Podcasts about indigenous peoples day

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Day honoring Indigenous Peoples of the Americas

  • 324PODCASTS
  • 408EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about indigenous peoples day

Latest podcast episodes about indigenous peoples day

SA Voices From the Field
Celebrating Thanksgiving and Indigenous Peoples Day

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:26


This week we are taking a break to celebrate Thanksgiving and Indigenous Peoples Day. We will be back again next week with another great episode as we talk to members attending the Western Regional Conference. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Juliette Lee: Loving Yourself Again After Trauma

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 47:01


Sueyeun Juliette Lee works as the Program Director at Chinook Fund, a social justice funder dedicated to supporting community led change across Colorado, where she directs a community leadership program in social justice philanthropy called The Giving Project. A writer, scholar, and video artist, she is a former Pew Fellow in the Arts and her fifth book of poems is forthcoming with Nightboat books in 2021. Juliette was a keynote speaker for the Smithsonian Institute's inaugural Asian American Literature Festival, and has held international residencies in video art and poetry. She has exhibited installation, performance, and video work locally at Artworks Center for Contemporary Art, the Denver Art Museum, Leon Gallery, and Georgia Gallery. Her scholarship specializes in contemporary poetics, the avant-garde, and Asian American writing. She grew up outside of metro DC; her parents are survivors of the Korean war, orphans, and immigrants. If you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Juliette LeeWebsite: https://silentbroadcast.com/ Order No Comet, That Serpent in the Sky Means Noise (Kore)Order Solar Maximum (Futurepoem)Juliette's Poetry Foundation profileJuliette's Pew artist profileFollow the podcast on Instagram @Resilience_and_ResistanceArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comClick THIS LINK for an exclusive offer from The Plug - https://www.theplug-agency.com/theplug-xclusive-offersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Then & Now
Revisited - Distinct Histories, Shared Struggles: A Conversation with Prof. Kyle Mays about Indigenous Peoples Day

Then & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 40:50


This revisited episode originally aired on October 12th, 2020, marking Indigenous Peoples Day. Professor Kyle T. Mays, historian and scholar of Afro-Indigenous studies, urban history, and Indigenous popular culture at UCLA, joins Then & Now to discuss the history and significance of the day, as well as his scholarship tracking the parallel and often intersecting histories of Indigenous and African American communities in the United States. He discusses moments of historical conflict and collaboration between the two communities, and how the shared experience of oppression can support a common agenda for justice today.November is Native American Heritage Month. Read more about this month here.

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Quandra Chaffers, LCSW - Going Deeper Childhood Sexual Abuse

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:20


As a trauma specialist, Quandra Chaffers helps teenagers and adults overcome intimate partner violence and sexual abuse. Quandra is also a kink & poly knowledgeable sex therapist. She specialize in areas of sexless marriages, painful sex, and problematic sexual behaviors. For over 10 years, she has honed her skill set in cutting edge therapies such as Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR) in order to mitigate the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues that result from exposure to trauma. Quandra is a powerhouse sexpert because she attacks the issues of sexual violence as a trifecta—community educator, therapist consultant, and psychotherapist. Before transitioning into private practice, Quandra worked for 3 semesters at Washington University in St. Louis as an Adjunct Professor. She taught graduate students a better understanding of developmental psychology as it applies to sexuality across the life course. For 4 and half years, Quandra treated on average 90 survivors per year as a Case Manager-Therapist at the YWCA St Louis Regional Sexual Assault Center. As a volunteer of Rape and Violence Ends Now (RAVEN), She co-facilitated batter's intervention programming for 6 years, working to rehabilitate men who have been abusive.IG: @sasstherapyTwitter: @sasstherapywww.sasstherapy.comIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Follow the podcast on Instagram @Resilience_and_ResistanceArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Marcia Romero: Building Resilience Through Hardship

