Podcasts about medieval world

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Best podcasts about medieval world

Latest podcast episodes about medieval world

HEAVY Music Interviews
Feeding The Machine With BLIND GUARDIAN

HEAVY Music Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 22:37


After paying close attention to the orchestral side of music over their last few releases, Blind Guardian have decided the boundaries can be pushed no more, electing instead to return more to their roots on their new album The God Machine.Thirty years after their groundbreaking release Somewhere Far Beyond, Blind Guardian prove that there's still life left in the metal genre by infusing elements of their earlier work with a modern sensibility that promises to appeal to fans both old and new.HEAVY caught up with drummer Frederik Ehmke still a few weeks out from release to discuss The God Machine."This time we had a long anticipation phase,” he nodded, “since the actual album was finished last year in July or so. We had to wait until then due to some production problems with vinyl pressing that they were waiting for materials and there was no room when they went to press the vinyl. Then there was the problem with the touring being postponed and that also is not a smart move to release an album when you can't tour for it. So that's why we were waiting, or were kind of forced to wait for another year. We tried to stretch that with some extra outputs, releasing some video clips and teasing with some material so people get an impression already beforehand. Finally, second of September is the day but we are now touring with festivals and still dealing with Corona problems somehow, so there's no real time to be nervous about the album release and we, pf course, cross our fingers that everything works out perfectly. We set the tracks and it's the best prepared that we could so we would assume and stay positive - not in a COVID way, we'll stay positive that everything will work out in the end."Much has been made of the sonic delivery on The God Machine, with Ehmke admitting he is relieved the band's flirtation with orchestral arrangements has been shelved for now at least."The God Machine is kind of a seizure in the band's latest discography,” he offered. “We came from a longer path working with orchestral sounds and evolving that to a certain eclipse which culminated in the Legacy of the Dark Lands album, which is only orchestral and Hanzie's voice singing along to that. So then we felt, where shall we go from there? What shall we build up from there? We wanna evolve somehow, and we were missing a little bit the band focus lately. The orchestra needed a lot of room production wise and also composition wise. It was clear for everybody pretty much that we don't want to work with the orchestra for the next time and we wanna go straight forward with focusing on the band which was clear during the songwriting phase. We had some experiments as always, and then all of a sudden we all know that it was going more in the straightforward direction. What people can expect from the album is a kind of straight, speed metal ish, powerful, energetic album that has not too many outside of the box extra sounds. I think we're... we're not having that much of a folkoristic elements any more. It's more of a modern sound. It's kind of darker, it's very, very intense sound. We changed a lot of the production ways to achieve a new sound and also in the compositions it's more modern. more like a cyborg, scientific approach more than Classic Fantasy or The Medieval World or something like that."In the full interview, Frederik talks about the album process, how it reflects back to the band's earlier material, the longevity of the band, experimenting with orchestra sounds and the impact it had on the rest of the band, the title and what it refers to, the striking cover art and more.

First Pages Readings Podcast
Episode 46: Non-Fiction

First Pages Readings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 10:48


In this episode, the first page of three non-fiction books will be read: The History of the Medieval World by Susan Wise BauerIstanbul: A Tale of Three Cities by Bettany HughesCleopatra: The Queen Who Challenged Rome and Conquered Eternity by Alberto Angela

That Shakespeare Life
King John with Ralph Turner

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 21:12


While King John isn't one of the more popular Shakespeare plays performed by companies today, taking a look back at monarchs of the past was a favorite pastime for Elizabethan England. To better understand the real history behind Shakespeare's version of this famous monarch, we've invited our guest and author of the book King John for The Medieval World, Ralph Turner here today to share with us the context of King John's life, impact on the legacy of England, and exactly what led to him being so villainized for centuries to come.

Craft Cook Read Repeat
Zazz it up

Craft Cook Read Repeat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 59:53


Episode 94 July 11, 2022 On the Needles 1:44 ALL KNITTING LINKS GO TO RAVELRY UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.  Please visit our Instagram page @craftcookreadrepeat for non-Rav photos and info     Reignbeaux sweater by yelley L.d., Teal Torch Knits DK in mermaid gradient and Hallowed Ground 2.0   Pentrose ring hat by KnittenKristen, Leading Men Fiber Arts Polwarth DK in Tainted Love – DONE!!   Mermaid geek socks by Wei S. Leong, fibernymph dyeworks Bounce in You're Mer-mazing!   Dead Marshes socks by Claire Ellen, Sincere Sheep Cormo Light Fingering in SF Summer On the Easel 7:48 Tattoo Pigeon Show BRUSHED Show DIY colored pencil drawers On the Table 15:39   Quinoa Salad with Zucchini and Tomatoes - The Wimpy Vegetarian   Spaghetti Carbonara Sheet Pan Shrimp Artichoke & Spinach “dip” pasta Melting Chicken Fixed the Mixer! Here's a helpful video for you! On the Nightstand 25:29 We are now a Bookshop.org affiliate!  You can visit our shop to find books we've talked about or click on the links below.  The books are supplied by local independent bookstores and a percentage goes to us at no cost to you!   Seasonal Fears by Seanan McGuire  Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry that Forged the Medieval World by Shelley Puhak Murder Rule by Dervla McTiernan  Scorpica by G.R. Macallister Once There were Wolves by Charlotte McConaghy  The Marriage Game by Sara Desai  Civilizations by Laurent Binet, trans by Sam Taylor The Absolute Book by Elizabeth Knox Bomb Shelter by Mary Laura Philpott Cold Earth by Ann Cleves (audio) White Nights by Ann Cleeves (audio) Birding without Borders by Noah Styker The Secret of Clouds by Alyson Richman True Biz by Sara Nović The Mad Women's Ball by Victoria Mas, trans. By Frank Wynne The Change by Kirsten Miller Bingo 53:31 Starts friday evening may 27, ends Mon Sept 5 Need to post a photo of completed Bingo with #CCRRsummerbingo2022 to instagram or Ravelry   Feta tart crust was new technique! Start new project: reignbeaux sweater Local: Seasonal fears (Berkeley), Marriage Game Murder Rule, Marriage Game, Once There were wolves= disability Once there were wolves– cort rec Make local: sincere sheep yarn Civilizations: translation    Cortney's BINGO thus far: Book in Translation—The Mad Women's Ball Read about differently-abled—True Biz Library Recommendation—The Secret of Clouds (but I can't remember which list!)

