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War involving the major global states

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Best podcasts about World war

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Latest podcast episodes about World war

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over The Moon, pt 2 (ep 179

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:34


How'd it go for the first BBC announcer with an accent?  How much work can you get if you "make it" in voiceover?  How much did the woman behind Siri make?  And what's a pencil got to do with any of this?  All this and more in part 2! Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. 00:25 RP and Wilfred Pickles (voiced by Simon Jackson) 04:26 The cast of Futurama work a lot! 08:17 Voiceover is easy! (right?) 11:30 #moxiemillion 12:30 Trying to find a job 13:55 Props and accessories 15:55 AI (even worse than the movie) 18:24 Bev Standing vs TikTok 20:50 sponsors: Sly Fox Trivia, Sambucol 23:06 Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri 27:53 It's in the game Music: Kevin MacLeod, Track Tribe . Links to all the research resources are on the website.   Back when the BBC was first launched in 1922, the first General Manager of the corporation, Sir John Reith, insisted the BBC be as formal and quintessentially British as possible, and he created a number of rules towards this end.  One thing he stressed in particular was that the newscasters spoke the “King's English.“  He felt it was “a style or quality of English that would not be laughed at in any part of the country”.  He also assumed RP would be easier for people across the empire to understand versus a regional accent, of which the tiny land mass of the UK has dozens.  Reish wanted things to be ‘just so,' even ordering that any newscaster reading the news after 8PM had to wear a dinner jacket while on air, on the radio, where no one could see them.    The BBC didn't create Received Pronunciation, though.  We can trace the origins of RP back to the secondary schools and universities of nineteenth-century Britain, making it the accent of a certain social class, the one with money.  Their speech patterns - based loosely on the local accent of the south-east Midlands, roughly London, Oxford and Cambridge, soon came to be associated with ‘The Establishment.'   although one of Reith's goals in using RP was to appeal to the widest audience possible, many listeners still felt alienated by the broadcasts being beamed into their homes because of this “upper class” accent being used. Despite this, newscasters were required to use Received Pronunciation right up until World War 2.   Why change it during the war?  Didn't they have bigger things to worry about?  Well, the Ministry of Information was worried about the Nazis hijacking the radio waves.  During World War 2, Nazi Germany invested a lot of time and money to train spies and propagandists to speak using perfect Received Pronunciation so that they could pass as British.  If they pulled it off, the Nazis could potentially issue orders over the radio in a thoroughly convincing and official-sounding newscaster voice.  Therefor, the BBC hired several newscasters possessed of broad regional accents that would be more difficult for Nazis to perfectly copy, and as a bonus might also appeal to the “common man”.   The first person to read the news on the BBC with a regional accent was one Wilfred Pickles in 1941.  [sfx clip]  The public trusted that he was in fact British, but they didn't trust, or couldn't ignore his accent to pay attention to, a word he said.  Far from being popular, his mild Yorkshire accent offended many listeners so much that they wrote letters to the BBC, blasting them for having the audacity to sully the news that way.  Nonetheless, after the end of World War 2, the BBC continued to loosen its guidelines and began to hire more people who spoke with the respective accent of the region they were being broadcast.  That said, the BBC does continue to select newscasters with the most mild accents for international broadcasts.   You can't please everyone, but if you can get in good in the voicework industry, you can do a staggering number of roles.  How many?  Here are some examples, pulling only from the cast of one of my favorite shows, Futurama.  You might say my husband and I are fans; we had a Hypnotoad wedding cake.  Billy West, the voice of Fry, Prof. Farnsworth, and Zoidberg, as well as both Ren and Stimpy, has 266 acting credits on his IMDB page.  Maurice LaMarche, who did Calculon, Morbo and Kiff and is the go-to guy for Orson Welles impressions like Brain from Animaniacs, has 390 roles listed.  Tress MacNeille, who did basically every female who wasn't Amy or Leela, as well as Dot on Animaniacs and Agnes Skinner on The Simpsons has 398 roles to her name.  Bender's voice actor, John DiMaggio, without whom the Gears of War video games wouldn't be the same, has worked on some 424 projects.  The man who made Hermes Conrad Jamaican, and gave us Samurai Jack, Phil LaMarr, is the most prolific voice actor on that cast, with a whopping 495 credits to his name.  Still, he falls short of the resume of Rob Paulsen, who did the voices of Yakko and Pinky on Animaniacs, and other examples too numerous to list here, because his IMDB pages lists 541 voice acting credits.  And did I mention they're bringing Animaniacs back? [cheer]  Paulsen is trailing behind Tara Strong, though.  The actress who voiced Bubbles on Powerpuff Girls, Raven on Teen Titans, and Timmy on Fairly Oddparents has 609 roles in her 35 year career, or an average of 17 a year.  That may not sound impressive, but have you've ever tried getting *one acting job?  Strong can't hold a candle to a man whose voice I can identify from two rooms away, a man who will always be Spike Spiegel from Cowboy Bebop no matter who he's playing, Steve Blum, who has racked up 798 voice roles.  And those are just a sampling of voice actors I can name off the top of my head.  So when career day rolls around, maybe skip doctor and firefighter and suggest your kid become a voice actor.  Not everyone who does voice work has a face for radio, so I put pictures of all the actors up on the Vodacast app so you can se what Fry, Yakko, and Raven really look like ..   “Sure,” you say, “that sounds like a sweet gig.  Walk in, say a few things, and cash the check.”  Oh my sweet summer child.  If it was that easy, everyone would do it.  For starters, there is no “got it in one take” in voice acting.  Be prepared to do your lines over and over again, with different emphasis, different inflection, different pacing, or sometimes simply saying it over and over again until, even though each take sounds the same to you, the director gets the subtle difference they're looking for.  Bonus fact: the feeling you get when you say a word or phrase so many times that it stops sounding like a word and becomes a meaningless noise is called semantic satiation.   You may be standing in a little booth all day, but that doesn't mean it won't be physically taxing.  Actors dubbing anime in particular are required to do a lot of screaming.  Chris Sabat, who voices Vegeta in the Dragonball series, says that even with his background in opera and the vocal control that taught him, “I will literally be sick the next day. I will have flu-like symptoms. Because you have to use so much energy, and use up so much of your voice to put power into those scenes, that it will make you sick. That's not an exaggeration; I will be bedridden sometimes after screaming for too long.”   That is, if you can get a gig.  Remember how I rattled off actors who've had hundreds of roles each?  That's because, in rough figures, 5% of the actors get 95% of the work. So unless you're a Tara Strong or Phil LaMarr, noteworthy roles will be hard to come by.  One plus side is you get paid by the word, as well as by the tag.  A tag is part of a recording that can be swapped out, like recording a commercial, and recording the phrases “coming soon,” “opening this Monday,” and “open now.”  The clients gets three distinct commercials from one recording sessions, so you get more money.  Assuming the client actually orders the session.  You may find yourself on stand-by or “avail,” as it's called in the industry.  You may be asked to set aside a few hours or even consecutive days for a recording session.  The problem is, the client isn't actually obligated to use you during that time and no one else can book you during that time until they release you from it.    But it's a job you can do in your pj's, and I often do, and that's always a plus.  Even though no one can see the actors, voice work still uses props and accessories.  While computers can be used to speed up or slow down dialogue (which is more of a concern in dubbing Japanese animation, where the visuals are already done), certain vocal changes can easily be achieved using random items in the studio. “If the character is in a hollowed-out tree, I might stick my head in a wastebasket,” veteran voice actor Corey Burton told Mental Floss. “If it doesn't sound quite right, I can throw some wadded-up Kleenex in there for better acoustics.”  Burton, like Mel Blanc, prefers to eat real food when the moment calls for it. “They want you to sometimes just go, ‘Nom, nom, nom.' No! I want a carrot, a cookie. I don't want to make a dry slurping noise when I could be sipping a drink.”   Pencils also play an important role, not for making notes on the script or creating any sort of convincing sound effect.  The plague of these performers is plosives.  You've probably heard them on podcasts; they've definitely been on mine.  A plosive is the noise you get when a consonant that is produced by stopping the airflow using the lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air.  It's also called popping your p's, since that's the worst culprit.  A round mesh screen in front of the mic helps, but the old-school trick to stop plosives actually uses a pencil.  If they're getting p-pops on the recording, voice actors will hold a pencil or similar linear object upright against the lips.  This disrupts the air enough to avoid the giant, sharp spike in the soundwave.  Now if only there were some cheap and easy trick to get rid of mouth noises and lip smacks.  You may hear a few on this podcast, but for everyone you hear, I cut twenty out.   The most sure-fire way to avoid mouth noises and breathing when ordering a recording is to use a computer-generated or AI voice.  Now this is a sticky wicket in the VO community, a real burr under a lot of saddles.  Whenever it comes up in message groups, a third of people turn into South Park characters [sfx they took our jobs].  I won't get too Insider Baseball here, but here's the scoop.  AI voices are cheap, fast, and they're getting really good.  Have you ever gotten a robodialer call where it took you a moment to realize it was not a live person?  There are companies offering entire audiobooks in AI voices.  There is even an AI voice that can cry!  So why am I not bothered?  The way I see it, the people who will buy the cheapest possible option, in this case an AI voice, weren't going to pay even my Fiverr rate, and invariably, the cheaper a client is, the more working with them makes you regret ever starting this business in the first place.  It's an irony a lot of freelancers and business owners are familiar with -- the $5k client pays you the day you submit the invoice; the $50 client makes you hound them for six weeks and then they say they want you to do it over or come down on the price.  So I'm fine with letting those gigs go.  The other reason is that while AI applications and devices such as smart speakers and digital assistants like Siri are powered by computer-generated voices, those voices actually originate from real actors!  In fact, I just wrapped an AI-generation job this week.    In most cases, even computerized voices need a human voice as a foundation for the development of the vocal database. Nevertheless, AI is creating new work for a wide range of voice actors. Are these actors putting themselves out of a job in future?  Maybe. Maybe not.  It's definitely something I had to wrestle with before accepting the job.  But I figured, AI is coming whether we like it or not, so it's best to be involved to help steer the ship rather than be capsized by its wake.   When I took the AI-generation job, there were two questions I had for the client: what control do I have over how my voice is used, and what happens if you sell the company?  I asked these two questions for two good reasons, Bev Standing and Susan Bennett.  Bev Standing, a VO and coach from Canada, was surprised to hear her own voice being used on peoples' videos when friends and colleagues told her to log onto Tiktok.  For one, people could use her voice to say whatever they liked, no matter how vile, and she'd never worked with, been paid by, or given permission for use of her voice to TikTok.   According to Standing, who I've taken classes with and is a really nice lady, the audio in question was recorded as a job for the Chinese Institute of Acoustics four years ago, ostensibly for translations.  “The only people I've worked with are the people I was hired by, which was for translations... My agreement is not what it's being used for, and it's not with the company that's using my voice,” Standing said in an interview.   Standing files a lawsuit against TikTok's parent company ByteDance on the grounds of intellectual property theft.  She hasn't consented to her performance being used by TikTok, and had very real concerns that the content created using her audio would hurt her ability to get work in the future.  Imagine if Jan 6 insurrectionists and other such hateful wackaloons used your voice on their videos.  Good luck getting hired after that.  TikTok and ByteDance stayed pretty mum, both publicly and to Standing and her lawyer, also a VO, but they did change the AI voice, which certainly looks like they done wrong.  The lawsuit was settled a few months ago, but it's all sealed up in NDAs, so I can't tell you the details, but I'm calling it a win.   The other name I dropped was Susan Bennett, but that's not the name you'd recognize her as.  Though she was training to be a teacher, it soon became clear to Susan Bennet that her voice was destined for more than saying “eyes on your own paper.”  She acted in the theater, was a member of a jazz band, an a cappella group, and she was a backup singer for Burt Bacharac and Roy Orbison.  That background helped her land gigs doing VO and singing jingles for the likes of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Macy's, Goodyear, Papa John's, IBM, and more.  In 1974, she became the voice of First National Bank of Atlanta's Tillie the All-Time Teller, one of the first bank ATMs.  Her voice made the new technology more user-friendly for a computer-unfamiliar public.     Bonus fact: one of the earliest ATMs in NYC printed the security picture of the user on their receipts.  According to the man who sold them to the bank, “The only people using the machines were prostitutes and gamblers who didn't want to deal with tellers face to face.”  Or it could be the hours they keep.  I can neither confirm nor deny this, but I like to think that sex workers are the underappreciated early-adopters that helped the rest of us to be able to hit the cash machine on the way out of town (or the Mac machine, as my mom called it well into the 90's).  Bennet also became the voice of Delta Airlines announcements, GPS's, and phone systems.   But even with all that, that's not where you know her voice from.  “Hey, Siri, how big is the Serengeti?” [sfx if Google was]  Susan Bennet was the original voice of Siri on the iphone, but she never actually worked for Apple.  In 2005, she recorded a wealth of words and wordy-sounding non-words for a company called ScanSoft or Nuance, I've been seeing either listed.   For four hours a day, every day, in July 2005, Bennett holed up in her home recording booth, saying thousands of phrases and sentences of mostly-to-completely nonsense, which the “ubergeeks” as she called them, could use for generating AI speech.  According to Bennet, “I was reading sentences like 'cow hoist in the tub hut today.' 'Militia oy hallucinate buckra okra ooze.' Then I would read these really tedious things that were the same word, but changing out the vowel. 'Say the shrayding again, say the shreeding again, say the shriding again, say the shredding again, say the shrudding again.' “  These snippets were then synthesized in a process called concatenation that builds words, sentences, paragraphs. And that is how voices like hers find their way into GPS and telephone systems.   The job was done, the check cleared, and life went on, then 2011 rolled around and Siri was unveiled as an integrated feature of the Apple iPhone 4S.  The actors who'd worked for Nuance had no idea until well after it happened.  Bennett found out that her voice is actually Siri after a friend emailed: ”Hey, we've been playing around with this new Apple phone. Isn't this you?'  Apple had bought SoftScan/Nuance and all of its assets.  “Apple bought our voices from Nuance without our knowing it.”  As a voiceactor, this turn of events was problematic for a few reasons.  Typecasting and stereotyping, for one.  The downside of being successful in a role can be that that's all people want you for after that, like Sean Bean and a character who dies.  So Bennett kept her identity close to her vest until 2013, when Apple switched voices.  “My voice was just the original voice on the 4s and the 5. But now it no longer sounds like Apple because [Siri] sounds like everyone else. The original Siri voice had a lot of character; she had a lot of attitude.   Bennet has never said how much she made from Nuance, but we know how much she's made from Apple.  In round figures, give or take for inflation, [sfx calculator] she made $0.  Her voice was on something like 17 million phones.  Even a penny per phone would have been a handsome payday, but no, no penny for you.  “We were paid for the amount of time we spent recording but not at all for usage. The only way I've been able to get any payment for it, really, is through my speaking events, but I'm very grateful to have been the voice of Siri. She's very iconic; it's led to a whole new career for me.”   Another widespread voice that didn't get commensurate royalties is known for a single phrase, barely a full sentence. [sfx clip]  From FIFA and Madden to UFC and NBA, Andrew Anthony's voice has opened EA Sports video games for 30 years now and let us all have a collective shiver of mortality at that fact.  Anthony had a friend who ran a small ad sales company, who had taken on the not-yet-industry-cornerstone Electronic Arts as a client.  "My friend then called me up in Toronto and said 'Hey will you do this thing... for free?' I said 'yeah, of course, I will! I don't even know what this is but I get a free trip down to see you, so for sure'.  So Anthony went to visit his friend, read the line, which was originally “If it's in the game, it's in the game,” and assumed he would never, ever hear anything about it again.  Call that an underestimation.  EA is valued at $37B, with the Sports being a big chunk of that.  And Anthony has seen exactly none of that money, and he's pretty okay with that.  Over the years, Anthony has met plenty of other gaming fans and happily agreed to do his EA Sports voice impression on camera.    Not every screen actor's able to do voice work successfully; we've all heard flat, lackluster performances from big name stars in animated features.  Looking at you, Sarah Michelle Gellar from the recent HeMan cartoon.  Not so with the person who arguably kicked off the trends of booking big names stars for voice work, Robin Williams in his role as Genie.  Williams recorded 30 hours of dialogue, most of it improvised, for the 90 minute movie.  He took the role for *9% of the fee he normally commanded with the condition that the recordings not be used to merchandise products.  He wanted to “leave something wonderful behind for this kids.”  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  So a wife overheard her boss saying he wanted a voice to notify people when they received email and volunteered her husband. “I recorded it on a cassette deck in my living room,” Edwards told the New York Post on November 7.  “Most people think I'm retired and own an island.”  Instead, he works at WKYC-TV from 3:30 a.m. to noon, and drives an Uber from noon to 6 p.m.  In 2014, Edwards told CNBC that he pranks people by standing behind their computers and booming, “You've got mail!”  Explained the voice-over actor, “I have fun with it!”  He's not bothered by not getting royalties, so I guess we shouldn't be either. 

