Podcasts about Seminole

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Native American people originally from Florida

  • 372PODCASTS
  • 1,608EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST
Seminole

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Best podcasts about Seminole

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Latest podcast episodes about Seminole

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (10-18-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 61:01


Replay of the October 18th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Front Row Noles
Front Row Noles- 10/20/21

Front Row Noles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:21


FSU running back Treshaun Ward joins Tom and Keith on today's show to discuss his path from walk on to key fixture in the Seminole backfield. Plus Osceola Insider Bob Ferrante is back with the latest on all things Noles. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Poker Action Line
Poker Action Line 10/19/2021

Poker Action Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:25


After a week off, the guys get back to work reviewing the latest events in the WSOP, with plenty of discussion on Phil Hellmuth‘s questionable behavior, followed by his successful return to the winner's circle. Is he the GOAT? Also, the latest legal wrangling surrounding the Seminole compact and the start of sports betting in Florida.

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions! - 10/19/21 Hour 2

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 50:18


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions! - 10/19/21 Hour 2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Corey's Sports Weekend, Miami & Florida, FSU - 10/19/21 Hour 1

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:47


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Corey's Sports Weekend, Miami & Florida, FSU - 10/19/21 Hour 1 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Take Control! Give Your Money a Job!

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 27:39


Today I had the pleasure of speaking with Melissa Houston, chartered professional accountant, a CPA, a financial strategist for CEOs, columnist for Forbes.com, and the host of the Business Society Podcast.    Melissa helps successful business owners increase their profit margins without having to increase revenue so that they keep more money in their pocket while increasing their personal wealth.    As business owners, we have to be very mindful of getting the information that we need from a source that we trust, but also in a way that we are able to use it. We're expected to be badass in business the way that we are badass in law. But the reality is finance is an entire industry and none of us should feel bad about ourselves because we don't know what we don't know, right?    Melissa Houston is a reliable source to inform, tune in to learn more!  In this episode we discuss: The importance of knowing your numbers as a law firm owner. The value of financial coaching. Why profit is far more important than revenue. How as a business owner, having more control over the wealth that you're creating. Understanding your money mindset and creating financial goals. Getting clear on what you want your money to do for you. A five-step money framework. Your responsibility to check in on the financial health of your business.   Guest Bio:   Melissa Houston is a Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA). a Financial Strategist for CEOs, a columnist at Forbes.com, and the host of The Business Society podcast. Melissa helps successful business owners increase their profit margins without having to increase revenue so that they keep more money in their pocket while increasing their personal wealth.    Melissa has over 20 years of business experience with large and small  corporations, government, and not-for-profit industries while specializing in Internal Controls, corporate accounting, budgets, financial reporting, corporate & personal tax, audit, and SR&ED. Melissa enjoys helping business owners build their businesses by increasing their financial management skills. Your numbers are telling you a story - make sure you are listening to it.    Melissa's passion is helping business owners go from 6-figure to 7-figure businesses and achieving their personal financial dreams.    When Melissa isn't helping entrepreneurs become better CEO's of their business, she can be found at the cottage with her husband Jamie, two teen children, and three dogs.   Contact info:   Five-Step Roadmap to Biz Finance Freedom is available on the Website   Website: www.melissahoustoncpa.com Forbes Contributions: www.forbes.com/sites/melissahouston/ ?sh=4de028d25ee8  Email: info@)melissahoustoncpa.com  Twitter: /melissahcpa  Facebook: /melissa.houston.1420354  lnstagram: /melissahoustoncpa/  Linkedln: /melissahcpa   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 20: 14 (30. Seconds)  And I especially see it with my clients that are lawyers as well is that when they come to me, there's a lot of shame and a lot of, you know, just feeling bad about themselves because they're like, I'm such a smart person. How do I not understand how to manage my money, right? And it's not that you're not smart. It's because, you know, your life centered around becoming a lawyer. I'm pretty sure nobody taught you how to run a business when you're trying to study for the bar exam, right?

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
How to Go On Law Firm Sabbatical without Checking In - Replay from December 2020

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 41:48


Is it October already? Seeing as the holidays are quickly approaching, it seemed appropriate to replay an episode from December 2020.   This episode is one that I think you're going to get plenty of value out of because even though the topic is sabbatical, and you may or may not have even thought about the possibility, let alone the desire of taking a sabbatical.    Freedom to be able to take a sabbatical implicates a lot of different moving pieces in a law firm. I want to go over some of the key things that you have to do in order to achieve that sabbatical so that whether you want to have one for yourself or not, you can step freely away from your business for an extended amount of time knowing that the business will still run without you. In this episode we discuss:   Contemplating the possibility of being able to take time away from your law firm.   A list of specific things you absolutely need in place to be able to have your firm run without you and continue to generate income. Understanding your marketing approach and your client avatar. Having a successful intake process in place. The importance of having clearly defined roles for who does what. Managing money and reporting systems.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler:  https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor    Snippets   00:39:43 Now, if you personally are struggling with taking time away from your law firm and you really want to get to a place where you can even just take an extended vacation more than a week away, you have to get these things lined up. And there's a very specific way that you can do this that does not involve stress or agita. It involves directing your attention to different activity than those that you're currently doing. Because at the end of the day, we are the product of our choices. You don't like the result you have in your law firm, you can make a different choice and we can help you do that.

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions! - 10/12/21 Hour 2

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:15


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions! - 10/12/21 Hour 2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Jordan Travis, Thank You Corey, Celebrations, Mack Brown - 10/12/21 Hour 1

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:44


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Jordan Travis, Thank You Corey, Celebrations, Mack Brown - 10/12/21 Hour 1 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
The Biggest Problem with Marketing and How to Fix It with John Hinson

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:51


In today's episode, I had the pleasure of speaking with John Hinson of Spotlight Branding. We had a really great conversation about marketing, but not from your usual perspective.    I think a lot of times when we, as law firm owners, want to solve a problem, we literally want to press a button and poof our marketing works, or we want to hire someone that we can just hand them a check and say, here, you go do the marketing thing while I go practice law - and that's how my business will grow. But John actually teaches and promotes a way of being more strategic with your marketing, fixing things that are kinks in your funnel.    I can't wait for you to apply some of these gems to your own business! Stay tuned! In this episode we discuss: Marketing, but not from the usual perspective. Fixing the problems in your marketing funnels. Ways of being more strategic with your marketing to save more time and money. Getting people from cold to warm and finally be interested in your business. Generating business from current and past clients by nurturing the relationship.  Creating a consistent marketing ecosystem that does much more to generate leads.   Guest Bio:   John Hinson is an author, podcast host, and Marketing Manager at Spotlight Branding and has spent the last  several years helping law firms grow by maximizing their referrals and attracting the right kind of clients. He is the  host of The Law Firm Marketing Minute and Center Stage, two popular podcasts dedicated to helping lawyers and  other white-collar professionals overcome marketing and business development challenges that they face while  running their own firm.    He is passionate about helping entrepreneurs and small business owners build marketing systems and internal  processes that help their businesses run smoothly and achieve their growth goals.    John received his Master's degree from East Carolina University. In his free time, he has written and published  more than 15 books on lesser known historical events and built a website documenting over 200 waterfalls along  the Appalachian Mountains.    Contact info:   John Hinson  - SpotlightBranding.com/solo – Free Resources   Website URL: www.spotlightbranding.com   Email: john@spotlightbranding.com   Phone Number: 17046432238   Facebook url: https://www.facebook.com/spotlightbranding   Twitter Username: @SpotlightLawyer   LinkedIn url: https://www.linkedin.com/company/2379244/   YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPWwPRr0bqxZgflPgkgcebg   Instagram username: @SpotlightLawyer Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00:17:59 (43 Seconds)  John Hinson: And just, it makes it so that people understand, OK, this you're the lawyer for the job. This is what you cover. This is how you can help. And we've seen that just doing that, that simple little strategy right there. You know, our clients come back to us. Every email they send out multiple requests for new business or repeat business or referrals or anything like that every single month. Allison Williams: Yeah. Well, I think what you're saying right here is just pure gold because I think a lot of lawyers don't start the process of content marketing because they think, OK, great. Now I have to sit down and download my brain and write a legal treatise, and they want to put five thousand details in. And I always say less is more here, right? You're not, you're not speaking to a judge, you're speaking to a person who just needs to know that you know what you're talking about.

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (10-11-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:56


Replay of the October 11th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Nolecast: Florida State football analysis
Seminole Shocker: FSU upsets North Carolina

The Nolecast: Florida State football analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 25:50


Florida State went on the road and out-physicaled the Tar Heels of North Carolina. Jordan Travis was brilliant, and the Seminoles took it to them with the run game. The defense stifled QB Sam Howell, who will finish his North Carolina career winless against the Seminoles. Bud Elliott of The Nolecast reacts.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

In today's episode I'm talking about law firm PTSD - which can be defined as that very tricky, undiagnosed mental health disorder that is seen when we are dealing with a new employee who's come into our company and is still suffering the effects of their residuals from their previous employer.    Now I know a lot of you have had experiences where you bring in a new employee and you're really excited to work with them as soon as they come in. But pretty soon in the process, you start to see some pretty unnerving behaviors, right? You start to see that the person is really jumpy or highly defensive, or the person seems to be terrified of doing anything without asking 15 different ways if they're doing the right thing.    I want you to consider that there are a lot of things that can cause that level of distress in a person. We're going to talk about what some of those are. But for the most part, I want you to just give yourselves the gift of saying that how these people move in the world, what their experience is when they first come into your business is something that you can respond to in a way that gives them a better experience and increases the likelihood that they will stay with you as an employee.   In this episode we discuss: Strategies to deal with a new employee who's come into your company still suffering the effects of their residuals from a previous employer. Shifting some of those feelings of PTSD. Giving your new employee time to adapt and heal. The importance of not taking anything personally. How having a positive mindset will help you work with any PTSD law firm employee.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info: Book The Four Agreements- Don Miguel Ruiz Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 15: 30 (38 Seconds)  Well, the one thing you would never want to do is to break that person's spirit, if you will, by becoming Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, right? You don't want to be one person all day, every day, and then as soon as that one person is tired of it and frustrated with whatever the employee did, you snap and you become someone else. Because that lack of consistency is going to say to them that the problem is much worse than they believed it to be, that whatever they have going on, they're now at greater risk.