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 49:29


Marcia Romero is the Community Affairs Manager at U.S. Bank based in Denver overseeing a multi-million-dollar community investment and social impact portfolio supporting the Colorado and Utah markets. Her professional experience spans more than 20 years with an extensive background in corporate social responsibility, financial services, marketing and communications in the private, public and nonprofit sectors. She is actively engaged in many of U.S. Bank's Business Resource Groups and serves as a mentor through the Bank's MentorConnect program.Her professional growth is fueled by a personal commitment to serving the community as both mentor and leader. A Colorado native, Marcia passionately volunteers for many organizations and serves on the boards of Latin American Educational Foundation (LAEF), Latinas First Foundation, the Newman Center for the Performing Arts at theUniversity of Denver and Fiesta Colorado Dance Company. She is an alumna of the prestigious Latino Leadership Institute at the University of Denver and the Colorado Hispanic Chamber Foundation's Leadership Program. She has an impressive performing arts background as a trained dancer that has taken her from the stages in the Southwest U.S. to Sydney, Australia.Marcia is staunch advocate for education as a first-generation college graduate with a degree from the University of Denver in International Business and a minor in Spanish. She resides in Denver with her greatest pride and joy – her identical twin sons. FB: https://www.facebook.com/romeromarcidLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marciadromero/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marciadromero/Twitter: https://twitter.com/marciarsandovalIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Follow the podcast on Instagram @Resilience_and_ResistanceArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Reverend Nicole M Garcia: Resilience in Spirituality

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 55:07


The Rev. Nicole M. Garcia, MA LPC, is an ordained minister in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and has been called to be the Pastor for Mission Development at Westview Church in Boulder CO. Pastor Nicole has a Master of Divinity from Luther Seminary in St. Paul MN and a Master of Arts in Counseling from CU Denver. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Colorado and continues to work quarter-time as a therapist and clinical supervisor with the Umbrella Collective in Boulder.Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Nicoleg152 Twitter: @nicoleg152Church: https://www.westviewboulder.org/ Counseling practice: http://www.umbrellacollective.orgFollow the podcast on Instagram @Resilience_and_ResistanceArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comPodcast Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

No Stupid Questions Show
NSQS - Does Indigenous Peoples‘ Day Cancel Out Columbus Day?

No Stupid Questions Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 23:18


Are you, like us, confused by President Biden's Indigenous Peoples' Day proclamation? Do you feel "some kind of way" about how it relates to or conflicts with Columbus Day?  Is it an actual Federal Holiday?  JAG and TLeake navigate a historical journey (with lots of interesting side trips) to explore their feelings about this new "holiday."                   Related links: President A Proclamation on Indigenous Peoples' Day, 2021 The "Failure" of Christopher Columbus         Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The No Stupid Questions Show” and share it with a friend. Rate and review NSQ wherever you enjoy your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts iHeart Radio Stitcher Spotify TuneIn   CONNECT SOCIALLY! Host: JAG Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/james.a.gray.3rd/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jagrayiii LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-gray-iii-a5766b/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/james.a.gray.3rd Host: TLeake Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/embodywell/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/embodywell LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tanya-leake/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/embodywell

St. Olaf Chapel
Elusive Wisdom: October 11-14

St. Olaf Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:03


This episode features College Pastor Matthew Marohl preaching on Indigenous Peoples Day, Jacob Boettcher '22, and Associate College Pastor Katherine Fick.Our theme music, Earth and All Stars, is used by permission of Augsburg Fortress.

Chasing History Radio
Chasing History Radio: First Americans Day, The Cherokee

Chasing History Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 15:04


In this episode, in remembrance of Indigenous Peoples Day, we discuss the first nations of North America in particular the native peoples of our home East Tennessee. We talk about what life was like in east Tennessee before the Anglo-European settlement and all of the different groups that once called our area of the united states home.  Please help us out by taking 20 seconds and giving us a rate and review or tell us how we can make a better show. We Appreciate Youz Guyz!   Please help us out by leaving a comment and sharing our show with others!    Don't forget to Subscribe, Comment & leave us a rating and review. We also have a YouTube Channel "Chasing History" where we take you into the field with the men & women who discover history!

