Podcasts about Ojibwe

Group of indigenous peoples in North America

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Minnesota Now
An interview with 3 ‘Reservation Dogs' actors, writers from Minnesota

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2023 13:57


FX's hit show “Reservation Dogs” is coming to a close this week but in its three seasons it has been a breakthrough for Native representation in mainstream media. That's thanks, in part, to creatives who are members of Indigenous communities in Minnesota. Dallas Goldtooth, Migizi Pensoneau and Bobby Wilson, who are actors, writers and producers on the show, all hail from Dakota and Ojibwe communities in Minnesota, urban and rural. They're also all close friends and collaborators who have performed together for more than decade in the comedy group The 1491s. They spoke to Minnesota Now host Cathy Wurzer.Fans can see Wilson on Oct. 2 at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, where he will host an artist talk at 6 p.m. in the Great Hall. For the full conversation, click play on the audio player above or read the transcript below. The transcript has been lightly edited for clarity. Note: This interview took place during the writer's strike, so the three did not talk about the show specifically. You lampoon Indian stereotypes fostered by the dominant culture and you are dead-on funny. For folks that are not familiar, describe Indian humor.Migizi Pensoneau: I think it's just humor. Indian humor is just people's humor. Bobby and I were just talking about this earlier today — because Indian country is so wide and vast, our experiences growing up in Minnesota are very different than the experiences we have written in “Reservation Dogs.” A part of that though, the reason why there is a connection all across Indian country is really we all have a similar relationship to white America … we have a lot of shared experiences with colonization in this country. So a lot of that is kind of, sardonic, Black humor, laughing in the face of genocide — that whole thing.Bobby Wilson: I shouldn't call it always in opposition to, but it is often critical of the interactions with non-Indigenous people, as Migizi said, in colonization and things around that.How did growing up in Minnesota play into your comedy, in your storytelling or your experiences? Dallas Goldtooth: I claim that I grew up both on the south side of Minneapolis during the summers with my dad and Migizi and everything, but in the school year, I lived down in southwest Minnesota. A lot of our comedy is heavily influenced by how we interact with the greater settler society.I grew up around farm kids. It was a bunch of Indians surrounded by a bunch of white farm kids in southwest Minnesota and the constant interaction with “Minnesota Nice” and how uncomfortable white folks get in Minnesota about certain issues is hilarious to me. I think that it has influenced me and has encouraged me to always be willing to push the buttons because I imagine what would make a white Lutheran in central Minnesota uncomfortable and let's go for that.What do you mean by that?Dallas Goldtooth: Having grown up in Minnesota, I feel like there's a certain expectation about what can be talked about in the public space and what shouldn't be talked about. We as Native people in Minnesota are on the fringes as it is. Whether we're invisible or we're the tourist icons that people like to go visit up north for their summer cottages, either way, we're not seen as a part of that mainstream and so I feel like I have greater liberties to critique, make fun or tease the culture that I'm surrounded by. Bobby Wilson: This is why I love the creative consortium that the three of us have — additionally with some of our other friends who aren't from Minnesota — is the differences in the spaces we grew up in. For me, I grew up around the Twin Cities, bounced around a lot of shelters, lived in a lot of people's basements on some air mattresses, you know.My interactions with white settler society across the Twin Cities has predominantly been systemic. I was sentenced to a boy's home for a couple of years and I had the privilege of writing about it for “Reservation Dogs” season two. That Minnesota nice thing is always a — I hate it. I hate it so very much because I always associate it with a state trooper beating my face in and then kind of blaming me for it and being like, well, you know, “I'm not the bad guy here.” And simultaneously also just as an artist working within a lot of the art spaces around the Twin Cities, Juxtaposition Arts, COMPAS arts, over most of my youth — it really influenced sort of the way that I can interact with it. Dallas Goldtooth: I never realized this, but between the three of us we have a commonality of having lived in Minneapolis or the Twin Cities area and we have family who lives there. I predominantly grew up in southwest Minnesota, Migizi is northern Minnesota, Bobby is in the Twin Cities. We all pull from many different references, right? So it's I think that's the advantage of all of us. Like we really do represent Minnesota. You guys are welcome. You're welcome, Minnesota.Whether it's for your personally or for your community or for your society, what are some of those barriers you think you guys have broken?Migizi Pensoneau: We've done it together as a group and that's one of the interesting things. So we have the two that aren't from Minnesota in our group, they are from Oklahoma … but we've managed to stick together as friends and so far … we'll see what happens, talk to us in a couple of years. But we've managed to continue to work