Podcasts about social sciences

The academic disciplines concerned with society and the relationships between individuals in society

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Latest podcast episodes about social sciences

Higher Density Living Podcast
White Sands Incident - Part 21

Higher Density Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 30:05


What are the values of Spiritual and Social Science? From time immemorial we can trace the inequities of appreciation against the dichotomy of the social phenomena compared to material logos. The Aliens had opened up a major discursive arena for Dr. Daniel Fry. They represent much compelling analogy of Social and Spiritual Scientific bombardments against Fry's Materialistic-Oriented Sciences. As we've seen, this goes in line with the great divide and scholarly debates among intellectuals and free thinkers of this planet. We are torn apart by dogmatic hegemony from those in power, rather than uplift actual enlightenment, bestowing submissiveness to their followers.Alex and Jason traverse several insights in Social and Spiritual Sciences with a spice of historical anecdotes. They build upon the metaphor of the cliff where they illustrate a picture of our status quo collective thinking. We are once again warned by the upbringing of material science, reigning triumphant, over the under-appreciated spiritual and social sciences. How many people will start to analyze what is universally valid and what are untruthful material foundations of reality? We deliberately blur the lines of moral objectives by basing off Nature on material machinations. This machine controls all of us, we all follow the same herd mentality that all is leading us to the cliff. The mission is to achieve understanding where true relationships flourish, but achieving these creational phenomena requires rigorous openness of the mind. Understanding is about building bridges to meet other people in the middle. It is an essential foundation for Creation to be conditional in the material realm. Mass media, material capital, and other man-made technology have tampered with our Free Will. As a collective, we must reclaim our power and Free Will to change our lives and make this world a better place. It is only with adamant courage, an initiative of self responsibilities, and the use of Free Will we can truly kick-start the path for a Higher Density of Living. Let's join Alex and Jason together as they discuss once again Alien/Human Technology, Social Science, and Spiritual Science. www.higherdensityliving.com

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

Other Life
Exit, Voice, and Loyalty by Albert Hirschman (Lecture)

Other Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:50


A lecture on Albert Hirschman's classic book from 1970. More info below.✦ Read the lecture notes at https://OtherLife.co✦ Subscribe to the Other Life podcast https://plnk.to/otherlife

Redefining Medicine
Redefining Medicine with special guest Dr. Judson Brewer

Redefining Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:05


Jud Brewer MD PhD (“Dr. Jud”) is a New York Times best-selling author and thought leader in the field of habit change and the “science of self-mastery”, having combined over 25 years of experience with mindfulness training with his scientific research therein. He is the Director of Research and Innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in Behavioral and Social Sciences and Psychiatry at the Schools of Public Health & Medicine at Brown University. He is also the executive medical director of behavioral health at Sharecare Inc. and a research affiliate at MIT.   A psychiatrist and internationally known expert in mindfulness training for addictions, Brewer has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including both in-person and app-based treatments for smoking, emotional eating, and anxiety. He has also studied the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness using standard and real-time fMRI and EEG neurofeedback. He has trained US Olympic athletes and coaches, foreign government ministers, and his work has been featured on 60 Minutes, TED (4th most viewed talk of 2016, with 17+ Million views), the New York Times, Time magazine (top 100 new health discoveries of 2013), Forbes, BBC, NPR, Al Jazeera (documentary about his research), Businessweek and others. His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, among others.   Dr. Brewer founded MindSciences (which merged with Sharcecare Inc. in 2020) to move his discoveries of clinical evidence behind mindfulness for anxiety, eating, smoking and other behavior change into the hands of consumers (see www.drjud.com for more information). He is the author of The Craving Mind: from cigarettes to smartphones to love, why we get hooked and how we can break bad habits (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017) and the New York Times best-seller, Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind (Avery/Penguin Random House, 2021). Follow him on twitter @judbrewer.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Are Canada's Police Services in Crisis?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:23


Ever since George Floyd was killed by police officers in Minneapolis back in May of 2020, there's been a massive uptick in interest in how the police do their jobs. However, For former Toronto mayor John Sewell , reforming the police has been a mission for half a century. His latest book is ,Crisis in Canada's Policing: Why change is so hard, and how we can get real reform in our police forces,, and he's also coordinator of the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition. Joining him for a conversation on policing today, we invite Scott Blandford, assistant professor and Public Safety Programs Coordinator in Faculty of Human & Social Sciences at Wilfrid Laurier University and a retired police officer; Frank Bergen, chief of Hamilton Police Service; and Nana Yanful, legal director of the Black Legal Action Centre. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Politics Done Right
Allison Gaines, co-founder of #WEOC on dedication to writing & more

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 21:11


Allison Gaines is the co-founder of Writers and Editors of Color (#WEOC). She discusses writing, the reason for the organization, and more. Allison Gaines discussed her organization Writers and Editors of Color. She explained why she formed it. Allison is a writer, editor, activist, and scholar interested in Social Sciences. She introduces herself at her blog as follows.--- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

The Hormone P.U.Z.Z.L.E Podcast
Unexplained Infertility 101 - Everything You Need to Know and More with Saskia Roell

The Hormone P.U.Z.Z.L.E Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 30:31


In episode #132 of The Hormone P.U.Z.Z.L.E Podcast, our guest Saskia Roell talks about Unexplained Infertility 101 - Everything You Need to Know and More. More about Saskia Roell: Saskia Roell is a happy mother of 5, even though she had experienced 3 miscarriages. She is now a world-renowned Specialized Body & Mind Fertility Coach, International Speaker, and Bestselling Author. For over 20 years she has helped women from all over the world to get pregnant who have suffered from unexplained infertility, miscarriage, and or emotional trauma. Her clients are from all walks of life from celebrities, entrepreneurs, CEO'S to stay-at-home to be moms. Saskia found her passion for empowering others while teaching at the Rijksuniversiteit of Groningen, in The Netherlands, as a member of the Faculty of Behavioral and Social Sciences in the Department of Experimental Psychology. She has extensively studied the conscious mind and the subconscious mind, and how our unhealed emotions and distorted beliefs effect our body and mind. She holds certificates in Naturopathy, Transformational Healing, Master Training in Integrative Life Healing Coaching, Advanced Hypnotherapy, Past Life and Age Regression, Somatic Healing, Birthing and Fertility Therapy and Matrix Energetics. Thank you for listening! Follow Saskia on Instagram: @saskia_roell Watch this Free Video Series - Unexplained Infertility Explained: 3 Secrets the Doctors Don't Tell You HERE. Follow Coach Kela on Instagram: @kela_healthcoach Get your FREE Fertility Meal Plan: https://coachkela.com/ For sponsorship opportunities, email HPS Media at podcast@coachkela.com.