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions!

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:10


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: FSU - UNC, Urban Meyer, Coaching Stability

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 49:40


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: FSU - UNC, Urban Meyer, Coaching Stability Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

In today's episode I'm asking you all “who are your clients”?   I've gotten a lot of questions recently about how to serve clients, take care of oneself and family, while creating financial wealth? It's almost like the idea of helping people who are poor is so foreign to the legal profession that people who want to do that work also assume that what comes along with the legal profession is affluence, abundance, financial success. It's not true, but that's the perception.   This leads to the thought that, “if I do anything outside of what's customarily done in the legal profession, if I go outside of serving the rich, I really can't make myself money,” and that is absolutely false.   Tune in and I'll explain why.   In this episode we discuss: Differences selling to the affluent versus those that on the face of it can't afford your services. Strategies to be financially successful while still giving back to your community. Putting your mask on first while building your success. How the obligation to give as a condition of your receiving, is emotional manipulation. The Universal Law of Reciprocity and having expectations for something in return when giving to others. Systematizing your business to be more efficient to be able to reach your financial goals.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   LawFirmMentor.net/Avatar LawFirmMentor.net/Masterclass Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 22: 02 (36 Seconds)  I wanted the person to see how the belief system was not a healthy one. Right. So we talked about self-interest in the fact that all people are driven to help other people out of self-motivation, right? Even when you are genuinely thinking about other people as you are standing at the soup kitchen or as you are leaving an extra-generous tip or as you are dropping off clothes to the Goodwill right. You're doing that for someone else, but do not believe that you are not also doing it for yourself.

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (10-2-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:50


Replay of the October 4th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Nights With Geno
4 Spots in the Tampa Area For Great Chinese Food

Nights With Geno

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 8:46


It's not easy to find great Chinese food in Florida. Here are 3 on the Hillsborough side and 1 on the Pinellas side.  2 are good dine in sit down spots.  2 are just take out. In this episode we talk about Zom Hee in Seminole, Yummy House in Tampa, Shang Hai in Tampa and China One in Brandon.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
"It Has To Be Me" and Other Myths in Law Firms

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:36


As we continue coming off of the high of our one-hundredth episode, today I'm bringing you a throwback to one of our most popular episodes.    This episode is entitled “It Has to Be Me and Other Myths in Law Firms”.  This is definitely one of my favorite episodes, and obviously you guys share the same sentiment because this is our most downloaded episode!    I think this episode continues to get more traction because the message really resonates with lawyers that believe that they started off in business with the mindset of ‘it has to be me, I have to be the smartest, I have to be the most capable, I have to be the most diligent, the most on top of things'. And then at some point, most importantly, in that evolution of growing from practice owner to business owner, the law firm owner recognizes that in order to create a sustainable business that isn't built on the back of the owner, it really does require expertise beyond the owner.    Enjoy this flashback and let us know if any of your favorite myths were busted in today's episode! In this episode we discuss:   Adjusting your belief system about who is supposed to do what in your law firm.   Clients hiring you as the lawyer versus hiring the law firm. How your marketing message can be shifted to direct a client to a better or different option. How ego can drive how you decide to create and structure your business. How hiring additional attorneys can enhance your law firm's skill set and strengths. Letting go of the fear of having another person do some of the work.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00:15:42 - About 50 Seconds OK, what I said to her was this, I believe lawyer that you believe this, that people come for you, and I believe that many people do come to a law firm for you. But I also believe that because you believe this, that you structure your business in a certain way. You communicate about your law firm in a certain way. Your marketing messages are characterized in this certain way. You speak to your clients about their cases in a certain way. You hire people to facilitate work in your law firm with this certain way in mind. Listen, people want what they want, until you show them that there is something better for them to want. So here's an example of that.   00:15:45 – About 57 Seconds If you have a desire for something greater than yourself and you are driven toward that ego gratifying activity, that's what makes brilliant trial lawyers. Right? I don't know any of them that do it for their health or do it for... Some of them do it for the contribution, but right there, there's also a very real ego component that goes along with it. So you have that desire to create. And as you create in your business and as you create in your profession, your ego is stroked. Ok. The ego stroking that comes from being the lawyer is a certain amount. It is a much bigger ego stroke to have a large entity of other people who are also exceptional, doing things alongside you, and only have that opportunity because you created what you created.

Family Plot
Episode 61 Skunk Apes and Florida Bigfeet

Family Plot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 68:48


Laura, Krysta and Dean are joined by James Herring (a student from Dean's Intro to Podcasting Class) as they discuss James upcoming podcast (tenatively titled Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Pizza). Krysta drops some facts about bears that are too cool to be believed and then they discuss the Skunk Ape. It's sightings go back hundreds of years as the Indiginous Seminole referred to it as the Esti Capcaki (Giant Cannibal) and then it's sightings by European Settlers in 1818 and continues to be sighted right up to this very day! So join us for an in-depth study of Florida's Bigfoot!

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions and some laughs!

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 48:14


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions and some laughs! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Finding Positivity in another loss

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:44


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Finding Positivity in another loss Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Replay of Very First Episode: SEO, Branding and Law Firm Intake Toolkit with Seth Price

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 44:46


Having just come off of the high of our 100th episode, I thought it would be fun to share a quick throwback to our very first episode.    I want you to recognize that we have always been committed to bringing you top quality information and strategies that you can use in your law firm right now to grow from a solopreneur to a company that ultimately can run without you.    My very first episode was really a raw, uncut version of me, unfiltered with one of my favorite people in the world who owns Blue Shark Digital, which is a marketing company specific to lawyers created by a very successful lawyer - Mr. Seth Price.    I hope you enjoy taking this trip down memory lane with me! In this episode we discuss: What is Search Engine Optimization (SEO)? How the novice marketing lawyer can vet an SEO company SEO as the backbone of business branding What is content marketing Google's shifting algorithm as relates to blogging basics for law firms Intake processes that increase conversions in law firms Differentiating intake talent attributes for contingency-based practices verses revenue-based practices Sustaining energy and enthusiasm in intake personnel The “right” customer service mindset and experience for powerful intake conversations   Guest Bio: An accomplished attorney and transformational thought leader, Seth Price is a founding partner and the business backbone of Price Benowitz LLP as well as the founder and CEO of BluShark Digital. Seth took a two-person law firm and scaled to 36 lawyers in less than a decade. Now Seth has taken the same digital power that built the firm to create a best in class digital agency focused on the legal sector in BluShark Digital.   Seth has been a frequent lecturer and moderator at some of the largest and most influential law conferences in the United States, speaking on the tools and strategies law firms can use to align their business development with changing consumer habits. He has spoken on topics including but not limited to, how to build a firm, ethics, best practices for firm operations, search engine optimization (SEO), and digital marketing as a whole.   Contact info:   Email – Seth@BluSharkDigital.com   Website – https://blusharkdigital.com/    To learn more about Blu Shark Digital, like/follow/share at https://www.facebook.com/blusharkdigital/   For a Free Consultation with Seth's Team, call (202) 871-1554   To speak directly with Seth, call his cell phone at (347) 661-9999   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor      Snippets   [00:02:56] And I also knew that he would give top quality information, not only because his marketing company services my law firm, but in particular because the information that I find he shares is easily digestible. It's something that you can use even before you hire your own digital marketing company if your budget is not yet at that place where you're ready to hire one. And I also feel that he's very relatable because like me, he has also gone through the process of using the strategies that he teaches in his own business. So there's a little bit more authenticity tried and tested truth to what he's sharing because he's done it before.   

Wake Up Warchant
(9/28/21): The soundbyte heard 'round the Seminole world, thoughts on defense, tighten up offense

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 62:27


(3:00) Corey on the importance of recruiting in forumlating his question to Norvell (8:00) Mike Norvell goes off when asked how do you recruit when you're 0-4 (15:00) Potential differing degree between current and former staff (31:00) Corey and his write up on the defense (40:00) Did Norvell draw a line in the sand with his comments, were they risky for a fragile team (50:00) Maybe not the best sign when you say success is contingent on everything being perfect? Music: Busta Rhymes - Turn It Up Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (9-27-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 59:52


Replay of the September 27th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
“Manifesting Like a Motherf**ker”

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 48:59


Today is our 100th podcast episode! I am so excited about this milestone and I wanted to mark this occasion by talking about manifestation.   Unfortunately for so many people, what stops them from making real strides and scalable growth in a law firm is the fact that they are often mired down in decisions.    There's so many things coming at you, so when your energy, your time, your attention, your focus is stratified over a lot of different activities, it is really challenging to not fall prey to decision fatigue.   Recently, I talked about how to be decisive. I wanted to share with you a prime example of what being decisive means, and how critically important and valuable this life-changing skill is.    Thank you to all our listeners for being with us on this amazing journey. I hope you enjoy this 100th episode! In this episode we discuss: How amazing your life can be when you learn the skill of being decisive. Creating what you desire when you have a thought that continues to come to your mind. Allowing yourself to feel and think what you desire without judgment.  Giving yourself permission to speak your desire out loud. Recognizing that you can recover from a bad decision. Solidifying in your mind that you are creating something by writing it down. Getting the right team assembled to assist and advise in the process of materializing your desires. Trusting your instincts and your inner voice.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   What If It's Possible? Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor Podcast https://lawfirmmentor.net/2021/06/25/what-if-its-possible/   How To Be Decisive? Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor Podcast https://lawfirmmentor.net/2021/08/20/how-to-be-decisive/   Four Transplants and a Microphone Podcast https://player.fm/series/4-transplants-and-a-microphone   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00:07:09 (33 Seconds)  But because I didn't have society's definition of a family, I didn't feel entitled to a house. So honestly, I was kind of waiting for me to just magically arrive at a family and there's a whole host of reasons why that's not happening, either, which we're not going to talk about today. But I said, finally, you know, I can't delay making the best financial decision for myself because I don't have the appearance of the family that society says I'm supposed to have in order to buy my house. So I just went out and said, Yeah, now's the time, and I decided what I wanted and I ultimately bought a house.

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions!

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 50:19


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: FSU Football

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 49:47


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: FSU Football Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What's Up, Casselberry?
Seminole Unites!

