9:2 that Darius was king during the time that Daniel received his famous seventy weeks prophecy, so these two events must have occurred relatively close to one another in time. In the seventy weeks prophecy, Gabriel appeared and helped Daniel to understand that while Jeremiah's prediction of seventy years of captivity (Jeremiah 25:11-12) was nearly over for Israel, there was a deeper meaning for the seventy years as well. There would also be seventy weeks of years, or 490 years, from the time of the rebuilding of Jerusalem, until the end of the age. It would be sixty-nine weeks of years from the rebuilding of Jerusalem until the Messiah would come (and according to “The Coming Prince” by Sir Robert Anderson, from the time Nehemiah was sent to rebuild the walls of the city, sixty-nine weeks of years, where a year in the calendar of the day was 360 days, would work out to 173,880 days. This is to the day when Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey on Palm Sunday, proclaiming himself to be king, Luke 19:28-44.) That last week of years, or the last seven years, will be the end of the age—and the rest of Daniel's seventy weeks prophecy describes the antichrist, the covenant with Israel that begins those seven years, and the abomination of desolation 3.5 years in, which will initiate the last 3.5 years of tribulation. Daniel's prophecy here doesn't indicate that there is a gap between the 69th and the 70th week, though some scholars believe that was because there didn't have to be a gap: had the Jews accepted Jesus as Messiah when he rode in on Palm Sunday, the first and the second coming might have been one and the same. This might have been why Jesus wept as he rode into town (Luke 19:41-44). As it was, there is a pause in Daniel's timeline “until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in” (Romans 11:25).    In my retelling, therefore, I imagined how full Daniel's mind must have been with such wonderful revelations. He'd seen and spoken with God's messenger, not once, but twice (Gabriel also came to him in Daniel 8:16). He'd been in captivity nearly all his life, and now in his eighties, he realized that the time drew near for his people to return to Jerusalem. His prayer in Daniel 9:4-19 is so impassioned, one can almost picture him weeping as he contends for their release. Gabriel told him that he was greatly beloved (Daniel 9:23), and told him that not only did the time draw near for his people's release, but also showed him God's entire plan for history.    Meanwhile, Darius wanted to promote Daniel because, like Pharaoh had said of Joseph, he had the spirit of God's wisdom upon him (Daniel 6:3). As King Solomon wrote, a man who excels in his work will stand before kings, and not obscure men (Proverbs 22:29). Daniel did his work with excellence, but he had no ambitions in Persia. His heart was clearly with his people, his homeland, and God's plans for the earth. So when the other governors and satraps conspired against him, I imagine that Daniel almost ignored them. He had far bigger things on his mind. He probably heard the threat, knew it was petty jealousy, proceeded about his business, and forgot about it.   It was the Persian custom that a law sealed by the king could not be changed (Daniel 6:15), which was the same issue Esther ran into in her day. Clearly Darius realized that his satraps and governors had convinced him to sign such a law just to entrap Daniel. Darius wanted to rescue Daniel and tried to find a loophole (Daniel 6:14), but even he couldn't do it, which was what his officials had counted upon. Daniel's devotion to the Lord had made such an impression on Darius by this point that when Daniel was cast into the lion's den, Darius declared, “Your God, whom you serve continually, He will deliver you” (Daniel 6:16). Even this pagan king believed God would save Daniel! He also loved Daniel so well that he didn't sleep that night, and rose first thing in the morning to check on Daniel and see if God had indeed delivered him. If he had been certain to find Daniel dead, he presumably wouldn't have gone to check.    What must it have been like for Daniel to spend the night in that pit? Did he actually see the angel that he later told Darius had shut the lions' mouths? I don't see why not; he'd seen Gabriel at least twice before by this time. If Daniel's mindset was what I imagine it might have been, I suspect that he would have slept that night, just as Jesus did on the boat during the storm (Matthew 8:24, Mark 4:38, Luke 8:23). That's the picture of the perfect peace of one whose mind is stayed on the Lord because he trusts in Him (Isaiah 26:3). Daniel, I think, embodied this peace. That's why he inspired even Darius with such confidence on his behalf.   When the king found Daniel alive, he then did to the conspirators what they had intended to do to Daniel. The concept of reaping what one sows is well established in scripture (Luke 6:38, Galatians 6:7, Proverbs 26:27). The fact that the lions tore them apart before they even hit the bottom of the pit proves that they were both vicious and hungry; they just hadn't been able to touch Daniel. It seems awfully harsh to punish the conspirators' wives and children for crimes they did not commit, and this is not God's way (Deuteronomy 24:16, Jeremiah 31:30). But God was not the one to mete out judgment against Daniel's accusers; Darius was.    Fictional Retelling:    I lived almost my entire life in exile—in the land that was Babylon for the majority of my life, and then became Persia in my old age. I was constantly surrounded by political intrigue, though most of the time, it did not concern me. My dominant thoughts lay elsewhere. Though I'd left there as a boy, my heart was still in Jerusalem: the city of my father David. It had been so many years since I'd seen it that the place had taken on a mythical quality in my imagination, and I commingled the concept of Jerusalem with that of the throne room of heaven. Every day, when my duties as one of the governors over the kingdom of Persia did not otherwise compel me, I pored over the writings of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel for some clue of the Lord's plans for His people. After I read, I opened the windows of the upper room of my home so that the sunlight would stream in; in my mind's eye, the sunlight was the radiance of the Lord Himself upon his throne, emanating from Jerusalem, His city. I faced Jerusalem and I prayed for wisdom, for repentance on behalf of my wayward people, and for mercy. When I shifted my heavenly focus down to the here and now, I executed my duties as governor with the wisdom the Lord gave me. King Darius set forty provinces, led by forty satraps, under each of his three governors. My provinces prospered effortlessly—of course. I had the wisdom of the Lord. It was clear that King Darius recognized the Lord's influence and admired me above all of the other governors and satraps, and I knew he considered putting me over the entire realm because of this. This was fine. I had no aspirations at my age. My heart and soul belonged to my own people and nation; I only labored for this one because for now, Darius was my king, and integrity demanded that I do the work he set before me to the best of my ability. I was vaguely aware that my more ambitious peers and the satraps under them envied me. I could do nothing about this though, and regarded their esteem lightly anyway. So I paid it little attention.  Instead, I spent my days swept up in visions and prophecy. One morning when reading the writings of the prophet Jeremiah, his words leapt off the scroll to me that the time of Jerusalem's desolations was to be seventy years.  Sixty-nine years had passed.  I tore my robes and put on sackcloth, deliberately sprinkling the floor of my upper room with ashes to symbolize repentance on behalf of my people, and determined to fast before the Lord for however long it took. Then I threw open my windows and fell to my knees, praying toward Jerusalem with such fervor that it was as though time and space fell away. I do not know how much time passed before I felt a hand on my shoulder. I was already so worked up that I jumped and my eyes flew open. The man I beheld was one I had met once before: the angel Gabriel. He was much larger and more powerfully built than the greatest of the Persian warriors, radiant with light and dressed in gleaming white.  He told me I was greatly beloved. He also showed me that there was a deeper meaning to Jeremiah's prophecy than what I had first supposed. Yes, there would be seventy years until my people could return to Jerusalem. But there would also be seventy weeks of years from the time of Jerusalem's reconstruction to the end of the age, and sixty-nine weeks of years from the reconstruction to the appearance of the Messiah.  I floated after this, so buoyant with happiness and overwhelmed with the implications of Gabriel's message that the details of the concrete world around me paled in comparison. So when I heard that the other governors and satraps had convinced Darius to sign into law the ridiculous order that for thirty days, anyone caught praying to any god or man except to him should be cast into the lion's den, I hardly considered it. I would not have heeded the rule at any time, but especially not now. The Lord had shown me such wonderful and marvelous things, so much larger than myself and my own life. I saw myself as a representative for my people, and Gabriel's words had confirmed this to me. We were on the cusp of the breakthrough I had awaited all my life… would I be stymied by fear, due to the petty jealousy of those who fancied themselves my political rivals? By no means!  I went home that very day and threw open the windows of my upper room as I always did. Then I knelt down and prayed to the Lord. I prayed for the end of my people's captivity. I envisioned my own return to Jerusalem, the city of my fathers. I prayed for my people 483 years from now, when Messiah the Prince would be revealed—oh! What a day that would be! May the people of that day know and recognize and rejoice at the appearance of their hope and redemption!  Two more times that day I did the same, giving thanks to God for hearing my prayers and for esteeming me so well that He was pleased to reveal to me what would come, long after my time. Both the second and third times I prayed that day, I glanced down and saw the assembly of governors and satraps on the street below, watching me, pointing, and whispering to one another.  “Oh Lord,” I prayed when I saw them, “as King Solomon wrote, ‘let he who digs a pit fall into it, and he who rolls a stone have it roll back on him.'” Then I went on with my prayers, thanksgiving, and supplications. I forgot all about the men clearly conspiring against me, until I heard a pounding upon my door at nightfall. It was insistent.  “Daniel!” shouted a voice I recognized as Kasper's, one of the other governors of the realm. I could tell he was not alone, but that he was with a company—probably the very ones who had seen me praying that day. I could make out the voice of Bijan, one of the most hateful of Darius's satraps, among them. “Open up, by decree of the king!”  