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast
Ep. 269 Ray Lambert (Guest: Kyle Clark)

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 90:27


We brought back friend of the show Kyle Clark to talk about Ray Lambert, a dude that lived through some of the worst shit World War 2 had to offer. And he did it all as a medic. Don't worry, he killed some shitbags along the way too, but his main focus was keeping American troops alive, and damn if he wasn't good at his job. Enjoy!

Burnin' Daylight
World War Thrice

Burnin' Daylight

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 75:14


The United States and Weimar Germany are a perfect case study into my theory that history is a parallelogram Theme Music  Burnin' Daylight - Matt Wilson   Featured Music War Pigs - Black Sabbath   Sponsors Tracie Morrison Custom Silver Hall's Rocky Mountain Jewelry SquareTop Leather & Design  Greene's Reserve Cardomax Go Follow  Jese Stetson Facebook YouTube  Website Contact  matt@burnin-daylight.com Beer Fund Spotify Playlists Featured Music Playlist Requests Playlist

Tactical Leadership
Tactical Friday: The Key is to Simplify

Tactical Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 13:22


“When you break it down into those steps, it becomes achievable. What do we do in the military, we break it down, right? We break it down simple steps.” - Paul Huszar Welcome to this episode of Tactical Friday! In today's episode, I welcome Paul Huszar back as he tells us the practical steps to take in making the transition to becoming business owners. It goes to show that the values we learned as veterans can be used as an advantage to make the process more feasible. LTC(R) Paul Huszar, CFE, P.E. is the CEO of VetCor, a restoration company focused on creating meaningful and sustainable employment opportunities for veterans, and Team VetCor, a holding company composed of several companies focused on creating business ownership opportunities for veterans and their immediate family members through franchising VetCor. Paul served 23 years on active duty including four combat tours in Iraq, service as the Dean of the U.S. Army Engineer School, and commanding Joint Task Force Eagle in 09-10, a 1,000+ Soldier and Airmen joint task force, operating throughout northern and western Iraq. Paul earned a B.S. in Civil Engineering from West Point and graduate certificates in Administration and Management, and Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics, along with an M.S.C.E from the University of Washington. Paul is a Certified Franchise Executive and also a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Missouri.   [00:01 - 00:46] Opening Segment If you have a platform and you want to create content that DELIVERS, go over tohttp://knightly.productions/ ( knightly.productions)! For the first part of my interview with Paul, tune in to last Monday's episode    [00:47 - 11:42] Call to Action for Transitioning Veterans Action steps to take Consider business ownership or owning stocks. Did you know that 49% of World War 2 veterans became business owners? Developing the business A system in place such as a franchise is ideal. This takes formulating a business plan, at least a month's worth of profit and loss analysis, and  Assumptions to facts Breaking down into simple steps   [11:43 - 13:23] Closing Segment   Connect with Paul (links below)  Visit his website, Linkedin, and more!  Closing words    Key Quote:  “A military leader can translate that [business operating systems] so effectively when it changes the game.” - Zack Knight     Connect with Paul  Visit his website at http://www.vetcorservices.com (www.vetcorservices.com). Connect with him at Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulhuszar/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulhuszar/).    Did you love the value that we are putting out in the show? LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue on putting out great content just for you! Share this episode and help someone who wants to expand their leadership capacity or clickhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/tactical-leadership/id1498567657 ( here) to listen to our previous episodes.   Tactical Leadership is brought to you by Knight Protection Services. A veteran-owned and operated company, with extensive experience in risk assessment and crime prevention. Find out more by visiting https://knightprotectionllc.com/ ( https://knightprotectionllc.com/)   If you want to learn how to build a better business check out my website athttps://beatacticalleader.com/ ( Beatacticalleader.com). You can connect with us onhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/zaknight ( LinkedIn),https://www.instagram.com/beatacticalleader/ ( Instagram), or joinhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/BATLgroup/ ( Our BATL Space) and become part of the community.

The Jon DiVito Show
Mass Formation Psychosis #350

The Jon DiVito Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 68:14


Please listen to this show with an open mind. We talked about how this has happened in the past. We saw it during World War 1 and World War 2. We explained what Mass Formation Psychosis is. We then talked about whether or not we may be experiencing it today. We had a panel of callers join the conversation. This was an informative show. We all need to speak up, stand up, and resist. It is the only way we will ever experience the old normal again. It's up to us. Thanks to Eric Kirk, John Gale, Mike from Tampa, Ba_Ewe_Podcast from Scotland, and Ziller for calling in. Thank you to all of my "Wankers" in the chat as well.  Listen and Download on: Podbean, Spotify, Stitcher, Podcast Addict, Deezer Podcasts, Tumblr, Linked In, I-Heart Radio, Google Podcasts, Player FM, Listen Notes, Tune-In, Podchaser, Goodpods, PodBay.fm, Amazon Music and Apple Podcasts, Epic Strategy Network.. Follow us on: Facebook: The Jon DiVito Show @thejondivitopodcast Twitter: The_Jon_DiVito_Show  @DiVitoThe Instagram: Jon_DiVito Gettr: @jdivitopod Parlor: @thejondivitoshow Email me at thejondivitoshow@gmail.com  

The Hard Times Podcast
The Hard Times Podcast w/ Lauren Lavin and Karter Mycroft (Fluppies)

The Hard Times Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 62:19


On the Hard Times Podcast, we have our first virtual band, Lauren Lavin and Karter Mycroft from Fluppies! They chat with Matt and Bill about World War 2, fisheries and Fluppies' multimedia project, The Los Suelos Project, releasing February 15th

Work Stoppage
Overtime Episode 9 PREVIEW - The Repressive State Apparatus Pt 2 - Operations Gladio & Condor

Work Stoppage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 13:38


If you're not a patron you can get the full episode by visiting patreon.com/workstoppage and support us with $5 a month.   On the second part of our Overtime series on the history of the US repressive state apparatus, we discuss its extension to attack working class movements overseas in Operation Gladio and Operation Condor.  We discuss how in the aftermath of World War 2, the United States organized, armed, and trained fascist terrorist groups to act as “stay behind” armies, ostensibly in preparation for a Soviet invasion of Western Europe.  In reality, these groups were primarily used to target the domestic population of their countries and suppress any left wing or workers movement deemed too friendly to communism by the CIA.  We also discuss the extension of the CIA's secret war against the working class to Latin America via the organization of a trans-national network of intelligence agencies connecting the fascist military dictatorships they brought to power.  We cover how these security agencies erased borders in their murderous quest to destroy any movement deemed “subversive” and a threat to United States interests. These massive secret operations left tens of thousands dead, and no one in the US has ever been held accountable for orchestrating them. We go over what lessons we can draw from the lengths the US national security state is willing to go to maintain its dominance over the world's resources, and how these tactics have evolved into operations being carried out today.