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Jennifer Samuel: Fostering Resilience is a Team Effort

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 49:03


Jennifer is the co-owner and managing director of Bodies By Perseverance, a health and fitness club located in Denver, CO. She's been involved in sports, fitness and health her entire life and loves helping her clients achieve their health and fitness goals. In 2020, Jennifer was invited to serve as an adjunct professor in the Entrepreneurship program at the University of Colorado, Denver campus. In this teaching role, she mentors, coaches and leads her students in ways that mirror her role in personal training. Prior to taking an entrepreneurial leap to follow her passion in teaching and fitness, Jennifer excelled as a marketing consultant that helped small businesses create lean marketing plans in a digital landscape. Her background spans 30 years of corporate work in marketing, project management, and business operations. Follow the podcast on Instagram @Resilience_and_ResistanceArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comPodcast Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comJennifer Samuel (Pronouns: She/Her)Owner and Celebrity Trainer Bodies by Perseverance 2860 Welton St. Denver, CO 80205Twitter: @jsamfitness Website: www.mybbp.comLinkedIn - Jennifer Samuel Instructor of Entrepreneurship Jake Jabs Center for Entrepreneurship | CU Denver Business SchoolJS Consulting Digital Marketing StrategistSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Wrong NDN Podcast
Sacred Season 4 with Guest Sten Joddi

Wrong NDN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 83:14


Welcome back to the Sacred Season 4 of the Wrong NDN Podcast on Indigenous Peoples Day exclusively on A Tribe Called Geek!! Our Premier Guest for episode one is Rap Artist/Actor/Entrepreneur Sten Joddi aka Punkin Lusty of FXonHulu's hit show Reservation Dogs! Be sure to subscribe to our channel and click the little bell to be sure that you are notified when the episode is available. In this episode: New Season, New Announcement: Partnering with A Tribe Called Geek What We Are Watching: Reservation Dogs Interview: Sten Joddi, Mvskoke Creek Nation Tribe of Oklahoma and Underground Native Hip Hop artist Find him here: Website: http://www.tattoomuzik.com/ Facebook: @stenjoddi Instagram: @stenjoddi Twitter: @stenjoddi TikTok: @stenjoddi YouTube: @stenjoddi Spotify: @stenjoddi Apple Music: @stenjoddi If you want to hear us first, visit https://atribecalledgeek.com/wrong-nd..., for Exclusive Streaming of the Wrong NDN Podcast every Monday and everywhere else Wrong NDN on Saturday. Wrong NDN Website: www.wrongndnpodcast.com Email: A'máy Tádits (Hail) Kenrick Escalanti: hail@wrongndnpodcast.com Brittany: brittany@wrongndnpodcsat.com Honeybee Marie: honeybeemarie@wrongndnpodcast.com Follow Wrong NDN Podcast on Facebook, Instagram,Twitter and Tiktok @wrongndn Follow the hosts: A'máy Tádits (Hail) Kenrick Escalanti @kjescalanti and @wrongndn on TikTok Brittany @itsbrittanyschulman Honey Bee Marie @xohoneybeemariexo We truly appreciate you for listening to us, Wrong NDNs! Thank you! Disclaimer: Any video or audio used in this podcast is for the purpose of commentary, criticism, and teaching and within the legal limits of copyright law. Any views or opinions represented in this Podcast are solely to the Podcast Hosts and do not represent those of people, institutions or organizations that the hosts may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity, unless explicitly stated. Any views or opinions are not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, or individual.

Tha Smoking Section
Indigenous Peoples Day

Tha Smoking Section

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 24:37


Today I talk about the topics surrounding indigenous peoples day here in America. Tap in and let me know what you think. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Going Deeper Intergenerational Trauma

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:11


Dr. Mariel Buquè is a Columbia University-trained Psychologist, disruptor, and sound bath meditation healer. Her work focuses on the advancement of culturally responsive therapeutic practices that affirm the lived experiences of Black & Indigenous People of Color (BIPOCs). Her clinical work centers on healing wounds of intergenerational trauma, holistic mental wellness, and centering indigenous healing practices. She started the Soul Healing Collective in order to create a community space for people to heal together, as she believes in the liberation of both our minds and of oppressive systems as necessary qualities of our collective wellness. You may find her work at and follow her on Instagram at @dr.marielbuque. Social Media for Dr. Mariel Buquè IG: @dr.marielbuqueTikTok: @dr.marielbuqueYouTube: https://rb.gy/fdkneoTwitter: @drmarielbuqueWebsite: www.drmarielbuque.comIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn moreSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Common Censored
Episode 176 - LIVESTREAM: Corporate Media Loves Cops, New Military Weapons to Fight Free Speech, Indigenous Peoples Day & More