Renaissance Festival Podcast
Anniversary Show

Renaissance Festival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 51:43


VISIT OUR SPONSORS: Louisiana Renaissance Festival https://www.larf.net/ The Ren Cruise https://www.therencruise.com/  SONGS When I Was A Young Maid performed by Tania Opland and Mike Freeman from the album Choice Fare Tarantella del Gargano performed by Owain Phyfe and the New World Renaissance Band from the album Tales From The Vineyard Greensleeves performed by Rosewood Guild from the album Forever And A Day Winter's Farewell performed by Kerridwynn from the album One for the Road performed by The Jolly Rogers from the album X Marks the Spot http://www.jollyrogerskc.com The Pint Song performed by Iris and Rose from the album The Crass Menagerie http://www.iris-n-rose.com/ Medieval Medley performed by Vince Conaway from the album Awakening http://vinceconaway.com/ Haul Away, Joe performed by Jim Hancock from the album Rolling Home www.jimhancock.com Wild Rover performed by Crossed Cannons from the album Reloading the Crossed Cannons https://www.facebook.com/crossedcannons/ Health To The Company performed by Minstrosity from the album Why Am I Not Surprised? A Moroccan Six performed by Tartanic from the album Unmistakeable Maid of Bedlam performed by Silent Lion from the album Into the Medieval World https://silentlion.com/ I Never Will Marry (Or Maybe Not) performed by Shillelagh Law from the album Songs from the Bridge Hobbit Birthday Song performed by Marc Gunn from the album Don't Go Drinking With Hobbits www.marcgunn.com SEGMENTS Festival update brought to you by The Ren List http://www.therenlist.com HOW TO CONTACT US Post it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/renfestmusic Email us at renfestpodcast@gmail.com HOW TO LISTEN Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/renaissance-festival-podcast/id74073024 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/76uzuG0lRulhdjDCeufK15?si=obnUk_sUQnyzvvs3E_MV1g Pandora http://www.pandora.com/ Podbay http://www.podbay.fm/show/74073024 Listennotes http://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/renaissance-festival-podcast-minions-1Xd3YjQ7fWx/  

Rosner's Domain
Sarah Ifft Decker: Jewish Women in the Medieval World

Rosner's Domain

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 22:39


Shmuel Rosner and Sarah Ifft Decker discuss her book: "Jewish Women in the Medieval World: : 500–1500 CE (Seminar Studies)".   Sarah Ifft Decker is an Assistant Professor of History at Rhodes College.   Follow Shmuel Rosner on Twitter.

New Books in History
Shelley Puhak, "The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:39


The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World (Bloomsbury, 2022) is the remarkable, little-known story of two trailblazing women in the Early Middle Ages who wielded immense power, only to be vilified for daring to rule. Shelley Puhak introduces readers to Brunhild, who was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in sixth-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe. The two queens commanded armies and negotiated with kings and popes. They formed coalitions and broke them, mothered children and lost them. They fought a decades-long civil war-against each other. With ingenuity and skill, they battled to stay alive in the game of statecraft, and in the process laid the foundations of what would one day be Charlemagne's empire. Yet after the queens' deaths-one gentle, the other horrific-their stories were rewritten, their names consigned to slander and legend. In The Dark Queens, award-winning writer Shelley Puhak sets the record straight. She resurrects two very real women in all their complexity, painting a richly detailed portrait of an unfamiliar time and striking at the roots of some of our culture's stubbornest myths about female power. The Dark Queens offers proof that the relationships between women can transform the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Shelley Puhak, "The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:39


The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World (Bloomsbury, 2022) is the remarkable, little-known story of two trailblazing women in the Early Middle Ages who wielded immense power, only to be vilified for daring to rule. Shelley Puhak introduces readers to Brunhild, who was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in sixth-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe. The two queens commanded armies and negotiated with kings and popes. They formed coalitions and broke them, mothered children and lost them. They fought a decades-long civil war-against each other. With ingenuity and skill, they battled to stay alive in the game of statecraft, and in the process laid the foundations of what would one day be Charlemagne's empire. Yet after the queens' deaths-one gentle, the other horrific-their stories were rewritten, their names consigned to slander and legend. In The Dark Queens, award-winning writer Shelley Puhak sets the record straight. She resurrects two very real women in all their complexity, painting a richly detailed portrait of an unfamiliar time and striking at the roots of some of our culture's stubbornest myths about female power. The Dark Queens offers proof that the relationships between women can transform the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in European Studies
Shelley Puhak, "The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:39


The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World (Bloomsbury, 2022) is the remarkable, little-known story of two trailblazing women in the Early Middle Ages who wielded immense power, only to be vilified for daring to rule. Shelley Puhak introduces readers to Brunhild, who was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in sixth-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe. The two queens commanded armies and negotiated with kings and popes. They formed coalitions and broke them, mothered children and lost them. They fought a decades-long civil war-against each other. With ingenuity and skill, they battled to stay alive in the game of statecraft, and in the process laid the foundations of what would one day be Charlemagne's empire. Yet after the queens' deaths-one gentle, the other horrific-their stories were rewritten, their names consigned to slander and legend. In The Dark Queens, award-winning writer Shelley Puhak sets the record straight. She resurrects two very real women in all their complexity, painting a richly detailed portrait of an unfamiliar time and striking at the roots of some of our culture's stubbornest myths about female power. The Dark Queens offers proof that the relationships between women can transform the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Women's History
Shelley Puhak, "The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Women's History

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:39


The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World (Bloomsbury, 2022) is the remarkable, little-known story of two trailblazing women in the Early Middle Ages who wielded immense power, only to be vilified for daring to rule. Shelley Puhak introduces readers to Brunhild, who was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in sixth-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe. The two queens commanded armies and negotiated with kings and popes. They formed coalitions and broke them, mothered children and lost them. They fought a decades-long civil war-against each other. With ingenuity and skill, they battled to stay alive in the game of statecraft, and in the process laid the foundations of what would one day be Charlemagne's empire. Yet after the queens' deaths-one gentle, the other horrific-their stories were rewritten, their names consigned to slander and legend. In The Dark Queens, award-winning writer Shelley Puhak sets the record straight. She resurrects two very real women in all their complexity, painting a richly detailed portrait of an unfamiliar time and striking at the roots of some of our culture's stubbornest myths about female power. The Dark Queens offers proof that the relationships between women can transform the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Medieval History
Shelley Puhak, "The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Medieval History

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:39


The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World (Bloomsbury, 2022) is the remarkable, little-known story of two trailblazing women in the Early Middle Ages who wielded immense power, only to be vilified for daring to rule. Shelley Puhak introduces readers to Brunhild, who was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in sixth-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe. The two queens commanded armies and negotiated with kings and popes. They formed coalitions and broke them, mothered children and lost them. They fought a decades-long civil war-against each other. With ingenuity and skill, they battled to stay alive in the game of statecraft, and in the process laid the foundations of what would one day be Charlemagne's empire. Yet after the queens' deaths-one gentle, the other horrific-their stories were rewritten, their names consigned to slander and legend. In The Dark Queens, award-winning writer Shelley Puhak sets the record straight. She resurrects two very real women in all their complexity, painting a richly detailed portrait of an unfamiliar time and striking at the roots of some of our culture's stubbornest myths about female power. The Dark Queens offers proof that the relationships between women can transform the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Crew Reviews Podcast
TCR Episode #115 | Boyd & Beth Morrison - THE LAWLESS LAND

The Crew Reviews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 60:54


New York Times bestselling author Boyd Morrison and his sister, expert art historian Beth Morrison join The Crew Reviews to discuss THE LAWLESS LAND, the first in a fast-paced knight-errant adventure series. This is Boyd's second appearance on TCR and Beth's first. Boyd Morrison is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of twelve thrillers, including six collaborations with Clive Cussler in the Oregon Files adventure series. He is also an actor, engineer, and a Jeopardy! champion. Beth Morrison is Senior Curator of Manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. A leader in her field, she has curated several major exhibitions, including ‘Imagining the Past in France, 1250-1500,' and ‘Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World'. She has a PhD in the History of Art from Cornell University. She lives in Los Angeles. Don't forget to subscribe to The Crew Reviews, hit the "LIKE" button, and leave a comment. And if you want to learn more about the guys from The Crew or see additional author interviews, visit us at http://www.thecrewreviews.com Follow us on social media Twitter | https://twitter.com/CREWbookreviews Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/thecrewreviews Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/thecrewreviews/  

Gone Medieval
The Queens Who Fought for 40 Years

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 32:19


We've all heard epic tales of early medieval kings, but what about the queens? It doesn't get much more spectacularly brutal than Brunhild and Fredegund, two sixth century queens who fought a bloody civil war against one another that lasted no less than four decades.The rival matriarchs also commanded armies, developed taxation policies, established infrastructure and negotiated with emperors & popes... yet their story has been largely forgotten, until now. In this episode for International Women's Day, Cat is joined by award-winning poet and writer Shelley Puhak, whose new book The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World tells this gripping tale of power, ambition and murderous rivalry in early medieval France.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Gone Medieval newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

2historyków1mikrofon
86. Analogie jak?