What's Up, Casselberry?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 36:51


Our Conversation with Jamila Millet & Sean Cooper of USA Unites. www.globalunites.org Historical Society of Casselberry https://historiccasselberry.com/ Free Resource event for Casselberry, October 21st6-8PM at Ascension Lutheran Church. Hosted by The Light House Girls. Please visit us at www.whatsupcasselberry.com Interested in sponsoring the What's Up Casselberry Podcast? Reach out to us at contact@whatsupcasselberry.com The views and opinions expressed in this episode, are those of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of others involved in this episode.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Lessons From Hurricane Ida

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 29:20


In today's episode, I talk about a recent weather event that we experienced. Hurricane Ida ravaged New Orleans. Our thoughts and our prayers are with Louisiana and everyone that was affected in the South. But Hurricane Ida also made its way up to the East Coast.    As a result of massive change in our climate, we have seen a significant uptick in weather events across the country. When Hurricane Ida became Tropical Storm Ida and hit New Jersey, many people that I am personally connected to were adversely affected.    So, I wanted to record this episode to really talk about some of the higher-level strategic thoughts that a CEO of a law firm should really have in their mind for these types of events. Stay tuned for more! In this episode we discuss: Higher-level strategic planning around natural disasters in your business. Developing the mindset of a law firm owner. Considering the care that your team members need during weather events. Checking in on everyone's physical and emotional wellness. Knowing your business numbers and your business insurance policies in order to maintain your business and financial security. Having a recovery plan for potential decreased productivity and declining sales.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info: Send a screenshot from the review to this  phone number:  908 292 3524 Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets 00: 15: 25 (34 Seconds)  Because again, as a leader, like as, as a person, of course, you want to know that they're OK because you care about them as a person, but as a leader, you want to make sure that they are OK to ensure that, that they are really functioning the way that you want them to function, right? So this is not so that this is not a situation where someone is not expressing that they're not OK. And then you're thinking, OK, everything's hunky-dory and we're going to go back to business as usual and then that person just can't perform.

Light After Trauma
Episode 61: Inside the World of Our Adolescents with Lynn Langan and Denise Wolf