Instinctively and though my window was shut just then, I glanced in the direction of Jerusalem, since in my mind, that was the direction of God's throne. More of Solomon's words came back to me unbidden: Though they join forces, the wicked will not go unpunished, but the posterity of the righteous will be delivered. I wrapped my nightclothes in my cloak and opened the door. Perhaps six pairs of hands grabbed me at once, and dragged me out of my house so forcefully that I stumbled, old man that I was.  “Daniel!” Kasper's voice rose above the din, even as they dragged me toward the palace, “you have not shown due regard for the king! You were seen today petitioning and praying to your God, against the royal decree. You knew the penalty for this was death by lions. We take you now to meet your fate!”  I tripped and nearly fell numerous times on the short walk to the palace dungeons, had it not been for the hands upon my robes. I should have been terrified, and entirely in this moment. Yet somehow, I felt insulated, almost as if I were watching the events transpire against someone else. I kept thinking of my friends Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego who, many years ago, had defied a similar order from King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. I had been traveling on the king's business at the time. When I returned and heard the story of their supernatural deliverance, I'd been almost envious. I so wished I'd been there with them, to have seen the Lord face to face! What a story!  Now, almost sixty years later, here was my chance. King Darius met me and my entourage at the entrance to the palace dungeons, looking frantic and disheveled.  “Daniel—!” he moaned, his voice thick with grief. “I did everything I could to deliver you, but the decree is iron-clad!”  “I know you did,” I smiled at the king tenderly, and reached out a hand to his shoulder. It was a more familiar gesture than I perhaps would have attempted under any other circumstance, but I felt a rush of affection for him in his obvious distress. He was too inexperienced a ruler to have understood how his governors and satraps had played him. He had not known the extent of the political machinations of his court when he'd signed that decree, though he knew now. “Your God, to whom you are so loyal, is going to get you out of this!” Darius suddenly declared.  I blinked at him in amazement, then beamed, even as the satraps moved the stone off of the mouth of the lion's den. I knew this, but to hear it from the mouth of a pagan king!  “You are already much closer to Him than you realize,” I told the king. “I'll see you in the morning—”  My words were cut off by a rough thrust from the hands of my accusers, shoving me toward the open pit. I stumbled, and then fell in headlong, twisting in the air. I landed hard on my palms and knees, sending jolts of searing pain up to my wrists, shoulders, knees, and hips. I gasped, but then tested my bones and joints to make sure nothing was broken. Darius let out a strangled sob up above, as the satraps and governors heaved the stone back in place. Just before it sealed, I caught a glimpse of the five great shaggy beasts pacing and growling around me.  Then there was utter darkness.  I closed my eyes and opened them again, and could tell no difference. The padding of great paws picked up their pace, and the growling turned to roars, one after the other, like a great cacophonous symphony. I had the sense that the lions were frustrated by the prey in their very midst, and yet they could not seem to get at it.  “Let me see you, Lord,” I prayed, yawning with sudden weariness as I lay down on the floor of the pit. “I know you're here…”  Suddenly the pit filled with an otherworldly glow. Gabriel circled around me, bearing a sword in each hand. He whipped it with dazzling speed each time one of the great cats got too close. They, in turn, backed off, but roared with fury.  “Go to sleep, Daniel,” Gabriel told me, and flashed me a grin. “You might as well. I'm going to be up all night, anyway.”  I laughed, and the vision faded until all was complete darkness again. I tuned out the lions' roars, though I think they eventually must have given up and fallen silent. I couldn't say for sure. I drifted off fairly soon after that.  “Daniel!”  I gasped awake, squinting against the light streaming in from the top of the now open pit. I perceived a silhouette up above, though all I could see was the disheveled hair sticking out in all directions. I recognized the voice as the king's though. He sounded nearly as anxious as he had the night before. “Daniel, servant of the living God, has your God, whom you serve so loyally, saved you from the lions?” I sat up, glancing around the pit to see the great cats fast asleep around me, though they stirred now as I did from the light and the noise. I grinned at the king, who began to come into focus as I gazed up at him.  “O king, live forever!” I called. “My God sent his angel, who closed the mouths of the lions so that they would not hurt me. I've been found innocent before God and also before you, O king. I've done nothing to harm you.”  Darius let out a shout of glee, clapping his hands together. He stood up out of my view, and I could neither see nor quite hear what he did next, but I heard him speaking to someone. The next thing I knew, a thick rope with a loop at the bottom of it descended into the pit, and I saw two strong servants at the top, ready to pull me out. Two of the lions saw the commotion, got to their feet, and began to snarl and pace again.  “Hurry!” cried one of the servants, glancing at the lions with alarm, just as one of the lions let out an almighty roar.  “Oh, don't worry,” I told them with a wave of my hand, as I stepped into the loop and grabbed on to the rope up above. “They're just frustrated. They can't even get close to me.”  I wasn't sure if the servants even heard this, as they immediately began to heave me up and out. Once I was well out of the way, the lions paced to the place where I had been lying, roaring up at me and swiping the air with their claws. The edge of one claw sliced clean through the bottom of my robe, just as one servant let go of the robe to grab me around my waist. I twisted to sit down at the top of the pit and edge away.  “Daniel!” King Darius forgot his royal position and threw his arms around my neck, weeping with relief. Surprised, I patted his shoulders, and then he pulled me back to inspect me. “You are truly unharmed?”  “Truly, my king,” I nodded, wiping the last of the sleep from my eyes as I yawned.  “Did—you sleep in there?” he demanded, incredulous. Then he added, almost accusing, “I didn't even sleep last night! I rushed here at first light to see how you fared!”  I smiled at the king fondly. “My king honors me greatly with his concern,” I said, and shrugged. “I saw no reason to fear the lions. Besides, I was tired.”  The servants behind King Darius let out an incredulous snort of laughter at this, but stifled it when the king whipped around to glare at them. One of the servants clamped a hand over his mouth, as a slow answering smile spread across Darius's face. Then the king started to laugh too. Before I knew it, the servants were doubled over, as was the king, tears running down his face.  Nervous relief? I thought as I watched them in wonder, totally missing the humor. When the king recovered himself, his expression grew suddenly fierce. He told his servants, “Tell my royal guard to seize Daniel's accusers, the other two governors, the complicit satraps, and their families. Bring them here at once, before the hour has passed!”  I felt a wave of foreboding and sympathy, suspecting I knew what the king intended to do to them for their treachery. Darius got to his feet, and I followed suit. He confirmed my fears when asked me, his expression dark, “Would you like to watch, Daniel?”  I closed my eyes and shook my head. “No, my king.”  “You are a better man than I, then,” said King Darius. “I rejoice at the destruction of my enemies. And your enemies have now become mine. You are dismissed.”  I bowed my head and made my way alone back to my home. At a distance, I saw Kasper, his wife and children struggling against the rough hands of the king's royal guard. His wife wept and begged. The children, I could tell, did not understand what was going on, but knew something was wrong. They cried because their mother did. Though we were far away, Kasper's eyes locked with mine, frantic with fear. A wave of nausea rolled over me.  “O God, may it be quick and painless,” I prayed. “I commend the souls of the innocents to Your mercy.”  I heard later that my prayers were answered. The hungry, frustrated lions overpowered all those thrown into the den, killing them instantly before they even hit the bottom.  The same messenger informed me that the king had now officially placed me above the entire realm. I had assumed this would be the case, since the other two governors had perished. The news brought me sorrow—not because I minded the position, but I had never sought it, either. All this had transpired because the governors had not wanted to relinquish their power to me. Instead of merely their power, they had lost their lives, and those of their families too.  That evening, I heard the news that King Darius had sent out a royal decree to every corner of his kingdom, which read, “Peace to you! Abundant peace! I decree that Daniel's God shall be worshiped and feared in all parts of my kingdom. He is the living God, world without end. His kingdom never falls. His rule continues eternally. He is a savior and rescuer. He performs astonishing miracles in heaven and on earth. He saved Daniel from the power of the lions.” I took the written decree to the upper room of my home, and laid it before the Lord. I thanked Him for rescuing me. I thanked Him for humbling and saving King Nebuchadnezzar all those years ago, when he returned to his right mind and served the Lord for the rest of His days. I thanked him that King Darius now honored Him too. I thought of Jonah's ministry to Nineveh, and how they too had repented. I thanked the Lord that He did not show favoritism; He wanted to save the Jew and the Gentile alike, the rich and the poor, the ruler and the peasant. I thanked Him that though I had been brought into Babylon as a captive, now like Joseph, I found myself favored by the king, and second in command of a pagan kingdom.  “You are faithful to honor Your servants who fear You, even in a land not our own,” I prayed.  Yet still, my heart was not here, in this foreign nation where I had lived most of my life. For all my power and prestige, I was but a sojourner; that was the great irony. I would serve the Lord where He had placed me to the best of my ability all of my days, and would try to represent Him well. But I would daily pray toward my true home, awaiting the day of our redemption.