Key Battles of American History
Bonus Episode - US Presidents in WW2 (Part 2)

Key Battles of American History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 30:22


In this episode, James concludes his two-part series about United States presidents who served in World War 2. In Part Two, James discusses the wartime service of Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as the near service of Jimmy Carter.

Blake's Takes for God's Sakes
World War Wooooooo!

Blake's Takes for God's Sakes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 43:48


Blake ranks the wars, and talks about why WWII is the most theatric. Blake's Patreon: Patreon.com/blakewexler See Blake Live: https://www.blakewexler.com/live-dates

Softcore History
Too German To Live

Softcore History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 76:56


Anti-German sentiment was at an all-time, absolutely bananas high during World War 1. Unfortunately for German immigrant Robert Prager, a local coal mining union used that as an excuse to lynch him just outside St. Louis, Missouri in 1918.

Character Debates
Character Debates: Should Time Travel be Legal

Character Debates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 45:44


Let's start this year off with a bang! Improv impressionist Pat Swearingen joins us as time traveling renegade Doc Brown to argue with the infamous Baby Hitler on should Time Travel exist!? They argue about curing Irritable Bowel Syndrome, the merits of killing babies, and why special guest judge Elon Musk can't blink! Moderator:Michael Harrison Doc Brown: Pat Swearingen Baby Hitler: Drew Dunn Elon Musk: Jake Vevera

Warfare
B17s and Bullet holes: A US Airforce Bomber

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 35:58


Chuck Richardson is a former member of the United States Airforce, serving across Europe in his B17 bomber during World War 2. He, and co-author of their new book Emily Wilson, join James this week to talk about Chuck's remarkable achievements, life, and extraordinary tales from the War. From flying a plane with over 600 bullet holes in, landing in Icelandic storms, to seeking refuge in Madame Tussauds during a bombing raid, Chuck's truly astounding life is full of stories that won't be forgotten.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hithttps://access.historyhit.com/?utm_source=audio&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Podcast+Campaign&utm_id=PodcastTo download, go to Android or Apple store:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=UShttps://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247If you're enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating Warfare content then subscribe to our Warfare newsletter. Follow the link here:https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library
“When you're in crisis mode all the time, it makes it very hard to think in the long term.” A Conversation with Dr. Jeremi Suri on the American presidency

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 48:42


This week we address the history of the presidency writ large with Jeremi Suri, the Mack Brown Distinguished Chair in Global Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and a professor in the Department of History at The University of Texas. He is a frequent commentator on current affairs and writes for op-ed pages and book reviews all over the country. He hosts his own podcast, This is Democracy, and he is author of several books in American history and the international history of the 20th century. In his book The Impossible Presidency: The Rise and Fall of America's Highest Office, Dr. Suri sweeps across the history of the American presidency and paints a rather gloomy picture of the institution in the early 21st century. In this episode, he explains why we haven't had a great president since Franklin Roosevelt, in his opinion.

Key Battles of American History
Bonus Episode - US Presidents in WW2 (Part 1)

Key Battles of American History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 32:49


In this episode, James begins a two-part series about United States presidents who served in World War 2. In Part One, James tells the amazing story of John F. Kennedy's service in the Pacific. James also discusses the wartime service of Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.

The Critical Hour
US and Russian Officials to Meet on January 10; Ghislaine Maxwell Convicted in Sex Trafficking Trial

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 115:42


Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss US Russia relations. Presidents Putin and Biden spoke again on Thursday evening in preparation for upcoming security talks over NATO expansion. Also, US and Russian officials are preparing their respective teams and issues for critical meetings in Geneva and Brussels.Professor Nicolai Petro, professor of political science at the University of Rhode Island specializing in Ukraine and Russia, joins us to discuss Ukraine's crackdown on opposition media. Ukrainian president Vlodomor Zelensky has again moved to close the opposition media. Three companies related to the main opposition party have also been heavily sanctioned. The Biden administration's lack of response is viewed as tacit support for the acts of blatant censorship. Also, far-right neo-Nazis are again marching to support World War 2 Nazi collaborators.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss the Middle East. Israel has attacked civilian targets in Gaza once again claiming that their actions are in response to rocket attacks. Also, US bases in Iraq are facing drone attacks and some suspect that the new year will bring increased activities of this nature.Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss Africa. Sudan's military rulers are maintaining power with the help of the US empire but the citizens are less than happy with their authoritarian leadership. Also, the US empire has transformed Djibouti into a tool of international military aggression.Nick Davies, peace activist and author of "Blood on Our Hands: The American Invasion of Iraq," joins us to discuss the Pentagon budget. The Pentagon is projected to hand over almost a half-trillion dollars to military contractors in 2022. Also, the $778 billion military budget in the face of massive debt and public strife may be the final nail in the coffin of the US empire.Peter James Hudson, associate professor of African American Studies and History at the University of California, Los Angeles and author of the book Bankers and Empire: How Wall Street Colonized the Caribbean, joins us to discuss Haiti. Frederick Douglass was briefly the Ambassador to Haiti. We discuss how his brief tenure helps to define the imperial project in the beleaguered island nation.Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch and author of "Danger in Society: Against Vaccine Passports,” joins us to discuss Ghislaine Maxwell. Ghislaine Maxwell was convicted of several counts in her recent high-profile trial. We ask many questions including why the media and investigators seem to have such little interest in pursuing the powerful people who were active in the child trafficking network. Marjorie Cohn, Professor Emeritus at the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, California, Marjorie Cohn has penned an article about an important recall effort in San Francisco. Cohn argues that the recall effort is based on the basic paradigms related to the reason for the existence of crime.

Neil Oliver's Love Letter to the British Isles
85 Your Country Needs You! World War I

Neil Oliver's Love Letter to the British Isles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:33


In this episode Horatio Herbert Kitchener, the secretary of state for war, declares, Your Country Needs You!The First World War meant that Britain had to raise a new army from volunteers, so the call was raised. Five strong, stout brothers from the Souls family, who lived in the Gloucestershire village of Great Rissington, signed up to join the army and become soldiers. After training they shipped out for France.Albert, the youngest brother, was the first to be killed. Fred was the second brother to die, he was killed at the battle of the Somme. Walter was killed next, soon followed by Alfred.The last of the five brothers alive was Arthur, he was Alfred's identical twin, and won the Military Medal for valour at the fight to hold Villers-Bretonneux. But during the battle he was fatally wounded.Five brothers from the Souls family, all lost. A snapshot of a war like no other - tragedy writ large.To help support the making of this podcast sign up to Neil Oliver on Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/neiloliverHistory & CommentNew Videos Every Week Instagram account – Neil Oliver Love Letter https://www.instagram.com/neiloliverloveletter/?hl=en Neil Oliver YouTube Channelhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnVR-SdKxQeTvXtUSPFCL7g See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

World War G
The World War G Deathcast

World War G

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 78:18


We apologize for indirectly killing Betty White Today in Geek History: Ronald Reagan enters politics, Richard Nixon, and the Scottish holiday First Footing This Week in Geek: Famous toy designer dies, Norman Reedus teases MCU role, James Bond's stolen car has been found, Seattle Space Needle Halo music, Dwayne Johnson responds to Vin Diesel's comments, Airbnb in Oregon is taking steps to fight discrimination. Our Top Ten Worst and Best Movies of 2021: Shang-Chi, Jungle Cruise, Halloween Kills and more Revs and Rex: The King's Man, Tick Tick Boom, Nightmare Alley, LetterKenny season 10 and Batman/Superman #22

What The If?
World War TROLLS? Social Media During WW2!

What The If?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 58:39


Happy New Year, fellow IFers! We taped a bunch of shows at the end of the year, so we're starting out 2022 with a bang: a brand new WTIF episode every day this week! Got an IF of your own? Want to have us consider your idea for a show topic? Send YOUR IF to us! Email us at feedback@whattheif.com and let us know what's in your imagination. No idea is too small, or too big! --- Want to support the show? Click a rating or add a review on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast app! itunes.apple.com/podcast/id1250517051?mt=2&ls=1 Don't miss an episode! Subscribe at WhatTheIF.com Keep On IFFin', Philip, Matt & Gaby

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Subscribe to the podcast!  https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ I've done many episodes talking about the first world war and I've done many episodes talking about the second world war.  However, despite the names we've given them, they weren't the only world wars. There was another global war that occurred well before the 20th-century wars. This war actually saw conflicts on five different continents.  Learn more about world war zero, the world war before the world wars, on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. https://surfshark.deals/EverythingEverywhere -------------------------------- Associate Producers: Peter Bennett & Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/EEDailyPodcast/ Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CCIRA Literacy Conversations
Marc Tyler Nobleman: Finding and Writing Untold Stories