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 54:16


On this week's episode we welcome back our good friend, Denise R. Wolf MA, ATR-BC, ATCS, LPC along with our brand new guest, author Lynn Langan. Alyssa, Denise, and Lynn are passionate about helping adolescents and use this episode to dive into the struggles and unique challenges facing our youth today. In Lynn Langan's brand new book, Duke & The Lonely Boy, she takes readers inside the world of our adolescents and emphasizes the importance of making kids feel seen and heard. Whether you are an adolescent, a young adult, a teacher, a therapist, or a parent, this discussion as well as Lynn's book will help you to better understand how to navigate the world of our adolescents.  Light After Trauma Website Support the Podcast   Purchase Lynn's Book Learn More About Denise Wolf Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:09]: Happy, happy Tuesday. Welcome back to another fun episode of Light After Trauma. It kind of feels like an oxymoron, doesn't it, to be like, "Oh yeah, this is another fun episode for a trauma-focused podcast," but I hope that if y'all have learned anything from me by now, it's that I think that the recovery process and the trauma process just isn't really possible without some humor. I am a really big fan of humor therapy, which is not officially a thing, but it's my thing because I believe if we don't laugh about some things, we'll cry about everything. We have with us two special guests today. One of them is a very familiar face on the podcast. We have got Denise Wolf back with us today, which is so exciting. She has done I believe two episodes already at this point, so this is her third episode on the podcast. We just need her to keep coming back because she's amazing. Denise has done some episodes. I think the one episode that she did with just me was on art therapy, and then the other one we did talking about law enforcement and the whole defunding the police versus backing the blue. So, definitely go and check out those episodes if you have not listened already, because Denise is really an incredible person and has a lot of awesome things to say. Plus, she's really funny as hell. I'm just going to reintroduce her in case she is new and you a new listener here on the podcast. Denise R. Wolf has so many letters after her last name, which just is a testament to how incredible she is. Denise R. Wolf is the Owner and Practitioner Therapist of Mangata Services as well as an adjunct faculty member at Drexel and Villanova Universities. Denise is a Licensed Professional Counselor, as well as a Registered Board Certified and an Art Therapy Certified Supervisor through the Art Therapy Credentials Board. For over 20 years, Denise has been practicing as a therapist primarily treating adolescents and adults with histories of complex interpersonal trauma. She works as a consultant for many Philadelphia organizations, including the Philadelphia Art Museum, providing clinical supervision and programming related to trauma informed care. Denise has presented at city, state, national, and international conferences in the areas of trauma informed care, trauma and neuro biology, pedagogy, clinical supervision. She has several articles published in peer review journals, and has contributed chapters to Seminole texts in her clinical work. Actually as I was reading that, I think you might have even done... Actually, I think the episode where we talked about art therapy with Denise, I think that one was a two person episode as well. We just love doing two person episodes with Denise, because yes, I'm pretty sure we had somebody else on that podcast as well. Regardless, go check those episodes out because they're awesome. Then I also want to highlight our other very special guest today, who is Lynn Langan. Lynn is brand new to the podcast, but I am really excited to have her on because we are talking all about adolescents, teenagers, whatever word you might have for them. I'm sure that some people have some choice words for teenagers, but I happen to absolutely love working with teenagers. As you heard, Denise with teenagers, I work with teenagers and adolescents, and kids that are young adults. That's really my wheelhouse. Lynn Langan is an author who just had a book come out that we are really going to dive in today, because it's really all about kind of diving into the adolescent brain. Lynn lives in Pennsylvania, and her love for writing developed after she finally learned how to read in the fourth grade, after being diagnosed with a learning disability. She fell in love with the characters crafted by the wonderful Judy Blume, and found a great escape into the world of fiction where everything seemed to be possible from big problems to small. She went on to graduate from Kutztown University, with a BA in professional writing, and then spent three glorious years teaching at an at risk youth high school just outside of Philadelphia. There, she was inspired to write her young adult novel, which is After You Were Gone, which is available. Her newest book is called Duke and the Lonely Boy, and that came out in August. That is published by Black Rose Writing. We are here today to talk about it. I cannot wait. Hello, Denise, Lynn. Welcome. Lynn Langan [05:34]: Hello. Denise Wolf [05:34]: Hello. Lynn Langan [05:35]: Thanks for having us. Alyssa Scolari [05:37]: I'm so happy you're here. I have to admit, I feel like I'm missing the party over there because you're both together recording this. I'm like I should be there. I should be over there with a glass of wine or something. Lynn Langan [05:49]: Absolutely. Denise Wolf [05:51]: [crosstalk 00:05:51]. Alyssa Scolari [05:54]: I'm so glad you both are here. As I was telling the listeners, Denise, one of the many things that I think are just incredible about you is your versatility and your ability to just kick absolute ass in so many different realms in the mental health field, and I love it. We've gone in depth about art therapy. We've gone in depth about the legal system. And now here we are today turning it to adolescence, which is a topic we could talk about forever, and something that I think all three of us are very passionate about. Thanks for coming back again. Denise Wolf [06:34]: Thanks so much for having me again. Alyssa Scolari [06:37]: Of course. It's such a pleasure. Lynn, it is such a pleasure to meet you. Talk to me about your journey to becoming a writer, because if I understand correctly, this isn't is your first book. You've had a book out before? Lynn Langan [06:55]: That is correct. Not published though. It's been for sale, but this is the first book that was sold for me. I went to college for writing, and then when you get out of college that's not really how you're going to make money apparently. I was doing newspapers and short story stuff, so probably when I was around 27 I was like, "You know what, I really want to write a book. I want to do this." So I spent a lot of time digging in and learning how to do this actually, because college can only teach you so much. But when you get out into the real world, you have to continue practicing and learning, and growing in your field of whatever you're doing. SCBWI conferences, which is just a whole chapter of adolescent writers from probably picture books all the way up to 18 years old, so it's a whole bunch of authors. They're getting together and to these conferences, and learning, and figuring out how to write an entire book, and query it, and all the steps that go along with it. It's been an incredibly long and hard journey, but worth it. Definitely worth it. Alyssa Scolari [08:12]: Yeah, I think that's very important that you said that because the life of a writer is not an easy one. Lynn Langan [08:18]: No. No, it's not. Alyssa Scolari [08:21]: I think it's really important to shed light on that because I think a lot of people have an idea of what it looks like. "I want to be a writer. I want to be a writer," but then putting that into practice, in theory it seems like a life of luxury. I write whenever I want. I sip my coffee. Pinky up. As I type of the computer while the birds are chirping outside. It's like [crosstalk 00:08:46]- Lynn Langan [08:45]: No. And the words are so easy. They're right there and I'm just plucking them out of the air. That is absolutely not the case. It's a lot of discipline because you work a full-time job. There's no one yelling at you to go to the computer to write this book. The future is unknown if it ever see the light of day. That's kind of where I grew my peace from, was that I'm doing this thing because this thing, this art, is what makes me me. It's my joy and my happiness, even there's struggle along the way. If I wasn't doing it, then I don't think I'd be complete. It is a lot of discipline. It's a lot of just sitting down and looking at the blank computer screen back at me like, "Come on. Put some words down." Alyssa Scolari [09:33]: Any second now. Lynn Langan [09:34]: Any second now, this big idea's going to come to me. That's not true. Alyssa Scolari [09:39]: It's so tough. It's so tough. Lynn Langan [09:42]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [09:43]: My next question, and this is a question I have for both of you, tell me why the love for adolescence, because all three of us share a big passion for the kiddos in this world. Why? It doesn't matter whoever can go first, but I'm very curious as to well adolescents are such a passion. At least in my experience, I always knew that I wanted to work with kids. Everybody would tell me, even my professors in college would be like, "No, you don't. No, you don't. No, you don't." In grad school, "What do you want to do?" "I want to work with kids." "No, you don't." Everybody kept trying to talk me out of working with kids. It's very unpopular. So tell me for each of you why it's so important to you. Denise Wolf [10:32]: I'll start. Part of it too, Alyssa, like I was told the same thing, "You don't want to do that." Tell me I don't want something or I can't do something, and I am going to do it 1,000% times over and everything on fire in my path. Alyssa Scolari [10:48]: Yes. Yes. Denise Wolf [10:48]: That's part of it, but it's also a connection to adolescence and that inner 15 year old kid that still lives in my heart that says, "Fuck you. I can do this. Get out of my way." That's part of it, I'm oppositional, and that connects with adolescence. Part of it is that I had a troubled adolescence, you could say. I'll stop there. Some of it I feel like is not quite payback. I don't have the right word, but making repairs for some of the errors that I made along the way. Part of it is because I can. Because I can and because a lot of people can or don't want to. I guess there's a fourth part that adolescents are so exciting from a neuro developmental perspective. It is like the Fourth of July in their brains. It was such a great time of change and shifting, and possibilities. Lynn Langan [11:46]: Discovery. Denise Wolf [11:46]: And discovery, yeah. It's really exciting. For all of those reasons. Lynn Langan [11:53]: Yeah, and I would go into that also for all those things, and say that I want to be an advocate because I remember my youth not being taken seriously because we're young, and our voices don't matter. That's not true. We are young... Well, we are not now, but we were young and they are young, and they see things and make connections in ways that if you stop and listen to them it makes sense. We're missing some of that youthful view in the way they see the world. As we get older, I think we get more narrow in our views and also take less chances where when you're young you kind of live and learn by your mistakes. I want them to know that that's okay. It's exactly how you're supposed to learn. The adults that are walking around judging you or saying what you're doing is wrong or whatever, it's not. It's your time to grow into a person. I want to be there to foster that. Authentically, I want to make sure that's in my work that they have opinions that matter, and the way they see the world matters, and they have a place for that. Alyssa Scolari [13:06]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [13:06]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [13:07]: Absolutely. Have either of you seen the Twilight saga, the movies? Lynn Langan [13:13]: Yes. Denise Wolf [13:14]: Yes. [crosstalk 00:13:14]. Alyssa Scolari [13:15]: I guess let's take it to the fourth one, Breaking Dawn Part Two. Lynn Langan [13:21]: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah, part two. Alyssa Scolari [13:23]: I know, I'm going here, right? Lynn Langan [13:25]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [13:26]: Full disclosure, I just finished watching that series again last week so it's fresh on my mind. But, this is kind of how I see adolescents and this is what I love so much about them. Remember the part in Breaking Dawn Part Two where Bella becomes a vampire and everything in the world is new to her, and her senses are heightened, and she can smell things, and run at a pace she's never been able to run before, and her skin, she's in a different body, she has a thirst for things she never thirsted before. She just feels like all of these things, like sensory overload. I feel like that's what it can be like working with adolescents. The world is just new to them. They're in bodies that they're not super familiar with. Things are explosive and exciting. Lynn Langan [14:23]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [14:24]: I love it. I feel like that's what it's like to work with kids sometimes. That's what it's like to be an adolescent sometimes. Lynn Langan [14:31]: Absolutely. Denise Wolf [14:31]: Yep. Lynn Langan [14:32]: Yeah, you've got these thoughts and everything is brand new. Everything. Your world is so small. You don't realize how big the world is until you become an adult and you start living in it. The adolescent brain, the picture that they see is very tiny and then it makes the things that they're experiencing seem so heavy. That's another thing to work with the adolescents is cool, because you can be the person that says, "Calm down. You don't know what you're talking about." Or you could be the person that says, "Sit down. Let me talk to you. Let's talk about this. Let's have a real conversation about it." This isn't the end of the world. This is just the beginning. Denise Wolf [15:09]: Yep, and it feels gigantic and soul-crushing. Lynn Langan [15:13]: Right, because it is for you. Denise Wolf [15:14]: Right. Because your life is only yea long, and this is taking up such a big part of it. Lynn Langan [15:19]: Right, yeah. Denise Wolf [15:20]: Which is cool and exciting, and to be there and to validate it and celebrate it. Lynn Langan [15:24]: Right, absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [15:26]: Yeah, to validate it and to celebrate it, especially because so many kids get shut down. Denise Wolf [15:33]: Oh, gosh. Lynn Langan [15:33]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [15:35]: The amount of times... Like I was saying before we started recording, the amount of times that adults say to children, "You don't know how easy you have it. What do you know? You're just a kid." I'm like I actually think they know a lot more than we know as adults. Lynn Langan [15:57]: Yes, absolutely. Denise Wolf [15:59]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [16:00]: They're smart as hell. Lynn Langan [16:01]: They're smart, yes. And they just need a platform for themselves to be able to... That's what's so critical too, because if that age if you have that one adult that's shoving you down and you're influenced by that, your whole trajectory of your life could be changed just by some adult making some offhanded comment to you. I see that a lot. I think we see that a lot too, probably all three of us, because everybody works with kids, or has worked with the kids. You have one person that doesn't validate, and then you get in your head and you can't put it down. Alyssa Scolari [16:37]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [16:38]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [16:39]: Absolutely. I'm sure we've been those kids. I know I for sure was that kid who really felt like... I felt like as a kid I was always too much. My emotions were always too big for somebody. It was always like "Calm down. Stop crying. Why are you crying about this? You have to get over it. You have to move on with your life." I see kids in my office who come in with those same big emotions, and those same big feelings, and I think about how they suffer so much less simply because another adult is able to say, "Aw man, of course you feel that way." Lynn Langan [17:20]: Right. Alyssa Scolari [17:20]: It makes all the difference, doesn't it? Denise Wolf [17:23]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [17:23]: It really does. "I see you." That's what you're saying, "I see you. You exist. Everything you feel exists. It's real. It's here." Don't bury that down because it's making other people feel uncomfortable it. I think a lot of kids get their voice shut off because of