Learn Languages with Steve Kaufmann
2022 Language Learning Goals

Learn Languages with Steve Kaufmann

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 14:12


I started Standard Arabic, Persian & Turkish to better understand the region. Dropped Turkish to focus on reading Arabic script. Now I'm doing more colloquial Arabic. Things change.

Riddle Me That! True Crime
ITRODUCING Curly Conspiracies: The Persian Princess Mummy

Riddle Me That! True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 26:19


This is legitimately one of my don't want to miss it podcasts every week. Each episode is typically around 30 minutes so it's perfect while preparing dinner or going for a walk. This is a fun and evidence based way to explore popular conspiracy theories. Description of episode & podcast below. Description of Show:Curly Conspiracies podcast is a show filled with mysteries, conspiracies, and things that go bump in the night. Each episode covers deep topics that bring laughter, curiosity, and a new perspective of events that have taken place in our history. Join Holly and Brooke every Thursday for a new mystery or conspiracy theory that will blow your tin foil hat off!During a murder investigation, a tip leads police to a video of a mummified 2,600 year old Persian Princess circulating the dark web in Pakistan being sold on the black market. Details about this discovery made scientists skeptical about its authenticity. Once more research was done though, what they found was much more disturbing than they had ever imagined.Picture: https://unsplash.com/photos/_r9XDE_KFuMSources:Sources:https://archive.archaeology.org/0101/etc/persia.htmlhttp://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/4749861.stmhttps://sites.psu.edu/emmatilton/2016/01/21/are-you-my-mummy/https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2001/06/modern-mummy-mysteryhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2001/persianmummytrans.shtmlhttps://www.maryhallbergmedia.com/post/the-mystery-of-the-persian-princess-mummyhttps://www.grunge.com/69067/untold-truth-mummies/https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/a-mummy-hoax-might-be-wrapped-up-in-a-modern-murderhttps://web.archive.org/web/20141021175641/http://www.pakistanpressfoundation.org/news-archives/22661/https://listverse.com/2019/09/14/creepy-mysteries-that-are-still-unsolved/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOoAdLHpkSc

Modern Persian Food
Persian Food with Stand Up Dan

Modern Persian Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 25:14


The Beats have so much fun geeking out about Persian food with Dan Ahdoot, a comic actor/writer, and most recently, very first Persian with his own show on Primetime TV!  Dan will be the host of a new show that follows “Chopped” on the Food Network (first show airing on Dec. 28th) called “Raid the Fridge”.  Help us support Dan in what is sure to be a hit show - with Dan's wit and energy, this is going to be a cooking show like no other.   What Dan, doesn't like to eat in terms of Persian food: Quince!  He doesn't like the way it sounds in Farsi, “beh”... and he is not a fan of too much sweet mixed into his savory meals, specifically as in Khoresh eh Beh, Persian stew made with quince fruit “Garagharoot”!  The most sour lavashak you can get, made from cooked down kashk.  In Dan's terms, it's sour in a weird, bovine way, resembling bile (!)   Side note:  Dan is a huge fan of most Persian foods - an under-represented food cuisine with delicious flavors and a rich history, coming not from poverty but from royalty.   What Dan, does like, and in fact, loves eating in terms of Persian food: Essentially anything that consists of mashed up beans and meat (Dan has a type!), what he refers to as Persian truck driver food.  Dan loves the expression “meechaspeh” which is used to describe rib sticking comfort foods and literally is translated from Farsi as meaning “sticking”. Dizi/ Deezi - Ab Ghousht Loves the paste made when the beans and meat are mashed together along with some sangak bread into a type of delicious, comforting paste Kaleh Paacheh - organ soup A super viscous soup made from cooked down head and hooves - in Iran most often prepared with lamb.  In the U.S., often made using beef.  Cooked with standard Persian base of friend onions and turmeric.  Traditionally also has Seville oranges (sour oranges).   Dan prefers it cooked fresh by his mom vs from a restaurant Aasheh Sholeh Ghalamkhar…to Dan, the most comforting of all Persian soups The ‘ugly step-sister' of the more popular, iconic Persian soup or aash, Aash Reshteh Made with meat, beans, and herbs   Tie in to Dan's new show on Food Networks, Raid the Fridge (first show Dec. 28th) What is the show - Four chefs and four mystery refrigerators.  Chefs will choose a fridge and create a meal, for example an omelet, using only the ingredients that are in their chosen fridge.  The winner is awarded $10k bucks! Use the ingredients you have to create Persian flavors and dishes Normalize Persian ingredients by incorporating them into other dishes - example, Dan loves to sprinkle ground limoo amani (Persian dried limes) on just about everything, especially on his ramen noodles!   References: Joon Rice Truck - mini tahchin in Queens Night Market Tahdig Tacos Vartamelon Reference to Chef Beeta Mohajari of Orange County Beetz Eats   Find more about Dan at https://www.standupdan.com and Dan Ahdoot (@standupdan)   All Modern Persian Food episodes can be found at: Episodes Co-host Beata Nazem Kelley blog: BeatsEats – Persian Girl Desperately Addicted to Food! Co-host Bita Arabian blog: Oven Hug - Healthy Persian Recipes | Modern Persian Recipes Podcast production by Alvarez Audio