2historyków1mikrofon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 59:27


Następny odcinek podcastu #2historykow1mikrofon pt. „Analogie jak?” jest dostępny online. Trudno było nam pominąć temat, który zdominował nasze życie codzienne. Wojna w Ukrainie i jej skutki, zwłaszcza dla ludności cywilnej, nie daje nikomu spokoju, stawia pytania o przyczyny, wymusza szukanie odpowiedzi, co można zrobić. Czy analogie historyczne są tutaj przydatne? Jaka jest ich rola w historii? W mediach kursują różne odwołania do wydarzeń z XX w. Czy są one wystarczające, by zrozumieć, co sie wokół nas dzieje i dlaczego? To tylko część pytań, na które szukaliśmy odpowiedzi. Zapraszamy do słuchania i komentowania. Pełny tekst opisu zamieściliśmy na stronie internetowej naszego projektu: http://2historykow1mikrofon.pl/analogie-jak/ Wymienione w czasie audycji publikacje i materiały: - Liverpool Fans Sings You'll Never Walk Alone' show support for Ukraine in moving tribute at Anfield, https://youtu.be/Cu73iaKT3ug (ostatni dostęp: 7.03.2022) - You'll Never Walk Alone - Captain Tom Moore, Michael Ball & The NHS Voices of Care Choir, https://youtu.be/LcouA_oWsnU (ostatni dostęp: 7.03.2022) - Historia pewnej piosenki, która zawładnęła sercami kibiców. Fenomen „You'll never walk alone”, 31.10.2021, https://kolumnasportowa.com/2021/10/31/historia-pewnej-piosenki-ktora-zawladnela-sercami-kibicow-fenomen-youll-never-walk-alone/ (ostatni dostęp: 7.03.2022) - Little girl singing "Let it go" in a shelter, https://twitter.com/ankita20200/status/1500496884255051776?s=21 (ostatni dostęp: 8.03.2022) - Christian Raffensperger, Reimagining Europe. Kievan Rus' in the Medieval World 988-1146 (Harvard Historical Studies 177), Cambridge Ms, London: Harvard University Press, 2012 - Władysław Inoziemcew, Nienowoczesny kraj. Rosja w świecie XXI wieku, z rosyjskiego Katarzyna Chimiak, Warszawa 2020, https://kulturalnysklep.pl/product-pol-61527-Nienowoczesny-kraj.html (ostatni dostęp: 7.03.2022) - Wacław Radziwinowicz, Władisław Inoziemcew: Groźna Rosja? My zależymy od was i technologicznie, i ekonomicznie, 28.03.2020, https://wyborcza.pl/magazyn/7,124059,25826008,wladislaw-inoziemcew-grozna-rosja-my-zalezymy-od-was-i-technologicznie.html (ostatni dostęp: 7.03.2022) - Jacob Augstein, Von Grosny blieb nichts. Das droht nun der Ukraine, "Der Freitag", 2022, 9, https://www.freitag.de/autoren/der-freitag/karl-schloegel-von-grosny-blieb-nichts (ostatni dostęp: 7.03.2022) #2historyków1mikrofon Krzysztof Ruchniewicz Blog: www.krzysztofruchniewicz.eu Facebook: Instagram: www.instagram.com/ruchpho/ Twitter: twitter.com/krzyruch YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCT23Rwyk…iew_as=subscriber Przemysław Wiszewski Blog: www.przemysławwiszewski.pl Facebook: www.facebook.com/przemyslaw.wiszewski Instagram: www.instagram.com/przewisz/ Twitter: twitter.com/wiszewski YuoTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCuq6q08E…iew_as=subscriber Do nagrania intro i outro wykorzystaliśmy utwór RogerThat'a pt. „Retro 70s Metal” (licencja nr JAM-WEB-2020-0010041).

Dark Side of the Library
Dark Nonfiction Books Coming Out February 2022

Dark Side of the Library

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 21:14


Dark Side of the Library #40: Dark Nonfiction Books Coming Out February 2022 Show Notes: (Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you) The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry That Forged the Medieval World https://amzn.to/3G2iGrT   Out of the Shadows: How Lotte Reiniger Made the First Animated Fairytale Movie, by Fiona Robinson (February 8) https://amzn.to/3Ho4xWo   A Taste for Poison: Eleven Deadly Molecules and the Killers Who Used Them, by Neil Bradbury, PhD (Feb 1) https://amzn.to/3L16H0H   South Asian Gothic: Haunted Cultures, Histories and Media (Gothic Literary Studies) by by Katarzyna Ancuta (Editor), Deimantas Valanciunas (Editor) – February 18, 2022 https://amzn.to/3HoMVK8 There Are No Accidents: The Deadly Rise of Injury and Disaster―Who Profits and Who Pays the Price, by Jessie Singer (Feb 15) https://amzn.to/3L1Nls8   Paint My Name in Black and Gold, by Mark Andrews (Author)  – February 8, 2022 https://amzn.to/3rZuSDI   Scoundrel: How a Convicted Murderer Persuaded the Women Who Loved Him, the Conservative Establishment, and the Courts to Set Him Free, by Sarah Weinman  (Author) – February 22, 2022 https://amzn.to/33PJEVP Pandemonium: A Visual History of Demonology by Ed Simon  (Author) - February 22, 2022 https://amzn.to/3zM8cdI   Follow Dark Side of the Library on Facebook and on Instagram!

CEU Podcasts
World in Fragments: Glass Trade between the Middle East and Western Europe in the Late Middle Age

CEU Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022


What can the fragments of glass bottles or beakers retell from their past? In this episode, Christopher Mielke speaks with Tanja Tolar about this very particular type of source materials and discovers how much the fragments can say about trade, manufacturing techniques, imagery, diplomacy, and contacts between the Western and Middle East societies in the 15-16th century. Tanja Tolar talks about her work experience with fragmented materials, the images that could be found, and the utilization of glass objects in the Late Medieval World. She also reveals the connection between the imagery on glass objects (such as «seated ruler») and royal representation in public space, looking for the patterns and individual figures on the materials and symbolism of the images. The historian proves that the fragments of glass objects can recreate a fascinating context of long-distance trades in the Medieval World and the contacts between western and eastern markets.  Past Perfect! is CEU Medieval Radio's show on medieval and early modern history and culture, where Christopher Mielke casually discusses with his guests various issues from the crusades to archeo-zoology to medieval urine sampling. The discussions are made with the aim to popularize medieval and early modern studies with the help of experts such as early musicians, historians, philologists and archeologists.This episode was first recorded and broadcast in 2012.

