Podcasts about social sciences

The academic disciplines concerned with society and the relationships between individuals in society

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Latest podcast episodes about social sciences

New Books in American Studies
Emily Mendenhall, "Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji" (Vanderbilt UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 33:25


Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji (Vanderbilt UP, 2022) is the story of what happened in Okoboji, a small Iowan tourist town, when a collective turn from the coronavirus to the economy occurred in the COVID summer of 2020. State political failures, local negotiations among political and public health leaders, and community (dis)belief about the virus resulted in Okoboji being declared a hotspot just before the Independence Day weekend, when an influx of half a million people visit the town. The story is both personal and political. Author Emily Mendenhall, an anthropologist at Georgetown University, grew up in Okoboji, and her family still lives there. As the events unfolded, Mendenhall was in Okoboji, where she spoke formally with over 100 people and observed a community that rejected public health guidance, revealing deep-seated mistrust in outsiders and strong commitments to local thinking. Unmasked is a fascinating and heartbreaking account of where people put their trust, and how isolationist popular beliefs can be in America's small communities. Professor Emily Mendenhall is a medical anthropologist and Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology in 2017. She is Editor-in-Chief of Social Science and Medicine-Mental Health and leads the office of Medical Anthropology and Critical Social Science. She has served as Honorary Faculty at the University of the Witwatersrand for the past decade. At Georgetown, she leads the global health concentration in the Science, Technology, and International Affairs (STIA) Program in the School of Foreign Service. Austin Clyde is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago Department of Computer Science. He researches artificial intelligence and high-performance computing for developing new scientific methods. He is also a visiting research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School's Science, Technology, and Society program, where my research addresses the intersection of artificial intelligence, human rights, and democracy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Medicine
Emily Mendenhall, "Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji" (Vanderbilt UP, 2022)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 33:25


Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji (Vanderbilt UP, 2022) is the story of what happened in Okoboji, a small Iowan tourist town, when a collective turn from the coronavirus to the economy occurred in the COVID summer of 2020. State political failures, local negotiations among political and public health leaders, and community (dis)belief about the virus resulted in Okoboji being declared a hotspot just before the Independence Day weekend, when an influx of half a million people visit the town. The story is both personal and political. Author Emily Mendenhall, an anthropologist at Georgetown University, grew up in Okoboji, and her family still lives there. As the events unfolded, Mendenhall was in Okoboji, where she spoke formally with over 100 people and observed a community that rejected public health guidance, revealing deep-seated mistrust in outsiders and strong commitments to local thinking. Unmasked is a fascinating and heartbreaking account of where people put their trust, and how isolationist popular beliefs can be in America's small communities. Professor Emily Mendenhall is a medical anthropologist and Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology in 2017. She is Editor-in-Chief of Social Science and Medicine-Mental Health and leads the office of Medical Anthropology and Critical Social Science. She has served as Honorary Faculty at the University of the Witwatersrand for the past decade. At Georgetown, she leads the global health concentration in the Science, Technology, and International Affairs (STIA) Program in the School of Foreign Service. Austin Clyde is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago Department of Computer Science. He researches artificial intelligence and high-performance computing for developing new scientific methods. He is also a visiting research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School's Science, Technology, and Society program, where my research addresses the intersection of artificial intelligence, human rights, and democracy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Anthropology
Emily Mendenhall, "Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji" (Vanderbilt UP, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 33:25


Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji (Vanderbilt UP, 2022) is the story of what happened in Okoboji, a small Iowan tourist town, when a collective turn from the coronavirus to the economy occurred in the COVID summer of 2020. State political failures, local negotiations among political and public health leaders, and community (dis)belief about the virus resulted in Okoboji being declared a hotspot just before the Independence Day weekend, when an influx of half a million people visit the town. The story is both personal and political. Author Emily Mendenhall, an anthropologist at Georgetown University, grew up in Okoboji, and her family still lives there. As the events unfolded, Mendenhall was in Okoboji, where she spoke formally with over 100 people and observed a community that rejected public health guidance, revealing deep-seated mistrust in outsiders and strong commitments to local thinking. Unmasked is a fascinating and heartbreaking account of where people put their trust, and how isolationist popular beliefs can be in America's small communities. Professor Emily Mendenhall is a medical anthropologist and Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology in 2017. She is Editor-in-Chief of Social Science and Medicine-Mental Health and leads the office of Medical Anthropology and Critical Social Science. She has served as Honorary Faculty at the University of the Witwatersrand for the past decade. At Georgetown, she leads the global health concentration in the Science, Technology, and International Affairs (STIA) Program in the School of Foreign Service. Austin Clyde is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago Department of Computer Science. He researches artificial intelligence and high-performance computing for developing new scientific methods. He is also a visiting research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School's Science, Technology, and Society program, where my research addresses the intersection of artificial intelligence, human rights, and democracy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

The Quicky
PM Albo, The Teal Bath & What Happens to Election Losers?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 16:08


After weeks of campaigning, the voting is over, but as the winners prepare to take up their new roles in Parliament, perhaps you're thinking we should spare a thought for the losers... and what actually happens to them anyway? The Quicky speaks to three experts in Australian politics to find out what it means to lose an election (and your job), whether you're the Prime Minister of Australia, party leader,  a backbencher, or a bureaucrat who was never known to the public anyway. Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au CREDITS  Host: Gemma Bath With thanks to: Associate Professor Paul Williams - Political scientist, practitioner and theorist across three scholarly professions – political science, journalism and pedagogy with more than 30 years' professional experience, based at Griffith University Amy Remeikis - Guardian Australia's political reporter Mark Kenny - Australian Studies Professor at the Australian National University's College of Arts and Social Sciences, and host of the weekly politics and public affairs podcast, Democracy Sausage With Mark Kenny Producer: Claire Murphy / Gemma Bath Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Jacob Round Subscribe to The Quicky at...https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Interplace
Bike Everywhere...If You Dare