Your Brain on Facts
Very New Year

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 18:58


Happy new year!  Or is it?  It depends on which calendar you're using. Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website.   On Monday this December 30th past, I clocked in at my retail jobs, put on my headset, and played the morning messages.  There was one from my manager telling us what to expect in terms of sales volume that day and one from corporate welcoming us to the first day of 2020.  The didn't get their dates mixed up.  December 30th 2019 was the first day of 2020 in a way that once crashed Twitter for hours.  My name…   When we think of the calendar, we think of it as singular and exclusive.  “The” calendar.  Sure, there were other calendars, but those were for old-timey people in old-timey times.  If you've ever listened to the show before, you'll know I'm about to disabuse you of that notion; it's kinda my schtick.  The calendar we think of as the end all and be all of organizing time into little squares is the Gregorian calendar, but it's just one of many that have been used and still are used today.   For example, at the time of this recording, it's currently the 27th day of the month of Tevet in the year 5782 for those who follow the Hebrew calendar.  The Hebrew calendar, also known as the Jewish calendar, was originally created before the year 10 CE.  It first used lunar months, which will surprise no one who has had to google when Passover or Easter are each year.  A standard Jewish year has twelve months; six twenty-nine-day months, and six thirty-day months, for a total of 354 days.  This is because the months follow the lunar orbit, which is on average 29.5 days.  Due to variations in the Jewish calendar, the year could also be 353 or 355 days.  It also used standard calendar years, but these two methods don't line up perfectly, and this posed a problem.  As time went on, the shorter lunar calendar would result in holy days shifting forward in time from year to year.  That simply wouldn't do as certain holidays have to be celebrated in a certain season, like Passover in the spring, Tu B'Shevat, the Jewish 'New Year for Trees,' which  needs to fall around the time that trees in the Middle East come out of their winter dormancy, or Sukkot, the festival that calls adherents to build and live in huts in their yard to commemorate Isrealites taking shelter in the wilderness, which is meant to fall in autumn.  So a thirteenth month had to be added every 3 to 4 years in order to make up for the difference.  Such a year is called a shanah meuberet ("pregnant year") in Hebrew; in English we call it a leap year, and it makes up all the lunar calendar's lost days.  The month is added to Adar, the last of the twelve months. On leap years we observe two Adars — Adar I and Adar II.  Today, the Hebrew calendar is used primarily to determine the dates for Jewish religious holidays and to select appropriate religious readings for the day.   Similar in usage is the Hijri calendar, or Islamic calendar.  It's based on lunar phases, using a system of 12 months and either 354 or 355 days every year.  The first Islamic year was 622 CE when the prophet Muhammad emigrated from Mecca to Medina, meaning today is the Jumada I 28, 1443 .  The Hijri calendar is used to identify Islamic holidays and festivals.  The Islamic New Year marks the journey of the prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Medina.  However, the occasion and the sacred month of Muharram are observed differently by the two largest branches of Islam, Shiite and Sunni.  Shiite pilgrims journey to their holiest sites to commemorate a seventh-century battle, while Sunnis fast to celebrate the victory of Moses over an Egyptian pharaoh.  Also known as the Persian calendar, it's the official calendar used in Iran and Afghanistan, and it's the most accurate calendar system going, but more on that later.   Further east you'll encounter the Buddhist calendar, which is used throughout Southeast Asia.  This uses the sidereal year, the time it takes Earth to orbit the sun, as the solar year.  Like other systems, the calendar does not try to stay in sync with this time measurement, but unlike the others, no extra days or months have been added, so the Buddhist calendar is slowly moving out of alignment at a pace of around one day every century.  Today, the traditional Buddhist lunisolar calendar is used mainly for Theravada Buddhist festivals, and no longer has the official calendar status anywhere. The Thai Buddhist Era, a renumbered Gregorian calendar, is the official calendar in Thailand.  The Buddhist calendar is based on an older Hindu calendar, of which there are actually three -- Vikram Samvat, Shaka Samvat, and Kali Yuga.  The Vikram Samvat is used in Nepal and some Indian states, and uses lunar months and the sidereal year to track time.  Sidereal means based on fixed stars and constellations, rather than celestial things on the move, like planets.  The Shaka Samvat, used officially in India and by Hindus in Java and Bali, has months based around the tropical zodiac signs rather than the sidereal year.  The Kali Yuga is a different sort of calendar altogether.  It meters out the last of the four stages (or ages or yugas) the world goes through as part of a 'cycle of yugas' (i.e. mahayuga) described in the Sanskrit scriptures. The Kali Yuga, began at midnight (00:00) on 18 February 3102 BCE,  is the final cycle within the 4-cycle Yuga era. The first cycle is the age of truth and perfection, the second cycle is the age of emperors and war, the third stage is the age of disease and discontent, and the third stage (the Kali Yuga) is the age of ignorance and darkness.  If you're worried because you already missed 5,000 years of the Yuga, don't fret; you have upwards of 467,000 years left.     You've probably heard of Chinese New Year, so you won't be surprised that there is a Chinese calendar.  According to this system, each month begins on the day when the moon is in the "new moon" phase. The beginning of a new year is also marked by the position of the moon and occurs when the moon is midway between the winter solstice and spring equinox.  China uses the Gregorian calendar for official things, but still uses the Chinese calendar is used to celebrate holidays.   You might be surprised to learn about the Ethiopian calendar.  The Ethiopian calendar is quite similar to the Julian calendar, the predecessor to the Gregorian calendar most countries use today.  Like the other calendars we've discussed, it's intertwined with the faith of the people.  The first day of the week for instance, called Ehud, translates as ‘the first day‘ in the ancient Ge'ez language, the liturgical language of the Ethiopian church.  It is meant to show that Ehud is the first day on which God started creating the heavens and the earth.  The calendar system starts with the idea that Adam and Eve lived in the Garden of Eden for seven years before they were banished for 5,500 for their sins.  Both the Gregorian and Ethiopian use the birthdate of Jesus Christ as a starting point, what Eddie Izzard called “the big BC/AD change-over,” though the Ethiopian Orthodox Church believes Jesus was born 7 years earlier than the Gregorian calendar says.  The Ethiopian calendar has 13 months in a year, 12 of which have 30 days. The last month, called Pagume, has five days, and six days in a leap year.   Not only do the months have names, so do the years.  The first year after an Ethiopian leap year is named the John year, and is followed by the Matthew year, then Mark, then Luke.  Sept. 11 marks the day of the new year in Ethiopia.  By this time, the lengthy rainy season has come to a close, leaving behind a countryside flourishing in yellow daisies. That's fitting because Enkutatash in Amharic, the native language of Ethiopia, translates to “gift of jewels.” To celebrate New Year's, Ethiopians sing songs unique to the day and exchange bouquets of flowers. Of course, there is plenty of eating and drinking, too.   So what about this Gregorian calendar I keep mentioning?  The Gregorian calendar was created in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, who made some changes to the previously used Julian calendar.  Okay, so what was the Julian calendar?  It should shock no one that the Julian calendar was ordered by and named after Julius Caesar.  By the 40s BCE the Roman civic calendar was three months ahead of the solar calendar.  The Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes, introduced the Egyptian solar calendar, taking the length of the solar year as 365 1/4 days.  The year was divided into 12 months, all of which had either 30 or 31 days except February, which contained 28 days in common (365 day) years and 29 in every fourth year (a leap year, of 366 days).  That 29th day wasn't February 29th, it was February 23rd a second time.  What a mess that would make, though that conflagration of confusion probably paled in comparison to to what Caesar did to align the civic and solar calendars--he added days to the year 46 BCE, so that it contained 445 days.  Unsurprisingly when you try to make such a large change to the daily lives of so many people in the days before electronic communication, it took over fifty years to get everybody on board.   Sosigenes had overestimated the length of the year by 11 minutes 14 seconds.  11 minutes doesn't mean much in a given year, but after, say, 1500 years, the seasons on your calendar no longer line up with the seasons of reality.  That matters when your most important holy day needs to happen at a certain time of year.  Enter Pope Gregory XIII, who wanted to stop Easter, which had been celebrated on March 21, from drifting any farther away from the spring Equinox.  Aloysus Lilius, the Italian scientist who developed the system Pope Gregory would unveil in 1582, realized that the addition of so many February 23rds made the calendar slightly too long. He devised a variation that adds leap days in years divisible by four, unless the year is also divisible by 100. If the year is also divisible by 400, a leap day is added regardless. [OS crash noise] Sorry about that.  While this formula may sound confusing, it did resolve the lag created by Caesar's earlier scheme—almost; Lilius' system was still off by 26 seconds.  As a result, in the years since Gregory introduced his calendar in 1582, a discrepancy of several hours has arisen.  We have some time before that really becomes an issue for the average person.  It will take until the year 4909 before the Gregorian calendar will be a full day ahead of the solar year.   Maths aside, not everyone was keen on Pope Gregory's plan.  His proclamation was what's known as a papal bull, an order that applies to the church by has no authority over non-Catholics.  That being said, the new calendar was quickly adopted by predominantly Catholic countries like Spain, Portugal and Italy, major world players at the time.  European Protestants, however, feared it was an attempt to silence their movement, a conspiracy to keep them down.  Maybe by making it hard to remember when meetings and protests were supposed to be, I'm not sure.  It wasn't until 1700 that Protestant Germany switched over, and England held out until 1752.  Those transitions didn't go smooth.  English citizens didn't take kindly to the act of Parliament that advanced their calendars from September 2 to September 14, overnight.  There are apocryphal tales of rioters in the streets, demanding that the government “give us our 11 days.” However, most historians now believe that these protests never occurred or were greatly exaggerated.  Some countries took even longer than Britain--the USSR didn't convert to the Gregorian calendar until 1918, even later than countries like Egypt and Japan.  On the other side of the Atlantic from the British non-protests, meanwhile, Benjamin Franklin welcomed the change, writing, “It is pleasant for an old man to be able to go to bed on September 2, and not have to get up until September 14.”   When Julius Caesar's reformed the calendar in 46 B.C., he established January 1 as the first of the year.  During the Middle Ages, however, European countries replaced it with days that carried greater religious significance, such as December 25 and March 25 (the Feast of the Annunciation).  I didn't google that one.  After my mom listens to this episode, she'll send me a gloriously incorrect speech-to-text message explaining it.  Different calendars mean different New Years days even now, and the ways in which people celebrate as as splendidly diverse as the people themselves.   The Coptic Egyptian Church celebrates the Coptic New Year (Anno Martyrus), or year of the martyrs on 11th of September. The Coptic calendar is the ancient Egyptian one of twelve 30-day months plus a "small" five-day month—six-day in a leap year.  The months retain their ancient Egyptian names which denote the gods and godesses of the Egyptians, and the year's three seasons, the inundation, cultivation, and harvest, are related to the Nile and the annual agricultural cycle.  But the Copts chose the year 284AD to mark the beginning of the calendar, since this year saw the seating of Diocletian as Rome's emperor and the consequent martyrdom of thousands upon thousands of Egypt's Christians.  Apart from the Church's celebration, Copts celebrate the New Year by eating red dates, which are in season, believing the red symbolises the martyrs' blood and the white date heart the martyrs' pure hearts.  Also, dates are delicious.    Bonus fact: You know that guy, Pope Francis?  He's not actually the pope.  The pope's proper title, according to the Vatican's website, is Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Primate of Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province, Sovereign of the State of Vatican City, Servant of the Servants of God.  'Pope' comes from the Italian 'papa.'  Francis is the Sancta Papa, the Holy Father.  The title of pope belongs to the head of the Coptic church.  So if anyone uses the rhetorical question “Is the pope Catholic?” to imply a ‘yes' answer, you have my authorization to bring the conversation to a screeching halt by saying “No.  No, he's not.”  Double points if you simply walk away without explaining yourself.