Common Censored

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:27


In this week's livestream hang, Lee and Eleanor dive into actions around Indigenous People's Day and take NY Times to task over their pro-cop reporting that links defunding police to a rise in crime rates. (spoiler alert - there is no link bc there's been no defunding). PLUS a new military weapon that has perfect implications for combating free speech, the dumbshittery and overt corruption of political agencies and more!   liberapay.com/leecamp

Generations Radio
Columbus Day Cancelledfor Indigenous Day - Erasing the Christian Heritage

Generations Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 40:00


Over the last two years, many of the states have moved to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day, or with some hybrid. The erasure of 2,000 years of Christ in the Western world is almost complete, while the indigenous religions are coming back. Neil Young celebrated-the human sacrificing pagan cults of the pre-Christian era with his music contributions, and now the state governments are bringing it back.--But, what was it that marked pagan civilizations and their demise---The same earmarks are seen here, now.---This program includes---1. The World View in 5 Minutes with Adam McManus -Saudi Arabia still bans Christians from worshipping in public, New York eliminated religious exemptions for COVID shot, Virginia Christian woman celebrates 110th birthday---2. Generations with Kevin Swanson

Coaching for Millennials: Career | Life | LinkedIn | Coaching Millennials in Discovering Their Life's Purpose & Achieve Succe
EP92: REFLECTION: A Conversation on Hispanic Heritage Month, National Coming Out Day, Indigenous Peoples Day, & The Great Resignation

Coaching for Millennials: Career | Life | LinkedIn | Coaching Millennials in Discovering Their Life's Purpose & Achieve Succe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:22


EP92: REFLECTION: A Conversation on Hispanic Heritage Month, National Coming Out Day, Indigenous Peoples Day, & The Great Resignation Hello Chit Chatters!  Welcome to another episode of Coaching for Millennials. In this episode I am sharing with you some thoughts and observation on recent events taking place this past week and sharing updates on information relevant to the Great Resignation that we are experiencing in our workforce.  If you're listening to this episode, you know I shared a lot of information. I also asked you as listeners to share your POV and opinions with me. I really want to hear from YOU!  Drop me an email, DM or a voice note!  My email is hello@coachingwithjosemiguel.com DM on FB & Insta: @josemiguellongo Leave a voice note on all platforms!  If you are ready to jump on a discovery call and are looking for clarity in your life, career and all the things, here is my calendly link:  https://calendly.com/josemiguel-longo/free-30-minute-discovery-call I am giving you 30 minutes FREE! If this session brought you value today and if it impacted your life, please share it with someone who needs it. And it would mean the world to me if you would leave me a review! I read every single one of them and give shouts on the show too! XO! #HispanicHertigageMonth #IndigenousPeopleDay #NationalComingOutDay #GreatResignation #Gay #LGBTQ #Latino #Hispanic #Career #Life #Culture

Brown Line Vineyard-Listen to Talks
Biblical lessons from a First Nations perspective

Brown Line Vineyard-Listen to Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:29


On the weekend of Indigenous Peoples Day, we unpack a couple of resources that help us encounter the Bible from a First Nations' perspective.

Pat Gray Unleashed
Since 1764? | Guest: Jason Whitlock | 10/12/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 94:43


An airline pilot stands up for the freedom we've lost due to constant mandates for COVID. More Southwest Airlines flights are canceled due to “air traffic control issues” and “weather." We've been fighting for freedoms since 1764? A mother gets arrested in front of her children for simply not showing proof of vaccination. Ben & Jerry's is forced to answer a difficult question about selling ice cream in Texas and Georgia. How's the weather in your state? Yesterday was Indigenous Peoples Day. The Left has really been changing our traditions. BlazeTV host of "Fearless" Jason Whitlock joins the show to talk about the sexualization of our music and sports culture. Whitlock questions whether critical race theory is replacing Christianity in America. California enacts a new law that will ban the sale of gas-powered lawn equipment. All lawn mowers and leaf blowers must be electric! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters #239

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 91:29


Callum and Harry discuss the plan to get HIV for the good of diversity, western comics are dying, and Indigenous Peoples Day.

It's Only 10 Minutes
October 12, 2021

It's Only 10 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:45


In his Indigenous Peoples Day address, Gov. Tony Evers issued an apology for the state's complicity in the boarding schools that sought to expunge Indigenous culture. Plus, the Madison Public Library has a new storyteller-in-residence from the Ho-Chunk Nation and COVID numbers remain steady.