that. No one's validating them or they can crawl inside their head and just be quiet. [crosstalk 00:17:45]- Alyssa Scolari [17:46]: 1,000%. [crosstalk 00:17:46] 1,000%. Lynn Langan [17:48]: Yeah, and it's sad. I don't want to see that for anybody. I think it's good to think of it in terms like that. It could just feel like you have a breakup with your boyfriend or girlfriend. Yes, as an adult you're like, "Get over it. You're going to get hurt 1,000 times." Well guess what, this is the first time I'm being hurt and everything you're saying to me is how I'm going to model my life from this point on. This is how I'm going to deal with things that come up in my life because you told me to calm down, or didn't see, or didn't hear me. I think that's good to give kids voices. Denise Wolf [18:23]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [18:24]: Absolutely. It makes them feel human. I almost feel like we dehumanize kids, and we don't see them as having the same kind of complex feelings and emotions that adults have. There's always "I'm the adult and you're the kid. This doesn't concern you." It's like if we could shift that. Your kid is an independent human with independent thoughts and feelings, and viewpoints of the world. If we could shift from "You're just a kid. What the fuck do you know?" To "Hey, tell me how you view that," it would make such a big difference in the lives of adolescents I think. Lynn Langan [19:16]: Absolutely. When people say, "Oh, well you don't know how good you have it," I look at kids and I'm like, "Man, you don't know how bad you have it." Because you have to be plugged in to this social media, to this... You're always plugged in and you don't get a break from that ever. Ever. I look at my nieces and nephews and I'm just like, "What would it be like if you could just put that phone down?" I know you can't because you feel like you have to be involved in that, but it's just crazy. You don't ever have a safe spot. When we were kids, you can get away from school or all of that, and just go geek in your room and do whatever you want. But not these kids. They're just sitting there taking selfies 24/7 and feeling like they have to, and people are judging them for that, and they're not looking at what are the consequences of that? What does that really feel like to be plugged in 24/7 and never getting a break? Denise Wolf [20:13]: They don't know because they haven't had a different experience. Lynn Langan [20:15]: Right, yeah it's very disheartening when adults judge the kids. They're like, "Oh, you don't know what it's like. I walked up to school on a hill and back again on a hill." No, these kids are going through it. There's a lot of pressures on them. New things that they're coming against. There's just so much for them I feel. Denise Wolf [20:37]: Yep. I think part of the reason we collectively adopt, dismiss and minimize adolescents is because they don't want to remember their own eps because they're growing pains. Growing pains, they're emotional and physical. They shut them down, "Be quiet. Get over it. Calm down," like being on an airplane when there's a crying baby and somebody's like, "Shut that baby up." My response is, "Oh, you were born a full grown adult asshole? You were never a baby?" People want to forget or deny their adolescence. Lynn Langan [21:14]: Right, absolutely. Denise Wolf [21:16]: But we don't. That's why we're amazing. Lynn Langan [21:18]: Right. Alyssa Scolari [21:20]: No, that's right. That's why we're fucking amazing at what we do, because we understand the magic that lives in adolescence. I love it. I love it. Tell me, Lynn, where was the inspiration for this book? I'll let you answer that question before I drill you with five more questions. Lynn Langan [21:47]: The idea of we indirectly impact people versus directly impact people has always been fascinating to me, because Denise and I worked at Carson Valley Children's Aid, which is a residential facility for troubled youth. We had a lot of Philadelphian children who came out to our school that were bused in. Alyssa Scolari [22:08]: Is that how the two of you met? Lynn Langan [22:09]: Yes. Denise Wolf [22:10]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [22:10]: That's awesome. Lynn Langan [22:12]: This one day the guidance counselor came out said, "Okay, I want you to give out a soft pretzel to a student that you think is deserving." We're teachers. We're like a million miles... You just take the ticket and you're like, okay whatever. So, I gave it to this student who was very short, very quiet, very closed off. She didn't like to talk at all. I walked up to her and I said, "Here you go." She started crying. I was like, "What's going on?" She was like, "I didn't think you knew who I was." I'm like, "I'm your teacher for a long time. Of course I know who you are." She was like, "I just didn't think you saw me." From that point on I was like, wow the littlest things that we do really do make a difference sometimes. You don't know. You don't know what that thing is going to be. Then that kind of just fascinated me like how many other things have I done to people that changed their perspective or vice versa. That whole seed was planted in me that I wanted to write this book where you think you know, but you don't know. You don't know what's going on in that person's life. What does that really look like, and how would that really spawn out into a novel? How could I get that across? That's kind of where I started playing with Duke and the Lonely Boy, because they both have these ideas about each other, but they don't really know each other at all. Alyssa Scolari [23:45]: Yeah. Yeah, it seems like... Again, I'm still reading this, but from all that I've gathered from the book so far, it seems like that is the moral... One of the many morals of the story is that you truly just don't know. What you did, is you magically crafted two characters who couldn't be further apart from one another. Without giving too much away, can you say a little bit more about who Duke and the Lonely Boy are? I just love their story right from the get go. Lynn Langan [24:19]: Yeah. It seems stereotypical, but it's not, I promise. Duke is the popular boy, and he's the All-Star football player, and he's got a very bright future ahead of him, but he's struggling in math. So, something very simple. The coach gets him this tutor, Tommy, who is just this outcast, but not in the stereotypical form. He's just quiet and nobody really knows his existence in this school or the story. They meet up and that's how the story begins, but it's told obviously through two perspectives. The first half of the book you're really getting Tommy's perspective as the little person and his story of what's going on. You're seeing him through Duke's eyes as a teenager. I think it's unpacking that for Tommy. Duke's got his own struggles going on, which Tommy kind of looks at like, "What's up? You can't do math, but you got everything else going for you." The story too jumps around in time, which kind of reminds me of therapy work, where it's not like you sit down with the client the first time and tell their entire history. You're working through their story kind of like event by event, and it's not sequential. So we as therapists have to be mindful that we don't make assumptions from go because I think for me one of the big takeaways is when you know, you know, and to remember that you don't. Duke and Tommy have these really complex stories, and have this sort of initial encounter where they think they know each other. Then throughout this jumping in time, back and forth in time and these crossovers of their interactions in their own personal stories, your perspective and understanding and empathy really shifts. Alyssa Scolari [26:18]: Yeah, absolutely. You know what also I love is that you're breaking this stereotype. If a high schooler were to pick up this book and read it, whether that high schooler is the football star in the school, the popular one, or more of the loner, you can still learn something. I love that this breaks the stereotype, because I think a lot of people feel like the kids who are loners are the only kids who have stuff going on. Like "Oh, they've got issues." I can't tell you how many times I have heard other kids be like, "Oh yeah, there's the loner. That's the kid that's going to shoot up the school," and say dumb shit like that that kids say. But you als don't know how much is going on behind the football stars, the basketball stars, the most popular girl. I like that you break that stereotype as well. Lynn Langan [27:24]: I wanted the reader to be able to identify with real characters. These are not those heavy issues in there, but with... I'm not sure if [inaudible 00:27:36] that for you is the right [inaudible 00:27:38]. I feel like the reader deserves that. Alyssa Scolari [27:42]: That it's like there are heavy issues in there. Lynn Langan [27:44]: Yeah, that there's heavy [crosstalk 00:27:45]. Alyssa Scolari [27:45]: Some of its tough. Lynn Langan [27:46]: Yeah, some of its tough, and it's real and maybe you could see yourself in some of these things. I like that Duke is the popular one, but he's growing so much in this story. He's trying to find his place. Just because you're popular doesn't mean you know your place. Duke constantly questions whether is this real, or if I don't keep doing things that these people are saying that I do then I'll lose everything. I do think that that's a struggle for the popular kids. If you could pick up that book as a popular kid and be like, "Yeah. Right, I have things too and I don't know what to do with these things. They're heavy and maybe I don't want to be in the box that I've suddenly found myself in. Maybe I want to go sit with the loner or the art students, or the music group," or whoever. High school is very segregated in where you're going to be, so it's nice for the popular kid to be able to pick up that book and say, "Yeah, I do have things and I don't necessarily know what the hell I'm doing. I don't have it all. I just appear to have it all." Sometimes our appearances really plays with your head. Denise Wolf [29:01]: In a lot of ways, Tommy has more resilience than Duke because Tommy's endured a lot and in some ways that's given him a lot of strength. Lynn Langan [29:12]: Yeah, but he doesn't know he has it. Denise Wolf [29:15]: Right. Lynn Langan [29:15]: Yeah, that's his journey, is that he is authentic to himself, but he doesn't know how to get that out to the world because he's just been shut down by his life situations. Denise Wolf [29:30]: I'm thinking about The Breakfast Club. I'm like is this a modern day Breakfast Club? You know in the end when I think Jeb Nelson's narrating, he's like "In each one of us there's a cheerleader [crosstalk 00:29:40]-" Lynn Langan [29:39]: Oh yeah. Denise Wolf [29:39]: "And the football player." Lynn Langan [29:42]: Right. Denise Wolf [29:43]: Right, and they're dealing with other characters in the book. You meet Charlie, and Lexie, and I'm thinking there's a little bit... It's not like, oh the popular kid's going to read this and identify with Duke. These characters are so well developed and complex. They really speak I think collectively of the adolescent experience. Lynn Langan [30:03]: Yeah, and sometimes I find I read young adult books and they bring up something that's heavy, and then they leave it. They just leave it there- Alyssa Scolari [30:14]: Skirted away, yeah. Lynn Langan [30:15]: It's like, actually that's not what the real emotion of that is. Don't just put it in there because it's heavy. Don't brush over that. We're also, as authors, I think we have a moral code that we should say we're not going to breeze over these emotions because it's not going to sell books or it's not Hollywood enough. No. I think that's what it is. We have the duty as these authors that are writing to these young children to really be their users into the world and validate their feelings that they're feeling, and not gloss over. I was reading a book recently and the main character was raped. Then we were done. I was like nothing- Denise Wolf [31:00]: [crosstalk 00:31:00] that's not how that goes. Lynn Langan [31:01]: That is absolutely not how that goes. Denise Wolf [31:03]: [crosstalk 00:31:03] like that. Lynn Langan [31:05]: Right, my fear is that the young girl who is reading that is like, "Well, I guess I gloss over that, this thing that happened to me. I guess I don't talk about it, or I don't have real feelings about it." Well, no. That's an injustice. Alyssa Scolari [31:22]: Yeah, and as you're both saying this, my adolescence is very much on the forefront of my brain just b because of all the inner child work that I've been doing recently. I have lots of memories from my adolescence, and I was in school. The time that I was in middle school, we didn't talk about this stuff. This really wasn't something that got talked about not even in the slightest. Even today, when it is getting talked about, it's usually not getting talked about correctly, or not handled well. So, we've got a long way to go, but that's a whole other podcast. I turned to books. I was such a reader, and I turned to all of these young adult novels. I remember... As you were saying that Lynn, I'm sitting here and the feeling that I used to feel as a 14 year old is coming back to me, where I was opening these books, these young adult novels, trying to find the darkest ones I could find. I need the darkest book that is in this section that somebody will let me take from this God forsaken school library. I would read it and look, and it would touch on something dark, and that to me would be what I needed to get into. I would be like, "Okay, we're talking about drugs here. We're talking about sexual abuse here." My 14 year old brain is like, "I need more of this. I need more of this. What do you mean you were raped? Are we ever going to talk about this?" No, we're just going to talk about how you got into a fight with your best friend now, and that's the plot. The rape is... So, I love that you're doing that because I agree, and I think that that is such a missing piece for so many young adult novels, is that for Hollywood purposes, for selling purposes, for stigma purposes, because we don't like to talk about these things, a lot of authors gloss over it. There's not many people who dig right into the core and look at all facets of it, because it's uncomfortable for folks. Lynn Langan [33:34]: Yep. Yeah, definitely. There's going to be times where the reader's going to be uncomfortable in Duke and the Lonely Boy, and that's appropriate. My only hope is that I did a good enough job that if it touches one kid's life, if it's a map for one kid's life, then I've done my job. That's kind of what my philosophy is on that. I want to be authentic and give you a real picture of what's going on. Alyssa Scolari [34:04]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [34:05]: Sometimes that's ugly. Alyssa Scolari [34:08]: Sometimes it's ugly, but that's what's so helpful. I know I shared this when we were going back and forth in emails, but for me the book that I was finally able to get my hands on that went into detail, this book it was called Almost Lost. It was the journey of a teenager's healing process and recovery from addiction, and it's the transcript of his therapy sessions were in the book. I read that book and I felt like I was home. Not only did I feel like that therapist in that book was speaking to me as a 14 year old, I was in the eighth grade when I read this book and did a book report on it, but in that moment that book told me this is what I need to do with the rest of my life. When you say "If this book can help one person," I guarantee it's going to help so many more than that because I see what a book did for me. It can change lives. Lynn Langan [35:09]: Right, absolutely. There's a theory I have to bring up here. Alyssa Scolari [35:12]: Please do. Please do. Denise Wolf [35:16]: A theory about why looking at art, why we have sort of these "oh my gosh" relief moments like you're say the art museum, or listening to a piece of well composed music or whatever it is. So, [inaudible 00:35:29] have this series born in psychology to arts that we take a well crafted piece of art, like [inaudible 00:35:36], but we take our defuse tensions and anxieties from our lives, the day, whatever it is, project it into the work of art or reading a book, and through resolution of the formal elements, story after story, our plot, characters, all that kind of stuff, we then experience a sense of our own relief or release of tension, cortisol, all that kind of stuff. I'm really connecting that to when story and your story, and my story of the dark, dark books that I dug out, or the banned books from the library [crosstalk 00:36:11]. Even if it wasn't directly my story to be able to be part of somebody else's that reflected a part of me, that's well crafted, we get a sense of relief and release. Lynn Langan [36:23]: Right, absolutely. Absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [36:26]: Yeah. I have never heard of that before, and that is fascinating. As you're sitting