The Thought Leader Revolution Podcast | 10X Your Impact, Your Income & Your Influence

“You're the only obstacle, and it's an obstacle that you can clearly move out of the way.” Two time Emmy award winning writer and producer, Robyn Symon joins us today. Specializing in documentary and tv series, Robyn is a filmmaker that tells transformational stories that highlight people who make a difference in the world. Robyn is passionate about giving people the courage to take action on their ideas, dreams and goals. A short list of her film achievements include; Behind The Blue Vail, One Week Job, Young Entrepreneurs Society, YesMovie.com, and Transformation: The Life And Legacy Of Werner Erhard. Her latest film is Do No Harm, which discusses the issue of suicide in the medical industry. Check out the IMDB link below for her full discography.   Expert Action steps Get in action! Whatever your goal or idea, are baby steps everyday toward making it happen. Talk about your dream as though it's real. Be in connection with other people. Share your ideas with people. Help people and share how they could help you.   To learn more about Robyn Symon or to connect with her directly: https://www.symonproductions.com/ donoharmfilm.com info@donoharmfilm.com robyn@symonproductions.com Facebook IMDB   Also mentioned in this episode: David Deida book The Way Of The Superior Man Nick Koumalatsos Wayne Allyn Root and The Great Patriot Protest and Boycott Book Sovereign Man Movement Sovereign Man Podcast   Visit eCircleAcademy.com and book a success with call Nicky to take your practice to the next level.

Persian News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN
NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Persian News at 13:00 (JST), January 03

Persian News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 13:56


NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Persian News at 13:00 (JST), January 03

Persian Hour Art and Music Show
Persian Hour Art and Music Show on 01/02/22

Persian Hour Art and Music Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022


Radio Javan Podcasts
RJ Countdown (EP 130 - December 2021)

Radio Javan Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021


Dragons in Genesis
067_2 Chronicles

Dragons in Genesis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 40:57


The wild inventions of the Chronicler continue in this episode as we cover the entirety of the First Temple Period beginning with King Solomon and ending with the Temple's destruction at the hands of the Babylonians, ushering in the influence of Persian rule and religion which is evident in the text. See how the Chronicler changes events from the record of the Books of Kings in order to satisfy his own theological views.