CCIRA Literacy Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 43:37


00:00:00 Molly RauhHello and welcome back to this CCIRA Literacy Conversations podcast. I'm your host Molly Rauh with my co-host Jessica Rickert. Today's podcast features, Marc Tyler Nobleman.00:00:14 Jessica RickertMarc's work centers around writing fiction and nonfiction books for young people, Mark shares how he writes books that grab an interest people will welcome. Mark we're so excited to chat with you tonight. Could you start by telling us a little bit about your background?00:00:34 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, thanks for having me. And I am very excited to be making my return to CCIRA. It's either my third or my fourth; I can double check that before I get there. So I am an author of books for young people. I've been doing this for most of my adult life. I've written both nonfiction and fiction. My main criteria is I want to write books that grab your attention. I want to tell....If it's nonfiction, I want to tell an Untold Story, or at least what I hope will be an untold story to most readers. And if it's fiction, I just want to surprise you. I wanted to be funny, or just feel fresh to you in some way, and something that you that might grab you just from a quick, quick little glimpse, or a quick initial explanation, not a deep dive. But just I want to grab people right away.00:01:25 Jessica RickertSo when did this start? When did you start writing?00:01:29 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, same time as everybody when I was a tiny person, but I liked it at the time, unlike a lot of my peers. And so I would write short stories. I know I did that in high school, so that might be the earliest I can say definitively. And in college, I knew I wanted to become some kind of a professional writer. It didn't know what. And I got out of school, and I stumbled into being a children's book author that was not on my agenda. Not that I was against it. I just didn't think of it. And here I am. All these years later, I'm very happy with that. I mean, it's expanded into a variety of types of writing, but that is my that is, my focus really is writing for young people. And and there are adults, their loved ones who are adults, their parents, their teachers.00:02:15 Molly RauhWell, and you and I have already... So people who can't see, he and I share the love of comics. And so I'm kind of curious. One of your more nonfiction stories is about the sort of originally unknown second co-creator of Batman. How did you get into that story?00:02:42 Marc Tyler NoblemanYes.00:02:42 Molly RauhHow do you spell across that? Where does that come from?00:02:45 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, do we do? Should I explain to who our listeners who Batman is, or do you think they already know? They probably...00:02:53 Molly RauhI hope they know00:02:54 Marc Tyler NoblemanThey probably know. Let's give them that benefit of the doubt. So that is my big story. I will be talking about that in person. I don't want to spill the beans too much on that. But I'll answer your question, which doesn't spill the beans, which is that I was a comic book reader since I was in, again, a tiny person. And back then it wasn't cool. Now it's cool now anyone can do it, now, there's no judgment, but back then it was not exactly mainstream, or, you know, widely accepted. In fact, you know, when I was in, when I was in grade school to high school, I think there were only two or three mainstream superhero movies in that entire 10 or 12 year stretch. Now there's two or three a week, just to put it in perspective. You know, there were the Superman movies. And then at the very end of high school, the Batman movie came out. Those are the main ones. And then there was a couple lesser ones. So it really wasn't something that was, you know, widely accepted. And I, as a as a person who became a writer, I started to pay attention not only to the fictional side, but to who created these characters. And I, I remember that on my 16th birthday. The cover of Time Magazine was Superman's 50th birthday, and it talked about his creators. So I was a sixteen-year-old reading Time magazine in my school library, you know, having an epiphany that yeah, these characters came from somewhere, and I was interested in that. So I don't know exactly when I learned about the story behind Batman, but I know it was not in college. It was after that. Because in college, I proof that I did not know about The Unsung co-creator, because there's not my proudest moment, but I'm just gonna be honest with you, because you're all adults, some of my friends and I would crank call each other each other, not strangers. And this is back in the answering machine days. So our goal was to just fill out the tape. Just talk until we got cut off. So I would just ram- We would all just ramble. You know, I would just pick up a book and start reading. I would tell some story from my childhood. I am. One of the stories I told was this story began Batman, and all I mentioned was Bob Kane, the artist, the man who was credited on Batman at the time, the only person. I didn't mention Bill Finger. So as as late as college, I had never heard of this man who then end up becoming the subject of my most, I think, my most popular book and a huge part of my life, which is, again, a story that I'll tell in great detail at the conference. But you know, just the point being that, you know, you can't, as we I'll say, as adults, and as teachers and Educators can't believe everything you read. Got to look further, you might be even if it's something as huge as Batman, maybe even, especially if it's something as huge as Batman, you've got to know your source. You've got a double check. Make sure you're getting the true story you might be, you know, pulling the wool over your eyes.00:05:39 Molly RauhNow, you just made me more curious. There's no answer.00:05:41 Marc Tyler NoblemanThat's the goal right? 00:05:42 Molly RauhI'm gonna have to come see you at the conference, so I can get more info.00:05:44 Marc Tyler NoblemanPlease, do. That's what I want. I want a big group on a big, huge attendance.00:05:50 Molly RauhOkay, so, thinking more about because, you know, we have teachers here. And so they're trying to inspire their own next generation of authors. In terms of process, how do you go about writing a book? Like what? What steps do you work through?00:06:11 Marc Tyler NoblemanSo if it's fiction, I like to try to sketch out the arc of the story in advance. Now you're not locked in, but it helps me to have guideposts. And when I teach creative writing to kids in the summer and at various times during the year and I always tell them that you, I recommend that you do that, but don't feel beholden to it. You know, if your writing and your story goes in another Direction, that's okay, you're not breaking a law or a rule, but it does help to have that outline, especially, I think, the ending, because I really think with fiction, it's and I think it's important at least it helps me to have some sense of your destination so that you get there and an exciting way. I talk about it with kids by saying, if you know, there's let's say it's a Sunday, and your family is all hanging out, looking for something to do. Someone in your family might say, let's go get ice cream, but you know, we're not going to go straight there. We're going to take the scenic route. Another person might say, let's just get in the car and drive, and who knows where we'll end up. So in one, in case you've got a destination which you might get excited about, and then you take a roundabout way to get there, because that's fun in another, you're excited because you don't know what at all where you're going. So it's just one of the two, but I just prefer knowing that we're going to get ice cream at the end. That's how I like to write that I know that's where we're going. Now with nonfiction. It just starts with just the, the, the, you know, the spark of the electricity running up my spine. I mean, I read something, I hear something that I feel is so enticing and even better again, if it hasn't been done before, and it's own book. So most of my nonfiction in recent years, it's that category. Its if given my know some of the story, of course, but it hasn't been the focus of its own book. And so I love that I love feeling like I'm walking through the forest by myself. No one else is looking for mushrooms or whatever you're foraging for. You're the only one you're going to get all the best spoils. And I also just love the excitement that I see on faces of both kids and adults want to telling a story that that is new for them. So, you know, with all no love loss to Rosa Parks and Babe Ruth. And, you know, any number of other textbook names that get tons of picture books about them all deserve it. Muhammad, Ali. And, well, a lot of the presidents are falling out of favor these days. But, you know, you know who I'm talking to. Ruth Bader Ginsburg. All these people have multiple picture books by now, and they deserve them. But I want to I want to be one of the people that writes about someone that you don't really know. So that, to me, is just it's a little riskier as some some publisher. Some editors don't want to work on books that aren't pre-sold. But for me, it's the only way forward. I just want to be fulfilled by the read, the process. So with fiction, I have to sketch it out a bit with nonfiction. I just have that spark, and I just download as much as I can about the topic. And then I go through and it's fun, because then you go through and pick out the kid-friendly parts. The parts that you know are going to excite kids. It might not be them. You know, the linear story from. I mean, it will be linear when it's done, but, you know, you might be missing big moments that are not appropriate or interesting for kids. You still have to make it, you know, a cohesive whole. So that's finest. Yet. What are the pieces of this that work best for my audience? 00:09:36 Jessica RickertAnd how, like, what resources, do you have "go to" resources when you're researching for those non-fiction books?00:09:45 Marc Tyler NoblemanYeah, I just use Wikipedia exclusively. I basically just rewrite Wikipedia articles and act like its original. Wait. You're going to share this with other people. (Jessica laughs) Good? Yeah. Now, well, because I'm trying to do these stories that are more or less Untold. Oftentimes I can't rely on just the internet or books, because again, there's stuff out there that's never been documented. So a lot of the work I've done has been about people that are either still alive, or people who died recently enough that there are people still alive who knew them. So I get original interviews with those people, and sometimes original documents, you know, private documents letters, or, you know, Vital Records or so on that helped fill in the story, never been published in. If they're on the Internet, it's often because I put them there. Now, after, after I do the book, I put some of the research online share the wealth, and you know, for the next person who might want to write about that. Of course, I do use the internet, and I do use books as well, but I'm more excited about these, you know, these Quests for the things that aren't as easy to find, and sometimes you don't get some anywhere. I mean, right now, I'm working on a book where there are two main true story, two main character, two main figures. They're both still alive. The story happened in the 70s. One of them gave me a lovely two hour interview so far. And the other one I I just reached out today to this person's family, but I've been told, don't expect this person to participate for reasons that will become clear when this, when the topic is revealed, but so I may not get that, but I'm going to carry anyways and just write based on what's already been documented, maybe without family. But again, some of the stuff I've written is by about people that are long dead. So I'm never. There's not any opportunity to talk to those people. So it can be done without talking to the people involved. It's just sweeter for me if I can get their buy-in and get there on, you know, the previously Untold Story. 00:11:43 Molly RauhThinking about just interviewing in general, I know that sometimes that's a challenge to ask kids to do. So, what are some of your tips for reaching out to someone and kind of asking for their time and their story and their information?00:11:59 Marc Tyler NoblemanYeah, well, I wish I was a little kid asking because who said, can say no to a little kid, right? That would that would be an advantage, but I get it. Yeah, it is an important skill, even if you don't become a writer. It's just important to know how to ask questions of other people. being appropriate, but, you know, getting the story, you know, and how to handle people that are difficult or mysterious, or whatever. So that is a great skill. I mean, for kids that are doing that for school, I mean, I did will depend on the assignment. But let's say they don't have a specific number of questions to ask, maybe just start with five something that seems manageable and not overwhelming. And if you can ask them to, don't think of it like an assignment. But think of it like, you're just curious, what do you? What do you? What would you want to know about? Someone kids are not. They're very curious. But, I mean, I have two kids of my own, and sometimes they just don't, you know, the they don't articulate what they want to know, and just they just they give up before they even start. So if you tell them just, you know, think about what something you want to ask someone that you think that person is never talked about, or wouldn't tell you without you asking, or just try to make it a little bit more of a game and a mystery like can you be the one to crack the code? Can you get this person to tell you about his childhood when she never talked about before? I don't know, make it a little bit more of a challenge. I haven't done that specifically with kids, but, you know, working on interview techniques. But you know, you never, you just have to keep trying. If someone's I don't know if I would emphasize this with kids. But when people say no to me, I don't, I don't hear the word no when it comes to asking for an interview that's not talking about other types of consent, but I will keep trying to get the story. And I actually put a bit of a burden on their shoulders saying, you might be the only person who can share this information. So for the you know, for posterity, for scholarship, I hope that you'll you'll talk about it, and that doesn't always work, but I am not gonna let it go without trying. It's just too important. I've had people that have died that I know know interesting things about my topics, but they wouldn't tell me. So I, you know, I don't want I want to limit, mitigate that as much as possible. So basically, like we tell kids, you know, there's no such thing as a dumb question. Ask whatever is of interest to you. 00:14:10 Molly RauhSo a little perseverance is valuable there too. Let's see, there's so so many different directions I could go. So I'm also curious, you know, just about. Obviously comic books have been a passion that informed a couple books. But what are some of your interests outside of writing outside of, you know, that career path that inspire you as a writer, or just help you kind of feel well-rounded and give you that energy and inspiration to keep writing?00:14:52 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, I mean, it's nothing original to say that I love reading, and I do. And I love running, and I can't say that it has a direct correlation to writing. But there are a lot of people that would compare writing to running because they're both typically solitary. And I also, you know, as a writer, I don't want to be the person of a person who's just at a desk in a room all day, even before covid. I wanted to get out and get some air. And so that that's a happy place for me. I. There's a trail that picks up right around the corner from our house. And it's might like it's like a second home for me to go there and listen to music and not, you know, a lot of people listen to podcasts when they run or commut or all that. But I'm so much with words all the time when I'm working, that when I run, I listen to music. I give myself a chance, because I don't have a commute. I don't drive anywhere everyday guaranteed. So that's my time to just listen to music and relax and get some, some fresh air. And I've actually got a couple book ideas while I've been running; nothing that's sold yet. But I don't know if the running is a help or a hindrance. But yeah, when you're out there, your head clears, and you can think of things and... And I have, as I mentioned, two kids. I love spending time with my family. They're both teenagers now. So it's not always my choice anymore. Spend time with them. I have to be penciled in or well, you know, typed in. And as I mentioned, I love music I love especially 80s music. I could do a whole talk on that, but I don't think anybody would show up. Maybe that's another conference. So those are my things running, music, family.00:16:36 Molly RauhAll right, I get that like running, I think, is I don't know, it's cathartic. It just helps you, you know, I, yeah, I think it's stimulating for ideas. Yeah. So no, no podcast, no words, music only.00:16:51 Marc Tyler NoblemanOkay, yeah, they're, we're a dying breed or so much so much pressure to listen to podcasts these days.00:16:58 Molly RauhI know. Well, I did the podcasting for a while, but even on my commute, I don't listen to podcasts anymore. I do listen to audio books. My commute is for audiobooks. So since you said reading which, you know, you said, not unique, which is true. Every time we talk to authors, they always have books that they love. So what are some of your favorite authors, or favorite books, especially when you were younger, that have kind of led you to have the passion you have for reading and writing?00:17:28 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, some of these may not be so original either, but Where the Wild Things Are, which each, when I revisited it as an adult, reading it to my own kids, I was really blown away about how beautifully written is. It's not just this memorable visual journey, but the way he wrote it was so so wonderful. And it's only 10 sentences, which is a weird thing to realize as an adult, I love a novel called the mouse in the motorcycle. By Beverly Cleary, who just passed away. I think it was last year. And I loved a book that is not well-known. It's called David and the Phoenix. Have you heard of that? By any chance? It wasn't a big, you know, classic book, although since I've been to, I mean, over the years I've blogged about it and talked about it in various ways. And I know a lot of people come out of the woodwork and say, I totally remember that book. That was a big favorite of mine. But again, it never became a classic. So that was a novel written in 1957 by a man named Edward Ormondroyd, who's still alive at 96 and he's a friend, I guess you could say, I did reach out to him at one point, interview him for my blog. And I met him in person. So that was a really fulfilling moment, to meet someone that inspired me as it, not only as a fan to an author, but as peers. I mean, because I do that now too. And he was very gracious and very interesting, and that he had never met. You'd never done anything that authors today do. He'd never spoken at a conference. He'd never done a book signing. He never did a school visit, they just didn't he his that this book was published in 1957. It wasn't - those things were in all standard at. Certainly not school visits, I would imagine. So that was interesting, meet an author who has a totally different experience as a children's author than I have. So those are three of my favorites as a kid. Yeah, those are three of my favorites.00:19:21 Jessica RickertWhat about for your own books that you've written? Do you have some favorites, both fiction and nonfiction that you love more than other book, your other books?00:19:33 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, everything I've done in the last ten or twelve years totally overrides everything I did before that not that they weren't books of Merit of some kind. I mean, I put my heart into those two, but what I've been doing recently are all things that topics that I hand pick. And before that, I was sometimes doing books based on other people's suggestions, or, you know, not not coming to it on my own. So, of all my books, and I mean my Batman book is my favorite in the sense that it became more than a book. And again, I don't want to teach just enough to get people to show up. It's it started off as a book, and it became a mission. And it became a very big mission that lasted many years, so that that's a category unto itself. And then, you know, the others I love in different ways too, they all like, with everything that we do, they have their, you know, they conjure different, you know, moments of your life, or in my case, I think about some of the struggles that each one involved, and what I had to try to overcome to get the book published, because nothing's come easy for me with writing, which is fine. If it's easy, it's it's boring. But it isn't like I've written a book and then the next day, someone says, I want that like