together in a way that's incredibly positive. And a lot of that, especially as we're getting into like our “Reservation Dogs” stuff these last few years, a lot of this was led by our friend Sterlin Harjo. We did it all the time with like, you know, prayers in the morning, prayers before we started songs, like we did everything in the ways that we were sort of taught and some of those things that sort of bring us together as Indian people are some of these traditions, like walking forward in the work that we do in a thoughtful and spiritual way.I don't know that anybody else is doing the same thing, at least to that sort of level. What I'm saying is that we are spiritually better than everybody else. And we've broken that barrier pretty hard. But no, I mean, we've tried to maintain spiritual and cultural integrity in everything that we do. We joke around all the time, but we are absolutely serious about making sure that the work that we put out in the world is thoughtful and is not flippant, even though, you know, the stuff we say off the cuff definitely is. But the things that we deal with, both in our sketches and in the work that we do on “Reservation Dogs,” is very heavy and there are people that are, you know, some of the subject matter is really intense and we don't go into that lightly. So having that sort of cultural and spiritual grounding to make sure that carries across through all of what we do, I don't know anybody else that does that … we've maintained our integrity in the work that we do.Dallas, do you agree with your friend, Migizi?Dallas Goldtooth: Yes, I do. I think that maybe one other aspect is that through the process of writing “Reservation Dogs” and also working on other projects now, we've broken that barrier of, like, we've been told that one, in many ways, whether it's direct or indirect, that our stories as Native people don't matter.I think that we as writers are breaking that barrier, saying, no, Native stories told by Native people, acted by Native actors and actresses not only have impact for us as community, but are meaningful to everybody. People really can enjoy them and that they are worthy of investment and worthy of support.Growing up in a dominant culture, we're often taught that, hey, you have to change your ways to fit to the mold that is the mainstream, that is colonization. What we're trying to do is say, I was gonna use a four-letter word, a sacred four-letter word, and I'm not gonna say it, but F that, you know, we are gonna be doing it on our own, in our own terms. And has maybe even, it has a greater impact than anything that could else be said.What have you heard from folks both inside and outside the Native community about the impact your work is having?Bobby Wilson: I've heard a lot of really fantastic positive reception, all the stuff that we've been doing … I think it is really quality work. And putting it on like a larger platform, really an international platform. I mean, I've got a homie in Germany that texted me that he was watching “Reservation Dogs” with his family and I was like, God dang, you know? Like, that's wild, it's really fantastic.I also love hearing folks who haven't watched the show at all and just tell me that, you know, it's on the list. I get that a lot. ‘Ah, I heard really good things about that.' So people are hearing good things. The most important thing for me is if we're all satisfied with the work. I think probably every artist feels that way, though. People keep telling us it's really great and I love that, I love to hear it. But, you know, we're always trying to hold ourselves to as high a standard as possible.This might be a stupid question, but I'm gonna ask it anyway. When will you guys know you've made it?Migizi Pensoneau: Here's what I know, here's how I know that I've probably made it enough, is that my own community up in Red Lake hasn't asked me to come be a part of anything yet. And I think if they ever ask me to come be a part of everything and to like come and speak to the youth up there, I will know then that I've peaked and I'm past my prime, that I'm obsolete. Your own community should not be asking you to do anything. Right now I'm hated enough and that's fine. Do you have any worries on what's next for Indigenous representation after the SAG-AFTRA strike ends? Bobby Wilson: I mean, for me, I was worried about it before it even started, you know? I hate to break the momentum but it took like 150 damn years since the invention of the camera to give Indians a TV show. I'm always worried about it but I think we have to be. There's still stuff coming out that's written by non-Native people, that's acted by non-Native people, that's supposedly about us. There's always a space for it and for us to go in there and to do our own work together and also collaborate with all the other amazing, phenomenal Indigenous talent. There's some really amazing people working on stuff.Dallas Goldtooth: No matter what, we're still part of a colonial project. We gotta remain vigilant at all times. Minnesota may change the name of Sibley Park, but they're still going to do some racist stuff. And so we're always going to be on the edge.I have a worry that the studios are gonna say “hey, we don't have enough money as much as we did before because we got to pay you guys a living wage now,” and oftentimes it's those on the margins, right, the Indigenous folks, Black folks, other communities of color who end up getting the cut first. So that's the worry I got. But I believe that we've proven that we can tell good stories that people are invested in and I have a lot of faith in them.