here, I'm such a dork, as you're sitting here saying that, I'm going "Oh shit, that's why I love Harry Potter so much. That's why I can't stop reading Harry Potter." Lynn Langan [36:46]: Yes. Denise Wolf [36:47]: Right, yeah. There's a part of us that we project into these works of art. Then through the character's resolution we experience a sense of our own. Does that mean it's going to fix your problems? No, that's not at all what I'm saying. Lynn Langan [36:59]: No. But sometimes, think we're all saying it too, it's nice to not feel alone. We're not alone and that. Even if it's not our story, if it's just something that's sort of singular or where we can insert ourself, even it's just a false victory because you read the character's victory, it does give you hope. Alyssa Scolari [37:21]: Yes. Lynn Langan [37:22]: And hope is all you really need at the end of the day, because if you feel that you have that, some kind of glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel per se, then you're going to chuck through to the end and find it for yourself. I think. Denise Wolf [37:22]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [37:38]: Yes. When you are dealing with the biology of an adolescent brain, and their emotional response center is on fire, and their prefrontal cortex, the place for rational thought is under-developed, hope can be a hard, hard thing to come by. Denise Wolf [38:06]: Very. Yeah, it's abstract. I think in adolescent, the top third of their brain is like under construction. Lynn Langan [38:13]: Right. Denise Wolf [38:14]: It's not even there. So, hope is [crosstalk 00:38:16] that belongs in that top third. So, you can talk about it, you have to feel about it. That's where art comes in, to create that- Lynn Langan [38:28]: Yeah, absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [38:31]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [38:33]: There were several scenes in this book that I wrote, and then I would walk away from my desk and come back and be like, "Nope, you wrote that as an adult. Stop. You can't fix the problems like that. Stop it." Alyssa Scolari [38:50]: Yeah, now this might a little bit of a, I guess, abstract question, but was there anything that you had to do to be able to really channel your inner adolescent? Or is that something that's very easily accessible to you? Lynn Langan [39:05]: It's something I think is very easily accessible to me, for some reason. It's a gift that [crosstalk 00:39:11]- Alyssa Scolari [39:11]: It's a gift. A gift and a curse. Lynn Langan [39:15]: [crosstalk 00:39:15]. It's both those things. I was reading this book. I'm dyslexic, so there's book about... A dyslexic author wrote this book about the gifts of being dyslexic. One of the things is that the way we form memories around the events that are happening because for a normal brain it goes syntax... What's that word? Here we go, [crosstalk 00:39:39]. Denise Wolf [39:39]: It's synapsis. Lynn Langan [39:41]: Synapsis. But for a dyslexic brain, it kind of takes a U turn. It pings differently, and because of that we're really grounded in memory. We have an excellent memory for all things, but that's kind of like our survival guide because it's how we thrive. Because of that, I can basically tell you everything that's happened in my life. My memory, for some reason, well not for some reason, for that reason is extremely strong. When I sit down to write these adolescent books, I can just sit down and be like, "Okay, you're 17. Go." You got to think of high school, of events, and just remember how small my brain was, or what I was thinking or feeling at that point. Then I can dive in. That's how I know when I'm not being authentic to the characters or the voice, is when I feel like my adult brain is coming in and being like, "Well, that was easy." I'm like, wait no, it shouldn't be easy. It's not an easy [crosstalk 00:40:39] job. You can't think like that. I feel like because of all of that, that's why I'm very good with my memories and all of that. Denise Wolf [40:47]: Mm-hmm [affirmative], it makes sense. Lynn Langan [40:48]: Mm-hmm [affirmative], I'm very in touch with that. Denise Wolf [40:52]: Fun fact about Lynn, oh my gosh, this so cool, Lynn has soundtracks or song for the characters, so trying to get into character, then they're like, "Oh I need to listen [crosstalk 00:41:03]." Alyssa Scolari [41:03]: Really? Oh, that's so cool. Lynn Langan [41:06]: Right, yeah. It's that initial, here's the story that I'm thinking in my head. Here's the soundtrack that I'm going to put to that, and [inaudible 00:41:14] music. It's very helpful in rewrites because my agent's coming back and saying, "Go into this novel and fix this problem." I'm like, "What? That was so long ago. Oh, I know. I'll just hit this play button right here." And then boom, I'm right back into their world. I'm right there. Alyssa Scolari [41:32]: That is brilliant. Where did you even think to be able to do that? [inaudible 00:41:38] music, depending on whatever you put on, can get you anywhere. Anywhere you want to go- Lynn Langan [41:45]: Yes, anywhere you want to go. Alyssa Scolari [41:46]: Music will take you there. Lynn Langan [41:48]: Yes, it will take you there. The writing process is unique in the fact that you sit down to the computer and you're asking yourself to leave yourself. You're asking yourself to forget about whatever troubles you had that day, or your perspective of the world, or sometimes your gender, and go. As a writer, that's the thing that you have to work on the most, is who is actually at the keyboard today? Is it Lynn, or is it Duke, or is it Tommy? Who is it? In order for me to train my mind to do that, when I first wrote my first novel, I would play their songs. I would play them three or four times before I even put my hands to the keyboard because I knew I had to listen to it repeatedly to get all of my personal baggage out of the way so that the character could step forward and would be influenced in my writing. I can do it now without music. It's really just training your... It's almost like a meditative state, is what I would best explain. You consciously ask yourself to exit. Alyssa Scolari [42:54]: That's fascinating and brilliant. Wow. Denise Wolf [42:59]: Something else [crosstalk 00:43:00] tell me about writing, because I've done some academic writing, is to write first with an old timey pen on paper. There's something about that kinesthetic sensory, just kind of writing actual words on paper and then the first edit becomes entering it into the keyboard. That connects so much more with sort of the I think emotional part of ourselves. Lynn Langan [43:25]: Absolutely. I usually edit... My first round, I'll print out the manuscript and edit that way because there's something about that process that gets you at a computer. Alyssa Scolari [43:35]: Agreed. Lynn Langan [43:36]: It's more authentic to you. Alyssa Scolari [43:38]: Yes, agreed. There's something so different that comes out of you when you are physically writing than hitting buttons on a keyboard. It's a completely different experience. Lynn Langan [43:51]: Absolutely, yeah. Alyssa Scolari [43:54]: I talk about journaling with some of my kids who I feel like it might be helpful for, and they're like, "Can I just type it out on my phone?" I'm like, "Hell no." Lynn Langan [44:04]: No. [crosstalk 00:44:06]. Get that pen in your hand. Feel it. [crosstalk 00:44:08]. Alyssa Scolari [44:08]: And get a fun pen, right? Lynn Langan [44:10]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [44:11]: I have a set of I think it's like 100 pack. Oh God, 100 pack of glitter gel pens. I'm still a giant child. Denise Wolf [44:21]: Yep. Yeah. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Are they scented? Alyssa Scolari [44:26]: Denise, I looked for the scented ones. Lord knows that I tried. Unfortunately, they're not. Denise Wolf [44:31]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Alyssa Scolari [44:34]: But I wish. The last question I want to ask you, because I also think this is important because I do know that we have listeners out there who are parents, and if they don't have an adolescent currently, they have an up and coming adolescent or adolescents at home. Do you feel that this book is one that can also help parents and even any adults who work with kids get a better view inside the mind of a kid, which will then also better help them to relate to their kid in real life? Does that make sense? Denise Wolf [45:14]: Yes and yes. Alyssa Scolari [45:15]: Okay. Lynn Langan [45:18]: One of the things that you try to do as a young adult writer is remembering the place of everybody in their lives. Yes, you're living in a family. Yes, you have chores and you have bedtimes, and you have all those things. That's all true. But what's really important is the social aspect. That's where you're getting all your connections, and that's the most important part. As a parent, I think it's easy to look at your 17 or 16 year old kid and forget that there's this whole other life that is very complicated. You're just thinking they're upstairs in their room. They're taking out the trash. It's easy to get into the routine of life and forget that there's these little stories that these kids are having that have nothing to do with you. [crosstalk 00:46:08]. You can only hope that you're a great parent and you modeled well, because they're out there in the real world by themselves, and this is the time. I think that's why I like this age, because it is the loosening of the parents and the influence, and the family structure, which is also very hard on the parents, but it's just as hard on the kids. It's that constant, I think you see that a lot with Duke, where he feels guilty for not watching football with his dad because that's what they used to do. He has a social life now, and he needs to go out with his friends, but he still has that little internal battle like, "I'm going," but there's also a sadness that I know that this slipping away. Even though I'm looking forward to my independence, it is also scary. I think for both parents and kids, that's a good reminder of that. Denise Wolf [47:01]: Right, that it's all the feels. It's all the feels. I had to do an art engagement with youth, so I had to craft a 50 message about adolescents to adolescence. So, that's not a lot of words. Lynn helped me write it, thank you, and it started off with "No matter what, it's going to hurt." It was really great, if I do say so, and I submitted and they changed it before publication and didn't check with me. So, when I read my message to adolescents in this glossy thing they put out, it was like being a teen is great. I'm like, fuck no. Alyssa Scolari [47:37]: What the fuck? Denise Wolf [47:39]: [crosstalk 00:47:39] I said it's going to hurt, but it's okay. Alyssa Scolari [47:44]: You wrote, "It's going to hurt," and they took that and said, "Being a teen is great"? Denise Wolf [47:44]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [47:50]: Yeah. Denise Wolf [47:51]: Mm-hmm [affirmative], [crosstalk 00:47:52]. Alyssa Scolari [47:51]: Jesus Lord Almighty. Denise Wolf [47:55]: To your question earlier, Alyssa, I think it's really valuable and important for adults, educators remind ourselves of all that angsty stuff, all the feels. Get back into that. Like, no matter what it's going to hurt. You're going to be okay, but can't escape the pain. That's where growth happens. Lynn Langan [48:15]: Right, exactly. Just go ahead and feel what you need to feel. It'll be funny if you interviewed I would say Duke's family, they also I think would come away and have the perspective that everything in Duke's life is okay, where it's not. His family member that really knows that is his sister, which is also good for parents to I think see from that angle that siblings have that connection with each other and they can look out for each other, or they can call each other out on their bullshit, or any of that. Yeah, it's just a weird time in the like where everybody's learning how to let go of this family unit. Denise Wolf [48:57]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Alyssa Scolari [49:00]: I think the most important part is just what both of you were speaking to is, being able as adults to get back in touch with not just the angst, but all of the feelings. I think so much of adulthood has become just about numbing out, by working 9:00 to 5:00, playing music or a podcast, or a news radio in the car to and from work. You come home. You eat. You do whatever. You go to bed, and you do it all the next days. Weekends stereotypically include going out, drinking, this, that... it's so focused around just numbing out. As adults, we almost just even have time for our feelings. I think that's what makes the three of us so fucking incredible, because I don't sense that we do that. We feel things. Denise Wolf [49:52]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Lynn Langan [49:52]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [49:53]: And refuse to live in the numbed out state that I think a lot of adults have found themselves in. Denise Wolf [50:01]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Lynn Langan [50:01]: Yeah. I should say I think one of the best advice that Denise has ever given me in my life was that she said, when I was going through some tough times, she was like "Look, pull up a chair. Make yourself a cup of tea. Get to know that feeling that you're feeling. Ask it questions. Just don't shy away from it. Lean into it." It's really good advice to remember that as an adult, you're right, we get into these routines and again, we get more and more narrow in our thinking, in the way... I think that's part of society's pressure too, like don't talk about your feelings. Just do, do, do. It's okay to have feelings around if you want to feel sad. It's okay to feel sad. If things are not working out, it's okay that things aren't working out. It's not the end of the world. That's what's so fun about adolescents too is that they can fall down and get back up. You're so resilient when you're young, because you just haven't really quite learned to stay on the floor. I think that's probably what the three of us have learned, we keep standing up. We're going to take the punches in the ring and it's going to hurt, but we keep going and we're going to feel those feelings, we're going to figure out how not to get hit by that again- Denise Wolf [51:17]: But we probably will. Lynn Langan [51:18]: We probably will. Denise Wolf [51:19]: We will. [crosstalk 00:51:20]. Lynn Langan [51:22]: Yeah, we won't shy away from it. Denise Wolf [51:23]: Yeah, and we'll have great stories to tell. Lynn Langan [51:26]: Yeah, exactly. Alyssa Scolari [51:27]: Yes, that's living. To me, that's living at it's fullest. Lynn Langan [51:31]: Right, absolutely. Denise Wolf [51:33]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [51:34]: I love it. Lynn Langan [51:34]: Through mistakes. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [51:37]: If people would like to buy this book, where on earth can they find it? I know Amazon is one, but I also want to plug if it's in any kind of small businesses or anything like that, or is it mostly Amazon? Lynn Langan [51:50]: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and the great and wonderful Bookshop where you can go on and order it and it fosters independent bookstores. So, if you buy it from Bookshop it will be pulled from your local store. Bookshop.org, yeah. Alyssa Scolari [52:06]: Bookshop.org. Okay, I will make sure... So yeah, to the listeners out there, this is a book you absolutely going to want to get your hands on, whether you're an adolescent tuning in, whether you're in the young adult phase of your life, whether you have kids of you own, whether you are a teacher, or a therapist, truthfully even if you're a therapist who works with adults, so many of the adults that you're working with have unresolved childhood issues. I don't like the word "issues", but I can't think of a better word right now. It's very important to be able to tap into this type of stuff. Honestly, this book is very useful for everybody. Of course, feel free to use Amazon because it'll get to you very quickly, but also I am going to put the other link in there because, you know, support your local bookstore, or support small businesses as well. So, head over to the show notes. Denise and Lynn, thank you for a wonderful episode. I love talking about kids. Lynn Langan [53:13]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [53:14]: It's been fun. Lynn Langan [53:14]: Yeah, thanks for having us. Denise Wolf [53:16]: Yeah, thank you. Alyssa Scolari [53:17]: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information please head over to LightAfterTrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we @LightAfterTrauma. On Twitter, it is @LightAfterPod. Lastly, please head over to Patreon.com/LightAfterTrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5.00 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So, please head on over. Again, that's Patreon.com/LightAfterTrauma. Thank you, and we appreciate your support. [singing]