Interplace

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 22:40


Hello Interactors,Most people think roads were planned, designed, and built for cars, but that’s not true. They’re public spaces intended to bring social and economic benefit by increasing mobility. Economically they’re successful, but socially they not only are failing us…they’re killing us.As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…WALKING AND BIKING TO DEATHToday is “Bike Everywhere Day” in the Seattle area. Once known as “Bike to Work Day”, it would typically inspire an estimated 20,000 people to grease the chain, pump up the tires, strap on the helmet, and tepidly merge into the smooth, rolling polluted river of concrete nestling up alongside menacing machines of masculinity hastily rushing to work. Commuting patterns have been disrupted by Covid the last couple years. But with the League of American Bicyclists declaring May as “Bike Everywhere Month” commuting to and from work isn’t the only reason to slide onto the saddle. If you dare to do so.According to the CDC, “bicycle trips make up only 1% of all trips in the United States. However, bicyclists account for over 2% of people who die in a crash involving a motor vehicle on our nation’s roads.” It’s important to note the CDC use the human-centered word ‘bicyclist’ to describe the victim but an object-oriented word ‘motor vehicle’ to describe the killer. It’s not the motor vehicle’s fault these people died, it’s the fault of motorists. As gun enthusiasts like to remind us, ‘guns don’t kill people, people do.’ The same is true for cars and both machines can be violent killers. The CDC report “Nearly 1,000 bicyclists dying and over 130,000 injured in crashes that occur on roads in the United States every year.” But that’s only those reported. Most cyclists, especially in disadvantaged communities, don’t bother reporting crashes. And not all police nor hospitals report or rate car-related bike and pedestrian injuries consistently…if at all. And different sources report different numbers.The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports “425,910 emergency department-treated injuries associated with bicycles and bicycle accessories in 2020.” The National Highway Traffic Safety Administrations reports “932 bicyclists were killed in motor-vehicle traffic crashes in 2020, an 8.9% increase from 856 in 2019.” The U.S. Department of Transportation announced this week that 43,000 people died on roadways in 2021 – the highest since tracking began in 1975.That’s a 10% percent increase over 2020. Pedestrian fatalities were up 13% and bicycle fatalities were up 5%. They note that during Covid speeding offenses climbed causing a 17% increase in speed-related fatalities between 2019 and 2020 and a 5% increase prior to 2019. It’s unclear how speed factors in the increase in pedestrian and bicyclist deaths during this time, but there is no denying that speed kills.The Transport Research Laboratory out of the UK compared multiple datasets of ‘pedestrians killed’ by the ‘front of a car’ (again comparing people to an object) to better understand the relationship between speed and risk of fatal injury to pedestrians. They concluded “The risk increases slowly until impact speeds of around 30 mph. Above this speed, risk increases rapidly – the increase is between 3.5 and 5.5 times from 30 mph to 40 mph.” This applies to cyclists as well. Choosing to bike on roads in America comes with a risk of dying that is nearly five times greater than choosing to drive a car. And the odds of dying in a car accident are already relatively high – 1 in 101 – the eighth largest risk just behind suicide and opioids in 2020.The ugly truth is the ongoing and rising deaths and injuries to cyclists and pedestrians at the hands of motorists is a seemingly necessary cost to uphold the freedom, comfort, and convenience of automobility that many enjoy. Our political and public administrative services care about saving lives, but evidently not if it means changing road designs, land-use policies, travel patterns, restricting access to some roads, or – heaven forbid – creating viable ways to ditch the car should you choose.But this country did once care about saving lives on the road. As the post-WWII boom in cars and roads continued to balloon so did car-related deaths. Federal, state, and local governments rallied to make cars and roads safe for motorists. The same is true for new bikes purchased for baby boomers. When kids were getting injured and killed on their bikes in the 60s and 70s due to poor design and construction, consumer protection agencies cracked down on manufacturers and the federal government almost made it illegal to bike on the street.It was a bike enthusiast out of Davis, California, John Forester, who fought for a cyclist’s right to use public roads. But as a confident cyclist, and self-proclaimed engineering expert, who prided himself on his ability to ride in traffic, he advocated for ‘vehicular cycling’ which meant treating a cyclist more like a motorist than a pedestrian. He even claimed protected or separated bike lanes were more dangerous than riding with traffic. He was making that claim up until he died in 2020. But he mostly was a bike snob who didn’t want to be burdened with having to share space with kids and slower everyday cyclists on a bike path, so he made it his lifelong ambition to tank efforts to build safer bike infrastructure. Though, it was elite bicycle enthusiasts like him we have to thank for the existence of paved American roads in the first place.A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN“Every person has an equal right to travel on the highways, either on foot or with his own conveyance, team, or vehicle. This right is older than our constitutions and statutes … The supreme rule of the road is, Thou shalt use it so as to interfere as little as possible with the equal right of every other person to use it at the same time …”This was written in 1897 by a patent attorney named Charles Pratt. He was one of three men who started the League of American Wheelman (L.A.W) in 1880. Now called the League of American Bicyclists, they’re the leading sponsor of today’s “Bike Everywhere Day.” Pratt was joined by a bike importer, Frank Weston, and writer, adventurer, conservationist, Kirk Munroe. Together they grew the L.A.W. to become one of the most influential and powerful organizations of their time. They are also the originators of America’s paved roads.In 1888 the L.A.W. members voted to fund the National Committee for Highway Improvement. Their first publication served as a textbook for road construction called, Making and Mending Good Roads & Nature and Use of Asphalt for Paving. Fifteen-thousand copies were printed and sent to state legislators as well as county, city, and town officials. But they also solicited bike manufacturers and dealers, road construction and pavement companies, and equipment manufacturers. Asphalt and pavement companies eagerly offered their support and financial contributions to the effort.One of the members of the L.A.W., Civil War Colonel and bicycle manufacturer (who later made electric cars), Albert Pope, was one of the most eager supporters of what became the ‘Good Roads Movement.’ In 1889 he offered an upfront contribution of $350 with an offer to fund whatever was necessary to build good roads writing: “Go ahead with the work…and we will pay the whole or any part of the expense you desire.”        If this sounds like a bunch of wealthy cycle enthusiasts coming together to design, fund, and build public roads across America, it is. Recall this is the same model used to build the rail system across the United States in the 1840s. Federal or state funding, or government sponsorship of any public transportation, was not on the minds of elite power brokers of the 19th century…or the 18th century for that matter. Road and highway design, construction, and maintenance was believed to be the job of local governments in partnership with private parties. One L.A.W. member from New York, A.J. Shriver, wrote in 1889 that federal funding of roads was “Socialistic” and thereby “unconstitutional.”But these beliefs and attitudes were largely coming from wealthy urban elites. Bicycling, after all, was something the privileged class enjoyed as a kind of hobby. But in the rural countryside attitudes were different. Most farmers were responsible for maintaining the roads along their property and believed they ‘owned’ them. They were also leery of wealthy city-slickers offering opinions on how ‘their’ roads were to be designed, used, and by whom.The L.A.W. drafted legislation in 1889 calling for a state tax to fund the highway commission for the creation of maps and plans for the construction of ‘good roads.’ The legislation was adopted by nine states, but failed to garner the necessary votes. Farmers were speaking out against this infringement on ‘their’ property. One Michigan farming coalition wrote, “The farmers must bear the expense while bicyclists and pleasure-riding citizens will reap the larger benefits.”The defeats at the state level sent the the L.A.W. back to the drawing board. They realized they needed a different approach. Their president wrote, “We must concentrate first on education, then agitation, and finally legislation.” They created a monthly publication that was an “Illustrated Monthly Magazine Devoted to the Public Roads and Streets” that hit a peak circulation of 75,000 copies by 1895.In 1898 the L.A.W. then published a 41-page book titled, Must the Farmer Pay for Good Roads?. They mailed 300,000 copies to farmers and members of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It worked. The book’s author, Otto Dorner, later wrote in The Forum magazine that,“… the farmers of the United States are beginning to thoroughly appreciate the need [for] better highways; and the work of the League of American Wheelmen in the direction of State aid is receiving much support from the more progressive among them … The Farmers’ National Congress … [commended] the efforts of the League of American Wheelmen to bring about the general introduction of the State Aid system.”The Model T was just around the corner, but it was the bicycle and bicyclists that made that corner. In 1902 these words appeared in a magazine called The Automobile:“The effect of the bicycle on road improvement has been … phenomenal in the past 10 and 15 years …” …Directly and indirectly the bicycle has been the means of interesting capital in road building to the extent of millions of dollars, and of spreading abroad more accurate and scientific data concerning road construction than was ever before done in so short a time. The bicycle practically paved the way for automobiling.”IT'S ONLY FAIRCyclists today get little gratitude for the early lobbying efforts to build smooth, safe roads. But it should also be noted that these early wealthy and influential cycling enthusiasts quickly became motoring enthusiasts. Henry Ford tends to get all the credit for automobile manufacturing, but it was the early bicycle manufacturers who converted bike factories to car factories. Henry Martyn Leland, before he created Cadillac and Lincoln, was making bike transmission parts for Colonel Pope’s bike company. A car, after all, is just a glorified motorized quad-cycle.Men like these are often portrayed as the protagonist in the power and glory of the early story of bikes, but women rode too. And it wasn’t just high-society women biking either. In 1872, Louise Armaindo, set the American long-distance record, covering more than 600 miles in 72 hours. In 1890, Kittie Knox became the first African American woman to become a member of the League of American Wheelman. She didn’t stop there. She became a successful bike racer and became the first woman to be seen racing in ‘bloomers’ instead of a skirt. Sadly, she still faced fierce discrimination. And while the bicycle plays a huge role in the liberation of women, and a symbol of the suffrage movement, women are still fighting for recognition, acceptance, and necessary leadership opportunities in a the current burgeoning cycling movement. They are also unrepresented in determining the design and use of our roads.Not much has changed since the the 19th century. The design of motorized and non-motorized vehicles, and the transportation infrastructure they require, is still very much dominated by Western, mostly white, men. Just as those early bicycle and pavement businessmen came together around the L.A.W. to “organise capital accumulation, advance[e] elite entrepreneurial agendas, and consolidate[e] urban regimes”, so too are today’s, mostly white male, CEOs of automobile, oil and gas, chemical, concrete and asphalt, and road construction companies.And they’re all in collusion with legions of civil engineers, elected officials, and administrative workers at the federal, state, and local level to provide a transportation system that perpetuates our insatiable need to make more money to buy more things; this requires more roads to move more people and more things by car or truck; which in turn creates more waste, more pollution, and more traffic-related deaths.This approach to planning public land has led to uneven urban and suburban development, perpetuated ethnic and race privilege, and is rooted in attitudes and beliefs stemming from a culture of patriarchy. As a group of transportation researchers out of Belgium observe,“…how across strikingly diverse cities, urban regimes hide and legitimize these logics by applying the discourse of sustainability, framing infrastructural investment as a largely technical and rational response to the problems of congestion or low quality of public space. Instead, approached critically, transport is an essentially political issue of distributing social and spatial benefits and costs of urban development.”That’s from their February 2022 paper, Moving past sustainable transport studies: Towards a critical perspective on urban transport. They call for a critical assessment of the study of transportation, adding that such a “perspective departs from analysing and juxtaposing specific transport modes (e.g. airplanes and private cars against public transport) and related lifestyles (e.g. mass tourism, suburban life and work against cycling and walking), and instead demonstrates their role in sustaining socio-economic structures that enable the capitalist mode of producing urban space and society. Therefore, in sum, being critical about transport means analysing it as a key component of capitalism.”They go on to prove their point by querying existing transportation research for terms like “capitalism” or “capitalist”, “neoliberalism”, “feminism”, and “race” and find there are few results. The words “equity” or “equality”, and “gender” return just 2% of existing publications found in the hundreds of thousands of leading academic transportation and mobility journals. In the larger corpus of over six million Social Science publications the percentage of reports with those three words doubles to 4%.They also point out “unravelling and analysing power and ideology underpinned and reproduced by transport in urban settings is by no means an exercise that hinges on a particular theoretical lens (Marxist, anarchist, feminist etc.) or focuses on a specific social group or factor (class, gender, ethnicity and race, age). But they nonetheless remind us that any critique of a system that has led to a climate-crisis and obscene income disparities has to be grounded in some social theory “because investigated facts are the result of human actions displayed within a given society.”Only with this analytical lens, they write, will we be able to “rais[e] the fundamental question of whether the role of public transport is to provide a public service to its passengers, or rather to generate profits for its shareholders.” We should also raise the question of whether we want to continue to use public land in the form of streets to be a place where too many people fear they will die or become injured. Is that a necessary price for our social system? Richard Van Deusen, an interdisciplinary researcher of the interaction of people and place: “Public space must be understood as a gauge of the regimes of justice extant at any particular moment.”Is the comfort, convenience, and luxury of car-oriented travel patterns worth interrupting in the interest of improving the lives we live, the air we breath, and the water we drink?  And for all those who are forced to live where a car is needed to earn a living wage, or those with impairments, where are the plans for fair, equitable, and just transportation and/or housing alternatives?When the freedom to choose comes with nothing to lose, the costs of social and spatial benefits diffuse. Escape the snare, get out in the air, let’s make our roads more fair. Equitable places in our public spaces means biking and walking everywhere. That may sound utopian, but as Geographer Don Mitchell once wrote, “Utopia is impossible, but the ongoing struggle toward it is not.” This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Glenn Show: What Is Social Science (Glenn Loury & Daniel Kaufman)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