VPM Daily Newscast
10/12/21 - Redistricting process mired in partisan fighting

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:09


Redistricting process mired in partisan fighting, voter registration deadline nearing, attorney general candidates spar over prosecution priorities, Richmond recognizes Indigenous Peoples Day, a new mutual aid 'store' opens, and more

Banshees and Booze
Ep 145 - Tastes Like Regret

Banshees and Booze

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 48:43


- Underwear and PJ protocol If you've ever wondered if Amie and Tami have strict underwear and PJ protocols, this is the episode for you! This week we're celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day, and eating (drinking?) a little crow! Tami reads an article that flips the cliché of the "ancient Indian burial ground" on it's head, and Amie reads some real stories from First Nations people that have the gals certain that they'll NEVER sleep again! Remember: when you know better, do better! (And fuck Columbus!) . We're Social!: www.bansheesandbooze.com www.instagram.com/bansheesandbooze www.twitter.com/bansheesnbooze . Theme Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ . Artwork: Laura de Mooij www.instagram.com/disneybabydoll/

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
October 11, 2021:  John Rothmann asks whose day is it anyway: Columbus or indigenous people?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:32


A pair of House Republicans introduced a measure in support of the federally recognized Columbus Day holiday amid efforts largely on the left to promote Indigenous Peoples Day instead. The resolution from GOP Reps. Andrew Garbarino and Mark Amodei expresses  support for recognition of the explorer Christopher Columbus and "his impact on the Italian-American community." "Columbus Day honors not just the contributions and ingenuity of Christopher Columbus, but also of the generations of Italian Americans that followed. It is a day of great pride and celebration for the Italian American community," Garbarino tweeted on Monday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The African History Network Show
What is Indigenous People's Day? Columbus Day; Africans In Americas

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 97:00


What is Indigenous People's Day? Why do people still Celebrate Columbus Day? What about The Africans that were in the Americas before Columbus and Native Americans?; Dave Chappelle gets major support from Netflix. - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 10-11-21   Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow   NEXT Class Starts Sun. 10-17-21, 12:00pm EST (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. ON SALE $80; ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND! REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021

The Real Talk Podcast
Indigenous Peoples Day/Tyrese Homophobic?/Dave Chapellle Issue

The Real Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:41


La'Trea, Chris, JRay & Trell join me to discuss Happy Indigenous Peoples Day, Tyrese mad about bisexual superman & Dave Chapelle issue. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/MikeBrooklyn/support

The Common Good Podcast
Karen Swallow Prior explains why “Beauty is the extravagance that makes us human,” Brian and Aubrey discuss the antidote to anxiety about the future, and they share how the Church is helping Afghan refugees - October 11, 2021

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 51:54


(00:00-7:09): Should we celebrate Columbus Day? Brian and Aubrey talked about this and commented on the following news stories:  “Columbus Day is not a holiday the U.S. — and Italian Americans — should celebrate” “Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples Day? Getting to the heart of the American identity crisis” “Celebrate Columbus's Achievements” (7:09-16:07): Brian and Aubrey shared their thoughts on a tweet from Jen Wilkin, “The antidote to anxiety about the future is not to discern the future, but to remember the past. Instead of straining your gaze forward, look over your shoulder and rehearse God's faithfulness to you, and to all generations.” (16:07-24:42): Is there a right and a wrong way to make an apology? Brian and Aubrey talked about this and shared their thoughts on an apology from Las Vegas Raiders head coach Jon Gruden about a 2011 email.  (24:42-34:06): Brian and Aubrey discussed Emily McFarlan Miller's Religion News Service article, “How one Chicago church is stepping up to help Afghan evacuees.” They also talked about faith-based organizations working with Afghans overseas and in the U.S. (34:06-51:54): Karen Swallow Prior, Research Professor of English and Christianity & Culture at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and Author of “On Reading Well: Finding the Good Life through Great Books,” joined Brian and Aubrey to chat about her Religion News Service article, “Beauty is the extravagance that makes us human,” and her New York Times opinion piece, “Texas' Abortion Law Should Force America to Change Its Ways.” Learn more about Karen and her books at karenswallowprior.com and connect with her on Twitter at @KSPrior See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
What the Dave Chappelle backlash says about workplace power struggles