it's taken a while for me, a lot of my work. And but again, because it's I'm, I think it's because I'm choosing topics that they feel are going to be a harder sell. And I tell them, well, that's what I'm here for. I'm not just going to write it and then go on a run and never come back. I'm going to help you sell it and promote it, and that's why I do conferences. That's why I go to schools. I want people to, you know, enjoy the story the way I did I wouldn't do all this work, and then let it float off, you know, on its own. So yeah, the Batman book would take first place. And then a lot of the recent ones would be in a tie for second.00:21:27 Molly RauhSo, thinking about that, you like comics? So we've asked about books, but what are some of your favorite Comics? Or even graphic novels? Because like you and I have mentioned there, you know, once upon a time, it wasn't cool to be into comics. But now, like there's not that stigma around that. So maybe share some of your favorites, some newer things that are being printed and published that kids might get their hands on, or that teachers might get hands on, because I certainly like some adult comics that I would never give to kids. And I've also had some comics that, like as soon as I'm done reading, I bring into the classroom to a particular kid. And I'm like, you have to read this. Here's the next one. What are some of your favorite? Well, a couple of graphic novels I've read recently that I loved were "Flamer" by Mike Curato, which is biographical and "New kid". Of course, I by Jerry Craft. I really liked. I don't read tons of graphic novels by you know, it's not I'm not. I don't specifically gravitate towards those. I just gravitate towards a good book, whether it's graphic novel, you know, pros or whatnot. Another one I read this summer that I thought was great was "Kent State." It's a new. It's 00:22:47 Molly Rauhthe newest book by a guy named Derf Backderf And it's, it's, it's his telling of the Kent State, the Ohio, you know, the, the Four Dead in Ohio story. And I knew almost nothing about that, even though I knew, ooh, that I know. I mean, I know of the song I know of the incident, but I couldn't have told you what it was about. And he just does a masterful job of weaving these four individuals stories into one tragic, overarching story. And then as far as traditional comics I mean, I grew up on I mean, being a huge fan of I'm a DC guy. As you can imagine, based on Batman. My favorites were Justice League because I like groups. I like to see how groups work together, like to see how groups split up to tackle different issues, both in superhero comics and in life. I also liked it a team-up comic called "The Brave and the Bold," which was Batman, plus somebody else every issue. And there was another one of DC Comics presents, which was Superman, plus someone else. And there are there are there are collected editions of those. I would recommend them for teachers with kids, because comics these days, the the there are still comics produced for elementary age kids. But a lot of the main characters are quite dark. Even Superman. I mean, a lot of the stories are quite sophisticated, quite dark. So not the same way when we were kids, where it was all kind of for everybody. So if you go back to the stuff that was done in the 70s and 80s, it's you know, it's a bit dated a little. It's a little dated. But I think for kids that like superheroes, they might really like it. You know, that sometimes it's a one-and-done story. It's you not to read 20 issues to get a full story. You can read one, which I think for reluctant readers is a little bit more accessible. Nowadays, you know, everything's an arc. You know, it's a it's 8 issue Arc, or a ten issue arc because they want to. They're creating these stories to be bound and sold as graphic novel so they can sell them online and easier with, you know, the newsstand business of buying this individual issue is, unfortunately, I don't think going to be around for much longer. Once people our age phase-out, they're not going to do it for the next generation. They're not buying comics generally. So, and then, of course, there's all the, you know, the ones that don't need my help. You know, there's there's the Raina, you know, Telgemeier books to Cece Bell, and they're doing great things, and kids know them already. So they don't need, you know, like them. But those are great too. 00:25:19 Jessica RickertI have a question not being a connoisseur of comic books, and only just watching the movies which I know is probably horrible for you two. Do you have a favorite superhero?00:25:32 Marc Tyler NoblemanSuperman. So it's again, it's there's this dichotomy throughout my whole childhood, you know, cool and uncool. So Superman uncool, Batman cool. DC uncool, Marvel cool. Han Solo cool, Luke Skywalker, uncool. You know, Fonzie, cool, Richie Cunningham uncool. I always like the uncle ones, except I did like Han Solo better than Luke. But for the most of the most of, those examples I was on the less cool side. So yeah.00:26:09 Molly RauhAll right, you're going to have to explain that one 'cause I have my reasons why I would pick Batman over Superman. So why Superman? Because, no I hardcore disagree with you on that one.00:26:20 Marc Tyler NoblemanSo do most kids. I I think it's, so I mean, a lot of it is just, you know, who you meet first. And he, I remember being introduced to Superman. It feels like first. But I also like, I mean, hit, you know, the Superman that I fell in love with is doesn't exist anymore. In a way. You know, he was good for good sake. There wasn't. There was no complexity to it. Of course, you know, our culture at the moment, and probably forever more is is just much more sensitive to all kinds of Injustice and differences, and, you know, sent being sensitive to as much as possible in every direction which those are certainly greatness there. Superman, you know, used to just you just you just had you just trusted the guy to do the right thing no matter what. And now it's just not as not as black and white. So I still love him, but I think it's just getting more complicated to be Superman than it used to be. And I love Batman too, obviously I spent a whole bunch of my life on him too. But I like Superman, just seems they both seem like loners. And I think I always was I always was drawn to that. Now they both have, well now they're both. It's not good. You know, things evolve. Now, they're - Superman's married with a son. And Batman has Catwoman. But you know, when I was growing up, they were loners and I that appealed to me to that they would do the right thing not to get tons of friends and to get paid or praise, but just because it was the right thing and that really resonated with me as a kid and helped inspire me to write Boys of Steel, my Superman book. That notion of just do the right thing, even if you don't get all this attention for it, or jobs and money, or your name on a big, you know, sign or plaque, or, you know, something like that. You're just doing it because, you know, in your heart, that's what you should do. And I like that about Superman. And Batman did it too. But it was just that was Superman's whole whole essence. 00:28:21 Molly RauhAll right, that's a fair argument. That's maybe the best argument for Superman I've ever heard. So, yeah, I might, I might like him a little better than I did a minute ago.00:28:31 Marc Tyler NoblemanWhat's your Batman take?00:28:33 Molly RauhWell, for me, it's it's a very simple piece of superpowers and not having superpowers. I like Batman because theoretically, like he is a regular human being. Yes, he's empowered by, you know, money and access to this technology. But, you know, I kind of liked that he was an ordinary human being. Who just, you know, used innovations, and you know his own personal sort of drive to become a superhero.00:29:07 Marc Tyler NoblemanI want to see if I can find. I saved this tweet that for me, really summarized Superman in a new way. But probably I knew it all along innately. So I love this. Superman stories aren't a fantasy about how good it would be to have power. they're a fantasy about what it would be like if someone with power was good. So giving credit where credit's due. This is I don't even know who this is. But the it's a someone on Twitter named Ian McIntyre. So I just love that that he could do whatever he wants. I mean, talk people talk about Batman that you know, look what he's doing with no power. But there's a flip side. Look what Superman is not doing with power. 00:29:50 Molly RauhI like that take that's kind of cool, that almost like I might have to pull that into an essential question, because I teach history and like, you know, we just finished some industrial like Gilded Age, Progressive Era, kind of stuff. And a big piece of that was looking at corruption. And so thinking about, like people with power, you know, do they do they always abuse it? Or are there people who use it for good? And so thinking of, yeah, yeah, well, I can send that to you. 00:30:25 Jessica RickertI just never really, like, you guys have opened my eyes to there's deeper and more complex things than just like the movies that I go to like looking. I'm definitely going to look at superheroes differently now. At a deep audio cuts out.00:30:43 Marc Tyler NoblemanThey're not for everybody.00:30:45 Molly RauhYeah, they're not for everybody, but I, you know, anybody I think, who's into comics, realizes that the majority of your comics, whether it's super hero stories or anything else, they're really human stories. They're looking at the human condition and looking at human motivations. And so the social scientist in me always loves them, because they're really just kind of who are we at our core? And, you know, what are we capable of in good and bad ways?00:31:14 Marc Tyler NoblemanYeah. 00:31:18 Jessica RickertWell. Are there any other books that you want to highlight for teachers that might be listening, that you think would be good for them to share with their students? I know you have a lot of books, but a couple that, oh, you should try this one or try this one00:31:33 Marc Tyler NoblemanSure. So I wrote a book called "Fairy Spell," which is a true story about two girls in World War One era England who went into the woods one day with a camera. And this was, again, World War 1 era. So this was not camera like anything we've seen. And they came back with only one photo, which one of their fathers developed in the dark room in their house. And that photo revealed one of the two girls with what they said were for fairies. And this kicked off a mystery that lasted for the rest of their lives. So they were one of them was only nine, and one was 16 and they didn't reveal the full truth about what really happened that day in the woods until they were in their 80s. So what I love about this story level out of things about I love it. It's about two girls. I love that it's about two girls that have agency. They're driving the story I love. I can't reveal it because it would spoil the book. But when they end up telling more of what happened later in life, I love their reason for not telling it sooner. So at first I thought maybe there'd be some. Maybe I'd get some pushback that I'm writing a book about liars. I don't want to say what they said that was true and not true. They said things that - I'm going to say this so I don't spoil the whole thing. At the end, there's they have a different -they say something different than each other. Their story was the same for most of those years. But then at the end, they diverge. So there is some. There is some untruth in it. But there's also some truth. And I love how it's just a new way of looking at the truth. And what isn't what we, how we classify truth and what we, how we judge people that don't tell the truth. You know, it's not, they don't lie for the same reason with the same effect. So I love that. And it also it's become, you know, very relevant with respect to fake news. I didn't write it because of that, but it is a great book to use to help children start to discern, you know, the importance of, again, not believing everything you read on at face value and learning how to verify things on the especially on the internet, whether they're true or not, or whether they need more, you know, more investigation. So that's a great book for that. And apparently, that's what a lot of people use it for. And there are a lot of lessons these days about that which is so important, teaching our kids how to be internet savvy, and how to not question everything to the point that you are a conspiracy theorist. But just you have a healthy skepticism about things so that you use your brain. And when I say in the book, you know, some people decry the internet saying that it makes us think less. I think it has to, really, it's making us think more. You really need to, like, I just said, don't take the first- and I, you know, I tell my kids, we all tell kids. Now, you know, the last couple of years, when you Google something, Google has a little box at the very top. It's in a box the to make you think like that's the definitive be-all-end-all answer. So I tell my kids, well, view, are you even looking at the source of that? And just because Google says it's true doesn't mean it is. So that book is helpful, I think with that topic. And then I wrote another book that's called "Thirty Minutes Over Oregon," so closer to your side of the country. And that's a true story out of WWII about a Japanese pilot named Nobuo who did something that no one before him, or since luckily has done. He became the only person in history to bomb the United States mainland from a plane. And the reason that most people have never heard this is because those bombs did not kill anyone, didn't even hurt anyone. They hit the forest outside of a town called Brookings. So maybe a couple squirrels bit it, but no humans. And because of that, it's not a World War. Two story that we teach it wasn't a turning point, but that's why I love it. It's a smaller story with a great famous first that is not really famous. And then this emotional core about this pilot, how this act impacted him later in life. So it's a great story about how enemies can become friends. I don't want to say too much, but he does come back to America after the war. And it's about something that you don't see in picture books. Too much least. I haven't seen it in non-fiction picture books, and that is redemption. This the idea of redemption, most picture books, that folk that are biographical. They follow the same arc. They start in someone's childhood. The child has a dream. The child tries and fails multiple times. And eventually the book ends with this person becoming the famous person that we all know. Again, the you know, with Bader Ginsburg or Babe Ruth, who met those I don't need to name famous people, you all know them, but that's and that's fine. But I don't. I prefer different kinds of stories. So I prefer story that's not quite as predictable where maybe they mean the Batman story is about a guy that basically opposite success. And then the ending is that he failed. So it's kind of a bummer, but that's life sometimes, and people we need to tell kids that you did a great thing. We shouldn't. He should be honored for it. But in the end, he didn't really benefit from it. And it was a sad story. And that's okay. It's okay to have a sad story. So the 30 minutes of Oregon book is a great story about Redemption about how I mean. Now it's especially, I think, a topic in the news and in life is about second chances. I mean, people are, you know, I see a lot of people that are not given a second chance. They misspeak. They something comes up from their past from sometimes even as young as being a teenager. And that completely changes the entire trajectory of their adult life. And there are times where, you know, second chances are definitely less viable. But I think for a lot of these cases, they're not in. This is a story about that. In today's world, you know, this man's story would he would have not been given a second chance, and he would have been a villain for the rest of his life. So I love this idea of, you know, seeing them at a human level. In this case, he was doing something during war, and you don't excuse that. But it was a war, and everyone was doing things that they would prefer not to be doing. And he did spend a lot of years trying to atone for that and show his true nature, and so reconciliation, redemption, very powerful, very powerful ideas. That, again, you don't see that often in - at least, I don't see them in picture books. I hope they're out there. I just haven't seen them myself. So those two, I think, really help with a lot of different levels of lessons in classrooms character development. And of course, the news thing is more, you know, practical skill.00:38:23 Molly RauhI love that. I think I know what books I'm picking up next, and hopefully I can get through them before. Maybe I hit some units where I could use those in my classes, because, you know, again, I'm a history teacher. I can totally use those.00:38:40 Marc Tyler NoblemanThank you.00:38:41 Molly RauhSo we're at that point where we're some of your heroes00:38:49 Marc Tyler NoblemanHeroes in general. Or...00:38:51 Molly RauhWell, certainly educational heroes, if you have them. But if you want to go a different route and just focus on anybody who's inspired you, who is your hero in what you do, you can go broader if that suits you better. Sure, well, I can do a two-in-one. I can do a personal hero and an educator here, which is my mom, who was a teacher before I was born. So I ruin that. She gave up when I came along, but she is just she's had a really, really challenging life for different reasons. But you turned out to be the sweetest mom. I mean, except for your two moms of all time. And with no, with no guidance, she, you know, she didn't have a loving upbringing where she had something 00:39:40 Molly Rauhto learn from. I don't know where she gets it from. And and she was also someone that you know, helped shape my creative side When We Were Young, my sister and I, my mother would not give us coloring books, because she felt we should start with a blank page that we should create from nothing. And so after a while, I think we wore down a bit, and as long as we still Drew on blank pages as well, but she didn't want us to be given someone else's work and then fill it in. And she also nudged me to be that she saw that I could be a writer before I did, which is typical mom. You know, she knew that I what I was good at, or what I had an aptitude for, and probably what I like, even though I didn't realize it. And she nudged me that way. And then again, as this is going to be no surprise about a guy who liked Superman Richie Cunningham, DC Comics better than there are opposite, which is that I have a lot of teachers that not only were inspirational for me, I'm still in touch with. I mean, most people I know if they're in touch with anyone, it's just one teacher I'm in touch with. I mean, not regular touch, but I have emails and reach out on, and I would say, on a, you know, somewhat regular basis to say hi to a number of teachers. So and you know, sometimes it's very vague why they resonate with me, but they must they must have helped shape me. I can't always figure out why I'm so drawn to them still, but a couple in particular are you no, are you know were formidable, or not formidable, formative, or probably formidable too, formative for me. And I love that because they are so that such a thankless job for so many and I it just three. It's very gratifying to, you know, all these years later, to just have this relationship so that they know that they mattered to me and probably to others that don't don't don't all right, as you know, aren't as obsessive about these things as I am, reaching out keeping in touch. So that means a lot to me for teachers that I had that had an impact for them to know that they did even your in my old age.00:41:47 Jessica RickertI love that. Well, thank you so much for joining us. We're all definitely going to have to check out so many more books. I loved your cliffhangers. And if you have not registered for Marc Tyler, Nobleman's sessions yet, now you got to go find out about the Batman story too. So thank you for joining us. And we look forward to seeing you in February at CCIRA.00:42:13 Marc Tyler NoblemanI can't wait. Thank you so much for your time. And I look forward to seeing you both in person. 00:42:19 Molly RauhThanks for listening to CCIRA Literacy Conversations podcast. To find out more about CCIRA go to CCIRA.org. On CCIRA.org, you can join as a member, or find great resources like our professional development blog, which posts every Tuesday and has a variety of guest writers on an awesome selection of topics. CCIRA is a professional organization of educators and community members is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of literacy. We also have a Twitter account @ColoradoReading. You can find us on Instagram at CCIRA_ColoradReading. Or you can find us on Facebook, where we also have a members only group that we're trying to build. And our Facebook account is CCIRA Colorado Reading. We'd love to hear more from you. And again, if you're looking for new content, please send any questions or things you'd be interested in seeing from ccir a to ccir a video at gmailcom. Thanks for listening and have a great week.