New Books in History
Matt Christman and Daniel Bessner, "Hinge Points: A Podcast About Historical Contingency"

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 55:48


How do we balance the importance of individual human agency with our understanding of larger socio-economic structures? How do we explore crucial “what ifs” in history? How do we make this stuff accessible to a wider audience? These are the questions central to Daniel Bessner and Matt Christman's new podcast mini-series “Hinge Points”. In this conversation we talk historical turning points, history podcasting, and Marx. Indeed, the conversation seemed to be guided by the famous line from “The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon”: “Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past.” The same could be said for history podcasts. “Hinge Points” can be found on the “Chapo Trap House” Patreon page and other podcast sites. Matt Christman is best known for his work on “Chapo Trap House”, a political humor podcast. He also posts almost daily vlogs where he reflects on history. He co-authored the Chapo Guide to Revolution with his fellow Chapo Trap House hosts. Matt and I chatted about that book previously on the New Books Network. Daniel Bessner, an intellectual historian of U.S. foreign relations, is the author of Democracy in Exile: Hans Speier and the Rise of the Defense Intellectual (Cornell, 2018) and co-editor, with Nicolas Guilhot, of The Decisionist Imagination: Sovereignty, Social Science, and Democracy in the Twentieth Century (Berghahn, 2019). He currently holds the Joff Hanauer Honors Professorship in Western Civilization at the University of Washington. He is also a Non-Resident Fellow at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and a Contributing Editor at Jacobin. In 2019-2020, he served as a foreign policy advisor to Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign. In addition to his scholarly articles, he has published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Guardian, and other venues. Daniel Bessner also co-hosts the “American Prestige” podcast with Derek Davison. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Matt Christman and Daniel Bessner, "Hinge Points: A Podcast About Historical Contingency"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 55:48


How do we balance the importance of individual human agency with our understanding of larger socio-economic structures? How do we explore crucial “what ifs” in history? How do we make this stuff accessible to a wider audience? These are the questions central to Daniel Bessner and Matt Christman's new podcast mini-series “Hinge Points”. In this conversation we talk historical turning points, history podcasting, and Marx. Indeed, the conversation seemed to be guided by the famous line from “The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon”: “Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past.” The same could be said for history podcasts. “Hinge Points” can be found on the “Chapo Trap House” Patreon page and other podcast sites. Matt Christman is best known for his work on “Chapo Trap House”, a political humor podcast. He also posts almost daily vlogs where he reflects on history. He co-authored the Chapo Guide to Revolution with his fellow Chapo Trap House hosts. Matt and I chatted about that book previously on the New Books Network. Daniel Bessner, an intellectual historian of U.S. foreign relations, is the author of Democracy in Exile: Hans Speier and the Rise of the Defense Intellectual (Cornell, 2018) and co-editor, with Nicolas Guilhot, of The Decisionist Imagination: Sovereignty, Social Science, and Democracy in the Twentieth Century (Berghahn, 2019). He currently holds the Joff Hanauer Honors Professorship in Western Civilization at the University of Washington. He is also a Non-Resident Fellow at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and a Contributing Editor at Jacobin. In 2019-2020, he served as a foreign policy advisor to Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign. In addition to his scholarly articles, he has published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Guardian, and other venues. Daniel Bessner also co-hosts the “American Prestige” podcast with Derek Davison. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Our Missouri
Episode 58: The Civil War on the American Middle Border – Christopher Phillips (Bicentennial Book Club, Part 18)

Our Missouri

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:24


In honor of the state's 200th birthday, Our Missouri will feature a series throughout 2021 entitled "Bicentennial Book Club," which highlights influential books related to Missouri and examines how scholars, historians, and authors dissect major topics in the state's history. So, join the "Book Club" to hear about award-winning publications that detail the state's diverse history, as well as the stories behind the stories featured within their pages. In this episode, Christopher Phillips discusses Nathaniel Lyon, Claiborne Fox Jackson, and the Civil War on the American Middle Border. About the Guest: Christopher Phillips holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Georgia. He is the John and Dorothy Hermanies Professor of American History and University Distinguished Professor in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at the University of Cincinnati. He is the author of "The Rivers Ran Backward: The Civil War and the Remaking of the American Middle Border," "The Civil War in the Border South," "The Making of a Southerner: William Barclay Napton's Private Civil War," Missouri's Confederate: Claiborne Fox Jackson and the Creation of Southern Identity in the Border West," "Damned Yankee: The Life of General Nathaniel Lyon," and "Freedom's Port: The African American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860." He is the co-editor of "The Union on Trial: The Political Journals of Judge William Barclay Napton, 1829-1883."

DesignSafe Radio
New Edition of the NHERI Science Plan

DesignSafe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 7:14


Ian Robertson discusses the third edition of the Science Plan, a living document for natural hazards to consult as they design their individual research projects. Version three of the NHERI Science Plan incorporates key uses of simulation and modeling tools, social science approaches such as policy and economics, as well as the NSF-funded Extreme Events Reconnaissance teams — who do field research after an earthquake or a hurricane.Be sure to download a copy for a fascinating look at the work ahead in natural hazards engineering research. https://www.designsafe-ci.org/facilities/nco/science-plan/ 

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh: What is Mental Illness (and How Do We Know)?

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 56:35


Conversations around the conceptualization, development & implementation of diagnostic frameworks around mental illness often generate more questions than answers, but are endlessly fascinating in their ability to pull on a number of diverse & interesting threads of inquiry.  Clinical psychologist, professor & former president of the Canadian Association for Cognitive & Behavioural Therapies (CACBT), Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh, C.Psych returns to Thoughts on Record for a discussion of diagnostic frameworks for mental illness.  In this conversation we cover:thoughts on the conceptualization of mental illnessthe functional utility/evolutionary significance of mental health "symptoms" - even when frequent and/or intensecultural expectations around the experience of psychological pain advantages and challenges of current diagnostic symptoms (e.g., DSM 5, ICD-11)mental health consumer expecations around receiving a diagnosispotential benefits and harm that can come with a diagnosisthe emergence of potential dimensional models of diagnosis (e.g., The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP))  transdiagnostic treatment of psychopathology, with a special focus on managing comorbidityconsideration of some common diagnostic conundrums e.g., severe symptoms in high functioning clientsAndrea Ashbaugh is an associate professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa, Director of the Centre for Psychological Services and Research, and is a licensed clinical psychologist in the province of Ontario, Canada. She obtained her master's and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.She is director of the Cognition and Anxiety Studies Laboratory (CASL) and the Sex and Anxiety Research Group (SAX-RG). Her research interests as part of CASL centre around understanding the causes and developing treatments for anxiety and fear-related problems. She has recently started a program of research to understand the causes and psychological effects of experiencing traumatic and non-traumatic events that transgress one's moral beliefs (Moral Injury) in military personnel and veterans. Her research in the context of the SAX-RG centres around the impact of beliefs about arousal sensations and context on the interpretation of arousal, and its impact on sexual interest and functioning. She has received funding for her research broadly including from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.Dr. Ashbaugh regularly supervises CBT training and teaches courses on psychopathology and clinical psychology at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She has served on the Editorial Boards of Psychological Assessment. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry and editorial board member for Behaviour Research and Therapy. She is a former president of the Canadian Association for Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies (CACBT) and was seminal in the development of national CBT training guidelines that were released by CACBT in May 2019.