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:59


Netflix suspended a trans employee who took to Twitter to criticize Dave Chappelle’s special over transphobic comments. It’s not the only example of workers flexing their power. Meanwhile, companies are struggling to figure out how to deal with it. Plus, Apple is still having trouble in the health care space. And, we’re celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Netflix suspends trans employee who tweeted about Dave Chappelle special” from The Verge “Apple dreamed of making healthcare easy. Then it silenced its medical experts.”from Business Insider “Facebook To Limit Politics, Boost Friends, Says Spokesman On ‘Meet The Press'” from Deadline “Gas-powered lawn mowers, leaf blowers to be banned under new California law” from Arts Technica “Trump holds fast to his election lies as the GOP establishment hugs him tighter” from Politico Read the transcript here. Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Marketplace All-in-One
What the Dave Chappelle backlash says about workplace power struggles

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:59


Netflix suspended a trans employee who took to Twitter to criticize Dave Chappelle’s special over transphobic comments. It’s not the only example of workers flexing their power. Meanwhile, companies are struggling to figure out how to deal with it. Plus, Apple is still having trouble in the health care space. And, we’re celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Netflix suspends trans employee who tweeted about Dave Chappelle special” from The Verge “Apple dreamed of making healthcare easy. Then it silenced its medical experts.”from Business Insider “Facebook To Limit Politics, Boost Friends, Says Spokesman On ‘Meet The Press'” from Deadline “Gas-powered lawn mowers, leaf blowers to be banned under new California law” from Arts Technica “Trump holds fast to his election lies as the GOP establishment hugs him tighter” from Politico Read the transcript here. Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 881 | Storms or ‘Sickout'? 2,000 Southwest Airlines Flights CANCELED | Guests: Savanah Hernandez & Eric July

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 44:58


Happy … Columbus Day? Indigenous Peoples Day? Whatever it is this year. Amid debated rumors of an anti-COVID-19-mandate “sickout,” Southwest Airlines had to cancel over 2,000 flights. Meanwhile, a family claim their young kids were mistakenly given an adult dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine instead of a flu shot. Dr. Fauci wants you to know he's not sure when vaccinated people can go maskless indoors again. Maybe he should visit Texas? White House press secretary Jen Psaki chooses a ridiculous scapegoat for President Biden's terrible approval ratings. Sara shows the panel what might be the most cringeworthy video of VP Kamala Harris ever. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has found yet another way to make California more insane. Note: The content of this episode does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID vaccine questions & concerns. Today's sponsors: This fall, upgrade what's underneath with NEW Tommy John Underwear. Get 20% off your first order at https://TommyJohn.com/WHY As the world opens back up, don't let fear or nausea keep you on the sidelines. Go to https://Reliefband.com and use promo code WHY to receive 20% off plus free shipping. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How Native Americans view Biden's restoration of national monuments Trump shrank

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:11


The Biden administration recently restored the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and Bears Ears National Monument just ahead of Indigenous Peoples Day. The White House said the move protects land sacred to Native Americans and preserves cultural and scientific wonders. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Real America with Dan Ball
10/11/21 - Columbus Day VS. Indigenous Peoples Day

Real America with Dan Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:01


10/11/21 - Columbus Day VS. Indigenous Peoples Day plus guests D.C. Draino, California State Senator Melissa Melendez & MORE!

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
A Lot of Federal Holidays are Political

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:18


Happy Columbus Day...or is it Indigenous Peoples Day? Why not both? Many people think the fight over what to name this holiday is another outgrowth of our recent culture war. But Reason's Eric Boehm joined Boyd to talk about how federal holiday designations have been political for well over 100 years.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Benjamin Dixon Show
10-11-21 MN Shooting | Indigenous Peoples Day ft LostSioux & JammedTomb | VA Beach Racist

The Benjamin Dixon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 146:35


We hate ads as much as you. Get access to the ad-free version of every show: Patreon.com/TheBpDShow OR Patreon.com/LikeItOrNot10-11-21 MN Shooting | Indigenous Peoples Day ft LostSioux & JammedTomb | VA Beach Racist