How scientific are the social sciences? … Glenn defends the reliability of economic predictions … The strengths and weaknesses of “natural experiments” … How much does culture affect economic behavior? … New insights from behavioral economics … Dan: We trust the social sciences too much …

Bloggingheads.tv
What Is Social Science (Glenn Loury & Daniel Kaufman)

Bloggingheads.tv

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 60:00


How scientific are the social sciences? ... Glenn defends the reliability of economic predictions ... The strengths and weaknesses of “natural experiments” ... How much does culture affect economic behavior? ... New insights from behavioral economics ... Dan: We trust the social sciences too much ...

Success Made to Last
Success Made to Last features Emily Shah of Jungle Cry debuting in theaters May 20th and streaming June 16th

Success Made to Last

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 30:28


Success Legends welcomes Emily Shah, debuting Jungle Cry. This movie debuts May 20, 2022 in theaters with streaming on June 16th. Jungle Cry is based on a true AND SIGNIFICANT story that follows the journey of 12 underprivileged children, playing sports barefoot, who went on to win the prestigious U14 Rugby World Cup in England. The team came from the Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences in Orissa, India, which has over 30,000 children from orphaned backgrounds. Emily Shah is an Indian American actress and daughter of famed Bollywood producer Prashant Shah. Hear the backstory on the making of this movie and the casting process of the young rugby players. This is moving podcast that points to "finding a place in your heart to do something of significance."

Sustain
Episode 121: FOSS Backstage 2022 with Cornelius Schumacher, Yadira Sánchez Benítez & Thomas Fricke