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (9-20-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 59:51


Replay of the September 20th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Your Budget is NOT Your Bible

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:52


Today I talk about one of my favorite topics, Your Budget is NOT your Bible. Now, I know the title alone may be triggering for some people. So, I'm going to explain to you what I mean by this topic. I'm also going to give a shout out to all of our financial people out there in the world that keep us financially stable through budgeting and sound financial decision-making - no matter whether we are investing it or whether we are saving it.   Oftentimes, not universally, financial people tend to be somewhat of an anomaly in terms of the financial evolution and growth of a law firm. And that's not because financial people don't know how to manage money, but because they often think inside the box.   Tune in to see how I can shift your perspective! In this episode we discuss: Having a healthy respect for your numbers while your firm is growing. 3 – key critical thoughts to create freedom, success and a highly scalable law firm. How good decision making based on a financial plan will help you create a successful business. Better planning by knowing the very basics of where your money is spent. The differentiation between investment and expense, and different types of ROI. Identifying shiny object syndrome while at the same time being open to opportunities. Creating a life that you will enjoy by conscientiously investing in yourself. Cultivating faith in yourself is key.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info: Textphone number:  908 292 3524   How to Be Decisive – The Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor Podcast https://lawfirmmentor.net/2021/08/20/how-to-be-decisive/   Moshe Amsel - The Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor Podcast https://lawfirmmentor.net/2021/01/12/crushing-the-challenge-of-change-in-the-legal-industry-with-moshe-amsel/    Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 07: 24 (32 Seconds)  But I do want you to consider that you need to have a financial plan as a part of your business so that you can make decisions in the future. One of the things that we talked about in a recent podcast episode, we talked about the idea of how to become decisive. And one of the real challenges with being decisive is lack of information. Right? So if you don't know what information is going to educate your decision and you don't know the information that you need to know, and typically information comes at you and you don't have a way of categorizing that in your mind.

The Golfers Journal Podcast
Episode 88: Chandler's Plan

The Golfers Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 55:34


If you're hungry for never-before-heard Ryder Cup stories, you've come to the right place. With stops at legendary clubs like Seminole, Merion and Hazeltine National, golf professional Chandler Withington has already lived a full golf life. And in a career full of them, perhaps his biggest highlight was being at the center of the action at the 2016 Ryder Cup. Withington joins host Tom Coyne and uses his Ryder Cup experience at Hazeltine—including the advice he gave then-captain Davis Love III on setting up the course, why Tiger Woods implored the 2016 U.S. team to celebrate and how he got Michael Jordan kicked out of the team room—to formulate his strategy for a U.S. victory this week.

Refractive
Spiritual Visions with Marlon Fixico

Refractive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 48:17


This episode, Spiritual Visions, features Marlon Fixico, at times a reluctant participant in his own fantastic spiritual path. Marlon, born into the Cheyenne and Seminole tribes, recounts the colorful, complicated, seemingly indirect path that led him from Native American spirituality, to Christianity, to a turn from Christianity, and finally to his own rich formula of spiritual living. Descended from a long line of spiritual leaders and healers, and an out gay man who wrestled with his rejection by society and religion during the AIDS epidemic, Marlon shares his experiences with sweat lodges, visions, auras, alcoholism, prophecies, a near-death experience in which he was reunited with his parents and brother, and his next spiritual chapter: becoming a Medicine Man. Find Marlon on Facebook by searching his name or clicking here. For similarly-themed episodes, try “From Addiction to Self Acceptance” or “Making Peace with our Dark Side.” Contact Johnny at johnny@refractivecoaching.com or visit www.refractivecoaching.com for more information on services to help you step into your authentic power for a life that feels right. Transcript follows- please excuse any errors from the transcription software. Hello, everyone. And welcome to another episode of refractive podcast. Today I have with me, a dear friend, Marlon Fixico. He is a descendant on both his mother and his father’s side of spiritual leaders and medicine people. He is part of the Cheyenne tribe and the Seminole tribe. How are you Marlon? Welcome to refractive.I’m feeling good today. Thanks, John.I am delighted that you are with us, you and I had an opportunity to visit not long ago. And you were telling me just a little bit about, uh, some of your spiritual history and some interesting things that happen to you. And because refractive is a show, that’s all about people kind of stepping into their most authentic selves and listening to their inner guidance and being in touch with kind of that high level, knowing of what our souls want for us in life. I thought you would be a really, um, a valuable guest on the show to share with listeners some of your experiences in that. And so I, I guess I’ll just kind of run down, uh, a basic premise of the episode today and then I’ll start digging in. Does that sound okay? That was good. All right. So you had, uh, told me when we were together, uh, just a little bit about your background and how your culture had influenced your spiritual life, your spiritual journey, the awakening that you’ve had and all of that. So I would love for you to just take us through that journey for you. What was your spiritual path like?Speaker 3 00:02:24 So, um, as you said in the introduction, I come from a long line of spiritual leaders and medicine people. Um, I would go down to the last, but it’s pretty extensive, but just suffice to say, uh, even my, uh, immediate parents, uh, were very spiritual and healers. Um, they, uh, never like advertise that, that that’s what they were that’s just too, they were, and I think that’s a mark of a true spiritual leaders. You don’t, they don’t need to tell you that they are, you just, somehow people just find out that they just know. And, uh, so I grew up a lot with my Cheyenne grandmother, my

Chasing Tales Outdoors Podcast
Hunting the Seminole Whitetail Feat. Richard Martinez

Chasing Tales Outdoors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 54:27


Walt sits down with return guest to discuss the Seminole Whitetail Subspecies, how to hunt them, the conservation issues it faces, and why he loves pursuing them! If you would like to become a patron of the show visit www.patreon.com/chasingtalesoutdoors

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions!

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 51:47


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Damage Report

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 50:09


SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: Damage Report Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

In today's episode, I'm talking about letting others fail. This is my favorite topic, actually, of all the things that we talk about involving people- the idea of training and cultivating a culture of people that know how to do things without you. It's such a challenging topic for most law firm owners, current/former clients, and even for people that have approached me online.    Many believe  there's no freedom in owning a law firm because there's so much stress and agita that's involved in actually having people work for you. Countless law firm owners decide they don't want to grow because in the past their employees did not perform the way that they wanted. As a result, they have made up their minds that there is no way for them to have a law firm that runs without them because they always either get the wrong employee, or they  just don't know how to train and manage and cultivate high performance in their teams.   I have solutions for you, stay tuned! In this episode we discuss: High performance from the perspective of failure. How to be a safety net for someone who is learning without taking over the task. Changing your mindset of trying for perfection. Learning lessons from the failures in your journey to success. The idea that you can enhance your law firm's reputation by hiring someone that is better at lawyering than you, rather than being intimidated to do so.  Being supportive, believing in your employees and delegating responsibility to them. Being ok with letting a person fail. Allowing people to demonstrate their value.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor   Textphone number:  908 292 3524   Podcast: Parenting Your Baby Lawyers. https://lawfirmmentor.net/2021/08/31/parenting-your-baby-lawyers/    Snippets   00:01:42 (38 seconds) Now, I know a lot of people are triggered by the idea of failure, and a lot of times we associate failure as a personal failing, meaning there's something wrong about me, either I'm wrong or I'm not good enough or there's something about me that is broken that led to this failure, even when all circumstances outside of yourself are pointing to your just not having mastered the different strategies that are involved in whatever it was that you failed at. But we take it personally when we fail and then as a result, we embed in our DNA a mindset that says failure is bad. Failure is wrong.