CEU Podcasts
World in Fragments: Glass Trade between the Middle East and Western Europe in the Late Middle Age

CEU Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022


What can the fragments of glass bottles or beakers retell from their past? In this episode, Christopher Mielke speaks with Tanja Tolar about this very particular type of source materials and discovers how much the fragments can say about trade, manufacturing techniques, imagery, diplomacy, and contacts between the Western and Middle East societies in the 15-16th century. Tanja Tolar talks about her work experience with fragmented materials, the images that could be found, and the utilization of glass objects in the Late Medieval World. She also reveals the connection between the imagery on glass objects (such as «seated ruler») and royal representation in public space, looking for the patterns and individual figures on the materials and symbolism of the images. The historian proves that the fragments of glass objects can recreate a fascinating context of long-distance trades in the Medieval World and the contacts between western and eastern markets.  Past Perfect! is CEU Medieval Radio's show on medieval and early modern history and culture, where Christopher Mielke casually discusses with his guests various issues from the crusades to archeo-zoology to medieval urine sampling. The discussions are made with the aim to popularize medieval and early modern studies with the help of experts such as early musicians, historians, philologists and archeologists.This episode was first recorded and broadcast in 2012.

IHSHG Podcast
The Bible in the Medieval World

IHSHG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 59:37


Confabulating with Prof Lesley Smith (Oxford University) Professor of Medieval Intellectual History; Fellow in Politics Harris Manchester College Research Interests Medieval Intellectual History The Bible in the Middle Ages Medieval Manuscripts She works on the medieval Bible, as both a physical and intellectual object. This ranges from close technical work with manuscripts of Bibles, biblical commentary, theology and pastoralia, to the exposition of commentary and theology, to investigation of the intellectual milieu of the schools in which the Bible was studied – the people and the products of this early university system, from the twelfth century onwards. In particular, She explores the two-way link between the manuscript evidence and the intellectual evidence of these early schools – in modern terms, how technology affects what we learn and know, and vice versa. The study of the Bible has also led her to contribute to the study of medieval Jewish-Christian scholarship and relations. She currently supervise Masters students in the fields: Medieval intellectual history, widely defined; history of exegesis, biblical studies and theology; history of the university. She is a regular supervisor for MSt Medieval Studies and MST Medieval History. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ihshg/support

Hyphen
The Jew in the Medieval World

Hyphen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 47:19


Avi explains to Stephen how Jews went from the world of the talmud to spread through the world. The primary streams of Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews are discussed along with the development of legal literature and scholarship and an equally important but separate mystical tradition.

Counterpoint
Gunpowder and happiness?

Counterpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 49:09


Did gunpowder change the world, especially the Medieval World? What is an emotion and why is it so complicated. The changing nature of loss aversion and poo. We generate a lot of it, what can we do with it?

Counterpoint - ABC RN
Gunpowder and happiness?

Counterpoint - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 49:09


Did gunpowder change the world, especially the Medieval World? What is an emotion and why is it so complicated. The changing nature of loss aversion and poo. We generate a lot of it, what can we do with it?

Scholarly Communication
Archival Etiquette: What To Know Before You Go

Scholarly Communication

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 73:38


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us your suggestion on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you'll hear about: how Megan became an archivist, the unusual collections she works with, why archives can be intimidating, how historians and archivists work together, and archival etiquette tips for new researchers. Our guest is: Megan Hahn Fraser, who has worked as the Assistant Curator of Manuscripts at The New-York Historical Society, the Library Director at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, Co-Head of Collection Management at UCLA Library Special Collections in Los Angeles, and the Vice President and Marcus A. McCorison Librarian at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass. Currently, she is working for the Research Institute for Contemporary Outlaws, a private collection of 20th century counter-culture materials based in Los Angeles. She received her Master of Information and Library Science (with a concentration in archives management) degree from Pratt Institute in 2000, and has an undergraduate degree in history from New York University. While at UCLA in 2014, Megan founded the Los Angeles Punk Rock Archive Collective, a group of archivists and others focused on acquiring collections from musicians, artists, and fans of the punk rock scene in Southern California. She has presented at the Society of American Archivists annual conference, the South by Southwest Festival, the L.A. as Subject Archives Bazaar, and the Legion of Steel Metalfest and Conference. She can be found on Twitter @mmhfraser, talking about archives, justice, and The Clash. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-producer of the Academic Life podcasts, and a historian of women and gender. She has a small garden. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: UCLA Library Special Collections Punk archive Research Institute for Contemporary Outlaws on Instagram For more information on how reliance on contingent labor is detrimental to the responsible stewardship of archives American Historical Association open letter to National Archives and Records Administration and retraction Society of American Archivists (SAA) Responds to the American Historical Association Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures by Robert K. Wittman (2010) Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World by Christopher de Hamel (2017) Standing in their own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution by Judith L. Van Buskirk (2017) Indecent Advances: A Hidden History of True Crime and Prejudice Before Stonewall by James Polchin (2019) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Academic Life
Archival Etiquette: What To Know Before You Go

The Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 73:38


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us your suggestion on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you'll hear about: how Megan became an archivist, the unusual collections she works with, why archives can be intimidating, how historians and archivists work together, and archival etiquette tips for new researchers. Our guest is: Megan Hahn Fraser, who has worked as the Assistant Curator of Manuscripts at The New-York Historical Society, the Library Director at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, Co-Head of Collection Management at UCLA Library Special Collections in Los Angeles, and the Vice President and Marcus A. McCorison Librarian at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass. Currently, she is working for the Research Institute for Contemporary Outlaws, a private collection of 20th century counter-culture materials based in Los Angeles. She received her Master of Information and Library Science (with a concentration in archives management) degree from Pratt Institute in 2000, and has an undergraduate degree in history from New York University. While at UCLA in 2014, Megan founded the Los Angeles Punk Rock Archive Collective, a group of archivists and others focused on acquiring collections from musicians, artists, and fans of the punk rock scene in Southern California. She has presented at the Society of American Archivists annual conference, the South by Southwest Festival, the L.A. as Subject Archives Bazaar, and the Legion of Steel Metalfest and Conference. She can be found on Twitter @mmhfraser, talking about archives, justice, and The Clash. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-producer of the Academic Life podcasts, and a historian of women and gender. She has a small garden. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: UCLA Library Special Collections Punk archive Research Institute for Contemporary Outlaws on Instagram For more information on how reliance on contingent labor is detrimental to the responsible stewardship of archives American Historical Association open letter to National Archives and Records Administration and retraction Society of American Archivists (SAA) Responds to the American Historical Association Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures by Robert K. Wittman (2010) Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World by Christopher de Hamel (2017) Standing in their own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution by Judith L. Van Buskirk (2017) Indecent Advances: A Hidden History of True Crime and Prejudice Before Stonewall by James Polchin (2019) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/academic-life