Sustain

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 44:11


Guests Cornelius Schumacher | Yadira Sánchez Benítez | Thomas Fricke Panelist Richard Littauer Show Notes Hello and welcome to Sustain! On this episode, Richard is at the FOSS Backstage 2022 that is held in Berlin every year. This conference focuses on open source sustainability. He had the opportunity to interview people who were there in-person and talk about software sustainability, what they hope to find in FOSS Backstage, talks they did at FOSS Backstage, and a bunch of other good stuff. Today, we have three guests joining us. Our first guest is Cornelius Schumacher, who's an Open Source Steward at DB Systel GmbH, where he helps teams to use open source software and to contribute to open source software. Our next guest is Yadira Sánchez Benítez, who's a Criminology and Human-Centered AI Doctoral Student at the Faculty of Social Sciences & Web Science Institute and a Fellow at the Software Sustainability Institute. And our last guest is Thomas Fricke, who's doing Kubernetes security consulting and started a side business supporting companies doing open source. Download this episode to find out much more! [00:01:09] Richard gives us a brief intro about Cornelius, what he did back in 2009, and Cornelius shares his view on open source now and his current job. [00:06:12] Looking at FOSS Backstage today, Cornelius tells us what he thinks is different now, given the amount of perspective he has, then what it used to be. [00:09:35] Cornelius details where we can improve or do better in open source. [00:11:35] Find out where to follow Cornelius online. [00:12:42] Yadira joins us and tells us everything she does, as well as what it has to do with criminology and human-centered AI. [00:15:55] Richard asks Yadira what structures we've built into open source which are actively excluding marginalized communities and how we can build a better open source ecosystem going forward that's more sustainable and diverse. [00:18:44] Yadira explains why she's in an institution saying don't make your software from institutions. [00:20:50] We find out about what open source projects can do to be more communitarian, and what open source program offices and large enterprises can do to be less dominating and single-minded in their approaches towards building software. [00:22:38] Yadira talks about the way she sees open source working by mostly voluntary contributions and people who want to be a part of this. [00:25:39] Thomas joins us and tells us what he's currently doing and some news in Germany about a Sovereign Tech Fund. [00:28:11] How does Thomas quantify what open source is critical information? [00:29:58] We learn about a little bit of the work going on by the German government that Thomas is advising on the topic about what's critical or not. [00:31:05] Richard and Thomas chat about the meaning of sovereign in Germany. [00:34:21] Thomas explains more about when he mentioned earlier, “forty-year old code packages just working,” and what he thinks about what kinds of packages need what level of support. [00:38:17] Find out if Thomas sees a future where we all work together to shore up the ecosystems and make it more sustainable and secure? [00:39:33] A study on critical infrastructure is brought up and Richard wonders if Thomas sees a way for developers to be able to raise issues to the state or to the $10 million funds to help them out on an ecosystem level. [00:40:44] What does Thomas see coming in the next five to ten years? [00:42:53] Find out where you can follow Thomas online. Links SustainOSS (https://sustainoss.org/) SustainOSS Twitter (https://twitter.com/SustainOSS?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) SustainOSS Discourse (https://discourse.sustainoss.org/) podcast@sustainoss.org (mailto:podcast@sustainoss.org) FOSS Backstage 2022 (https://foss-backstage.de/) Cornelius Schumacher Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornelius_Schumacher) Cornelius Schumacher Twitter (https://twitter.com/cschum?lang=en) Cornelius Schumacher GitHub (https://github.com/cornelius) Cornelius Schumacher Blog (https://blog.cornelius-schumacher.de/) Cornelius Schumacher LinkedIn (https://de.linkedin.com/in/cschum) Yadira Sánchez Benítez (University of Southampton Social Page) (https://www.southampton.ac.uk/sociology/postgraduate/research_students/ysb1u17.page) Yadira Sánchez (Google Scholar) (https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=D-XRxO0AAAAJ&hl=en) To App or Not to App? Understanding Public Resistance to COVID-19 Digital Contact Tracing and its Criminological Relevance (https://scholar.google.com/citations?view_op=view_citation&hl=en&user=D-XRxO0AAAAJ&citation_for_view=D-XRxO0AAAAJ:d1gkVwhDpl0C) Thomas Fricke Twitter (https://twitter.com/thomasfricke?lang=en) Thomas Fricke Email (https://thomasfricke.de/) Thomas Fricke LinkedIn (https://de.linkedin.com/in/thomas-fricke-9840a21) FOSS Backstage-Thomas Fricke: Log4Shell-The Open Source World on Fire (YouTube) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Es_ehuyeCIQ) Credits Produced by Richard Littauer (https://www.burntfen.com/) and Charlotte Tiennes (https://www.linkedin.com/in/charlotte-tienes-88038a18b/) Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Show notes by DeAnn Bahr Peachtree Sound (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Special Guests: Cornelius Schumacher, Thomas Fricke, and Yadira Sánchez Benítez.

New Books in History
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

The Quicky
Election 2022: What You Need To Know Before You Eat A Democracy Sausage

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 24:43


It's the final countdown... time to fire up the barbeque and get those democracy sausages sizzling, as we prepare to head to the polls to vote in the 2022 federal election (unless you're one of the 5 million super-organised Aussies who've already cast their ballot). But what if you haven't been particularly engaged in this election campaign, or you're still not sure who to vote for?  Well, fear not, because The Quicky speaks to two experts in Australian politics to wrap this election up like the bread around your snag into one easily digestible episode, summarising everything you need to know before you number those boxes. Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to: Amy Remeikis - Guardian Australia's political reporter Mark Kenny - Australian Studies Professor at the Australian National University's College of Arts and Social Sciences, and host of the weekly politics and public affairs podcast, Democracy Sausage With Mark Kenny Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Jacob Round Subscribe to The Quicky at...https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Social Worker Matters
The Discovery Project

Social Worker Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 20:40


In this episode I speak with a new friend Lauren Sheehy, we met at a Networking event hosted by the British Library, I thought her work in the area of self care may have resonance for us in the social care sector. Lauren Sheehy is joint owner of The Discovery Project.   Lauren and Zoe lived together during the COVID when they had conversations about life; marriage, babies, career ladders, the illusive seeming ‘purpose' and relationships.  Lauren shares how she moved through some personal difficulties and through further discussions with Zoe they decided to create spaces for women to talk openly and became stronger.   They want to create a more empowered world where women can live from their heart and not from their conditioning.  Enjoy the interview.  Here are the links to TDP's socials -    E-mail: hello@thediscoveryproject.co.uk website: https://thediscoveryproject.co.uk/ https://www.instagram.com/thediscoveryprojectuk/ https://www.facebook.com/thediscoveryprojectuk   They also have a podcast: https://thediscoveryproject.co.uk/podcast   My email address: drssmith@inclinetrainingconsultants.com   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

David Gornoski
THINGS HIDDEN 57: Richard Koenigsberg on War as Sacrifice

David Gornoski

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 98:00


David Gornoski sits down with Richard Koenigsberg, psychologist & historian from the Library of Social Science, for a discussion on sacrifice, violence, and war. Mr. Koenigsberg starts the discussion by describing his interactions with Rene Girard. The conversation then moves to the psychology of Hitler, the purpose of political violence, male aggressiveness, the Ukraine war, and more. Visit the website of the Library of Social Science here. Visit A Neighbor's Choice website here.