Higher Density Living Podcast
McMinnville UFO Incident Analysis Part 1

Higher Density Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 29:25


Continuing a popular trope in Higher Density Living is yet another mini-series of podcasts relating to historical sightings of Unidentified Aerial Objects. The rural findings of Paul and Evelyn Trent capturing an oblong plateau-ish spacecraft hovering above the skies of the couple's farmland were significant images today. Just like various reports during its time the Mcminnville UFO phenomena remain imprinted in the community as clear-shot and credible Alien images. Higher Density Living will celebrate many more future episodes concerning various UFO incidents across the history of the USA. In this episode, Alex and Jason make crossroads for testing the popular denial of mankind against Extraterrestrial Phenomena. A casual discussion among various topics ranging from personality development to religion takes us into McMinnville, a simple grassland utopia sitting in the middle of Oregon state, where during the 1950s was a grazing farmland for agricultural American communities as they discuss a brief introduction and background for McMinnville county and get a sense of its community identity back in 1950s. Sedentary rural farmland grazing in America Midwest to the industrialization of United State's Nuclear Weapons Program, Procurement, and Transformation of Aerospace Technology through Rocket Propulsion systems. As related with Dr. Daniel Fry's White Sand Missile Project the Aliens have traveled far and wide revealing themselves to unsuspecting citizens. Decades of federal military investigations squandered to deny, shroud, and deliberately cover up the existence of Aliens. Higher Density Living is here to bring this topic up at your service. Join us in this discussion and help spread awareness.  Let's join Alex and Jason as they discuss Ethical Science, Contemporary Philosophy, Nuclear Weapons History, and Social Science. www.higherdensityliving.com

De Rudi & Freddie Show
Rutger Bregman over de lessen van 3 maanden vaderschap

De Rudi & Freddie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 46:15


Luisteraars! Daar zijn wij weer. Niet langer de ontoegankelijke enkelvoud van Jesse, niet weer zo'n podcast over de waardeketens in de wereldwijde verfproductie. Nee, dit keer weer een fijne Rudi & Freddie Show tezamen, een toegankelijke lifestylepodcast over vaderschap. Rutger kreeg drie maanden geleden een kind, dus bij hem giert het onderwerp uit alle poriën. Wat viel hem op na drie maanden vaderschap? Dat Nederland een zalig land is! Allerlei mensen die opeens op je stoep staan om te helpen bij de kindzorg – het is ge-wel-dig. Maar wat ook opvalt is het ietwat dwingende regime van 'natuurlijk' ouderschap dat wordt opgelegd. Goedbedoelde adviezen die dikwijls matig zijn gegrond in wetenschappelijke kennis. Rutger vertelt over het boek Cribsheet van Emily Oster, dat in het huishouden-Bregman inmiddels beter bekendstaat als de 'De Bijbel'. In dit boek worden veel geboden en verboden rond het ouderschap op zijn minst genuanceerd. Misschien het meest in het oog springende voorbeeld: de kwestie borstvoeding versus kunstvoeding. Een onderwerp waarover zeer sterke meningen heersen, maar waar de wetenschap op zijn minst onduidelijk over is. Tot slot vertelt Jesse over de ongelijke verdeling van de lasten van het ouderschap. Economen hebben de afgelopen jaren veel werk verzet om te laten zien dat de komst van een kind vaak een forse inkomensterugval betekent voor de moeder, maar niet voor de vader. Zo neemt het inkomen in Nederland bij moeders relatief tot vaders met zo'n 46 procent af. Leesvoer bij deze aflevering: · Emily Oster, Cribsheet. A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, From Birth to Preschool (https://bit.ly/3c2e1Zv). Haar eerdere boek Expecting Better (https://bit.ly/30dSOJg over de periode van de zwangerschap) is ook een dikke aanrader. Daarin lees je bijvoorbeeld dat je als vrouw best zo nu en dan een wijntje mag drinken en dat een koffietje ook prima is. · Het oorspronkelijke artikel van Oster over borstvoeding (in haar boek heeft ze een nog langere analyse): 'Everybody Calm Down About Breastfeeding' (https://53eig.ht/3oe4QuG). · De studie uit 2018 in Social Science & Medicine: 'The best of intentions: Prenatal breastfeeding intentions and infant health' (https://bit.ly/3D6PP4d). · Tamar Stelling schreef over de kindboete: 'Dit is waarom steeds minder vrouwen kinderen willen (en geef ze eens ongelijk)' (https://bit.ly/309f8nw). Zoals altijd zijn wij weer te bereiken op rudienfreddieshow@decorrespondent.nl!

Higher Density Living Podcast
White Sands Incident - Part 17

Higher Density Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:26


It is in great detail knowing that the Social Science and its Spiritual sibling had incremental growth from linear progress over the course of history while the material sciences cultivate quantities and qualities of debate among brilliant minds and awaken those misguided by delusion. They are lagging behind the well-developed structures of technology and material science. The enlightenment brought about by this massive tower of material science as we break through more understanding around the natural world hedge only from the frugal, feeble, and fragile pillars of the Social and Spiritual concepts of mankind. This reckons to be a train wreck as incompatible knowledge conflicts with one another creating no balance and co-existence between the three branches of human knowledge. Let's join Alex and Jason as they discuss Ethical Science, Contemporary Philosophy, and Social Science in this episode. www.higherdensityliving.com

Asia Rising
#174: Biden's Asia Agenda

Asia Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 25:41


After a quiet start to his presidency, United States President Joe Biden has made some recent decisive steps in engaging with Asia by selling nuclear submarines to Australia and establishing the AUKUS pact, outlining an approach to trade with China, and hosting a Quad summit at the White House, gathering with key U.S. partners in Asia. A major part of this strategy is building up alliances to offer both the region and world at large to drive ‘responsible competition' with China. With the withdrawal of the US from Afghanistan signals a step away from the wars of the past two decades, Biden now has an opportunity to focus the US on the region it is says is its highest priority, Asia. Guest: Professor Nick Bisley (Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University) Recorded on 9 November, 2021.