Bedletter
The Ides of December

Bedletter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:15


What are the days of our lives, if not the passing of time into tomorrow? The moments here and now are stolen away and buried under all that will be, cast long like a shadow of the future. That darkened image sketched before me, mirroring back my movements, copying my arm waves and leg shuffles—it grows the darkest in December. Always black as the evening tide in the ides of December. I hate the twelfth month of the year, when everything’s rounded out and times tick down and everyone’s busy as the bees in spring. But it’s winter, it’s hibernation time, ice-time, time to batten down the hatches and cradle in warm, fire-lit living rooms with people we know, filling up on their chuckles like melted marshmallows in a mug of hot cocoa. Always so warm and willing and it’s December, the worst month of the year.I shouldn’t be surprised. The calendar rolls out like an ancient scroll every year, the same months following one after another. I shouldn’t be surprised when November ends and December punches the ticket for thirty-one days to come. It always has. It’s the bookend, the capper, the final act of the play, the anticlimactic climax of two-thousand twenty-one just as it was in twenty-twenty, and all the gatherings of days before. I shouldn’t be surprised. But for some reason I always am, always struck by the mood of winter, the emotions of slumber. When dopamine finds itself in hibernation, leagues away from the meat of my mind. I wake up in December like counting to twelve, and am stunned that I made it all this way. All the way up the rungs to twelve, just like I did every other year. Still caught off guard, ignorantly off guard, still wondering why I can’t manage the melting enigma behind my eyes. It’s seasonal. And we’re here in December and I’m always dazed.December’s a big pharma commercial. The ones we see on television while we watch “Christmas Special” football—this year it’s my green men, my Packers, versus the Browns. We won. It was too close, an ugly victory. And the commercials reel like fast-jargoned cinema. It’s hard to keep up and the small print is so small the pixels deflate when you step a little closer. It’s so lovely, though. Two grandparents, pacing through a meadow, hand-in-hand. They smile and sheen their pearly whites at each other, a kiss on the cheek, the woman rests her head on the collar bone of the man. It’s a snapshot of days to come, future days. Floating through love and life like the kitschy family room signs plastered up above entryways—live, laugh, love it all. They sure are in this forty-five second ad run. The screen shifts to a family, dancing around the holiday tree, lights blipping and beaming bright and it’s all slow motion and perfect. Their teeth are all so perfect, lined up and whitened up and spotlighting the aftereffects of December. The parts we all live for, the times we all pray, eat, drink, and hope for.But December’s big pharma, it still lists its attributes to me and every year I forget what the coked-out auctioneer voice raced through as side effects of ingesting the twelfth month of the year. Short days, a low sun, cold temperatures, and holiday extremes may have secondaries including mellow moods, depression, existential anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, invisibility, and a disconnect from the world around you. You may also consider wrapping your car around the nearest telephone pole once every third car ride downtown, but results may vary. If you are pregnant or at risk of heart failure, please consult Father Time before ingesting the twelfth month of the year. It’s a doozy. Do all the consulting you want, you can’t out run, out hibernate, out navigate the onslaught of December. I still try.It’s a month of extremes, a span of double-living. Either lost in the emotional sauce of another year passing you by, or flipped one-eighty and hugging and kissing and sitting with family and telling tales of the last three-hundred-sixty-four days. There’s scarcely time for anything in between. It’s all chaotic and whimsied and experience tries its hardest to live up to expectation, but it often falls short and I wonder if expectation is the root of all evil. The happy-juice brain robber, the self-convincing conman. But that’s just big pharma December—telling you that every day will be flowers and bliss, while most the month is dark and surprisingly hopeless. Maybe that’s why they smushed Christmas into the last month of the year. It needed a little lightening up, it was taking itself too seriously. They gave December a prescription of its own. Here, take a baby Jesus for your troubles.And it’s not all bad. It ends just like every other space of days. Memories are a fickle thing; they inform decisions and warm up current moments when you’re around the ones you shared them with. So potent that we live entire lifetimes dedicated toward trying to make it all happen for fear of missing out. The absolute fear of missing out. But what is life, if not but the passing of time into tomorrow? What are moments, if not the ones you are living? I was given a new journal for Christmas. It’s leather-backed—real animal hide, you can smell it—and the pages feel like canvas. As looks and vibes go, this one tops the list. On the front there’s a quote stamped deep into the faded chestnut leather. It reads, “Be happy for this moment. This moment is your life.” That was spoken by Omar Khayyam, a Persian mathematician and philosopher who lived almost a thousand years ago. And I read that and I wonder how someone could ever be so spot on.We are ruined by the future. Destroyed by the past. But the present is as blank as the canvas pages in my new journal. December is black and shadowed, and that’s fine. December has shorter days than most the year. The sun hides away, it’s cold, and the year ends and you remember how little or much you did or didn’t do over the last eleven months. You see a new year horizon-lining and recall that you’re about to start three-hundred and sixty-five days over again. And again. And again. And that’s fine. December is just December, and it seems to me that if this moment is my life, then this month isn’t that different from the rest of ‘em.Subscribe to Bedletter: https://bedletter.substack.com/welcomeFollow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cashliman Get full access to Bedletter with Christian Ashliman at bedletter.substack.com/subscribe

پادکست فارسی بی‌پلاس ‌Bplus
73: Innate (مغز باشخصیت)

پادکست فارسی بی‌پلاس ‌Bplus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 55:22


      نویسنده‌: کوین جی میشل       متن: عیسی صحابه | روایت: علی بندری  تدوین: امید صدیق‌فر | موسیقی : پیمان عرب‌زاده  وبلاگ بی‌پلاس یوتیوب بی‌پلاس        کتاب‌های بی‌پلاس را از اینجا  بخرید.        پشتیبانی از بی‌پلاس با تشکر از اسپانسرهای این اپیزود:  آچاره فلایتیو عضویت در خبرنامه‌ی بی‌پلاس

Rasa Cast
Rasa Cast Ep. 84 | رساکست اپیزود ۸۴ | تست شناخت شخصیت ۱۰۰ سوالی، اهمیت افراد روشن فکر و افراد سنتی در جامعه

Rasa Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 91:52


در این قسمت آرش و اردوان درباره اهمیت افراد روشن فکر و افراد سنتی برای هر جامعه ای صحبت میکنند و آرش از اردوان یک تست شخصیت شناسی ۱۰۰ سوالی میگیرد.   In this episode, Arash and Ardavan discuss the importance of progressive people as well as conservative people, also Ardavan goes through a 100 question personality test.رسا کست را میتوانید از طریق لینک های زیر پیدا کنید.Rasa Cast is available on the following links:1) Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rasa-cast/id15151650322) Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5z1Naz27zPpQ4LOLwsq2WU3) Castbox: https://castbox.fm/channel/Rasa-Cast-id2918082?country=us4) Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQz2EM_0o7xqCD01C_h56jAOur Social Media Links:Instagram: @RasaCastTelegram: https://t.me/rasacastTwitter: @TheRasaCastIntro Songs: All that – Benjamin TissotGuitarsstate - Unknown

Modern Persian Food
Persian Cocktails

Modern Persian Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 11:47


In this episode we are gifting you with 5, fun Persian-inspired cocktails! Pomegranate fizz Sekanjabin mojito Watermelon slushie Gohl Getter Cardamom Hot Toddy   With our unique ideas you'll have festive cocktails twists to ring in the new year. Disclaimer: all of these drinks can easily be made without any alcohol as mocktails.  If you choose to drink, be sure to drink responsibly and have a designated driver.   Pomegranate Fizz - a fun, pinkish, fizzy drink - make with pomegranate juice, club soda or ginger ale, and pomegranate arils as garnish.  Optional to spike it with gin.   Sekanjabin mojito - sekanjabin syrup (cooked down sugar/honey, vinegar, and mint), mixed with muddled fresh mint and grated cucumber.  Optional to spike it with rum. See Sekanjabin micro episode for more info on how to make the syrup.   Watermelon Slushie - blended frozen innards of fresh  watermelon, and sugar, garnished with a small wedge of watermelon.  Optional to spike it with vodka. Can use the watermelon from Yalda winter festival, learn more in the Yalda episode.   Gohl Getter - a play on words, as in “goal getter” - go get your new year's resolution goals!  Made by mixing rose petal jam with Brut rosé, lime juice, garnished with rose petals and/or rose buds.  To make this drink non-alcoholic, use a Martinelli's sparkling apple cider in the place of the rosé. We talk more about flowers in the Gol episode.   Cardamom Hot Toddy - Tea bag with Persian black tea flavored with cardamom, honey, lemon, hot water.  Optional to spike it with whisky or bourbon    Ask the Beats -  In their last Ask the Beats segment of 2021, the Beats as each other, do you have any goals/intentions for the new year? To double the number of Modern Persian food listeners!  To help us reach our goal, please ask one person you know who you think would love hearing this episode to listen! Drink more water and stay hydrated! Spread love and positivity around the world   Other episodes referenced: Episode 35: Sekanjabin Persian Syrup Episode 63: Yalda Episode 26: Flowers | Gol   All Modern Persian Food episodes can be found at: Episodes Co-host Beata Nazem Kelley blog: BeatsEats – Persian Girl Desperately Addicted to Food! Co-host Bita Arabian blog: Oven Hug - Healthy Persian Recipes | Modern Persian Recipes   Podcast production by Alvarez Audio