New Books Network
Archival Etiquette: What To Know Before You Go

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 73:38


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us your suggestion on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you'll hear about: how Megan became an archivist, the unusual collections she works with, why archives can be intimidating, how historians and archivists work together, and archival etiquette tips for new researchers. Our guest is: Megan Hahn Fraser, who has worked as the Assistant Curator of Manuscripts at The New-York Historical Society, the Library Director at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, Co-Head of Collection Management at UCLA Library Special Collections in Los Angeles, and the Vice President and Marcus A. McCorison Librarian at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass. Currently, she is working for the Research Institute for Contemporary Outlaws, a private collection of 20th century counter-culture materials based in Los Angeles. She received her Master of Information and Library Science (with a concentration in archives management) degree from Pratt Institute in 2000, and has an undergraduate degree in history from New York University. While at UCLA in 2014, Megan founded the Los Angeles Punk Rock Archive Collective, a group of archivists and others focused on acquiring collections from musicians, artists, and fans of the punk rock scene in Southern California. She has presented at the Society of American Archivists annual conference, the South by Southwest Festival, the L.A. as Subject Archives Bazaar, and the Legion of Steel Metalfest and Conference. She can be found on Twitter @mmhfraser, talking about archives, justice, and The Clash. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-producer of the Academic Life podcasts, and a historian of women and gender. She has a small garden. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: UCLA Library Special Collections Punk archive Research Institute for Contemporary Outlaws on Instagram For more information on how reliance on contingent labor is detrimental to the responsible stewardship of archives American Historical Association open letter to National Archives and Records Administration and retraction Society of American Archivists (SAA) Responds to the American Historical Association Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures by Robert K. Wittman (2010) Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World by Christopher de Hamel (2017) Standing in their own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution by Judith L. Van Buskirk (2017) Indecent Advances: A Hidden History of True Crime and Prejudice Before Stonewall by James Polchin (2019) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Remedial Herstory: The Other 50%
Episode 4: How did medieval women rise and why were they erased? with Shelley Puhak

Remedial Herstory: The Other 50%

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 30:52


This episode, Kelsie and Brooke learn from Shelley Puhak, author of a new book The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry that Forged the Medieval World, which you can preorder now. The book is about two real life women who ruled most of Western Europe during the Middle Ages and none of us have ever heard of them, because that's what their successors wanted. Puhaks promotion reads, "Brunhild was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in 6th-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe." Intrigued? So were we! Support our work at www.patreon.com/remedialherstory Find lesson plans at http://www.remedialherstory.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/remedialherstory/support

The Delicious Legacy
Pork as medicine in the ancient and medieval world

The Delicious Legacy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 33:48


I've been eternally fascinated with ancient medicine and all the different remedies and potions that medicinal writes were advising to cure all sorts of maladies! But one "cure" -literally- salted, cured, ham and bacon it was really above all others! Tarikhos -aka salted meat- and any other pork cut was considered light and and nutritious meat.I wanted to find out how it was used and why!The theory of maintaining or regaining one's health through a lifestyle of moderation and balance was called “dietetics.” More than in our days, diet played a role in preventing and curing diseases, and in fact it was one of the main areas of study at medieval medical schools. Not surprisingly, foodstuffs and dishes were seen in much the same way as simple and compound drugs, and like them were classified in accordance with the theory of the four humors, by which was meant a theory of the four bodily fluids. To find out the history of this early scientific theory we must go back to the sixth century B.C., to such Greek philosophers as Anaximenes, Heraclitus, and Thales.It was Hippocrates, the famous Greek physician, and his followers who around 400 B.C. added to the four qualities of Zeno the four bodily fluids blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile, and formulated a prototype of what came to be known as “humoral theory.”One of the few remnants of humoral theory that has survived into the twenty-first century; when we describe a person's temperament today as sanguine, choleric, melancholic, or phlegmatic, we are, in effect, referring to their dominant bodily fluid or humor: blood (sanguis), yellow bile (cholé), black bile (melaina cholé), and phlegm. The Greek physician who was the most prolific medical writer and who influenced medieval medicine more than any other was Galen of Pergamon of the second century A.D. In selecting and harmonizing elements of the humoral theory he found in Plato, Aristotle, Hippocrates, and others, he created a system that was capable of describing the world as a whole, and all inanimate and animate objects in it. By Byzantine times, the theory of humours was accepted without question by doctors and court alike and even amongst more common people. Foods had to be judged and balanced for their effects on the bodily humours, month by month, hour by hour, and according to individual constitution.Ancient medicals writers, physicians and philosophers mentioned on this podcast:Oribasius: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oribasius Aetius of Amida: https://peoplepill.com/people/aetius-of-amida Alexander of Tralles: https://www.penn.museum/sites/expedition/the-life-and-times-of-alexander-of-tralles/ Paul Of Aegina: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_of_Aegina Anthimus: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthimus_(physician)Many thanks to Pavlos Kapralos for the music! You can find more of Pavlos's work on his YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzgAonk4-uVhXXjKSF-Nz1AThanks for listening!The Delicious LegacySupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy. If you love to time-travel through food and history why not join us at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-delicious-legacy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Renaissance Festival Podcast
The Happy Season (2)

Renaissance Festival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 50:43


VISIT OUR SPONSORS: Louisiana Renaissance Festival https://www.larf.net/ The Ren Cruise https://www.therencruise.com/ SONGS The Butterfly performed by Circa Paleo from the album Tideland http://www.circapaleo.com/ A Rosebud In June performed by Tania Opland and Mike Freeman from the album Choice Fare Unknown Website Fireflies performed by Vana Mazi from the album Izam Anav http://www.vanamazi.com The Fields Of Athenry (Live) performed by The Reelin Rogues from the album Live At Claddagh https://www.thereelinrogues.com/ The Butterfly performed by Oakley the Faerie from the album First Sapling https://www.facebook.com/OakleyTheFaerie/ Backyard Renaissance performed by Silent Lion from the album Into the Medieval World https://silentlion.com/ Crowning of the King performed by Blackmore's Night from the album Fires At Midnight https://www.blackmoresnight.com Usti Usti Baba performed by Wine and Alchemy from the album Bacchanalia https://wineandalchemymusic.com/ Never Trust Tequila performed by MenageAMoi from the album Indulgences www.menageamoicomedy.com Health to the Company performed by MenageAMoi from the album Indulgences www.menageamoicomedy.com The Man In The Moon performed by Withe & Stone from the album The Circle Path www.witheandstone.com John Barleycorn performed by Celtic Stone from the album Celtic Stone Unknown Website SEGMENTS Festival update brought to you by The Ren List visit http://www.therenlist.com for more information. HOW TO LISTEN Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/renaissance-festival-podcast/id74073024 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/76uzuG0lRulhdjDCeufK15?si=obnUk_sUQnyzvvs3E_MV1g Pandora http://www.pandora.com/ Podbay http://www.podbay.fm/show/74073024 Listennotes http://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/renaissance-festival-podcast-minions-1Xd3YjQ7fWx/ HOW TO CONTACT US Post it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/renfestmusic Email us at renfestpodcast@gmail.com

The History of Failure
Emerging from the Medieval World with Henry VIII

The History of Failure

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 40:26


A hyper condensed version of 1,000 years of Church history and the court of King Henry VIII. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/history-failure/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/history-failure/support

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages
El Rey Lobo: The Wolf King of 12th Century Medieval Murcia | Dr. Kyle C. Lincoln