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (9-13-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 59:51


Replay of the September 13th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Former NFL QB Christian Ponder on marriage, retirement, and identity

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 45:04


Christian Ponder is a former quarterback who played six seasons in the NFL. He was selected 12th overall in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft by the Minnesota Vikings. After spending four seasons in Minnesota, he played two more years with Oakland, Denver and San Francisco before retiring in 2017.  In college, Ponder was recruited by legendary coach Bobby Bowden at Florida State and was a three-year starter for the Seminoles. In 2010, Ponder was the first Seminole quarterback since Chris Weinke in 1999 to lead his team to victories over both its in-state rivals, Miami and Florida. He also the 2010 Bobby Bowden Award presented to the top student athlete among FBS schools. Ponder graduated from Florida State in two and a half years with a degree in finance and a 3.73 GPA.  Today on the podcast, Christian shares about his journey of faith, being baptized by Jon Kitna, the spiritual impact of his wife Samantha, and his memories of Bobby Bowden and the legacy he's left.  --- Listen to our conversation with Christian's wife, Samantha Ponder from 2018 here and here.  Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up here.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Squash Stress and Increase Productivity

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 27:27


Today's episode is dedicated to the topic of efficiency. Now, before you tune out and say, “Oh, my God, she talks about Crushing Chaos all the time! Do we really have to go there again?”I'm not going to go there on my own.    I brought in a special guest who is a productivity coach. I learned about the role of a Productivity Coach some time ago. When Mridu, our special guest, approached me and we talked about her coming on the show, I was really intrigued by her particular perspective! Stay tuned because she has a simple and easy framework that we're going to end the show with! In this episode we discuss: Seeing positive changes by taking control of demands and distractions at home and at work. Recognizing that willpower alone as a superpower isn't enough to get it all done. Developing the non-negotiable habit of a Professional Power Hour to begin your day. Building back your confidence by being organized and productive in small chunks of time.  Putting timeframes and being realistic about what can get done on the To-Do List each day. The power in controlling your thoughts. Intentionally scheduling buffer time to prepare or de-stress before or after a meeting. Applying a 4-Step framework to successfully identify, schedule, systematize and complete a task or project.   Guest Bio: Ready to get control of all your demands? Then you need Mridu Parikh on speed dial.    Mridu (Mri-thu) is The Stress Squasher. As a productivity coach, speaker, and founder of Life Is Organized, she has taught thousands of women business owners simple ways to wake up with a plan… take control of their distractions… and drop overwhelm with ease. Results include a 300% increase in billable time, 10 hours a week saved on emails, and multiple pant sizes shed through new routines.    Mridu is the author of the Amazon bestseller, Accomplish It, and the host of the Productivity on Purpose podcast. Her techniques on mastering tasks and habits have been featured in The Huffington Post, US News & World Report, and Real Simple, as well as her own column in The Tennessean.    When she's not wrangling a list or schedule, you can usually find this former professional organizer turned productivity pro with her two teens and one husband in Nashville enjoying a Malbec. Get Mridu's FREE resources on beating distractions, procrastination, and stress - www.lifeisorganized.com/resources   Contact info:   Company name: Life Is Organized   Website URL: www.lifeisorganized.com   Email: mridu@lifeisorganized.com   Phone number: 19176995495   Facebook url: https://www.facebook.com/LifeIsOrganized   Twitter Username: lifeisorganized   LinkedIn url: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mridu-parikh/   Instagram username: lifeisorganizsed   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets (00.10:38) (55 seconds) Allison Williams: And, you know, when you, when you start talking about the idea of training your brain, I think that's one of the things we talk about a lot when we start going into thought work and the fact that our thoughts are something that we can control. And I don't think a lot of people realize that. So we kind of go into that it must be this way because I thought that way before not realizing that we actually have control over that. Mridu Parikh: Absolutely. Now, I think if there was one takeaway, I would say for all entrepreneurs is we have fallen into this, this belief that, that we have no control. Right? That we live in a world that we're always on the receiving end, where we're always reacting. And the truth is, you have the ability to retrain yourself. And when you do, your perception in your industry, in your business, by your clients, by your family members is going to be so much more empowered and strong and positive when you are in control, right? Like both at work and at home.

Florida Focus: A College Football Podcast
Episode #111 - Week 1 ends with a Gator victory and Seminole OT loss

Florida Focus: A College Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 57:00


Chris and Brandon run through the first week's results. Both teams had 2 QBs that performed well, and setup for an interesting roster mixup. www.floridafocuspodcast.com www.patreon.com/floridafocuspodcast  

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 2: Headliner Questions!

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 48:47


Hour 2 - 9/7/21 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Seminole Headlines
SEMINOLE HEADLINES HOUR 1: FSU - ND Reactions, McKenzie Milton and Jordan Travis

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 48:37


Hour 1 - 9/7/21 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Today I'm talking about buying attorney awards. Many of us are familiar with some of the big organizations that give out “awards” to attorneys. We know about Super Lawyers, Best Lawyers of America, and the growing cottage industry around different types of awards. Some awards can be bought while others cannot.    So, I've decided to give you some frame of reference for thinking about attorney awards and whether or not it's worth your investment to get them. If you do choose to get them, I'll show you how you can use them effectively in your business.  In this episode we discuss: Different types of awards available to purchase. How our need for connectivity can be used effectively in marketing. Using awards effectively in your marketing efforts to promote your business. Using your website as a home base and driving people there through your marketing activity. Sharing news of the award whether it was purchase or bestowed upon you.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info: Youtube video: Should you buy yourself an award?   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qApbIOJg_Vw   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 03: 10 (36 Seconds)  Now, what's interesting about it is that the criteria for selection are usually very vague. It's usually like you have to have been nominated by someone in your community and you have to have the trial skills or the verdicts or the settlements or the reputation in the community or something like that that would justify you being chosen. And my very best friend, as she was in a partnership with two older gentlemen, both of whom are now deceased, and she shared with me that both of them had actually gotten the awards after they had died.

Inside FSU Athletics
Inside Seminole Football with Mike Norvell (9-6-21)

Inside FSU Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 59:51


Replay of the September 6th edition of Inside Seminole Football with Mike NorvellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
The Gift of Constant Feedback

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 20:37


In this episode I talk about constant feedback. Constant feedback refers to being in a state of giving people your perspective on how they are doing on an ongoing basis.    A few of you may remember when I requested your feedback in an episode called “Pivot The Annual Review”. In that episode I remember explaining that when you give the annual review, the annual review is a reciprocal process - You are reviewing your employee, and your employee is reviewing you- and how that should not be your only time to give them feedback. An employee should not be hearing for the first time in an annual review that their performance is less than satisfactory in some critical area. But then one might ask, "well, then how frequently should I be giving negative feedback? Do I meet with them once a month or do I pull them aside once a quarter? How do I do this?"   Tune in to find out what I recommend! In this episode we discuss: In this episode we discuss: Being in a state of persistent negative feedback. Differentiating feedback about the behavior versus it being about the person. People's different reactions to negative feedback based on past experiences and related punishments. How creating a culture of constant feedback helps people to improve and can also provide validation that they're doing a good job. Developing a new framework for the delivery of feedback. Presenting negative feedback as a growth opportunity.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 12: 29 (31 Seconds)  And one of the areas where it's really challenging for business owners not to take things personally is when we have to give negative feedback. Because most of us don't like inflicting pain for a living. Even our most aggressive litigators, Right? We might have a kill... Kill the opponent type of attitude when we're in the courtroom. We're going for the jugular. Most of us don't want to bring that back to our office.

Front Row Noles
Front Row Noles- 8/31/21

Front Row Noles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 44:44


FSU National Champion and Super Bowl Champion William Floyd join Keith and Tom today to talk Seminole football. Plus the Osceola's Patrick Burnham dives deep to preview the big matchup with Notre Dame. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Parenting Your Baby Lawyers

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 33:05


In this episode, I'm going to be talking about parenting your baby lawyers. Yes, I know that the term "Baby Lawyers” can be considered controversial, even offensive to some new lawyers. And if you are offended by that term, please know that I use the term, not with any level of condescension.    A baby lawyer simply means the individual does not yet have the knowledge, skill, or context that a seasoned practitioner naturally acquires over years of practicing law. There's a lot that goes into lawyering! Part of the reason why I think the term baby lawyer is so accurate is that if you think about the lifespan of an infant, when you give birth or when you or your spouse gives birth to a child, a new infant comes into your household and that child is being developed, cultivated, it's soaking up everything that you have to give him or her so that they can become a member of society. In this episode we discuss: Having “baby lawyers” learn as quickly as possible. Training and developing an associate. How you are experiencing the perceived shortcomings of your young attorney. The challenge of teaching nuance to a young attorney. Risks associated with developing “baby lawyers” in your firm. Levels of guidance, structure, and responsibility that you will have to have toward a younger attorney. Allowing space for being themselves and how it will help their growth. Challenges faced when parenting a “baby lawyer”.   Allison Bio:   Allison C. Williams, Esq., is Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law.    Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.  In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest growing companies among graduates of Florida State University.   In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers.  She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money.  Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications and money management in law firms.  Contact Info:   Contact Law Firm Mentor: Scheduler: https://meetme.so/LawFirmMentor     Snippets   00: 09: 02 (46 Seconds)  I'm not a big proponent of kind of drowning the baby on the first day or letting the baby sit in the corner sheltered in a bubble for years before you start giving them things to do. There needs to be a balance there. But what tends to happen is that the lawyer who owns the law firm, and has hired on the baby lawyer, starts to get triggered by the baby lawyer being, frankly, a baby. So what do I mean by that? What I mean is that when we hire people for our businesses, there is often a significant fear that the person we hired is not going to be good enough, not going to do justice for our clients, not going to get good results, not going to make us look good.