Fire in The Belly
E298: "Find the Quiet Place and Go From There" Will Schirmer

Fire in The Belly

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 68:47


Will is an experienced HR professional who brings a wealth of knowledge and passion about people and how they work to his daily life.  He is consistently inspired by his life and his teachers, and he wishes to pass that along to others, and has made that his mission in  his career and through the books he writes.  We have a fascinating conversation about authentic, work priorities, how you can figure out for yourself what those are, and what traditional employers may not be understanding about the new career landscape.   KEY TAKEAWAYS  You need to work to live, not live to work. Understand that your life needs to exist outside of your job Emotional intelligence is just as important as experiential and academic experience, and emotional intelligence *is* a skill that can be learned and practiced.  Work backwards, but not in terms of a project, from the end of your life. What would you wish you had done differently? Work from that place of knowledge. How can we re-invent leadership to understand intrinsic motivation? How can we harness the lessons that we as a world have learned the past few years to help make work more meaningful and filled with purpose?   BEST MOMENTS   "That's where good leadership comes in, I think -- not just using carrots and sticks, but really getting to know their people and leading with a sense of personal motivation and compassion. ... You only learn over time that it's about the journey and not the destination." "Writing a second book was better for me as a person. It helped me focus on, you know 'what does bring you joy'." "Nobody says 'gee I wish I bought a nicer car' or 'I wish I'd gotten a better raise or promotion.' We need to remap."  "The Great Resignation is happening amongst those leaders who aren't modern leaders. ... (employees are) leaving these leaders who haven't delivered for them."  ABOUT THE GUEST  William Schirmer is a senior management professional in HR, having been involved with Human Resources, Talent Management, and Learning & Development functions for domestic and international firms over more than twenty years. His expertise includes creation and deployment of leadership development programs for a number of organizations. William holds USA, UK, and Global HR certifications. His undergraduate study in Political & Behavioural Sciences was completed via University of Minnesota-Mankato in the USA. William completed his Graduate Degrees in Human Resource Management via Fort Hays State University in the USA and Social Sciences via the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom. Will is currently based in Olympia Washington.   CONTACT METHOD  Will on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/willschirmerofficial/?hl=en on Linked In https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-schirmer-b887ba8/ Buy Will's book, "The Leadership Core", on Amazon https://www.amazon.ca/Leadership-Core-Competencies-Successfully-Leading/dp/1631954881 ABOUT THE HOST  The ‘Mighty Pete Lonton' from the ‘Mighty 247' company is your main host of ‘Fire in The Belly'.  Pete is an entrepreneur, mentor, coach, property Investor, and father of three beautiful girls. Pete's background is in project management and property, but his true passion is the ‘Fire in The Belly' project itself. His mission is to help others find their potential and become the mightiest version of themselves. Pete openly talks about losing both of his parents, suffering periods of depression, business downturn and burn-out, and ultimately his years spent not stoking ‘Fire in the Belly'. In 2017, at 37 years of age that changed, and he is now on a journey of learning, growing, accepting, and inspiring others. Pete can connect with people and intuitively asks questions to reveal a person's passion and discover how to live their mightiest life. The true power of ‘Fire in The Belly' is the Q&A's - Questions and Actions section.  The ‘Fire in The Belly' brand and the programme is rapidly expanding into podcasts, seminars, talks, business workshops, development courses, and rapid results mentoring. CONTACT METHOD https://www.facebook.com/mightypetelonton/ https://uk.linkedin.com/in/mightypete https://www.facebook.com/groups/430218374211579/                            Support the show: https://www.facebook.com/groups/430218374211579/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bloggingheads.tv: The Glenn Show
Daniel Kaufman – What Is Social Science?

Bloggingheads.tv: The Glenn Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


This week’s episode is a throwback to 2015, when Daniel Kaufman, professor of philosophy at Missouri State University, editor of the online magazine the Electric Agora, and (at that time) a mainstay on bloggingheads.tv and meaningoflife.tv, invited me onto his show Sophia. I stumbled across this video again last month, and I think it remains an illuminating discussion that addresses some fundamental questions about economics and the social sciences. We begin by discussing the “science” part of the social sciences. I explain that we economists tend not to philosophize about our discipline as much as other social scientists. But many major economic thinkers (think Keynes, Marx, and others) elaborate concepts that do ask fundamental questions about the nature of economics. To call a discipline a “science” implies that its findings are testable and replicable, that its insights are able to predict future conditions from present conditions. Does economics do that? I argue that it does. Of course, since much economic data is drawn from real-world behavior rather than controlled experiments, it can be difficult to isolate variables in a way that would satisfy, say, a physicist. This is because markets exist within particular cultures and under particular social arrangements that are not themselves purely economic in nature. And cultural values are going to affect, at least to some extent, how people behave within markets. The idea that people will try to maximize utility in a rational way is important to economics, but of course we know that humans often behave in ways that seem irrational. How does economics incorporate irrationality into its methodology? And finally, Dan and I were speaking at a time when the (still ongoing) replication crisis was all over the news. Is replication as seemingly dire a problem in economics as it is in psychology? Dan’s training in philosophy helps him to ask some really deep questions here, and I think you can tell I relished the opportunity to answer them. Love to know what you think about this “classic” episode. This post is free and available to the public. To receive early access to TGS episodes, an ad-free podcast feed, Q&As, and other exclusive content and benefits, click below.5:44 How scientific are the social sciences? 11:20 Glenn defends the reliability of economic predictions 29:47 The strengths and weaknesses of “natural experiments” 36:48 How much does culture affect economic behavior? 50:06 New insights from behavioral economics 58:12 Dan: We trust the social sciences too muchLinks and ReadingsDan’s website, the Electric AgoraThe Electric Agora on YouTubeSendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir’a book, Scarcity: The New Science of Having Less and How It Defines Our Lives This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit glennloury.substack.com/subscribe

China in the World
Live Recording Replay: China's Growing Role in the Middle East

China in the World

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 61:52


As the United States reduces its footprint in the Middle East, China is stepping up its diplomatic and economic engagement in the region. Beijing has already struck notable deals with longstanding U.S. partners such as Saudi Arabia while maintaining strong ties to Iran. How will regional countries navigate intensifying U.S.-China competition? What role will China play on economic, diplomatic, and security issues in the Middle East? And how might the United States respond to Beijing's growing influence in the region?During a live recording of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle spoke with Amr Hamzawy, director of the Carnegie Middle East Program, He Wenping, professor at the Institute of West-Asian and African Studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and Bilahari Kausikan, chairman of the Middle East Institute at the National University of Singapore. This panel is the fifth of the Carnegie Global Dialogue Series 2021-2022 and is available to be viewed on the Carnegie Endowment's website. https://carnegieendowment.org/2022/05/11/china-s-growing-role-in-middle-east-event-7874

Retrieving the Social Sciences
Episode 19: UMBC/UMB Gerontology w/ Dr. John Schumacher, Dr. Rob Millar, Dr. Sarah Holmes, Min-Hyung Park, Jenn Haddock, & Rachel McPherson

Retrieving the Social Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 39:26


Today's episode features the remarkable work of the UMBC/UMB doctoral program in Gerontology. First we hear from Dr. John Schumacher, co-director of the program and Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Public Health at UMBC. Dr. Schumacher's profile In the episode, we also hear from three current Ph.D. students working on dissertations in gerontology: Min-Kyoung Park Rachel McPherson Jenn Haddock Kirk And finally, we hear from Dr. Rob Millar, Policy Analyst Advanced at the Hilltop Institute, and Dr. Sarah Holmes, Assistant Professor in the University of Maryland School of Nursing: Dr. Roberto Millar Dr. Sarah Holmes   Check out the following links for more information on UMBC, CS3, and our host: The UMBC Center for the Social Sciences Scholarship The University of Maryland, Baltimore County Ian G. Anson, Ph.D. Retrieving the Social Sciences is a production of the UMBC Center for Social Science Scholarship.  Our podcast host is Dr. Ian Anson, our director is Dr. Christine Mallinson, our associate director is Dr. Felipe Filomeno and our production intern is Sophia Possidente. Our theme music was composed and recorded by D'Juan Moreland.  Special thanks to Amy Barnes and Myriam Ralston for production assistance.  Make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, where you can find full video recordings of recent UMBC events.