Little Left of Center Podcast
EP108-Social Identities w/ Jay Van Bavel

Little Left of Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 44:10


Allison continues her series on belonging, talking to Dr. Jay Van Bavel about social identities. How do we identify with others? What groups do feel safe with and which ones are considered threats?  These are all questions that are important to our lives, our views on the world around us and our own views about our ourselves. EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:Social identitiesPolitical identitiesThe impact of feeling excludedAre our thoughts really autonomous?The "7 Days Adventists" experimentStereotypes: a double-edged sword GUESTS LINKS:Dr. Jay's websiteFollow Dr. Jay on TwitterALLISON'S LINKS:Visit Allison's websiteFollow Allison on InstagramCheck out Allison's blogListen to The Podcasters' Journey PodcastAllison's Favorites - And some great deals for you!

marketing social society business entrepreneur creativity freelance seth godin tedx writer tim ferriss anthropology high school wisdom groupthink social media leadership inspiration creative blogging social sciences real estate political science success identities motivation career selfhelp forum futur entrepreneurship blog john green forbes productivity leader sociology uber speech podcasters groups public speaking steve harvey marketing strategies digital marketing bestseller wealth marketing tips small business tips jordan peterson inspirational motivational business school dip personal development timothy ferriss group dynamics tribes social interactions thought leaders evernote creative blocks robert kiyosaki email marketing success principles brand marketing alan watts creativelive joe rogan experience gary vaynerchuk self development purple cow life advice business tips motivational speech this is marketing writer's block self improvement joe rogan socialization imposter syndrome linchpin personal growth social issues generosity hank green keep going brand manager never give up soft skills marietv marie forleo grant cardone altmba social studies adoption story be yourself marketing strategy get it done self discipline inbound marketing permission marketing change your life tom bilyeu inspirational video hubspot ray lewis good taste morning motivation chris do digital marketing strategy getting unstuck seminars crash course joe rogan podcast career tips natural selection brand management my roots keynote speech brian elliott thought leadership chase jarvis impact theory success habits your turn vlogbrothers nbf marcus taylor all marketers are liars creative practice lewis howes school of greatness game of life habits for success be generous stumbleupon making art know your audience seth godin linchpin eric thomas trust yourself tom ferry leadership training real estate coaching ted speaker motiversity marketing advice business entrepreneur overcoming anxiety direct marketing angel investors bryan elliott business motivation london real best advice ever find your niche nordic business forum real estate marketing jay van bavel marketing skills tim ferriss podcast real estate training find your calling get back up motivational talk market positioning keys to success life motivation social media engagement social groups millionaire habits motivational speakers hubspot cms social relations how to be a leader public speakers be motivated modern marketing elementor pro independent creators real estate school keynote speakers finding your calling random show motivate you social life page builders senior high school inside quest positioning yourself set godin inbound conference eye opening social group steve harvey morning show motivational videos inspirational talk how to change your life science standards best interview gym motivation listenable marketing tips and tricks
Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
Evolutionary Governance under Authoritarianism, with Kellee Tsai

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 74:57


Speaker: Kellee Tsai, Dean of Humanities and Social Science and Chair Professor of Social Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology The structural transformation of China over the past several decades has given rise to a fundamental tension between the pursuit of social stability and authoritarian resilience. On the one hand, repressive strategies enable the party-state to maintain its monopoly of political power (authoritarianism). On the other hand, the quality of governance is enhanced when the state adopts softer modes of engagement with society (resilience). This dilemma lies at the core of evolutionary governance under authoritarianism. This talk engages the vast “authoritarianism with adjectives” literature in the study of contemporary China and presents case studies of state-society interactions to offer insight into the circumstances under which the party-state exerts its coercive power versus engaging in more flexible responses or policy adaptations. This event is part of the Critical Issues Confronting China lecture series at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard Univeristy.

Human Centered
Minds Memes & Windsurfing - Daniel Dennett

Human Centered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 81:15


Allison StangerDaniel DennettFrom Bacteria to Bach and Back: The Evolution of MindsCASBS@casbsstanford

Roots of Reality
#45 Roots of Reality Experiences: Technology and Gerrymandering with Dr. Wendy K Tam Cho

Roots of Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:42


Historian Ben Baumann and Dr. Wendy K. Tam Cho discuss how technology has increased the ability to gerrymander, but also empowers us to combat it. (Wendy K. Tam Cho is Professor in the Departments of Political Science, Statistics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Asian American Studies, and the College of Law, Senior Research Scientist at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Faculty in the Illinois Informatics Institute, and Affiliate of the Cline Center for Advanced Social Research, the CyberGIS Center for Advanced Digital and Spatial Studies, the Computational Science and Engineering Program, and the Program on Law, Behavior, and Social Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also a Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Society for Political Methodology, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavior Sciences at Stanford University, and a Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.) For more on Dr. Wendy K Tam Cho check out the following links: Website- http://cho.pol.illinois.edu/wendy/ (The memories, comments, and viewpoints shared by guests in the interviews do not represent the viewpoints of, or speak for Roots of Reality)

Being Human
The (Somewhat) Secret History of Queer Theory: An Interview with Heather Love

Being Human

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 66:38


An interview with Heather Love, professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. The interview focuses on Professor Love's most recent book Underdogs: Social Deviance and Queer Theory.        

The Addiction Psychologist
Dr. Robert Miranda - Treating Substance Use Disorder in Adolescence

The Addiction Psychologist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 60:45


A great deal of our research focuses on adults with substance use disorder. Yet, many who develop severe substance use disorder begin during adolescence. What types of psychosocial treatments are available for adolescents? What about pharmacological treatments? Does combining psychosocial and pharmacological treatments increase efficacy? In this episode, Dr. Robert Miranda discusses treatments available for adolescents and the complications of developing these treatments. Dr. Robert Miranda is a Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior in the Warren Alpert Medical School, a Professor of Behavioral and Social Sciences in the School of Public Health, and the Training Director of the NIAAA/NIDA Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University. He is also the Clinical Director of the Vista Intensive Outpatient Program at Bradley Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island.

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Imi Lo: Reflections on Psychotherapy & Conceptual Frameworks

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 58:35


While most psychotherapists identify with one predominant theoretical orientation, in practice it is common for clinicians to adopt an "eclectic" approach that aligns with the varied lens/interests a clinician might hold as well as to meet the varied needs of clients.  Consultant, coach, author and podcast host, Imi Lo, joins host Dr. Pete Kelly for a very wide-ranging discussion of a variety of topics related to psychotherapy including:   Imi's preferred theoretical orientation, conceptual framework and why she has chosen to focus on work with emotionally intense and highly sensitive peopleblending psychodynamic and CBT principlesa brief discussion of the schema therapy model, with a focus on mode workthe judgment that can be inherent in the conceptualization of personality disorderscurrent conceptualizations of mental illness and the functional utility of "symptoms"the inner lives of highly sensitive, intense peoplethe notion of emotional "over-control" and a brief consideration of the utility of RO-DBT in this contextnavigating & integrating the ongoing tension between champions of "vulnerability" vs "radical self-responsibility"Imi's reflection on process-related aspects of therapymanaging emotional depletion to avoid burnoutreflections on principles of acceptance, and not resisting one's experience (for clinician and client, alike)description of, and navigation of the so-called "midlife passage" some overall thoughts on current areas of interest and growth in psychotherapyImi Lo is a consultant for emotionally intense and highly sensitive people. She is the author of Emotional Sensitivity and Intensity, available in multiple languages, and The Gift of Intensity. Imi is the founder of Eggshell Therapy and Coaching, working with intense people from around the world.  Imi has practised as a social worker and therapist in London (U.K). She has trained in mental health, psychotherapy, art therapy, philosophical counseling, and mindfulness-based modalities. She works holistically, combining psychological insights with Eastern and Western philosophies such as Buddhism.  Imi's credentials include a Master in Mental Health, Master of Buddhist Studies, Graduate Diploma in Psychology, Bachelor of Social Science in Social Work, Certificate in Logic-based Therapy, and an Advanced Diploma in Contemporary Psychotherapy. She has received multiple scholarships and awards including the Endeavour Award by the Australian Government. She has been consulted by and appeared in publications such as The Psychologies Magazine, The Telegraph, Marie Claire, and The Daily Mail.eggshelltherapy.com