Midday
Indigenous Peoples Day: America's reckoning with native communities

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 17:28


Today, Indigenous Peoples Day is being observed in more than a dozen states. Maryland isn't among them. But the movement to ditch the traditional Columbus Day holiday is growing, in favor of celebrating the unique contributions Native Americans have made, and continue to make to our nation. Several cities in Maryland have replaced Columbus Day with the holiday to honor Native American history, including Baltimore, Washington DC, and more than 130 other cities, counties and school districts across the country do too. On Friday, President Biden issued the first ever Presidential Proclamation on Indigenous People's Day, which was widely seen as a major stride towards re-directing the focus of the federal Columbus Day holiday towards recognition of Native Peoples. It said, in part, “our Nation celebrates the invaluable contributions and resilience of Indigenous peoples, recognizes their inherent sovereignty, and commits to honoring the Federal Government's trust and treaty obligations to Tribal Nations.” Columbus Day is a federal holiday established by Congress. The President also issued a Columbus Day Proclamation, in which he acknowledged “the painful history of wrongs and atrocities that many European explorers inflicted on Tribal Nations and Indigenous communities. Joining us now is Daisee Francour. She is a member of the Oneida Tribal Nation and serves as Director of Strategic Partnerships and Communications at Cultural Survival, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based non-profit group that helps indigenous communities protect and preserve their cultural traditions. Daisee Francour connects with us on Zoom from Chicago. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
10-11-21 Slow progress on Indigenous issues awareness

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:30


The Black Lives Matter social justice movement called attention to just how unbalanced public awareness and recognition is for Native American issues. Native people and their allies took to the streets, toppling statues and monuments that civic leaders long ago established to promote a decidedly white, colonialist—sometimes racist—viewpoint. Now elected officials are pondering what to do with statues of Christopher Columbus, Father Junipero Serra, and others. Meanwhile the number of places recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day is growing and getting more organized.

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show
10/11/21 Monday, Hour 1: Happy Columbus Day!

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:00


Jesse went hiking…; Columbus Day vs Indigenous Peoples Day…; Brent from NY has a suggestion for a biblical question. He asks "Do you believe that God can act supernaturally in your life?" --- Larry from Albany, GA asks Jesse why he talks down on black people. William from California comments on hypocritical black callers.

The Chad Benson Show
Merck wants approval for its COVID pill treatment

The Chad Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 110:12


Merck wants approval for its COVID pill treatment. William Shatner set to go to space on Blue Origin. Indigenous Peoples Day. Police dragged a paraplegic man from his car during traffic stop. Weekend movie box office numbers. Trust in media. Southwest forced to cancel thousands of flights. Former Navy Nuclear Engineer and Wife Arrested on Espionage Charges

The Michael Knowles Show
Ep. 861 - Fly Your Own Airplanes, You Tyrants 

The Michael Knowles Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 48:43


Two Indiana children suffer heart problems after accidentally being injected with a COVID vaccine, Biden issues a first-ever “Indigenous Peoples Day” proclamation from the White House, and the New York Times says we need a new American flag. My new book 'Speechless: Controlling Words, Controlling Minds,' is now available wherever books are sold. Grab your copy today here: https://utm.io/udtMJ  Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

Antonia Gonzales
10-11-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:58


Tribal leaders applaud Biden's action to restore protections to Bears Ears Native artists in Kansas showcase work as part of Indigenous Peoples Day

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: What's in a Name? Rewriting History on Columbus Day

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


In a decision representing the triumph of anti-Columbus sentiment, President Joe Biden announced Friday he plans on officially commemorating Indigenous Peoples Day, rather than Columbus Day, on Monday. The controversy surround Christopher Columbus has spanned decades. To some, Columbus serves as a symbol of bloodthirsty colonial expansion, a petty tyrant hellbent on pillaging native lands. […]