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 42:38


The Wolf King of Murcia: Ibn Mardanish and the Second Taifa Period in Eastern Al-Andalus. Before Game of Thrones was a thought in our imagination, literature and television there was man in medieval Iberia who would reshape trade, the borders of Kingdoms and would forever define the complicated relationship of Medieval Christians, Muslims and Jews in the Medieval World. That man commonly known as El Rey Lobo or the Wolf King was officially known as Abu ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Mardanīš. Surrounded by rivals and potential allies the Wolf King set out to make medieval Murcia a force to be reckoned with as he expanded and fought to ensure the prosperity of his kingdom, family and people. From working with Christian kingdoms to going to war with fellow Islamic kingdoms he was a man who looked beyond religion and ethnic bias in order to achieve what he wanted. As he expanded his impact would greatly impact trade in the medieval Mediterranean, Iberian coinage, architecture, traditional borders and the way that medieval chroniclers saw powerful Muslims in medieval Iberia. But as he grew older caliphates and dynasties came and went into the abyss of history and a new power arose. Slowly the Almoravids came under conquest of the Almohads and the old wolf found himself in a world that was changing and he foresaw a future that would not bode well for his family. Tragically he spent his last days trying to negotiate power between his Muslim enemies and his heirs who would follow him. From battlefields to Christian courts the wolf king left a legacy of cunning ambition and one that would never be forgotten. This episode explores a series known as "Heroes or Villains in Medieval Iberia where the audience decides if a certain historical character is a hero, a villain or if it is more complicated than one over the other. Video Footage attribution goes to Adam Myrie of HAMAA | The Historical African Martial Arts Association. Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2AdDHTxTH9hzchUqxVeI1A For more information on Dr. Lincoln and his awesome work check out these links below to his book and other writings! KING ALFONSO VIII OF CASTILE : GOVERNMENT, FAMILY, AND WAR Edited by Miguel Gómez, Kyle C. Lincoln and Damian J. Smith https://www.fordhampress.com/9780823284146/king-alfonso-viii-of-castile/ Academia Profile: https://norwich.academia.edu/KyleLincoln --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antiquity-middlages/support

Verity Ed
REVIEW: TAN's The Story of Civilization - Medieval World | See Inside the Complete Set!

Verity Ed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 16:04


Erika REVIEWS The Story of Civilization, TAN Academy's elementary Medieval history program. Look inside the Teacher's Manual and Activity Book, and get the best tips for using this program at home. Can you use it as a one-room schoolhouse program? To what ages and stages is it best suited? How parent-friendly is it? Watch to find out! MY RELATED VIDEOS AND CONTENT: My Memoria Press High School Literature Review: https://youtu.be/espW9y5S0NI My Memoria Press Science Review: https://youtu.be/u9-wXM6qY4g RESOURCES (may contain affiliate links): TAN Academy Curriculum: https://www.tkqlhce.com/click-100402570-14505212?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftanbooks.com%2Ftan-academy%2Fcatholic-homeschool-curriculum%2F%3Fgclid%3DCj0KCQjwktKFBhCkARIsAJeDT0hiOFFNOB3yTyqT4liX-SOU0bvfysewn0a_EqrvRjGBVGUevgEauwgaAtAVEALw_wcB Story of Civilization - Medieval World Complete Set: https://www.jdoqocy.com/click-100402570-14505212?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftanbooks.com%2Fthe-story-of-civilization-volume-2-the-medieval-world-complete-set%2F Story of Civilization - Text Only: https://www.anrdoezrs.net/click-100402570-14505212?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftanbooks.com%2Fcatholic-kids-books%2Fstory-of-civilivation-series%2Fthe-story-of-civilization-volume-2-the-medieval-world%2F Story of Civilization - Medieval World mp3 Audiobook: https://www.anrdoezrs.net/click-100402570-14505212?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftanbooks.com%2Fcatholic-kids-books%2Fthe-story-of-civilization-volume-2-the-medieval-world-dramatized-audiobook%2F SAMPLE: Video Lecture from Complete Set: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sy5Iol3jtWU SUPPORT VERITY ED: Shop these links to support Verity Ed. Thank you! Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/verityed (JOIN an exclusive group of supporters with access to special content.) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/erika239/support

Hit 101.3  - Gawndy & Ash Pollard Catch Up
NSW New Home Of Medieval World Championship | BONUS

Hit 101.3 - Gawndy & Ash Pollard Catch Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 5:45


NSW New Home Of Medieval World Championship | BONUS See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages
How Plague defined Ancient and Medieval History | Dr. Andrew Latham

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 46:41


In this episode the awesome scholar Dr. Andrew Latham guides us into the role of disease and how it defined ancient and medieval history. We set out in the ancient world exploring pandemics like the Plague of Athens, the Plague of Justinian and the Plague of Cyprian; and as we explore the impacts that these diseases had on city states and empires. We explore how these diseases caused society and history to evolve from the decline of paganism to the dominance of Christianity in the West and later the expansion of Islam in the East. Slowly we reach the end of the Western Roman Empire, the survival for the time being of the Eastern Roman Empire and the birth of the "Barbarian" Kingdoms of Europe as we reach the foundations of the Medieval World. And with a new era comes and equally vicious disease determined to make its mark in our history and that is the Black Death. We watch as Europe is engulfed in a nightmare of apocalyptic proportions. However, there is a silver lining. Society had to adapt. And we see the evolution of medieval society and the working class as the chains of feudalism and serfdom are cast to the way side and the foundation of the complex capitalistic world that will create the borders and parameters of our own world. This is a story of disease. A story of collapse and revival. It is a story of triumph. It is our story. Support Dr. Latham and his work by checking out the links below and if possible support him with your patronage and purchase one or more of his books! Academia : https://macalester.academia.edu/AndrewLatham Website: https://andrewlatham.academia.edu/ His career: https://andrewlatham.academia.edu/cv Get his books here! The Holy Lance: https://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Latham-ebook/dp/B07DZ4TGR2 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antiquity-middlages/support

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages
Antisemitism and Forced Conversion in the Medieval World | Dr. Jacob Lackner

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 58:54


In this lecture by Dr. Jacob Lackner we are taken into the very heart of violence, martyrdom and intolerance within Medieval Europe. We explore Christian and Jewish reactions to forced conversion and baptism with the sword as we enter into a controversial subject that split the church and society of the Medieval world. From seeing different stances within the church and the head of the papacy to watching as Christians attempt to defend their Jewish neighbors from radical crusaders an intense and bitter image develops as we watch an older society attempt to discover what it believes about a minority within that society. What I found most interesting is that in this world of child abduction, forced conversion, mass murder and martyrdom we watch as the Jewish faith evolves into three forms of martyrdom which will include those who go humbly to the slaughter, suicides often including entire families who rather than being forced to convert to what they viewed as idolatry chose to die righteously and finally we come to my personal favorite and that is the Jewish Martyrs who decided to make a stand and meet violence with violence, armor with armor and sword with sword. From powerful stories to tragedy and triumph, once again the superb Dr. Lackner makes the already complicated medieval world even more complicated. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antiquity-middlages/support

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages
Debunking the Medieval "Dark Ages" Myth | Dr. Paul Sturtevant and Dr. Amy Kaufman