Poverty Research & Policy
Brieanna Watters and Robert Stewart on Native Americans and Monetary Sanctions

Poverty Research & Policy

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 35:13


In this episode of the Poverty Research & Policy Podcast, we hear from Brieanna Watters and Robert Stewart about a paper they coauthored* on Native Americans and Monetary Sanctions involving the criminal legal system. They discuss how Native American experiences in relation to the legal system are often unique, how the rural nature of Indian Country matters when it comes to policies around fines and fees, and how their research in Minnesota finds higher levels of fines and fees for Native American defendants, particularly in areas near reservations.  Watters is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Minnesota, and Stewart is an assistant professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland.  *The paper discussed in the episode was coauthored by Stewart, Watters, Veronica Horowitz, Ryan Larson, Brian Sargent, and Christopher Uggen. You can find it in a special issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences at https://www.rsfjournal.org/content/8/2/137  

Poetry Unbound
Rafiq Kathwari — Mother Writes to President Eisenhower

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 15:08


Would you write a letter to a world leader? Do you think they'd listen? What would you say?Rafiq Kathwari is the first Kashmiri recipient of the Patrick Kavanagh Award. He obtained an MFA in Creative Writing at Columbia University and an MA in Political and Social Science from the New School University. Rafiq divides his time between New York City, Dublin, and Kashmir.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.We're pleased to offer Rafiq Kathwari's poem, and invite you to sign up here for the latest from Poetry Unbound.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E4: Does a family of 4 in Singapore really need $6,426 a month for basic standard of living? (Pt 1): In Your Opinion

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:45


Synopsis: The Straits Times' opinion editor Grace Ho takes a hard look at political and social issues of the day with her expert guests.  In this episode, the first of two parts, she looks at whether a family of four in Singapore needs $6,426 a month for a basic standard of living.  In the studio to explain the study and its methodology are Associate Professor Teo You Yenn, associate professor at the School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University; and Dr Ng Kok Hoe, Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Case Study Unit at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.  Highlights (click/tap above): 00:41: Is there a household budget that captures the lived realities of Singaporeans? What is the Minimum Income Standard? 04:55: Addressing criticisms of the study and its methodology 10:00 How is the Minimum Income Standard applied in the United Kingdom, and how does the UK decide what is a living wage? Read the article here: https://str.sg/wBJ3 Produced by: Grace Ho (graceho@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Follow In Your Opinion Podcast each month here: Channel: https://str.sg/w7Qt Spotify: https://str.sg/w7sV SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  Grace Ho's articles: https://str.sg/w7sr Read ST's Opinion section: https://str.sg/w7sH --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wXz6 Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

College Matters. Alma Matters.
Kayla and David Suisse on Utah State: Undergraduate Research on Medicinal Benefits of Sagebrush, and Discovering Humanities.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 54:26


In High School, Kayla loved every course she took. She was quite stressed trying to figure out what course to pursue. David on the other hand, was pretty set on studying medicine early on. He loved the Sciences. Kayla and David join us on our podcast to share their Undergraduate Research experiences, their work with Sagebrush-based research, and their college journey at Utah State University. In particular, we discuss the following with them: Choosing Utah State University Benefits of doing UG Research Majoring in Biology, Global Communication Advice to Freshman and High Schoolers Topics discussed in this episode: Introduction to Kayla, David Suisse, Utah State Univ [0:38] Hi Fives - Podcast Highlights [1:53] Overall Experience at USU [4:24] Why Utah State? [6:48] High School Interests [8:03] Giving Things Time…[11:13] Transition to USU & UG Research [13:27] Kayla and David's Research [17:41] Sagebrush-based Research [22:46] What's Next for Sagebrush Research? [30:37] Kayla - Science meets Social Science [32:34] Impact of UG Research [34:27] The Future [39:06] Why Freshman should do UG Research [41:53] Advice for High Schoolers [45:27] Fav Memories [48:46] Our Guests:Kayla Suisse is a graduating Senior majoring in Biology from Utah State University. David Suisse is a graduating Senior majoring in Global Communication and Pre-Medical Studies from Utah State University. Memorable Quote: “...people will tell us, well, you're gonna have to pick one. You can't just have so many interests and be able to do all those things. I disagree. I see places where I wish that this professional had this skill, you know. I'll meet with a doctor and say, Wow, I really wish that they had greater communication or writing skills…”. David & Kayla. Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Similar Episodes: College Experiences Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Digest. Follow us on Instagram. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify.

The Talent Development Hot Seat
The Role of Higher Education in Lifelong Learning with Dean Geoffrey Garrett of USC Marshall School of Business

The Talent Development Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:31


In this episode of The Talent Development Hot Seat, Andy welcomes Dean Geoffrey Garrett from the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. Dean Garrett joined the Marshall School of Business in the summer of 2020 after six years as dean of The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the board of directors of Park Hotels and Resorts. He's also a distinguished international political economist and has held academic appointments at Oxford, Stanford, and Yale Universities. Dean Garrett is a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Social Sciences, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a winner of the Foreign Policy Association Medal, and the Advanced Global Australian award. Dean Garrett is a LinkedIn influencer whose blog is widely followed by academic, business, and thought leaders, and his expertise on world politics, business, and the global economy as well as on the U.S.-China relations is sought after by major media organizations around the world. Dean Garrett holds a B.A. with honors from the Australian National University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Duke University, where he was a Fulbright scholar. In this episode, you'll hear: What Dean Geoffrey Garrett sees as some of the key challenges facing businesses today and how the pace of change is affecting workplaces. The three key skillsets you need to succeed in business as taught by the Marshall School of Business. Why executive education is important, who should be furthering their education, and how you can apply that education to your career while participating in continuous learning opportunities. How you can add value to learning opportunities in your organization with a high-performance learning journey. Why creativity is a crucial part of modern-day leadership and the three core pillars he focuses on. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (Website) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (LinkedIn) https://tdtt.us/ (Join us in the Talent Development Think Tank Community)! Connect with Dean Geoffrey Garrett here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/garrettgeoffrey/ (LinkedIn)

Bright Future
Ep. 29: Marnie Howlett on Ukraine as a Borderland

Bright Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 36:50


The war in Ukraine brought the country and its people to the forefront of international attention. Every day more and more people are seeking to help Ukrainians to end the war and to recover from the damage that is being inflicted.Dr. Marnie Howlett has dedicated her life to understanding—and helping others understand—how Ukraine and its people view their country and their unique position as a borderland between Europe and Russia.  She joins us this episode to provide a deeper understanding of how Ukraine's history, its complexities and its realities on the ground have helped to shape the war and are fueling the Ukrainian resistance.About our guest:Marnie Howlett is a Departmental Lecturer in Politics at the University of Oxford. She completed her PhD in the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics (LSE) in 2021. She holds a BA (High Honours) in International Studies (2015) and a MA in Political Science (2017) from the University of Saskatchewan. She has held Fellowships supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Shevchenko Foundation of Canada. Marnie has previously served as a legislative intern with the Saskatchewan Legislative Assembly and as an international electoral observer with CANADEM during Ukraine's three most recent elections.Marnie has provided a number of links to organizations and sources of additional information about Ukraine listed below.Two notable organizations supporting Ukraine with direct ties to Saskatchewan include: Stream of Hopes Ukrainian Patriot  A Live Working Document of Various Organizations that are Supporting Civilians and the Armed Forces on the Ground in Ukraine (Google Doc Link)Some reputable Ukrainian news sources (in English) include: The Kyiv IndependentThe New Voice of Ukraine Book - Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy SnyderCheck out all of our analysis on the war in Ukraine at https://www.conferenceboard.ca/insights/impact-of-the-russian-invasion-of-ukraineAnd access all our research at conferenceboard.ca.

Surviving Society
E152 Live Podcast: Northumbria University - Love, hope and solidarity

Surviving Society

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 68:52


Live podcast! Surviving Society is back on the road!!! We kicked off our first in a series of tours to university's around the UK with staff and students of Northumbria University Department of Social Sciences. We discussed how we can collectively resist present day local and global political calamities by grounding our conversations around the concepts of love, hope and solidarity.