Happy Life Studios Podcast
Episode 5: HeadTails HL281

Happy Life Studios Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:20


During a coin toss we say "heads or tails", but the truth is every coin has 2 sides. Every coin has heads AND tails. If a coin only has a heads OR tails it's not a coin. The same is true with our lives; we all have a good side and a bad side, a positive and a negative The larger the plus, the larger the minus. So what we need to do is celebrate the good and learn from the bad.Here is the link of the coin toss clip we used in the beginning of the episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmxb9FhiMaAContact usEmail: Podcast@HappyLife.StudioVoicemail: (425) 200-HAYS (4297)Webpage: www.HappyLife.lol Facebook: www.Facebook.com/HappyLifeStudios Instagram: www.Instagram.com/HappyLife_Studios Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HappyLifStudios YouTube: www.YouTube.com/StevoHaysIf you would like to help us spread the HappyPayPal: www.PayPal.me/StevoHaysCash App: $HappyLifeStudiosZelle: StevoHays@gmail.comCheck: Payable to Hays Ministries or Steve Hays and send to PO Box 102 Maple Valley, WA 98038

Draft Queens
[The Huddle] Week of 10/11/21

Draft Queens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 14:35


Ready to kick off the holiday Monday for this Indigenous Peoples Day? Your favorite Draft Queens segment is BACK with it's own dedicated episode every week, on Mondays at 8AM ET. Listen to The Huddle to start your week as your Draft Queens read the biggest headlines of the week in 60 seconds or less, and then do a deep dive into a few key news stories in sports. Get your weekly sports news fix to kick off your Monday, and tune in now! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Marketplace Morning Report
Indigenous Peoples Day lends a helping hand to Indigenous business

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:34


The recognition of Indigenous Peoples Day is growing, which has led to a concerted effort to call attention to back Indigenous-owned businesses. The effect of the push has been real, as some businesses have seen sales spikes. Also today, senior economics contributor Chris Farrell chats with us about the Nobel Prize in economics. A new law in California allows more freedom for workers to speak out about abuse at the workplace.

Marketplace All-in-One
Indigenous Peoples Day lends a helping hand to Indigenous business

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:34


The recognition of Indigenous Peoples Day is growing, which has led to a concerted effort to call attention to back Indigenous-owned businesses. The effect of the push has been real, as some businesses have seen sales spikes. Also today, senior economics contributor Chris Farrell chats with us about the Nobel Prize in economics. A new law in California allows more freedom for workers to speak out about abuse at the workplace.

Music Therapy Chronicles
131. Set Up Systems: Self Care Challenge day 9 #selfcaronicles

Music Therapy Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 12:16


In honor of Indigenous Peoples Day, please use the link below to find the original stewards of the land you currently reside on. Also, recognize the origin of your self care practices. Where are their roots and lineage? What sacrifices had to be made so you can practice these self […]

5 Things
One-fourth of US infrastructure is at risk of flooding

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:35


That's according to a new report out today, the latest bleak climate news in recent weeks. Plus, a Minnesota shootout leaves at least 1 dead, the Nobel prizes come to a close, a growing number of cities replace Columbus day with Indigenous Peoples Day and a new-look Boston Marathon returns.(Audio: Associated Press)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Daily Signal News
What's in a Name? Rewriting History on Columbus Day

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:41


In a decision representing the triumph of anti-Columbus sentiment, President Joe Biden announced Friday he plans on officially commemorating Indigenous Peoples Day, rather than Columbus Day, on Monday.The controversy surround Christopher Columbus has spanned decades. To some, Columbus serves as a symbol of bloodthirsty colonial expansion, a petty tyrant hellbent on pillaging native lands. To others, Columbus is a misunderstood and unjustified target of anti-American scorn who should be praised for his tolerance and kindness towards indigenous people.Jarrett Stepman, a Daily Signal contributor and author of the book "The War on History: The Conspiracy to Rewrite America's Past," falls squarely in the latter camp.Stepman joins "The Daily Signal Podcast" to discuss the long-running controversy surrounding the much maligned Columbus and to share the true story of the man who discovered America. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 10/8/2021 (Guest: Media analyst Eric Boehler on media downplaying Trump GOP's danger to democracy)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 58:08


Not Your Little Lady
The Resilience of the Eastern Band Cherokee Indians

Not Your Little Lady

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:03


It's almost Indigenous Peoples Day and in honor of that this episode's guest is Sky Sampson, director of Western Carolina University's Cherokee Center Staff and enrolled member of the Eastern Band Cherokee Indians. On the episode we chat about the history of Cherokee Tribes, the EBCI, the importance of land acknowledgements and how to best honor indigenous people. The Who's that Lady (from History)? is Lula Leta Owl Gloyne, the first EBCI registered nurse.