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 9:38


In this episode the superb scholars Dr. Amy Kaufman and Dr. Paul Sturtevant quickly walk us through the myth of the Dark Ages created by Late Medieval Humanists in the height of the Italian Renaissance who hated the idea of the Early Middle Ages. We talk about a variety of viewpoints and inaccurate ideas and images of the medieval world and how there was more of a continuity from the Roman Empire and the Medieval World into the Renaissance. We also talk about the contributions of great Islamic Medieval Civilizations that are oftentimes overlooked or ignored. To support these awesome scholars please check out the links below and buy a copy of their book! To buy a copy go here: https://utorontopress.com/ca/the-devil-x2019-s-historians-2 Dr. Paul Sturtevant. Website: www.paulsturtevant.com Academia: https://si.academia.edu/PaulSturtevant His first book "The Middle Ages in Popular Imagination: Memory, Film, and Medievalism", which lays out a study he did of what people "know" about the Middle Ages, and how they learn about it (especially through consuming pop culture). https://www.amazon.com/Middle-Ages-Popular-Imagination-Medievalism-dp-1350124907/dp/1350124907/ref=mt_other?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid= The "Race, Racism and the Middle Ages" series at The Public Medievalist: https://www.publicmedievalist.com/race-racism-middle-ages-toc/ Check out The Public Medievalist here: https://www.publicmedievalist.com Dr. Amy Kaufman Website: https://www.amyskaufman.com/ The Devils Historians Website: https://www.devilshistorians.com/ An article she did involving ISIS, Terrorism and History. https://www.publicmedievalist.com/dark-revivals-medievalism-isis/ https://www.publicmedievalist.com/dark-revivals-medievalism-isis/ Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/KaufmanAmy --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antiquity-middlages/support

Collège de France (Général)
01 - La peste noire - VIDEO

Collège de France (Général)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2021 61:15


Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

Collège de France (Histoire)
01 - La peste noire - VIDEO

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2021 61:15


Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

Collège de France (Histoire)
01 - La peste noire

Collège de France (Histoire)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2021 61:15


Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

Histoire des pouvoirs en Europe occidentale, XIIIe-XVIe siècle

Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

Histoire des pouvoirs en Europe occidentale, XIIIe-XVIe siècle

Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

Histoire des pouvoirs en Europe occidentale, XIIIe-XVIe siècle

Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

Collège de France (Général)
01 - La peste noire

Collège de France (Général)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2021 61:15


Patrice Boucheron Collège de France Année 2020-2021 La peste noire « In medias res » (introduction générale) Résumé Le passage de la mort dans la vie d’une femme, à Marseille, en 1348 : c’est ainsi que commence le cours de cette année in medias res. On y parle d’expérience et de narration, dans la continuité des leçons données l’année dernière, mais aussi de deuil et de progrès scientifiques, présentant les principaux enjeux d’une histoire à la fois globale et sociale de la peste noire. Sommaire Quand l’événement est en cours, commencer « au milieu des choses » Marseille, août 1349 : Alayseta Paula devant son juge, « privée de tous ses proches, enceinte et affaiblie, continuellement remplie de chagrins et d’afflictions » La peste arrive à Marseille (Ole Jørgen Benedictow, The Black Death 1346-1353. The Complete History, 2004) « La terrible puanteur des morts » : une vision hallucinée de la peste noire, de Boccace à Antonin Artaud Résilience notariale et résistance sociale à Marseille, Perpignan et Bologne (Shona Kelly Wray, Communities and Crisis. Bologna during the Black Death, 2009) Alayseta Paula dans le portrait de groupe des travailleuses marseillaises (Francine Michaud, Earning Dignity. Labour Conditions and Relations during the Century of the Black Death in Marseille, 2016) Propter pestilentiam : l’écho amorti de la catastrophe dans la documentation publique (François Otchakovsky-Laurens, La vie politique à Marseille sous la domination angevine (1348-1385), 2017) Une société politique qui résiste et qui s’adapte (Daniel Lord Smail, « Accommodating plague in Medieval Marseille », Continuity and Change, 1996) Pandémie et pestis universalis : « la violente mortalité due à la peste envoie en ce moment atrocement ses flèches partout » (Elisabeth Carpentier, Une ville devant la peste. Orvieto et la peste noire de 1348, 1962, rééd. 1993) Anno mortalitatis terribilis proxime decurso : un nom barré et l’évidence de l’histoire Avril 2020, un historien envoie sur internet une carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Daniel Lord Smail, « A Life in the Black Death: The Inventory of Alayseta Paula (Marseille, 1348) ») Avril 2020, un autre historien envoie sur internet une autre carte postale vidéo sur la peste noire (Patrick Boucheron, « Propos de chercheur ») Coïncidences ou concordance des temps ? Prétendre tirer les leçons du passé, c’est se préparer à « penser en retard » (Marc Bloch) : Guillaume Lachenal et Gaël Thomas, « L’histoire immobile du coronavirus », Comment faire ?, 2020 Globaliser la peste noire (Monica Green dir., Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World. Rethinking the Black Death, 2014) et faire l’histoire de la santé globale (Monica Green, « Emerging diseases, re-ermerging histories », Centaurus, 2020) Le progrès historiographique par accumulation de savoirs : une histoire sociale et politique de la peste noire (Jean-Louis Biget, La grande peste noire, CD audio « De vive voix », 2001) Le progrès historiographique par révolution des paradigmes (Pierre Toubert, « La Peste noire (1348), entre histoire et biologie moléculaire », Journal des savants, 2016) Séquençage génomique et histoire environnementale : une histoire profonde de la peste noire est-elle possible ? (Daniel Lord Smail, Deep history and the Brain, 2008) Qui racontera cette histoire ? Retour sur Le conteur de Walter Benjamin (1936), lorsque se rompt la chaîne de « l’expérience qui suit son cours de bouche en bouche » Recommencer depuis Boccace et son « horrible commencement » (cours du 16 janvier 2018, « Boccace, le survivant et la tyrannie de la mort ») Freud le travail de l’histoire et le Trauerarbeit (Laurie Laufer, L’énigme du deuil, 2006) « La mort ne se laisse plus dénier ; on est forcé de croire en elle » (Sigmund Freud, « Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort », 1915) Philippe Ariès et « l’humanité coutumière et résignée » d’avant 1914 (Stéphanie Sauget, « En finir avec le déni de mort ? Autour de Philippe Ariès », Sensibilités, 2020) Quand « l’ombre de l’objet est tombé sur le moi » (Sigmund Freud, « Deuil et mélancolie », 1917) L’effondrement mélancolique et l’épreuve de vérité.

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages
The Invention of the Crusades and Holy War | Dr. Andrew Latham

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2021 18:50


Welcome to lecture one of the series A Very Brief History of the Crusades, 1095-1291! This episode is taught by Dr. Andrew Latham and he carefully and thoroughly guides us through the background of the Crusades and how Holy War and Crusading was created in the Medieval World in "Western Christendom." We begin with the Plague of Justinian and the stagnation of the Byzantine and Persian Empire which allowed the Arabian Armies of Islam to burst out and expand across the Middle East, into Africa and Europe. We explore the creation and concept of Crusading and Holy War in "Latin Christendom," and the complexity and nature of these terms. We see the evolution of the idea of Crusading and Holy War as it changed and adapts to be used within Christendom itself when dealing with various heresies and heretical groups and we use the term heretic very much in a historical context rather than a modern view. We also see the concept expand to cover missionary expansion in the Baltic's but what is even more interesting is how we see how different these Crusades were by region and how they differed from each other whether it was in Northern / Eastern Europe, Iberia, the Middle East and Southern France. I loved this and I hope you all enjoy it as well. Support Dr. Latham and his work by checking out the links below and if possible support him with your patronage and purchase one or more of his books! Academia : https://macalester.academia.edu/AndrewLatham Website: https://andrewlatham.academia.edu/ His career: https://andrewlatham.academia.edu/cv Get his books here! The Holy Lance: https://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Latham-ebook/dp/B07DZ4TGR2 Theorizing Medieval Geopolitics: War and World Order in the Age of the Crusades (Routledge Research in Medieval Studies) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007JL1RS2 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antiquity-middlages/support

ad Astra
Prognostication in the Medieval World with Klaus Herbers

ad Astra

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2020 30:00


In this podcast we talk with Klaus Herbers, Professor of Medieval History at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität. He is also the First Deputy Director of the IKGF – International Consortium for Research in the Humanities “Fate, Freedom and Prognostication”, a partner institution of the Astra Project. Our conversation addresses the Professor’s study on the medieval world and prognostication. In this regard we discuss the new publication Prognostication in the Medieval World: a Handbook which provides a transcultural overview of current historical research on medieval prognostication. For more information on Klaus Herbers work see: https://www.geschichte.phil.fau.de/person/herbers-klaus/#sprungmarke3 Details on the book, Prognostication in the Medieval World: a Handbook, can be accessed here: https://www.degruyter.com/view/title/522832?tab_body=overview