Haaretz Weekly
Racist Jew vies for French presidency, shocking and splitting Jewish voters

Haaretz Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 28:21


Prof. Michel Wieviorka, from the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences in Paris, and France 24 journalist, Shirli Sitbon join host Simon Spungin to discuss the rise and rise of Éric Zemmour – the leading noncandidate who is already disrupting next year's French presidential election with his hashtag provocations, his anti-immigrant rhetoric, and his outrageous rewriting of French history. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Baylor Connections
Byron Johnson

Baylor Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 26:59


The Global Flourishing Study represents the largest initiative of its kind to investigate the determinants of human flourishing. In this week's Baylor Connections, Dr. Byron Johnson, Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences and Director of the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor, takes listeners inside the massive project that will survey over 240,000 individuals in 22 countries over five years. With $43 million in funding, it's also the largest funded research project in Baylor history, with a scope that will impact numerous disciplines through scientific, longitudinal data on a variety of factors that influence human thriving.

Perfect Bound with Jennifer Yoffy

Jason Koxvold is the kind of person you would hate if he wasn't so smart and talented and thoughtful and kind. Oh, and charming. Did I mention charming? Yeah, he's the worst. Jason Koxvold (b. 1977, Liege, Belgium) received his BSc in Social Science from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland in 2000. His fine art practice focuses on the shared spaces between neoliberal economic policy and military strategy; he has made work in diverse locations, from Afghanistan to Nigeria, Arctic Russia to South Africa. His first monograph, Knives, was published in 2017, followed by You Were Right All Along (2018) and Calle Tredic iMartiri (2019). He is the founder of Gnomic Book, an imprint focused on challenging subjects by emerging artists, and Virtual—Assembly, an online book fair to support publishers and artists in our present moment of social distancing. Koxvold has exhibited in solo and group shows in the UnitedStates, Britain, France, and Japan. His work has been featured in publications including The British Journal of Photography, Aperture, the Financial Times Magazine, Der Greif, Wired, Le Litteraire, Newsweek, Gestalten, Thisispaper, The Great Leap Sideways, Mother Jones, and Slate. He currently lives and works in Portland, OR.

New Books in Psychology
Bernard Scott, "Cybernetics for the Social Sciences" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:22


On this episode, I have the great pleasure of finally getting to talk with one of the “unsung heroes” of cybernetics, whose work has finally begun to receive the critical attention it has long deserved, and upon which I have leaned quite heavily in my own work since I entered this field. With Cybernetics for the Social Sciences, out from Brill in 2021, Bernard Scott has met a long-felt need by authoring a book that shows the foundational relevance of cybernetics for such fields as psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Scott provides user-friendly descriptions of the core concepts of cybernetics, with examples of how they can be used in the social sciences, and explains how cybernetics functions as a transdiscipline that unifies other disciplines and a metadiscipline that provides insights about how other disciplines function. He provides an account of how cybernetics emerged as a distinct field, following interdisciplinary meetings in the 1940s, convened to explore feedback and circular causality in biological and social systems and also recounts how encountering cybernetics transformed his thinking and his understanding of life in general. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books in Geography
Bernard Scott, "Cybernetics for the Social Sciences" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:22


On this episode, I have the great pleasure of finally getting to talk with one of the “unsung heroes” of cybernetics, whose work has finally begun to receive the critical attention it has long deserved, and upon which I have leaned quite heavily in my own work since I entered this field. With Cybernetics for the Social Sciences, out from Brill in 2021, Bernard Scott has met a long-felt need by authoring a book that shows the foundational relevance of cybernetics for such fields as psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Scott provides user-friendly descriptions of the core concepts of cybernetics, with examples of how they can be used in the social sciences, and explains how cybernetics functions as a transdiscipline that unifies other disciplines and a metadiscipline that provides insights about how other disciplines function. He provides an account of how cybernetics emerged as a distinct field, following interdisciplinary meetings in the 1940s, convened to explore feedback and circular causality in biological and social systems and also recounts how encountering cybernetics transformed his thinking and his understanding of life in general. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

New Books in Sociology
Bernard Scott, "Cybernetics for the Social Sciences" (Brill, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:22


On this episode, I have the great pleasure of finally getting to talk with one of the “unsung heroes” of cybernetics, whose work has finally begun to receive the critical attention it has long deserved, and upon which I have leaned quite heavily in my own work since I entered this field. With Cybernetics for the Social Sciences, out from Brill in 2021, Bernard Scott has met a long-felt need by authoring a book that shows the foundational relevance of cybernetics for such fields as psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Scott provides user-friendly descriptions of the core concepts of cybernetics, with examples of how they can be used in the social sciences, and explains how cybernetics functions as a transdiscipline that unifies other disciplines and a metadiscipline that provides insights about how other disciplines function. He provides an account of how cybernetics emerged as a distinct field, following interdisciplinary meetings in the 1940s, convened to explore feedback and circular causality in biological and social systems and also recounts how encountering cybernetics transformed his thinking and his understanding of life in general. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Bernard Scott, "Cybernetics for the Social Sciences" (Brill, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:22


On this episode, I have the great pleasure of finally getting to talk with one of the “unsung heroes” of cybernetics, whose work has finally begun to receive the critical attention it has long deserved, and upon which I have leaned quite heavily in my own work since I entered this field. With Cybernetics for the Social Sciences, out from Brill in 2021, Bernard Scott has met a long-felt need by authoring a book that shows the foundational relevance of cybernetics for such fields as psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Scott provides user-friendly descriptions of the core concepts of cybernetics, with examples of how they can be used in the social sciences, and explains how cybernetics functions as a transdiscipline that unifies other disciplines and a metadiscipline that provides insights about how other disciplines function. He provides an account of how cybernetics emerged as a distinct field, following interdisciplinary meetings in the 1940s, convened to explore feedback and circular causality in biological and social systems and also recounts how encountering cybernetics transformed his thinking and his understanding of life in general. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

DesignSafe Radio
NHERI Science Plan: A Guide to High-Impact Research

DesignSafe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 8:49


In this episode, NHERI's Ian Robertson discusses how natural hazards engineers quantify how well they are addressing the big problems, sometimes called “grand challenges.” For civil engineers, success is often measured by the incorporation of new designs into building codes. Robertson discusses the long-term processes for getting ideas for resilient structures into actual practice. For instance, the NHERI Science Plan highlights high-impact areas for study and provides examples of the kinds of research needed to get into code — and address the grand challenges.“By incorporating social science in our engineering research, we can be more cognizant of how it is going to impact society.” - Ian Robertson Find details and download the NHERI Science Plan:https://www.designsafe-ci.org/facilities/nco/science-plan/