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
US Air Force Colonel leaks coordinates of ancient Antarctic Ruins

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 6:55


On December 26, my US Army source, JP, was given a set of geographical coordinates from an unnamed Lt Colonel (USAF) who simply told him to publicly release them. JP had seen the officer at a classified briefing he attended at a military base where he is currently stationed, where he was told about ancient ruins being found on Antarctica, the Moon, Mars, and elsewhere in our solar system. These were being investigated in joint missions with various Earth nations, including China. JP participated in the Moon mission, which I covered in my previous interview with him, and in an earlier joint mission to Ganymede. The coordinates given to JP (72°31'12"S 3°36'26"W) appear to show a large building complex located about 150 miles (240 km) from the Antarctic coastline in Queen Maud Land. This is an area that was claimed by Hitler's Third Reich and where an Antarctic Colony, Base 211, was secretly established during World War 2.

Finest Hours
Operation Cowboy: Rescuing the Finest Horses of The Third Reich

Finest Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 30:56


In the final days of World War 2, Germany's prized Lipizzaners were under threat of Soviet destruction. Germans responsible for the care of the horses, set aside feelings of animosity towards the Americans and plead with them to rescue these prized horses from the onslaught of the Red Army.

Gutting the Sacred Cow
Episode 115: JL Cauvin BURIES Lawrence of Arabia in a sand dune Episode 115 GTSC podcast

Gutting the Sacred Cow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 82:34


@JL-Cauvin is a master Donald Trump impressionist as well as a master at making us watch LONG films and continues the streak in our latest episode.  JL has us view the nearly FOUR HOUR spectacle known as Lawrence of Arabia.  Does he convince @KevinGootee and @KevinIsrael_NJ that this classic holds water like a desert does?Looking to sell your product, advertise your services, or raise brand awareness? We'd love to help you and we can be reached at guttingthesacredcow@gmail.comDon't forget, you can find us on all podcasts platforms: apple iTunes, Spotify, google, spreaker, stitcher, iheartradio, castbox. You name it and we're on it! And you can also see our handsome yet smug faces on Youtube as well. https://guttingthesacredcow.com/where-to-listen-see-us/ Hello to our new friends! We love it when you click "subscribe", like us on social media, and most importantly when you tell your friends/family about our podcast. Thank you ALL for continually shouting us out on social media, we love when you do that as well as leave us those 5 star rating and 2-3 sentence reviews. Guttingthesacredcow.com is where you find us every day giving YOU those movie quotes, movies news, THAT DOESN'T HAPPEN, and more!  We're at Patreon now: patreon.com/guttingthesacredcow so if you're feeling so inclined to throw a few bucks in the bucket, we'd love you long time.  Social media for the gang: @KevinGootee on Twitter, FB, IG. www.kevingootee.com@kevinisrael_NJ on twitter, FB, @Kevin_israel_comedy on IG www.kevinisrael.com @JL-cauvin on twitter.  www.jlcomedy.com

Main Event Marks
Episode 82: WCW Starrcade 1998 (The End of Goldberg's Streak)

Main Event Marks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 95:33


While 1998 on the whole was a pretty good year in wrestling (maybe one of the best), WCW was about to go on a great, great decline. Goldberg was hot as hell, he was still on his streak, he defeated Hollywood Hogan for the WCW Title in the Georgia Dome, and now, Kevin Nash was heating up right on his heels with a win at World War 3. Besides that, the nWo Black and White was feuding with the nWo Wolfpack. This show opens strong, ends SHOCKINGLY, but all in all, this may have been one of the weaker Starrcade events. This podcast is a tad long, but there's A TON of news to cover that we think you'll all appreciate.CHECK OUT OUR MERCHANDISE: MainEventMarks.redbubble.com & bonfire.com/store/maineventmarksGET YOUR SPORTS SWAG ON FANATICS: fanatics.ncw6.net/jxzKMORDER FROM SWIFT LIFESTYLES: SwiftLifestyles.com, use PROMO CODE: MainEventMarks at checkout for 15% offLISTEN EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 8PM EST: unhingedsn.airtime.proALL PODCAST, SOCIAL MEDIA, & MERCHANDISE LINKS: linktr.ee/MainEventMarks

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast
Ep. 263 Joseph Winston "Pat" Glover

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:47


Today we're talking about another Joseph, but this one was dope as hell. He found probably the bonkerest way to deal with all the stress leading up to Operation Market Garden during World War 2, then had to deal with that whole cluster fuck of a battle. But then he got to take a nice tour of the European countryside before making his way back to England. Enjoy!