Persian News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN
NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Persian News at 23:30 (JST), December 28

Persian News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 13:56


NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Persian News at 23:30 (JST), December 28

پادکست – جادی دات نت | کیبرد آزاد
رادیوگیک شماره ۱۳۳.۵ – جیمز وب در فضا

پادکست – جادی دات نت | کیبرد آزاد

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


در شماره ۱۳۳.۵ از رادیوگیک، به خبرهای هفته گذشته نگاه میکنیم و غیب شدن شماره ۱۳۲ رو جبران میکنیم. تلسکوپ جیمزوب، آمازون و رهبر چین و تحلیل عمیقی از بدافزار آیفون ماجراهای اصلی این هفته بودن و لاگ ۴ جی هم که هنوز میتازه و سگها از فیزیک نیوتون سر درمیارن. متاسفانه براوزر شما از … ادامه خواندن رادیوگیک شماره ۱۳۳.۵ – جیمز وب در فضا ←

Roqe
Roqe - Ep #161 -The Plight Of Persian Music - Amir Bahari - Part Two

Roqe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 75:20


The second part of a new mini-series on Roqe, The Plight of Persian Music, about the dysfunctional nature of the Iranian music business. Well-known Persian music journalist, critic and author, Amir Bahari, joins Jian from Istanbul to discuss the nature and evolution of music in Iran before the revolution, the dominance of the “6/8” style, the devastating effects of the Islamic Republic censorship on creativity and musical artists, and the issues that still exist for Persian music inside Iran in the present day where innovation is suppressed, no democratic platform for exposure exists, and even the best Persian music does not get the international recognition and acclaim it deserves. (NOTE: THIS INTERVIEW IS IN PERSIAN). Plus the Roqe Team on air team grapple with sickness and Covid as Kyan and Reza return with masks and sniffles.

Learn Persian by PODGAP
PODGAP (49) | Persian Conversation (Int.): Health is not valued till sickness comes

Learn Persian by PODGAP

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 9:58


In this episode, you will learn how to talk about different health problems and the most common illnesses, symptoms, and medicine in Persian.If Podgap helps you with learning the Persian language share it with your friends. That would mean a lot to us. We can be in touch by podgapp@gmail.comBy subscribing to us at www.patreon.com/podgap you will get access to Persian Transcription, Transliteration & Worksheet of all the episodes that published.

Unfiltered with Sahar
Ep. 40 - YOBS GUYS AND SEXTING

Unfiltered with Sahar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 58:23


In this episode I give you guys yet another single sahar life update where I teach you the meaning of what it means to be YOBS and then rant about YOBS kissers who ultimately give you YOBS orgasms. I literally did research for this episode so ya'll better appreciate me taking one for the team.I then go on to talk about sexting, the different styles you can use with a partner and a couple of tips and tricks to spice things up and get the juices flowing. To end it all I also answer some questions sent in by listeners about Persian weddings and how to not be insecure when getting intimate.

Modern Persian Food
Aash Reshteh

Modern Persian Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 17:10


Do you want to make warm, delicious, comforting, nutritious iconic Persian soup,  Aash Reshteh, also known as Persian Noodle and Bean and Herb Soup?!   Join the Beats as they walk through their recipes including short-cuts and techniques, and a fun modern take on blending American and Persian cultures - making and eating it for the Western calendar new year on January 1st of the Gregorian calendar (vs the traditional time aash reshteh is enjoyed, the Persian New Year Norouz/Norooz which falls on the first day of spring in March).   Ingredients: Noodles: Persian Reshteh, reshteh is Farsi for the special noodles that go in this soup - reshteh noodles are long, a bit flat, and slightly saltier and starchier than Italian pastas  Can be found in Persian or Middle Eastern markets or ordered online Italian linguine, fettuccine, or spaghetti can be substituted for reshteh noodles Herbs  Fresh - parsley, cilantro, dill, mint Dried - Mint, dill  Used both in the soup as one of the primary ingredients as well as part of the topping (fried onions with dried mint, garlic and turmeric) Vegetables Onions Spring onions Leeks Spinach (optional) Spices Turmeric is the main flavor note Cinnamon (in Beata's recipe version)   Kashk  Fermented dairy product Texture is thicker than yogurt;  flavor is salty and a little umami Used drizzled on top as part of the garnish and/or mixed into the soup Beans Use cooked dry beans, frozen beans/peas, or canned beans Lentils  Chickpea /garbanzo  Red beans or kidney  White or cannellini beans  Blackeyed peas Clever blending of cultural traditions - use black eyed peas, a southern new year's tradition, in this soup to serve on American new year, Jan. 1st   Garnish or topping for the soup Kashk Fried onion, fried mint Modern options:  yogurt, vinegar, lemon juice   Episode 12, 3 Persian Soups Episode  Norooz Part 3:  Persian New Year Siz Dah Behdar   All Modern Persian Food episodes can be found at: Episodes Co-host Beata Nazem Kelley blog: BeatsEats – Persian Girl Desperately Addicted to Food! Co-host Bita Arabian blog: Oven Hug - Healthy Persian Recipes | Modern Persian Recipes   Bita's recipe for Aash Reshteh | Persian Noodle Soup   Beata's short-cup recipe: Ash Reshteh | Persian Noodle Soup Beata's traditional recipe: Asheh Reshteh – Persian Noodle Soup – Original Recipe Post   Podcast production by Alvarez Audio

Living 4D with Paul Chek
EP 168 — Hanna Mehrabani and Sahba Sizdahkhani: Persian Health Secrets

Living 4D with Paul Chek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 143:23


When you apply cremes, soaps or liquids on your body, do you think about where all of the ingredients came from?Hanna Mehrabani and Sahba Sizdahkhani describe the nuts and bolts of creating skin care products derived from organic soils in this fragrant Living 4D conversation.Stay tuned for a special musical performance by Sahba, that fuses jazz and improvisation with Persian Classical Music. Learn more about Hanna and Sahba on Instagram here and here. Listen to Sahba's music on his website.For Living 4D listeners: Save 10 percent on any plant-based, skin and self-care products Hanna sells on her Seeb and Solace website by using the code LIVING4D at checkout.Show NotesHow Hanna transitioned from fracking for the oil and gas industry to formulating skin/animal care products. (9:45)Hanna chooses between fearing everything or having faith and slow breathing. (15:45)Sabha's journey to become a musician with a Persian focus. (21:56)Sahba expresses musically the experience of using their self-care products with a santur. (33:36)“Anything we put in or on our bodies is essentially soil. Soil is our skin. Soil is our body.” (41:05)Your skin care regimen allows your body to breathe or suffocates it. (52:44)Sahba expresses organic soil musically. (1:09:09)Washing your hands too much? (1:14:10)Pregnant women eat frankincense (designed to be consumed) in Iran. (1:30:00)How much saffron is enough? (1:40:01)Incremental detox. (1:54:11)Love and respect your liver! (2:07:42)“Fifty percent of what I'm feeling is collective anxiety, and the rest is mine.” (2:12:28)Paul performs a song he created with Angie. (2:21:01)ResourcesPaul's Living 4D conversations with Dr. Monica Gagliano, Ari Honarvar, Dr. Zach Bush and Alicia RoseChloramines and drinking waterMugwortThe work of John Coltrane and Hazrat Inayat Khan Thanks to our awesome sponsors: The CHEK Shop, Cymbiotika (save 15 percent on your purchase by using the code CHEK15 at checkout), Organifi (save 20 percent on your purchase by using the code CHEK20 at checkout), Paleovalley (save 15 percent on your purchase by using the code chek15 at checkout), BiOptimizers (save an extra 10 percent on your purchase by using the code PAUL10 at checkout) and Airestech (save 15 percent on any purchase you make by using the code CHEK15 at checkout).As an Amazon Associate, we earn commissions from qualifying purchases.