New Books Network
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Environmental Studies
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

Oscillations
The Art (and Science ) of Grace with Sarah Kaufman

Oscillations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 82:18


Grace is a way of making others feel at ease. Like hospitality, good manners, cultivating a sense of fashion, and putting your best foot forward when it counts, grace is an ongoing effort and cultivated habit of making the world less stressful and more pleasing for those around us.For these reasons, grace is something like a virtue or a paramount “first principle” of social interaction. In this sense, grace is a courtesy; a respect for others. Grace reflects an awareness of being situated in something larger than ourselves, whether that's a relationship, a community, or a society. Yet grace is overlooked. In my own lifetime, it seems to have eroded considerably. I remember fondly back to my childhood, a time when nobody received calls after 7pm - a social convention that respected family and personal time and recognized a need to collect oneself, move at a slower pace, and wind down for the day. I remember a time when politicians showed at least some deference to decorum, especially a head of state. I even grew up in a small town in the foothills of Berkshires where vestigial organs of a bygone etiquette would make the occasional appearance: antique ideas that children might refer to their parents and grandparents by “sir” and “maam,” that one ought to ask to be excused from the table, or that any plateware left behind by a guest ought not be returned to them empty.Grace is an outward orientation, and as such it's a bit anemic in a modern culture with such inward-oriented messaging that encourages us to prioritize our own happiness, our own boundaries, our self care, our self expression, our feelings, our self-reliance, and our independence. To try and understand what grace is and where it fits into modern life, we're speaking today with Sarah Kaufman, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and dance critic at the Washington Post. I read her book “The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life” years ago and it's had a lasting impact on me. It takes the reader on a search for grace, occasionally looking at some pretty surprising and educative examples. It's not only a pleasure to read, it's an inspirational call to action. At OSCILLATIONS we're all about the inspirational and the visionary - the imagining of new, more creative and beautiful worlds. The book gently encourages us to imagine a world where we are generally better to each other and collectively contributing to a sort of beautification project. For most of us, life is hard enough without having to suffer through its trials surrounded by slumped shoulders, shuffling feet, and morose dispositions. I came away from the book with a strong desire to fashion myself into a graceful person as a matter of virtue and civic responsibility. Let's just say it's a work in progress. We couldn't be more honored and excited to speak with Sarah about grace, culture, art, dance, civics, and science. And so with that, we bring you Sarah Kaufman."Art is the signature of civilizations." -Beverly SillsJoin the movement from the very beginning. If you believe that #thefutureiscreative, support us with a like, a follow, and a share.subscribe: YouTube  / Instagram / TikTok / Facebook / Twitter / Vero / Substack / Patreon 

The Jillian Michaels Show
Inside the FDA with a Former FDA Director, Richard Williams

The Jillian Michaels Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 52:41


Richard A. Williams, former Director for Social Science with the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the FDA, takes us behind the scenes on what the FDA actually does: how regulations are put into place, and why they sometimes aren't when they should be; how warning labels and bans on things like trans fats are determined, and by whom; food safety versus nutrition, and Genetically Modified versus Genetically Engineered. Is irradiation (similar to microwaves) a safe way to kill pathogens in food? Why is obesity still on the rise? And we take a look at the future of food, from precision fermentation, vertical farms, and 3D-printed foods, to personalized diets and so much more.Guest Links:Website: https://www.richardawilliams.comFor 25% off The Fitness App by Jillian Michaels, go to www.thefitnessapp.com/podcastdealFollow us on Instagram @JillianMichaels and @MartiniCindyEmail your questions to JillianPodcast@gmail.comYou can find new episodes of Keeping It Real: Conversations with Jillian Michaels, completely ad free, on Wondery+ https://wondery.app.link/jillianSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

RTP's Free Lunch Podcast
Deep Dive 201 – Fixing Food: An FDA Insider Unravels the Myths and the Solutions

RTP's Free Lunch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 59:30


In this episode, Professor David Hyman interviews Dr. Richard Williams about Dr. Williams' new book, "Fixing Food: An FDA Insider Unravels the Myths and Solutions."A twenty-seven-year veteran of the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Nutrition, Dr. Williams questions the accuracy of more than thirty years of food labeling, along with consumer education on diet/disease relationships and failed attempts to get consumers to track intakes.Featuring:- Dr. Richard A. Williams, Former Associate Director for Social Sciences, FDA; Author, "Fixing Food: An FDA Insider Unravels the Myths and Solutions"- [Moderator] David Hyman, Scott K. Ginsburg Professor of Health Law & Policy, Georgetown University Law CenterVisit our website – www.RegProject.org – to learn more, view all of our content, and connect with us on social media.