The History Listen
Diamond Jack, Smirnov and the Pelikaan

The History Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 28:36


A wild ride involving a Russian flying ace, an escape from Java in World War 2, and a missing package of diamonds.

Neil Oliver's Love Letter to the British Isles
84 World War I, Isle of Skye

Neil Oliver's Love Letter to the British Isles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 36:35


In this episode we're travelling over the sea to Skye, an island of ancient jagged crags and rare breath-taking beauty, which feels as though it's washed in heaven's tears.When the first world war was declared, there was a seismic shift and everything changed forever. All of Britain felt it's pain and devastation, but it hit the Highlands the hardest. A conflict of such magnitude, billions of spent bullets and millions dead, the sorrow and suffering it cause is impossible to comprehend. I'm in Portree, exploring its impact on one small community, trying to come to terms with the magnitude of the Great War.To help support the making of this podcast sign up to Neil Oliver on Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/neiloliverHistory & CommentNew Videos Every Week Instagram account – Neil Oliver Love Letter https://www.instagram.com/neiloliverloveletter/?hl=en Neil Oliver YouTube Channelhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnVR-SdKxQeTvXtUSPFCL7g See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

American Prestige
Bonus - The Christmas Truce of World War I w/ Terri Blom Crocker (PREVIEW)

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 3:12


Merry Christmas! Danny and Derek speak with the historian Terri Blom Crocker to discuss the famous Christmas Truce of 1914, when soldiers in World War I made various agreements to cede fighting. We talk about the reality of the various truces and how the truce has been memorialized and remembered since 1914. Please find Terri's book here: https://www.kentuckypress.com/9780813166155/the-christmas-truce/ Become a patron! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

Today in the Word Devotional

One of my grandmother’s earliest memories was of the day World War 1 ended. When the newspapers published the news, she recounted, people ran out into the streets banging pots and pans to celebrate the end of that long, bloody war. This was good news that was worth dropping everything to celebrate! Today we are celebrating the very best news! The birth of Jesus demonstrates God’s love for us in a profound way. While Jesus was born into humble circumstances, He did have some fanfare at His arrival. An angel of the Lord appeared to shepherds working the night shift and declared, “I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord” (vv. 10–11). Israel had been longing for the coming of the Messiah for generations. Had the time finally come? The declaration of the angel was followed by a great host of angels praising God to mark the momentous occasion (vv. 13 14). The shepherds “hurried off” to find Mary, Joseph, and the baby (v. 16). Upon seeing Him they had two responses. The first was to worship God (v. 20). They celebrated the fact that God had kept His promise of sending a Savior. They celebrated the hope that Jesus embodied. Their second response was to tell others the good news. Luke tells us, “When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child” (v. 18). They had a new purpose to fulfill. >> Merry Christmas from your friends at Today in the Word! We join you in celebrating the birth of Jesus, our Lord and Savior: “Joy to the world! The Lord is come. Let earth receive her King!” As we rejoice in this momentous day, we look forward to Christ’s return!

London Real
‣ “Facebook should be concerned about going Meta.” - Alex Mashinsky

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 8:37


Watch the Full Episode for FREE: https://londonreal.tv/alex-mashinsky-the-next-world-war-will-be-a-currency-war-china-vs-america-on-central-bank-coins/

Good After Morning
Spiderman: No Way Home Til' Christmas

Good After Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 44:58


In today's episode, I talk about the new Spiderman movie, how dope the MCU really is, how messed up Christmas can be, and I also went off about World War 2 for some reason..? Yeah idk man, I been wild lately BE SURE TO LIKE // FOLLOW // SUBSCRIBE // TO NEVER MISS AN EPISODE LEAVE A MF REVIEW ON SPOTIFY AND APPLE Follow GAM on socials: Youtube: GoodAfterMorning Instagram: @goodaftermorningg Twitter: @goodaftermorn

London Real
‣ Take control of your MONEY - Alex Mashinsky

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 2:15


Watch the Full Episode for FREE: https://londonreal.tv/alex-mashinsky-the-next-world-war-will-be-a-currency-war-china-vs-america-on-central-bank-coins/

London Real
‣ Can the Digital Yuan challenge the Dollar? - Alex Mashinsky

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 4:52


Watch the Full Episode for FREE: https://londonreal.tv/alex-mashinsky-the-next-world-war-will-be-a-currency-war-china-vs-america-on-central-bank-coins/

Alien vs. Predator Galaxy Podcast
#137: “The Ultimate Betrayal – The Denial Of Glory,” Reviewing Aliens vs. Predator: Three World War

Alien vs. Predator Galaxy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 90:45


Includes a review of Dark Horse Comic’s Aliens vs. Predator: Three World War. Presented by Corporal Hicks, RidgeTop, VoodooMagic and Xenomorphine.

London Real
‣ “Crypto is for the community, not the money.” - Alex Mashinsky

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 2:49


Watch the Full Episode for FREE: https://londonreal.tv/alex-mashinsky-the-next-world-war-will-be-a-currency-war-china-vs-america-on-central-bank-coins/

Assorted Goods
An Assorted Goods Christmas

Assorted Goods

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:39


Revisiting a classic episode of the podcast from December 2019 (what a different world it was back then!). It's a Christmas edition of Assorted Goods, looking at Christmas related stories, including the shortage of Christmas trees, and our tradition of spending ourselves into serious debt. Also, a look at how Christmas has evolved since its Pagan roots, and telling the tale of when holiday traditions put a World War on pause. Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year from Assorted Goods! Source List: https://www.disinformed.ca/ag-sources/an-assorted-goods-christmas-source-list

London Real
‣ “Celsius is all about giving back.” - Alex Mashinsky

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 7:00


Watch the Full Episode for FREE: https://londonreal.tv/alex-mashinsky-the-next-world-war-will-be-a-currency-war-china-vs-america-on-central-bank-coins/

London Real
ALEX MASHINSKY - The Next World War Will Be A Currency War: China vs America on Central Bank Coins

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 79:01


Watch the Full Episode for FREE:  https://londonreal.tv/alex-mashinsky-the-next-world-war-will-be-a-currency-war-china-vs-america-on-central-bank-coins/

Without A Country
Ep. 100: World War Me

Without A Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 118:08


It's all about the Benjamins! Without A Country celebrates 100 episodes with Trump's tax returns, Amazon is evil and bad at delivering packages, Hasan Piker's cracker gaffe, the Supreme Court is Anti-Titty, the world is unfair, and we eat Twinkies.Air Date: 12/14/21Support Our Sponsors!YoDelta.comBlueChew.comIPVanish.comRockAuto.comYou can watch Without A Country LIVE for FREE every Tuesday at 7:00pm at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/live. Once you're there, sign up for GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code WAC to receive a 7 Day FREE TRIAL with access to our entire catalog of archived episodes! On top of that, you'll also have the same access to ALL the other shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!**PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW ON iTUNES & SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL**WHERE YOU CAN ANNOY US:Corinne Fisher: @PhilanthropyGalShayne Smith: @ShaydozerExecutive Producer: Alec AlaggioEngineer: Natalie DeCiccoResearch Assistant: Sami WeisbandSpecial Thanks: @GaSDigitalBREAKINGTrump tax records can be released by Treasury Department to House, judge ruleshttps://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2021/12/14/trump-tax-records-treasury-release/GUUUURLBanned for Saying Crackerhttps://www.vice.com/en/article/4awxjw/hasan-piker-allegedly-banned-from-twitch-for-saying-crackerTornadoes Can't Stop Production!!https://www.yahoo.com/now/factory-bosses-workers-tornado-leave-214937404.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAG9kp-k4PYgE8OaCw0boOM8vjQwjyoHcf5mjaNv_a-Z7-7S2rwZbdvwBNe8EAg0mS80hZygnnPcTMuWiPwuKF26WKzLBpBQsJ99WYjEnTnHKrXwdYagDMgvf6AZItbbVwLpW6DTKl9Nu_cR-t1Xp7110Gc63JIZiinF3pfnpnIOHKim Kardashian Passes Baby Barhttps://edition.cnn.com/2021/12/13/entertainment/kim-kardashian-law-exam-scli-intl/index.html?utm_source=ground.news&utm_medium=referralTopless Ban May Go to Supreme Courthttps://thehill.com/regulation/court-battles/585653-women-call-on-supreme-court-to-strike-down-towns-topless-sunbathingSouth Dakota Teachers Dash for Cashhttps://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/13/us/south-dakota-teachers-dash-for-cash.htmlSimpsons & Republicanshttps://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/lawmaker-calls-out-disney-for-scrubbing-simpsons-episode-in-hong-kongSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Movie Meltdown
Santa's Sinister Six

Movie Meltdown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 104:21


Movie Meltdown - Episode 568 Our holiday festivities continue as we discuss six Christmas movies we've recently watched. Some are more disturbing than others… you be the judge as to which you find the most ridiculous.  And while we get involved in crazy scenarios involving mistaken identity, aliens, lies, murders, usurpers, dating apps, fairy tales and telepathy - we also address… Pirates World, Dark Angel, Santa extreme close-up, dating apps, during World War 2, Geraldo Rivera's mustache, losing musical eras, naughty Martians, Hans Christian Andersen, Mad Max homage, Jon Favreau, fighting off a wolf, our brain stem fluid is a drug, working in a toy factory, gloriously annoyed, A Midnight Clear, stuck in Florida, RiffTrax, plucked a gorilla, an air raid horn, showing off how dumb our characters are, the whole mise en scène of the whole thing, cops and aliens, It's a Wonderful Life and mutant karaoke.  “So we have completely mishmash nostalgia, out-of-date references… and we're making references to far better films.”