Minnesota Native News
Fast Break - New Novel "Rez Ball" Runs the Court

Minnesota Native News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2023 5:01


This week, a new novel called Rez Ball uses basketball to tell the story of an Ojibwe teen on the Red Lake Reservation. Reporter Emma Needham interviewed author Byron Graves about this coming-of-age book. Image: Author Byron Graves from Red Lake Nation. Photographer: Mike FinneyEN: The Red Lake Warriors Basketball is well known, but not because they are the best in Minnesota. The Warriors, and other tribal teams, are known for playing a specific type of basketball called Rez Ball. Rez Ball is also the title of a debut, young adult novel. Author Byron Graves explains what Rez Ball the sport is: BG: Rez Ball is poetry in motion. It's a Zen state of mind. It's not controlled, other brands of basketball, you're setting up a play, you're moving a certain way. You're doing things in Orthodox manner. Rez Ball is creating in the moment, it's like rep freestyle. So nobody knows what's going to hit up, hit them at any moment your opponent doesn't know. The novel Rez Ball was released on September 12th, and isn't just about Basketball. Author Byron Graves shares about the other experiences he wrote into his book. BG: It's a coming of age story of a Ojibwe teenager going into his sophomore year. He has big dreams of becoming the next big basketball star. His brother had recently passed away, and he was the best basketball player that the reservations ever seen. And everybody expected him to go to a D1 school, maybe even go to the NBA, they were all hoping he would be the one to lead them to their first state tournament. And his brother, unfortunately had passed away in a car accident about a year before. So the main character trait, he is navigating the grieving process, seeing his community and family and friends and teammates also mourn. And also just trying to be a teenager who's falling in love for the first time trying to figure out who he wants to be as a person and trying to fulfill his own Hoop Dreams. So he's navigating all of those different things as a 16 year old, and you end up rooting for this kid. So it's kind of just a beautiful story of working your way through the hardships of life, while also pursuing a dream.EN: Basketball holds a special place in the hearts of Native people nationwide. Graves shares why he chose basketball to tell this story. BG: Basketball amongst Indian country, if you will. I think that's like the thing we all can rally behind. We all so many of us, I say we all I know, a lot of us who love basketball.BG: I remember like several years back when the Schimmel sisters were making their final four runs, how exciting it was, for all of us across the country, to see them on TV, and they were just killing it. And I remember hearing even like some of the announcers saying, well, they play a style of basketball called red ball. And I know like it was both a beautiful moment and also kind of a cool, funny moment. You know how Indian humor is like, we can think something's like awesome and kind of be chuckling about it at the same time. So that's why I picked basketball to tell the story.EN: It's no secret that life on the Reservation differs from what most Minnesotans experience. Graves says he wanted his novel to express those experiences and help people heal. BG: I wanted to tell a story of what was different about trying to make it as an athlete, and a Native American athlete. I feel like we have our own unique trials and tribulations. And it's never just one thing, or one of us, you know, three of your teammates, positive, your teammates, all of your teammates are all going through things that can be some extreme hardship. And how does that then reflect on the court when you're playing a game against maybe, you know, different community that maybe has it a little bit better.Or how does that affect the way you train the way you play your mindset in a game. So I was trying to capture some of those unique challenges that Native American youth face when chasing their dreams.EN: Rez Ball is available at many local bookstores and most major retailers. There is also an audiobook available online. Graves says to watch for his next novel set to release in Fall 2024. For Minnesota Native News, I'm Emma Needham. 

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Angeline Boulley on New YA Thriller

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 27:59


Author Angeline Boulley, author of the bestselling YA thriller Firekeeper's Daughter, is back with a new novel. Warrior Girl Unearthed features a young Ojibwe teen in the U.P. caught up in a complex web of murder and theft, politics, and culture. GUEST: Angeline Boulley, writer __ Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work. Music from Blue Dot Sessions and Audio Network.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Tony Drews: Capturing Excitement for Native Culture and Language Through Games

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2023 28:30


Today, Leah and Cole chat with Tony Drews (first-generation direct descendent of Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe), a lifelong student of Ojibwe culture and language.  As president and founder of Nashke Native Games, Drews talks about his background in education and how he has found ways to better engage native students in their culture. He describes how excited the students are with these games that not only teach language, but the meaning and history behind the words.  Drews is also the program coordinator for the American Indian Family Empowerment Fund at the Tiwahe Foundation.   Miigwech, Tony, for sharing your story! 

Throughline
A Tale of Two Tribal Nations

Throughline

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2023 51:15


The word "reservation" implies "reserved" – as in, this land is reserved for Native Americans. But most reservation land actually isn't owned by tribes. Instead it's checkerboarded into private farmland, federal forests, summer camps, even resorts. That's true for the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe in northern Minnesota, where the tribe owns just a tiny fraction of its reservation land. But just northwest of Leech Lake is Red Lake: one of the only reservations in the country where the tribe owns all of its land. So what happened? In this episode, we take a road trip through Leech Lake and Red Lake to tell a tale of two tribal nations, the moments of choice that led them down very different paths, and what the future looks like from where they are now

The Silvercore Podcast
Ep. 112: Ojibwe Bear Clan / Conservation Officer - Ron Leblanc