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages
The History of Armenia from the Neolithic to the arrival of Islam ~ Dr. Maranci

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2020 42:56


In this episode Dr. Maranci guides us through the history of the region of Armenia taking us back into human prehistory and into the Bronze Age, the transformation of the Iron Age and eventually into the Medieval World. Join us as we explore, art, architecture, cultures, empires and religion. Support Dr. Maranci at these sites below where you can enjoy so much more of her excellent works. Academia: https://tufts.academia.edu/ChristinaMaranci Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Maranci Her books: The Art of Armenia: An Introduction ISBN-13: 978-0190269005 A Survival Guide for Art History Students ISBN-13: 978-0131401976 Vigilant Powers: Three Churches of Early Medieval Armenia (Studies in the Visual Cultures of the Middle Ages) ISBN-13: 978-2503549002 Armenian Art https://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195396584/obo-9780195396584-0209.xml --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antiquity-middlages/support

Historia
Relics in the Medieval World

Historia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 44:02


What were relics? Why were they important? Today on Historia I am joined by Dr. Cheryl White to discuss relics in the Medieval World. We also take a little time to talk about the Shroud of Turin, one of her areas of scholarship. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit historia.substack.com

Fantasy Literature
Why 'Game of Thrones' Matters

Fantasy Literature

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2020 56:42


'Game of Thrones' and storytelling. In 'Why Game of Thrones Matters', Carolyne Larrington discusses some reasons for the popularity of the HBO series, explores some of its principal themes and considers ways in which it both is – and isn't – like other epic fantasies. Carolyne Larrington teaches medieval English literature at St John's College, Oxford. She is the author of 'Winter is Coming: the Medieval World of Game of Thrones' (Bloomsbury, 2015) and her new book on the show, 'All Men Must Die' is forthcoming from Bloomsbury later this year.

The Rabbi Berel Wein Podcast
Antisemitism in the Medieval World | Rabbi Wein (Part 2)

The Rabbi Berel Wein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2020 51:21


Antisemitism in the Medieval World. This is part 2 in a series by Rabbi Berel Wein on antisemitism. This lecture […]

The Force Fed Sci-Fi Movie Podcast

This week we take a look back at the Westworld original movie from 1973 that inspired the current hit HBO series. We'll dive into some information about the Westworld movie cast, compare the Westworld movie vs show, give our own Westworld film review and rating, and more. Let's enjoy ourselves as we talk about some murderous western robots! (Make sure to try out listening to the podcast episode and rate us on your favorite podcast app!) Westworld Film Summary At an amusement park containing three different 'worlds,' Westworld, Medieval World, and Roman World, visitors pay $1000 per day to play out their fantasies no matter how good intentioned or ill-intentioned they are. However, when a virus begins to plague the robots and androids that are the main part of the entertainment, begin to act differently and eventually become violently towards the park's guests. The film eventually focuses on one chase of a seemingly unstoppable killing robot after a man named Peter, who just had his friend John murdered. Does he survive? Watch the film, listen to the podcast episode, or read on to find out! Westworld By Michael Crichton Photo by Jon Chase While Crichton had already made one TV film prior to Westworld, this movie was his feature film directorial debut. And of course, Crichton was more of a writer with his career, therefore; this film was scripted by him as well. There was actually a question of why Crichton just didn't make this story into a book. He felt this story was more of a visual-told one. While we appreciate Crichton being willing to make this into a feature film, we think it would've done well as a book / novel as well. Many of us made the point that Westworld has many parallels to his famed Jurassic Park novel, which as we know was made into a film itself (check out our podcast episode for Jurassic Park). Essentially, both stories involve a tourist park attractions attacking its visitors: one story has robots killing and the other has dinosaurs killing. While the main story elements remained the same, we are glad he wrote Jurassic Park as it was turned into one of the best films ever made. Westworld Movie Cast Yul Brynner as The Gunslinger Yul Brynner in MGM's Westworld The legendary Yul Brynner was the marketed character in this film. Understandably so though, as he became a household name in the year of 1956. That year he starred in three major films including The King and I (his most well known role), The Ten Commandments, and Anastasia. He won the Best Actor Academy Award for his performance in The King and I. Possibly one of the best years any actor has ever had. We also cannot disregard his performance in the original film of The Magnificent Seven either. His role in Westworld was definitely a bit different, although our podcast host Chris states he is basically re-acting his The Magnificent Seven role, but just as a robot. In any case, Brynner actually doesn't have many lines, most of which take place in a bar scene towards the beginning of the film. While he his dialogue was limited, it was quite comical as he made fun of Richard Benjamin's character in the bar scene. While the last third of the film there is limited dialogue, it consists of Yul Brynner chasing Richard Benjamin's character. Maybe a bit too long of a 'chase' scene, but Brynner simply walks stoically with his shining eyes (which we loved by the way). That combined with the music, does create quite a suspenseful feeling. Richard Benjamin (left) & James Brolin (right) in MGM's Westworld Richard Benjamin as Peter Martin Benjamin actually has quite a few acting credits, but it seems that only a few were a success, including this role in Westworld. It seems he eventually became a bit more of a success with directing as he directed films such as The Money Pit and Made in America. We thought he did a decent job with this character. He is comical at times when he is timid next to his friend John as they begin to exp...

Heisenbook 1.0 (No longer updated)
TGC The Medieval World Part 1 of 2

Heisenbook 1.0 (No longer updated)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2018 549:23


Far from being a time of darkness, the Middle Ages was an essential period in the grand narrative of Western history. But what was it like to actually live in those extraordinary times? Now you can find out.These 36 lectures provide a different perspective on the society and culture of the Middle Ages - one that entrenches you in the daily human experience of living during this underappreciated era. Drawing on history, literature, the arts, technology, and science, these lectures will deepen the way you understand not only the Middle Ages but everything that came afterward: From the Renaissance, to the Enlightenment, to your own world.Filled with amazing insights, this series brings you closer than ever before to life as it was lived and felt. You'll meet the likes of William Caxton, England's first printer who not only printed and distributed a variety of works but also often had to translate them himself; learn about Hugh of Payns and the role of his Knights Templar - organized for the protection of pilgrims traveling to Jerusalem - in the creation of the first modern bank; see how communities dealt with marriage in a time when the church had not yet drawn this institution into its orbit; and much more.Rich with information and period detail (including revealing examples of medieval literature from the English, French, Norse, Icelandic, and Italian worlds), these lectures will dramatically increase your understanding of how lives in the Middle Ages were really lived.