Paint the Town Dead
Episode 80: James Alexander Cary

Paint the Town Dead

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 71:41


Andrew tells us the story of James Alexander Cary, who served in the first World War before becoming a ranger with the National Park Service stationed in Hot Springs during Prohibition. Cary spent most of his time tracking down bootleggers and their liquor stashes in the mountains. In 1926, Cary arrested three men illegally transporting booze, one of whom threatened Cary, telling him that he would never be able to testify against the bootleggers. Afterwards we test Caitlin's Harry Potter trivia and it seems really difficult unlike that easy Star Wars quiz Andrew was given. Twitter: https://twitter.com/PTTDpodFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/pttdpod/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paintthetowndead/Email: PTTDPod@gmail.comhttps://www.hotsr.com/news/2017/may/17/national-park-service-ranger-discusses-/https://www.arkansas.com/articles/hot-springs-site-monument-first-fallen-national-park-service-rangerhttps://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/entries/james-alexander-cary-12010/https://www.nps.gov/hosp/learn/historyculture/james-a-cary.htmhttps://www.nps.gov/hosp/learn/news/memorial-to-ranger-james-a-cary.htmhttps://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/may/30/hot-springs-honors-slain-park-ranger-20/https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/2016/05/slain-ranger-receive-memorial-hot-springs-national-park See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 117: Our 2021 Literary Life Reading Wrap-up

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 84:48


On this week's episode of The Literary Life podcast, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share a wrap up of their year in reading–their favorite books of the year, their most hated books read in 2021, and how they each did with covering the categories of the #LitLife192021 Reading Challenge. They also talk a little about how they will be approaching their reading for next year. Download the Two for '22 adult reading challenge PDF here, and the kids' reading challenge PDF here. The Literary Life Commonplace Books published by Blue Sky Daisies are back with new covers for 2022! Also, check out the Christmas sale at HouseofHumaneLetters.com! Coming up on The Literary Life podcast in the new year, we have Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream coming up in January and after that, Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis. Then we will be reading The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim and Charles Dickens' Hard Times later in the year. Our children's classic novel this year will be The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Commonplace Quotes: Literature's world is a concrete human world of immediate experience. The poet uses images and objects and sensations much more than he uses abstract ideas. The novelist is concerned with telling stories, not with working out arguments. Northrop Frye The moon is the only one of the heavenly bodies that, whilst rising resplendently like the other luminaries, nevertheless changes and waxes and wanes as we do. Malcolm Guite I almost think that the same skin For one without has two or three within. Lord Byron, from “Don Juan” The Poetry of Shakespeare by George Meredith Picture some Isle smiling green ‘mid the white-foaming ocean; – Full of old woods, leafy wisdoms, and frolicsome fays; Passions and pageants; sweet love singing bird-like above it; Life in all shapes, aims, and fates, is there warm'd by one great human heart. Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins The Educated Imagination by Northrup Frye Faith, Hope, and Poetry by Malcolm Guite David's Crown by Malcolm Guite Savior of the World by Charlotte Mason The Mirror Cracked from Side to Side by Agatha Christie Anthony Horowitz Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy Hiking Through by Paul Stutzman A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson Wintering by Katherine May The Narnian by Alan Jacobs In the Year of Our Lord 1943 by Alan Jacobs Elizabeth Goudge Assignment in Brittany by Helen Macinnes Look Back with Love by Dodie Smith The Go-Between by L. P. Hartley The Atonement by Ian McEwan Desmond MacCarthay David Cecil Letters by a Young Contrarian by Christopher Hitchens Ann Veronica by H. G. Wells The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell The Odd Women by George Gissing Excellent Women by Barbara Pym If Walls Could Talk by Lucy Worsley Corsets and Codpieces by Karen Bowman *The Storytelling Animal by Jonathan Gottschall (not recommended) *Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics by Stephen Greenblatt (not recommended) MacBeth by William Shakespeare As the Indians Left It by Robert Sparks Walker Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset Lady Susan by Jane Austen Tolkien and the Great War by John Garth A Hobbit, A Wardrobe and A World War by Joseph Laconte Piranesi by Susanna Clarke Neil Gaiman The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham Mythos by Stephen Fry Nina Balatka by Anthony Trollope Christmas at Thompson Hall by Anthony Trollope Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Tolkien Road
0268 » The Goblin Wars!!!

The Tolkien Road

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 50:23


Have you ever heard of Tolkien's GOBLIN WARS? (HINT: you won't find them in the Middle-earth legendarium). These are the stories of Goblins invading the North Pole and stealing gifts intended for the children of England from Father Christmas' cellar. Join us as we explore how the "Other Fellowship" of Father Nicholas Christmas, the North Polar Bear, the Red Gnomes, and others join forces to save Christmas! EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Andrew T, John R, Ms. Anonymous, Redhawk, Kaitlyn of Tea with TolkienWATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE » https://youtu.be/BEK4vr1gXAw***THIS EPISODE IS 2 DAYS EARLY AND AD-FREE FOR OUR BELOVED PATRONS!******LIVE DISCUSSION - DEC 16TH @ 7PM CT »»» https://www.wisdom.audio/*** If you've ever wanted to engage with us LIVE, your opportunity is coming up! On Thursday, December 16th, at 7pm CT, we'll be going live on the WISDOM app to discuss whatever Tolkien-related things you guys want to talk about! Just follow me on the Wisdom App via @johncarswell. » https://www.wisdom.audio/ We are looking forward to talking with you, taking your questions, and we can't wait to hear from you! Once again, WISDOM APP. Go download it! » https://www.wisdom.audio/CONTENTS: - 1932: Goblins Underground! » 5:30- 1933: Revenge of the Goblins! » 21:05- 1941: Goblin Resurgence of World War 2 » 28:15- Correspondence » 42:50 LINKS: - buy The Father Christmas Letters » https://amzn.to/3FSMAhH- Major Events of 1453 » https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1453- Hornby Model Trains » https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornby_...- Allison Uttley » https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alison_...- Support Us On Patreon » https://patreon.com/tolkienroadSPECIAL THANKS:- Andrew T- John R- Ms. Anonymous- Redhawk- Kaitlyn of Tea with Tolkien- Shannon S- Brian O- Emilio P- Zeke F- James A- James L- Chris L- Chuck F- Asya V- Ish of the Hammer- Teresa C- David of Pints with Jack- Jonathan D- Eric S- Joey S- Eric B- Johanna T- Mike M- Robert H- Paul D- Julia- Werty

It Could Happen Here
Neoliberalism Part 2: The Trade World War: G7 vs G77

It Could Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 35:39


In part 2 of our series on Neoliberalism we look at the economic crises that plagued the 1970's and the forgotten conflict between the G7 and the G77 that shaped the modern world Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Elite Man Podcast
My Thoughts On Gender-Neutral Bathrooms, Transgender People, Woke Culture, American Public Schools, And More – Justin Stenstrom (Ep. 350)

Elite Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 45:48


Justin Stenstrom, bestselling author, health expert, and speaker, joins our show in this special episode of the Elite Man Podcast! In today's episode Justin talks his thoughts on gender-neutral bathrooms, transgender people, woke culture, the American public school system, World War 3, and much more. If you're wondering about these current important topics of today, check this episode out now! *Download this episode now and subscribe to our channel to get more of these amazing interviews! In our episode we go over: • The important new gender-neutral bathroom announcement in Chicago • How these bathrooms will improve all of our lives • The problem with political correctness • Feminists and the dichotomy they have with supporting trans rights • Where I draw the line with transgender rights • Woke culture and why it's gotten insane • The problem with the American public school system • Lunatic teachers • Dumbass students • World War III and the fact we're losing it • Focusing on our real problems • Equality for all Check out Justin on: Website: EliteLifeNutrition.com Instagram: instagram.com/justinstenstrom Sponsors: *Check out Justin's new book ELITE MIND at EliteMindBook.com.

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers
BUTCHER OF HANOVER-Alan R. Warren

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 63:18


Butcher of Hanover focuses on the serial killer of at least 27 young men and boys in Germany in the post-World War 1 era. At the center of this murder case were Fritz Haarmann and Hans Grans, who were lovers while committing these murders. It wasn't until the skulls and bones started washing ashore from the Leine River in Hanover that Germany realized they had a cold-blooded serial killer in their country.As you read the exploration of the case in this book, ask yourself, did Haarmann murder each victim to keep his lover Hans Grans to stay with him? Did Grans decide who it was that was to be murdered? The evidence on this case will keep you on the edge of your seat, trying to determine who was really behind these gruesome murders. BUTCHER OF HANOVER: Fritz Haarmann-Alan R. Warren

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast
A Fed Policy Error That Will Live In Infamy – Ep 758

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 55:06


Markets recover most all of their Black Friday losses. Fed can't fight inflation without deflating inflated economic bubble. Data shows biggest drop in productivity in 62 years. Consumer prices are headed much higher. Real wages are headed much lower. Bitcoin is a lousy store of value in terms of Ethereum. Americans made real sacrifices during World War 2, not during the war on Covid. US would have to fund a war with China by borrowing money from China. Thanks Raycon! For a limited time, go to https://buyraycon.com/gold and use code HOLIDAY for up to 15% off your entire Raycon order. Thanks FEALS. Become a member at https://feals.com/gold and get 40% off your first three months with free shipping INVEST LIKE ME: https://schiffradio.com/invest RATE AND REVIEW on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PeterSchiff/reviews/ SIGN UP FOR MY FREE NEWSLETTER: https://www.europac.com/ Schiff Gold News: http://www.SchiffGold.com/news Buy my newest book at http://www.tinyurl.com/RealCrash Follow me on Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Instagram: https://Instagram.com/PeterSchiff

Stories Fables Ghostly Tales Podcast
762: 10 War Poems by ISAAC ROSENBERG | Dry Read Poetry

Stories Fables Ghostly Tales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 31:55


Welcome, welcome, you lovely souls. Today I have for you 10 poems, dry read, so that means no music, just my voice alone, narrating Isaac Rosenberg's rich yet sad poems. They speak of war, death, creation, loss, and melancholy. Surely a set of poems to evoke emotion. Isaac wrote poetry about the trenches in World War 1, where he would be shot and killed. He was both a war poet and a painter, and wrote poems that questioned our humanity, and humans relationship with God, spirituality, and the grief brought upon by death. Although his time with us was short, his poetry lives on his collections, and also, this episode. Enjoy!

Timesuck with Dan Cummins
273 - The Hells Angels

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 156:28


Did you know that Hunter S Thompson of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas fame was one of the first people to bring national attention to the Hells Angels? Or that they were founded by soldiers returning home from World War 2? Or that a Marlon Brando movie in the 1950's also lead to growth of not just the Hells Angels but other Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs, as the US Justice Department likes to call them? Who are the real Sons of Anarchy? Big informative episode today about the Hells Angels, the history of motorcycles, and the rise of the MC - Motorcycle Club - in American culture (which was quickly exported internationally).  It's a gun-runnin', back your brother's play, keep the ride fast and tight on the freeway and keep the booze and drugs flowing when we make it to the end of the run edition, of Timesuck. The Bad Magic Productions charity for December is the Bad Magic Giving Tree! So far we have raised - thanks to so many of you - $44,160, and that money will give  176 kids from 177 families the best holiday of their lives! Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! Watch the Suck on YouTube:  https://youtu.be/UeFBK_VokoMMerch - https://badmagicmerch.com/  Discord! https://discord.gg/tqzH89vWant to join the Cult of the Curious private Facebook Group? Go directly to Facebook and search for "Cult of the Curious" in order to locate whatever current page hasn't been put in FB Jail :)For all merch related questions/problems: store@badmagicproductions.com (copy and paste)Please rate and subscribe on iTunes and elsewhere and follow the suck on social media!! @timesuckpodcast on IG and http://www.facebook.com/timesuckpodcastWanna become a Space Lizard? We're over 10,000 strong! Click here: https://www.patreon.com/timesuckpodcastSign up through Patreon and for $5 a month you get to listen to the Secret Suck, which will drop Thursdays at Noon, PST. You'll also get 20% off of all regular Timesuck merch PLUS access to exclusive Space Lizard merch. You get to vote on two Monday topics each month via the app. And you get the download link for my new comedy album, Feel the Heat. Check the Patreon posts to find out how to download the new album and take advantage of other benefits.

Jocko Unravelling
Unraveling 26: Absolute War

Jocko Unravelling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 99:33


Description: The French Revolution ended the era of limited warfare, and ushered in the era of peoples' war. The Napoleonic Wars shocked Europe's great powers into a century of relatively few direct military confrontations, but those that occurred - the US Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War, and the Russo-Japanese & Crimean Wars - were prelude to the industrial violence that would engulf the continent in World War 1. But even the savagery and degradation of the Great War did not prepare anyone for what was in store the second time around, when unprecedented technological brutality targeted the civilians of enemy nations.