Market Hunt
Spotlight on Aquaculture

Market Hunt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:19


The aquaculture industry has evolved tremendously over the last 40 years. Today, Aquaculture is supplying over 50 % of the world demand for seafood. That's up from less than 5 % 30 just years ago. Interview with University of Guelph Professor Rich Moccia to discover the innovations taking place in this burgeoning industry, as well as an introduction to the world's first genetically modified protein approved for human consumption.Check out the Ie-Knowledge Hub Video Case Studies on the International Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub.Questions or feedback on our episode? Get in touch with show host Thierry Harris: thierry.harris@cartouchemedia.com Episode Research Questions:What are Food economics and how do they impact the commercialization of Aquaculture companies?How does labeling of new products impact Aquaculture companies?What supply chain management issues could impact the Aquaculture ecosystem? Describe the regulatory impact on Aquaculture companies?Write to us at solutions@ie-knowledgehub.ca and we'll post some of your answers on our website page.Guest bio:  Rich MocciaFascinated by the aquatic environment since before his birth, Professor Moccia's career path has always involved ‘water' in some way. Although Rich has focused much of his research and teaching activities in disciplines relevant to the science and practice of aquatic food production, his research also spans studies related to ecosystem impacts and animal welfare. Professor Moccia has held both faculty and senior executive cross-appointments at the University of Guelph, where he has been employed since 1987. Recently completing his term as the Associate Vice-President, Research for the Strategic Partnerships portfolio, he oversaw a number of partnership files, including the OMAFRA-UG Agreement. Professor Moccia's responsibilities to the provincial agrifood partnership included managing research programming, contract administration and infrastructure of 14 provincial research facilities and one regional campuses, as well as oversight of the Laboratory Services Division, encompassing both the Agriculture and Food Lab and the Provincial Animal Health Laboratory. He was also responsible for the Catalyst Centre (ie. research business development office) and the Central Animal Facility.As a professor in the Department of Animal Biosciences, Rich engages in teaching, research and graduate training, and has always had a strong commitment to industry-relevant research, education and extension service.  Rich enjoys exploring the interconnectivity of many varied disciplines in the search for solutions to relevant issues affecting our world.Prior to joining the university, Professor Moccia was self-employed in the private sector, having established 2 SME start-ups specializing in ag-based technologies in the aquatic food production industry.  Rich has been a founding member of several provincial and federal industry associations and advocacy groups, has sat on the Boards of Directors of several agri-based private companies, and has been an invited participant in numerous policy and regulatory reform committees helping to guide smart legislation for Canada.Career Snapshot2007-2016.  Associate Vice-President, Research (Strategic Partnerships), University of Guelph1990-present  Director, Aquaculture Centre, Department of Animal Biosciences1987-present.  Professor, Aquatic and fisheries science, University of Guelph1981-1990.  President and self-employed in 2 small, start-up companies.1978-1981.  Professional Associate, Department of Pathology, Ontario Veterinary College, UGAquaculture CentreProfessor Moccia established the Aquaculture Centre in 1988 and has been its Director ever since.  The Aquaculture Centre has been dedicated to integrating research and extension programs to contribute to the economic and environmental sustainability of the aquaculture sector.  Awards and HonoursLifetime Achievement Award, Aquaculture Association of Canada (2018)National Research Award of Excellence, Aquaculture Association of Canada. (2007)Distinguished Professorial Teaching Award, University of Guelph Faculty Association. (2002)Distinguished Extension Service Award, University of Guelph, OAC Alumni Association. (2004)Dr. Bill Winegard Community Volunteer Award, Volunteer Centre of Guelph-Wellington-Dufferin (2015)Gabrielle Hubert Volunteer Award, UG United Way Campaign (2019)‘Employees Making a Difference' Award for UG – United Way (2015)John Appleton Volunteer Award-Peninsula Bruce Trail ClubInductee. Guelph Sports Hall of Fame-Baseball (2018)Industry Boards and Community Associations (Current only)Canadian Aquaculture Industry Alliance (CAIA)-Executive memberCanadian Association of Underwater Science (CAUS)-Executive memberNational Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC)-Board of DirectorsOilseed Innovation Partners (Formerly Soy 20/20)United Way Leadership Committee of Guelph-WellingtonBig Brothers, Big Sisters Guelph-Wellington (Vice President)Ontario Marine Heritage CommitteePeninsula Bruce Trail Club Canadian Aquaculture industry overview (source: Aquaculture.ca)ECONOMIC IMPACTThe sector generates:$5.4 Billion in economic activity in Canada$2.2 Billion in GDPPRODUCTIONAquaculture Production Volume: 191,416 tonnesAquaculture Production Value: $1.39 billionAquaculture accounts for 16% of Canada's total seafood productionAquaculture accounts for over 33% of Canada's total seafood valueEMPLOYMENTAquaculture employs 26,000 full time workersAquaculture generates $1.2 billion in labour incomeEXPORTSAquaculture Export Volume: >103,000 tonnesAquaculture Export Value: $897 millionPrimary Export Destination: United States (94% of total exports)Other Export Destinations: Japan, China,  Taiwan, Israel, Hong KongEPISODE LINKSRich Moccia websiteHistory of aquacultureMemorial UniversitySylvia WulfAquabountyAquAdvantage Salmon fishUniversity of GuelphCook AquacultureMOWI InternationalDr. Garth FletcherDr. Choy HewOcean PoutElliot EntisCanadian Parliamentary review meeting discussing GMOs in AquacultureFDA Review on AquAdvantage Salmon Aquaculture Innovations & ResearchNOAA research linksFeed and nutrition innovationsGenetic selection and engineering technologiesAnimal health and disease managementDisease processes in Aquatic organismsThe Future of therapeutic agentsVaccine developmentWater quality management #1Water quality management #2Marketplace innovations in AquacultureInnovative productsLife support systemsAI in AquacultureData insights in fish monitoringRecirculating aquaculture systems Aquaculture industry ecosystemAquaculture association of Canada, HQ in Torbay NLCanadian Aquaculture allianceOntario Agi-Food Innovation AllianceOntario Ministry of Rural and Agricultural AffairsFisheries and Oceans CanadaU.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  IE-Knowledge HubBusiness Video Case studiesMarket Hunt Podcasts Ie-Knowledge Hub Sponsor CaseMagex Video Case StudyCatherine LamontagneThierry HarrisShow Credits:Market Hunt is produced by Cartouche Media in collaboration with Seratone Studios in Montreal and Popup Podcasting in Ottawa. Market Hunt is part of the International Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub network.  Funding for this program comes from the Social Sciences and Humanities Resource Council of Canada.Executive Producers: Hamid Etemad, McGill University Desautels Faculty of Management and Hamed Motaghi, Université du Québec en Outaouais. Associate Producer, Jose Orlando Montes, Université du Québec à Montréal.Technical Producers Simon Petraki, Seratone Studio and Lisa Querido, Pop up Podcasting. Show consultant, JP Davidson. Artwork by Melissa Gendron. Voiceover: Katie Harrington.You can check out the ie-Knowledge Hub Case studies  at ie-knowledgehub.ca.

What We Can't Not Talk About
The Dramatic and Underrepresented Effects of Religion on Prisoners (and on Us)

What We Can't Not Talk About

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 34:24


Professor Byron Johnson joins us for a conversation on a core piece of the human experience that many of us hold dear but has been neglected in studies of criminology and other fields for decades: the influence of religion on human behavior. In this episode, he covers a brief history of our nation's understanding of the purpose of prisons, the role of faith-based programs in prisons in making prisoners more “pro-social,” the work of Prison Fellowship International in aiding the rehabilitation of prisoners, why people commit crime and why people follow laws, i.e. don't commit crime, are both important, and how cancel culture is harming our ability to forgive one another, and the dramatic effects of faith-based programs led by inmates in rehabilitating their fellow inmates such as those in an Angola Prison. Byron Johnson is a Senior Fellow of the Austin Institute and a Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences at Baylor University. He is a leading authority on the scientific study of religion, the efficacy of faith-based organizations, and criminal justice.  Recent publications have examined the impact of faith-based programs on recidivism reduction and prisoner reentry. Prison Fellowship International: https://pfi.org/ The Prisoner's Journey: https://pfi.org/what-we-do/hope-for-prisoners/the-prisoners-journey/ Prison Fellowship: https://www.prisonfellowship.org/

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour: Paul Moreno, David Harsanyi, & Korey Maas

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


TOPICS: Jackie Robinson, the new book EUROTRASH, & a look at the Renaissance philosopher Erasmus Host Scot Bertram talks with Paul Moreno, William and Berniece Grewcock Chair in Constitutional History, Professor of History & Dean of Social Sciences at Hillsdale College, about the story of Jackie Robinson and breaking the color barrier in Major League […]

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour
Paul Moreno, David Harsanyi, & Korey Maas

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 48:25


TOPICS: Jackie Robinson, the new book EUROTRASH, & a look at the Renaissance philosopher Erasmus Host Scot Bertram talks with Paul Moreno, William and Berniece Grewcock Chair in Constitutional History, Professor of History & Dean of Social Sciences at Hillsdale College, about the story of Jackie Robinson and breaking the color barrier in Major League Baseball. David Harsanyi outlines the arguments in his new book EUROTRASH: WHY AMERICA MUST REJECT THE FAILED IDEAS OF A DYING CONTINENT. And Korey Maas, Associate Professor of History at Hillsdale, introduces us to the Renaissance philosopher and Catholic theologian Erasmus on the 555th anniversary of his birth.