Crazy Money with Paul Ollinger
From the Trailer Park to the Comedy Big Time (with Rocky Dale Davis)

Crazy Money with Paul Ollinger

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 45:22


Comedian Rocky Dale Davis grew in a trailer park in Brookwood, Alabama. His single mom worked hard to keep him fed and on the straight-and-narrow. After eight years doing comedy, Rocky is headlining all over the country and experiencing his first taste of financial success. So it's that much more fun to watch me cringe as Rocky tells me that he tries to get rid of money as soon as it comes in and that he doesn't have health insurance. Rocky has appeared on This week at the Comedy Cellar and Kevin Hart Presents on Comedy Central, NBC    In addition to all this, Rocky and I discuss:  His "abusive, White trash dad" Why he went to Mexico to get his teeth fixed. Getting into fights at church   Get you some more Rock here and here.    **Please rate and review Crazy Money here.** Email Paul here   About Crazy Money:   Unlike traditional personal finance shows like Dave Ramsey or Suze Orman, Crazy Money is not about how to make a million bucks, how to beat the market, or how to save money by switching cable providers. It is about deciding what role we want money to play in our lives and how we can use it to be our best selves. Topics covered include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status. Iranian immigrant, Persian immigrant. Iran. Immigration   Edited by Mike Carano   Did you already rate and review Crazy Money? Yes? Okay, you can go now...

The John Batchelor Show
Three Great Empires Return. Cliff May @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 10:00


Photo: Tomb of the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great: in Pasargades, the oldest base-isolated structure in the world. Given for free public use by Behrad18n. Three Great Empires Return. Cliff May @FDD https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2021/dec/15/china-russia-and-iran-the-empires-strike-back/

The United States of Anxiety
Face the Darkness, Welcome the Light

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 50:07


Do you need a revival?  On the longest night of the year, join us to celebrate Yalda, a poetic Persian tradition. Then, a conversation about those we've lost with jazz and gospel artist Gregory Porter.   Here's the translation of the Hafez poem read by Armen Davoudian at the end of our show: Ghazal 43 (Hafez) The orchard charms our hearts, and chatter when our dearest friends appear – is sweet; God bless the time of roses! To drink our wine among the roses here – is sweet! Our souls' scent sweetens with each breeze; ah yes, the sighs that lovers hear – are sweet. Sing, nightingale! Rosebuds unopened yet will leave you, and your fear – is sweet; Dear singer of the night, for those in love your sad lament is clear – and sweet. The world's bazaar contains no joy, except the libertine's; food cheer – is sweet! I heard the lilies say, “The world is old, to take things lightly here – is sweet.” Hafez, the happy heart ignores the world; don't think dominion here – is sweet. — Translated by Dick Davis in Faces of Love: Hafez and the Poets of Shriaz (Penguin)   You can watch the live-streamed Yalda event mentioned in the show. Here is the information: Tuesday, Dec. 21st, 9PM Eastern/ 6PM, PST Instagram:  @iraniandiaspora studies Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CenterforIranianDiasporaStudies YouTube: Center for Iranian Diaspora Studies  “Celebrating Shab-e Yalda” is a pre-recorded event premiering on the longest night of the year, Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 6:00 PM. This very special program includes poetry reading and a performance from Paris-based opera singer and composer Ariana Vafadari and California-based singer Sima Shahverdi, as well as a ceremonial lighting of candles to bring light and warmth to this night. Co-presented by The Center for Iranian Diaspora Studies at San Francisco State University and the Diaspora Arts Connection, this is a free event and no registration is required. All you have to do is tune in to our Facebook, Instagram, and/or YouTube channels on the evening of December 21 to watch.   Companion Listening: How the Dead Still Speak to Us (11/1/2021) This Halloween, we reveal its history and why connecting to the dead is important to so many, from Ireland, to Mexico, to NYC. Plus a guided meditation to help you connect, too.   “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.  We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

Masty o Rasty | پادکست فارسی مستی و راستی
EP175 Masty o Rasty (مستی و راستی) - Samaneh Savadi (Cheragh.org)

Masty o Rasty | پادکست فارسی مستی و راستی

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 81:59


*** This episode is sponsored by Cheragh.org ***Cheragh.org is an educational academy in Persian that helps increase awareness regarding sexual harassment in the work place, home and other situations. They offer a variety of free courses for people and companies to go over to make sure that there is no confusion as to what constitutes misappropriate sexual conduct and behaviour.In this episode I am joined by Samaneh Savadi an Iranian feminist and gender equality activist. She has been at the forefront of the Iranian #metoo movement while helping victims of sexual abuse get their stories out while their perpetrators are brought to justice.----------King Raam Tour:London Jan 13https://www.ticketweb.uk/event/the-troubadour-presents-king-raam-troubadour-tickets/11564345-----------Intro song: King Raam - Lazy Bee, Outro song: King Raam - Without Sleep-----------Social Media: @kingraam,Voice Messages: www.t.me/mastyorastyMerch: www.kingraam.com/merchNFT: www.foundation.app/kingraam,Donations: paypal.me/raamemami,Venmo: @kingraamgofundme.com/kingraam

پادکست فارسی بی‌پلاس ‌Bplus
72: Friendship (نیروی پنهان دوستی و رفاقت)

پادکست فارسی بی‌پلاس ‌Bplus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 63:49


دوستی چه فایده‌ای دارد؟       نویسنده‌: لیدیا دنوورث       متن: عباس سیدین | روایت: علی بندری  تدوین: امید صدیق‌فر | موسیقی : پیمان عرب‌زاده  وبلاگ بی‌پلاس یوتیوب بی‌پلاس        کتاب‌های بی‌پلاس را از اینجا  بخرید.        پشتیبانی از بی‌پلاس با تشکر از اسپانسرهای این اپیزود:  آچاره فلایتیو عضویت در خبرنامه‌ی بی‌پلاس

پادکست – جادی دات نت | کیبرد آزاد
رادیوگیک – شماره ۱۳۳ – تیش تیش تیش گرفته، اینترنت آتیش گرفته

پادکست – جادی دات نت | کیبرد آزاد

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021


در شماره ۱۳۳ رادیوگیک به لاگ۴شل نگاه می‌کنیم که اینترنت رو به آتیش کشیده و بررسی می کنیم که آیا در این دنیا می شه آدم خوبی بود؟‌ درباب اجباری شدن اینماد حرف می زنیم و ماجرای کسر پول ماهانه توسط فیلیمو و تکنیک سرقت ماشین با ایرتگ‌های اپل و … متاسفانه براوزر شما از … ادامه خواندن رادیوگیک – شماره ۱۳۳ – تیش تیش تیش گرفته، اینترنت آتیش گرفته ←