The Quicky
Election Explainer: Everything You Want To Know But Are Too Afraid To Ask

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 18:46


It's now less than two weeks until 17 million Aussies will head to the local polling station to cast their vote in the Federal election and hopefully get a free democracy sausage to celebrate. But what happens if you don't know who to vote for? Or maybe you don't really understand how our preferential voting system works anyway? And how do you cut through all the noise and work out who actually stands for what? The Quicky speaks to an expert in Australian politics to answer some of your biggest questions that you've always wanted to know about elections and voting, so you can feel confident when you go to choose your favourite candidate on May 21. CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to: Mark Kenny - Australian Studies Professor at the Australian National University's College of Arts and Social Sciences, and host of the weekly politics and public affairs podcast, Democracy Sausage With Mark Kenny Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Madeline Joannou Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au GET IN TOUCH: Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading or listening to our content, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au  Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CSPI Podcast
35: Baby Brainwaves and Broken Science | Jordan Lasker & Richard Hanania

CSPI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 68:06


Jordan Lasker is a PhD student at Texas Tech University and a bioinformatician. He joins the podcast to discuss his recent report for CSPI, “About Those Baby Brainwaves: Why ‘Policy Relevant' Social Science is Mostly a Fraud.” The report critically examined a recent study claiming small cash transfers to the parents of newborns improved their babies' brain activity. The study was lauded in the media and by D.C. policymakers, who argued its results supported redistributive policies, most notably the child tax credit. Jordan demonstrated that the study in question wildly overstated its claims, was methodologically suspect, and that its authors engaged in numerous bad research practices. Social science, he argues, is not a sound basis for policymaking given academia's warped incentives. He and Richard talk about why physiological measures like EEGs are taken much more seriously than psychometrics like IQ tests, whether “rich brains” and “poor brains” exist, if the Flynn effect means we're getting smarter, and the politicization of academia and science more generally. The two agree that the priors of the average researcher or policymaker are way off base: dozens of studies have found cash transfers and even adoption to high SES families have minimal effects on IQ or income. Given that, why would we expect $333/month to move the needle? They conclude by considering whether society is better off with leaders who “trust the science” or those who are openly anti-intellectual, given broken incentive structures and political bias within the policy relevant literature.  Jordan Lasker, “About Those Baby Brainwaves: Why ‘Policy Relevant' Social Science is Mostly a Fraud.”  Troller-Renfree et al. (Baby Brainwaves Study), “The Impact of a Poverty Reduction Intervention on Infant Brain Activity.”  Richard Feynman, “Cargo Cult Science.”  Kirkegaard et al., “Nerve Conduction Velocity and Cognitive Ability: A Large Sample Study.”  “Flynn Effect.”  Wongupparaj et al., “The Flynn Effect for Verbal and Visuospatial Short-Term and Working Memory: A Cross-Temporal Meta-Analysis.”  Odenstad et al., “Does Age at Adoption and Geographic Origin Matter? A National Cohort Study of Cognitive Test Performance in Adult Inter-Country Adoptees.” Tobias Hübinette, “The Adopted Koreans of Sweden and the Korean Adoption Issue.” Sign up for CSPI's Substack newsletter: https://cspi.substack.com. Follow CSPI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CSPICenterOrg. Subscribe to our YouTube for video podcasts: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvs4ugq0xSvbvwArpFJG6gA. Learn more about CSPI: https://cspicenter.org.

The Quicky
Female Umpires Fight Back Against Toxic Culture

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 16:22


Imagine every day you go to work and not only are you confronted by a crowd of people telling you how terrible you are at your job, but that the reason you're terrible at your job is because you're a woman. That's what female umpires face when they step out to referee sports across the country, and with a damning report into the culture of AFL umpiring, it's been revealed that the abuse is not just coming from the crowd but from within their own ranks too. The Quicky team speaks to a former umpire and author of that report to find out what's turning women away from doing a job they love. *please note some of the content from the report has been voiced by voice actors CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to: Dr Victoria Rawlings - former AFL umpire and Researcher, and Lecturer in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney. Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Jacob Round Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au GET IN TOUCH: Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading or listening to our content, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au  Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Roots of Reality
#66 Nuclear War Prevention with Dr. Scott Silverstone

Roots of Reality

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 42:27


In this Roots of Reality Experiences episode, historian Ben Baumann talks with Dr. Scott Silverstone about the risk of nuclear war, what to make of authoritarian nations with nuclear weapons, and how to prevent the use of nuclear weapons in modern warfare. (Dr. Scott Silverstone is a Professor of International Relations in the Department of Social Sciences, where he has served on the faculty since 2001. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in Political Science from the University of New Hampshire. He is a Senior Fellow with the Center on the Future of War at Arizona State University and New America and a Senior Fellow with the Center on the Study of Statesmanship at Catholic University. He is the author of three books - From Hitler's Germany to Saddam's Iraq: The Enduring False Promise of Preventive War (2018), Preventive War and American Democracy (2007), and Divided Union: The Politics of War in the Early American Republic (2004) – and numerous articles and book chapters. Earlier in his career Dr. Silverstone was a U.S. naval officer. He served as a Naval Flight Officer with a P-3 Orion squadron based at Naval Air Station Barbers Point in Hawaii from 1987 to 1990, deploying extensively throughout the western Pacific, the Indian Ocean, the Persian Gulf and East Africa conducting anti-submarine operations and maritime reconnaissance. From 1990 to 1993 Dr. Silverstone served as a crisis management officer and planner on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Plans, Policy, and Operations in the Pentagon. In this position Dr. Silverstone managed the Navy's portion of the White House-directed nuclear attack survivability program and directed all Navy participation in the Joint Chiefs of Staff-sponsored global crisis management exercise program and the NATO crisis exercise program. In September 1992 he was appointed Director of the Navy Staff's Crisis Action Center to focus on Operation Southern Watch in Iraq, the naval embargo against Yugoslavia, and the Navy's role in hurricane Andrew relief in southern Florida. He also served as the Navy representative with the inter-agency team that planned Operation Restore Hope in Somalia. After leaving active duty Dr. Silverstone served as a Naval Reservist in support of the Navy Command Center in the Pentagon from 1994 to 2000. ) Westpoint Bio- westpoint.edu/social-sciences/profile/scott_silverstone Books- www.amazon.com/Scott-A-Silverstone/e/B001H6OY8A/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1 (The memories, comments, and viewpoints shared by guests in the interviews do not represent the viewpoints of, or speak for Roots of Reality)

MONEY FM 89.3 - Weekend Mornings
Weekends: International News Review

MONEY FM 89.3 - Weekend Mornings

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 14:53


In our International News Review, Glenn van Zutphen and award-winning author Neil Humphreys speaks to Steve Okun, Senior Advisor, Mclarty Associates and Trisha Craig, VP and Senior Lecturer, Social Sciences, Yale-NUS to talk about upcoming ASEAN summit held in the US White House and the objection of abortion in the US, and more.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ricochet's Unpacking the News
Mutually-Assured Dysfunction (Darts & Letters ep55)

Ricochet's Unpacking the News

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 59:44


The war in Ukraine has brought nuclear technology to the forefront. There's the threat of nuclear weapons, and the danger of nuclear power plants melting down under military fire. Yet, the nuclear industry also promises to deliver us from our dependency on fossil fuels. It's an interesting duality with nuclear: is it the end of the world, or is it salvation? Professor Jessica Hurley, author of Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex, walks us through the history of nuclear dystopia and nuclear utopia, and how they have always been closely connected. Also: happy Earth Day, even though we are not feeling particularly optimistic about the state of our planet. The war in Ukraine has brought environmental politics front-and-centre, with countries racing to extricate themselves from Russian oil and gas. Yet, in Canada, we are seeing industry push to ramp up dirty tar sands production. How will the war change energy policy? We wonk out and get into the nitty-gritty of the state of climate policy with, Mark Winfield. ——————-SUPPORT THE SHOW————————- We need your support. If you like what you hear, chip in. You can find us on patreon.com/dartsandletters. Patreon subscribers usually get the episode a day early, and sometimes will also receive bonus content. Don't have the money to chip in this week? Not to fear, you can help in other ways. For one: subscribe, rate, and review our podcast. It helps other people find our work. —————————-CONTACT US————————- To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. If you'd like to write to us, email darts@citedmedia.ca. —————————-CREDITS—————————- Darts and Letters is hosted and edited by Gordon Katic. The lead producer is Jay Cockburn. Our managing producer is Marc Apollonio. Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop, and we have marketing support from Ian Sowden. This is a production of Cited Media. This episode received support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. It is part of a series of episodes on the politics of technology and techno-utopian thinking. We had research advising from Professor Tanner Mirrlees at Ontario Tech University and Professor Imre Szeman at the University of Waterloo. Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.05.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 58:40