WFOD: The Wheelbarrow Full of Dicks Internet Radio Program
FIXING FOOD AND THE POPTART PROBLEM (EPISODE #526)

WFOD: The Wheelbarrow Full of Dicks Internet Radio Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 62:48


Mike and Travis discuss the following topics…. Why did the chicken cross the road? Michael Meyers' wrestling theme…. There's a lady suing pop tarts…. Dr. Richard A Williams joins us after the break. He is the former Director for Social Science with the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the Food and Drug Administration. He has a new book called “Fixing Food: An FDA Insider Unravels the Myths and the Solutions. Check out Richard's website at richardawilliams.com Potw: outrageous pumpkins/chucky Well, bye.

Catholic Family News's Podcast
Weekly News Roundup 10/28/2021

Catholic Family News's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 64:46


Our stories this week include: (1) a very inculturated Mass for the opening of the Synod on Synodality in California; (2) the Pope's meeting with a group of German Lutherans, plus his latest general audience (more railing against "fundamentalists"); (3) the appointment of notorious population control advocate Jeffrey Sachs to the Pontifical Academy for Social Sciences by Pope Francis; (4) a new decree issued by the Congregation for Divine Worship (CDW) concerning liturgical translations and adaptations (practical application of Francis' 2017 Motu Proprio Magnum Principium); and (5) Archbishop Viganò's appeal to the U.S. Bishops and the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith to reconsider their support for abortion-tainted and experimental vaccines.

Ideas of India
Gaurav Mittal on Political Geographies and the Urban Transportation Crisis

Ideas of India

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 37:22


This episode is the third in a mini-series of weekly short episodes featuring young scholars entering the academic job market who discuss their latest research. In this episode, Shruti speaks with Dr. Gaurav Mittal about illegal and informal methods of transit, the role of courts and bureaucrats in transportation policy, failed government schemes to solve the transportation crisis and much more. Mittal is an associate faculty member at the Singapore University of Social Sciences. He obtained his Ph.D. in geography from the National University of Singapore. His research interests include urban governance, public transport and political geography. Follow Gaurav on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gaurav_mtl Follow Shruti on Twitter: https://twitter.com/srajagopalan  For a full transcript of this conversation with helpful links, visit DiscourseMagazine.com. 

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show
770: Pope Francis appoints Reproduction Rights expert Jeffrey Sachs to Vatican Academy [Podcast]

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 16:58


Pope Francis appointed prominent reproduction rights advocate Jeffrey Sachs as a member of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences. Dr. Taylor Marshall comments on this appointment and the Sustainable Development Goals. Watch this new podcast episode by clicking here: Or listen to the audio mp3 here: If you'd like to order a copy of Taylor's […] The post 770: Pope Francis appoints Reproduction Rights expert Jeffrey Sachs to Vatican Academy [Podcast] appeared first on Taylor Marshall.

The Quicky
COP26: Is Australia Really That Sh*t On Climate Change?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 19:37


This weekend, Prime Minister Scott Morrison will reluctantly fly to Scotland for the United Nations Climate Change Conference better known as COP26, but why did it take a tongue-lashing from Prince Charles and the Queen to convince him to attend? And why has there been such a last minute scramble between the Liberals and Nationals to finally agree to some kind of 'in-principle' plan to achieve Net Zero emissions by 2050 when we've known for decades that urgent action is needed? The Quicky speaks to a climate change expert, and an expert in Australian politics to find out if Australia really is that bad when it comes to global warming and protecting the environment, and what might go down in Glasgow? CREDITS  Host/Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri Guests: Emeritus Professor Will Steffen - Climate Council spokesperson and climate change expert based at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra Mark Kenny - Australian Studies Professor at the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences, and host of the weekly politics and public affairs podcast, Democracy Sausage With Mark Kenny Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU171: DR DWIGHT TURNER ON INTERSECTIONALITY, PRIVILEGE, OTHERNESS, COUNSELING, PSYCHOTHERAPY

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 56:29


Rendering Unconscious welcomes Dr. Dwight Turner back to the podcast! Dr. Dwight Turner is a Psychotherapist & Supervisor working in London and online, as well as a Senior Lecturer in the Psychodynamic PGDip in Counselling and Psychotherapy training at School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Brighton in East Sussex. https://www.dwightturnercounselling.co.uk His new book is Mockingbird: Intersections of Privilege and Otherness in Counselling and Psychotherapy (Routledge, 2021): https://www.routledge.com/Intersections-of-Privilege-and-Otherness-in-Counselling-and-Psychotherapy/Turner/p/book/9780367426774 Follow him at Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dturner300 And Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dturner300/ This episode available at YouTube: https://youtu.be/7aDcTLGA3mo Rendering Unconscious Podcast is hosted by psychoanalyst Dr. Vanessa Sinclair, who interviews psychoanalysts, psychologists, scholars, creative arts therapists, writers, poets, philosophers, artists & other intellectuals about their process, world events, the current state of mental health care, politics, culture, the arts & more. Episodes are also created from lectures given at various international conferences: www.drvanessasinclair.net Rendering Unconscious Podcast can be found at Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Vimeo… Please visit www.renderingunconscious.org/about for links to all of these sites. Rendering Unconscious is also a book! Rendering Unconscious: Psychoanalytic Perspectives, Politics and Poetry (Trapart, 2019): store.trapart.net/details/00000 You can support the podcast at: www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl Your support is greatly appreciated. The song at the end of the episode is "Follow My Voice (for Hatshepsut)" by Vanessa Sinclair and Per Åhlund from the album of the same name. Available at Bandcamp: https://vanessasinclairperhlund.bandcamp.com and as a limited edition CD: https://store.trapart.net/details/00168 Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson for creating the intro and outro music for Rendering Unconscious Podcast. https://www.carlabrahamsson.com Portrait of Dr. Dwight Turner: https://www.dwightturnercounselling.co.uk

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson
Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin; MSU's Matt Grossmann on "How the Social Sciences Got Better"

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:02


Rep. Slotkin talks about the Build Back Better and infrastructure packages, her legislation to bolster the national stockpile, her decision to move to the Lansing area to run in a new Congressional district, and more. And Grossmann talks about his new book "How the Social Sciences Got Better."

Burning the Couch
Social Justice and Humanitarian Work with Tamara Sharifov, LCSW

Burning the Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 54:06


Guest speaker Tamara Sharifov, LCSW speaks on her experience doing humanitarian work. Tamara shares her ideas on how other helpers can incorporate their knowledge of mental health in social justice and fighting for change.  Tamara is a co-founder of Rise Up Humanity, a nonprofit organization supporting and providing aid to refugees. Find out more about Rise Up Humanity and Tamara.