Omega-3 and cancer recovery: How supplementation helps reduce hospital stays after operations Capital Medical University (China) Omega-3 supplementation boosts immunity and helps reduce inflammation among gastrointestinal cancer patients after surgery, new meta-analysis reports. Recent studies have indicated that nutritional intervention can reduce these problems, with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) particularly promising because of their inflammation benefits. Results showed that patients on an n-3 PUFAs regime had lower levels of inflammation markers. The academics, from China's Capital Medical University, stated: “The results of our study showed that n-3 PUFAs significantly decreased the level of inflammation and increased immune function. “Thus modulation of immune responses and reduction of inflammatory responses together lessens postoperative hospital stay for GI cancer patients.”     Vitamin D levels higher in exercisers   Johns Hopkins University The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism published the finding of researchers at Johns Hopkins University of a correlation between increased physical activity and higher levels of vitamin D. Higher levels of vitamin D and exercise was also associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. The study included 10,342 men and women who were free of coronary heart disease and heart failure upon enrollment in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study between 1987 to 1989. Physical activity levels were assessed during follow-up visits that took place over a 19.3-year period. Stored serum samples obtained at the second visit were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Following adjustment for lifestyle and other factors, those who met the recommended levels had a 31% lower risk of being deficient in vitamin D than those with poor activity levels. Subjects in the recommended activity group with levels of vitamin D of 30 ng/mL or more had a 24% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.   Gingko biloba helps protect against the toxic cognitive effects of aluminium chloride Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt) Ginkgo biloba extract helped protect the brain from the toxic effects of aluminium chloride, exposure to which has been linked to diseases such as Alzheimer's. Researchers found its antioxidant properties were key in protecting the brain neurons of rats from oxidative stress caused by aluminium chloride (AlClʒ) intake. “The toxic effect of AlClʒ caused significant histologic changes in brain and testis tissues which is in agreement with other data that found accumulation of Al metal in neurons which cause ultra-structural changes,” wrote researchers from the Atomic Energy Authority in Egypt wrote in Nutrition Journal. “Administration of Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) with aluminium chloride improved some biochemical and histologic changes observed in the brain and testis of male rats.” Overexposure to aluminium, a potent neurotoxin, could be a possible factor in several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, say researchers. GbE on the other hand, has antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. It has been used to help treating cerebral disorders that result from ageing and hypoxia. Previous studies also highlighted its ability to regulate neurotransmitters and exert neuprotective effects.   New data shows avocado consumers have improved nutrient intakes USDA and Haas Avocado Board A new analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, compared avocado consumers to non-consumers and found that consuming avocados may be associated with an overall better diet, higher intake of essential nutrients, lower body weight, lower Body Mass Index (BMI) and smaller waist circumference. Insulin and homocysteine levels were lower in the avocado group, as well as a significantly reduced incidence of metabolic syndrome. Homocysteine, when elevated, has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.i Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that raises the risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke.ii The analysis, "Avocado consumption by adults is associated with better nutrient Intake, diet quality, and some measures of adipositywas published in the journal Internal Medicine Review. SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS: * Compared to non-consumers, avocado consumers have:   Higher intakes of dietary fiber, total fat, good fats (monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids), vitamins E and C, folate, magnesium, copper and potassium.   Lower intakes of total carbohydrates, added sugars and sodium. * Improved physiologic measures include:   On average, avocado consumers weighed 7.5 lbs less, had a mean BMI of 1 unit less and 1.2 in. smaller waist circumference compared to non-consumers.   Avocado consumers were 33% less likely to be overweight or obese and 32% less likely to have an elevated waist circumference compared to non-consumers.   Incidence of metabolic syndrome was significantly reduced for avocado consumers.       Better quality relationships associated with reduced dementia risk University of East Anglia (UK) Positive social support from adult children is associated with reduced risk of developing dementia, according to a new research published today. Conversely, negative social support is linked with increased risk, according to the 10-year follow-up study carried out by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), University College London (UCL), London Metropolitan University and the University of Nottingham. The researchers analysed a decade of data that followed 10,055 core participants from ELSA who were dementia-free at the start of the study. Participants were interviewed every two years and incidence of dementia was identified from self-reports by participants or information given by nominated informants. Positive support was characterised by having a reliable, approachable and understanding relationship with spouses or partners, children and other immediate family. But negative support scores showed stronger effects - an increase of one point in the negative support score led to up to 31 per cent rise in the risk. Negative support was characterised by experiences of critical, unreliable and annoying behaviours from spouses or partners, children and other immediate family.   After spouse passes, death risk from ‘broken heart' rises Rice University In the three-month period following a spouse's death, widows and widowers are more likely to exhibit risk factors linked to cardiovascular illness and death, according to a new study This could make a bereaved spouse more likely to “die of a broken heart,” the researchers say. The study, which appears in Psychoneuroendocrinology, found that individuals who have lost a spouse within the last three months have higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (immune markers that indicate inflammation in the bloodstream) and lower heart rate variability (HRV) compared with non-bereaved individuals who share the sex, age, body mass index, and educational level. Both are factors that increase an individual's risk for cardiac events, including death. The study is the first to demonstrate that bereavement is associated with elevated levels of ex vivo cytokines and lower HRV. “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41 percent increased risk of mortality,” says lead author Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology in Rice University's School of Social Sciences. “Importantly, 53 percent of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular disease. This study is an important step toward understanding why this is the case by identifying how bereavement gets under the skin to promote morbidity and mortality.” Finally, the bereaved spouses reported 20 percent higher levels of depressive symptoms than the control group. Participants ranged in age from 51 to 80 (average 67.87) and included 22 percent men and 78 percent women. The sex and age of the control group was comparable, and the results were the same when accounting for slight differences in weight and health behaviors.

The Greenlight Bookstore Podcast
Ep. QS97: Rachel Krantz + Jen Winston (May 5, 2022)

The Greenlight Bookstore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 61:24


When Rachel Krantz met and fell for Adam, he told her that he was looking for a committed partnership—just one that did not include exclusivity. In her nonfiction debut, Open: An Uncensored Memoir of Love, Liberation, and Non-Monogamy, Krantz explores these questions with an unflinching eye and page-turning storytelling, tracing her search to understand what non-monogamy would do to her heart, her mind, and her life through interviews with scientists, psychologists, and people living and loving outside the mainstream. For the book's virtual launch, Krantz joined us along with Jen Winston, author of Greedy, for a frank and heartfelt conversation on non-monogamy, bisexuality, “stigmatization, feeling too much yet not enough of an identity, and struggling through the accidental poetry of everyday life” (--K., Greenlight event host)--and a resounding reminder to write the book you need to write. (Recorded January 25, 2022)