The Silvercore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2023 93:02


This is the historic first time a BC Conservation Officer has spoken on a podcast.    Ron is a 26 year veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces, having served twice in Afghanistan.  Fittingly, Ron belongs to the Ojibwe Bear Clan which is known for being protectors of the people, community and the environment.   Ron uses the opportunity to provide a unique perspective on the benefits and challenges faced by BC Conservation Service.  Ron answers Silvercore Club members questions and provides a roadmap for those who wish to better understand how they can do their part to assist in the protection and conservation of our natural resources and insight into how you can become a C.O.    ______ Silvercore Club - https://bit.ly/2RiREb4 Online Training - https://bit.ly/3nJKx7U Other Training & Services - https://bit.ly/3vw6kSU Merchandise - https://bit.ly/3ecyvk9 Blog Page - https://bit.ly/3nEHs8W Host Instagram - @Bader.Trav https://www.instagram.com/bader.trav Silvercore Instagram - @SilvercoreOutdoors https://www.instagram.com/silvercoreoutdoors ____    

The Warblers by Birds Canada
Sharing Anishinaabe Bird Names through Tourism

The Warblers by Birds Canada

Play Episode Play 40 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 12, 2023 14:49


You might remember Joe Pitawanakwat from a previous episode, Bneshiinyik, where he shared knowledge about how birds are named in the Anishinaabe language. Since we last spoke with him, Joe has been working on many projects to continue expanding and sharing Indigenous Knowledge.  In this episode, we tag along with him for one of those projects. Join us for a birding adventure on Manitoulin Island! Wikwemikong Tours offers an array of Indigenous Tourism experiences in the Manitoulin Island and Killarney Region. Their year-round services specialize in cultural tours and land-based learning experiences. Check them out!Get a copy of Joe's Anishinaabe bird name pamphlet here.Joseph Pitawanakwat is an Ojibwe knowledge keeper for ancestral knowledge of plants, medicine and language. He is from Wiikwemikoong First Nation on Manitoulin Island and he is the founder and director of Creator's Garden, an Indigenous outdoor, and now online, education-based business focused on plant identification, beyond-sustainable harvesting, and teaching every one of their linguistic, historical, cultural, edible, ecological and medicinal significance through experiences. He is uniquely blending and reinforcing that Indigenous knowledge with an array of western sciences.  @creators.garden on Instagram and Twitter. Mandaago Osawamick and Jack Rivers are cultural tour guides for Wikwemikong Tours. Andrea Gress (she/her) studied Renewable Resource Management at the University of Saskatchewan. She pivoted towards birds, after an internship in South Africa. Upon returning, she worked with Piping Plovers in Saskatchewan and now coordinates the Ontario Piping Plover Conservation Program for Birds Canada. Follow her work at @ontarioplovers

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Shaun Chosa: Reimagining Indigenous Presence in Pop Culture

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2023 28:29


Today, Leah and Cole chat with artist Shaun Chosa. Shaun's art boldly blends Indigenous heritage, counterculture, and pop culture influences, echoing his self-described nomadic upbringing.  Currently, his pieces are on display at the Friedli Gallery through October 2023, where he weaves Indigenous traditions into the fabric of popular culture. Shaun shares captivating stories from his travels across Indian country, offers unique insights into Indigenous representation in pop culture, and his journey as an artist.  Miigwech, Shaun, for sharing your journey! Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices ShineNative Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.   Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

MPR News with Angela Davis
New school year offers breakfasts and lunches to students at no cost

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 47:07


Students in Minnesota are returning to the classroom.   They're meeting their new teachers, seeing their friends, and, in many cases, looking forward to that first big break in their day: lunch.And starting this school year, students across Minnesota will have both breakfast and lunch provided to them at no charge. The program will cost the state of Minnesota close to $400 million in the first two years.Minnesota is the fourth state in the country to enact a universal meal program for all students at any public or private school that participates in the federal school meal program. Previously, free school lunches and breakfasts were only provided to students whose families met USDA income guidelines.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks about what this means for families and kids with Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, an organization advocating to end hunger in Minnesota and a nutrition services director from a school district in Mankato, Minn.Guests:  Minnesota Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan is a St. Louis Park, Minn., native, a graduate of St. Louis Park Public Schools and a member of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe.   Leah Gardner is the policy director at Hunger Solutions, an organization advocating with both state and federal governments to end hunger in Minnesota. Darcy Stueber is the director of Nutrition Services at Mankato Area Public Schools.Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.  Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation.  

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Monday, September 4, 2023 – Native Bookshelf: Warrior Girl Unearthed by Angeline Boulley

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 56:25


Where else can you get a young adult mystery and a lesson in the Native American Graves Protection Act but from Ojibwe writer Angeline Boulley (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians)? In Warrior Girl Unearthed, a follow-up to her debut novel The Firekeeper's Daughter, Boulley catches readers up with the Firekeeper family's subsequent generation on Sugar Island. As the title suggests, the young protagonist digs into connections to her people and culture she never realized were there.

Minnesota Native News
Community Health Conversation: Charmaine Branchaud's Success in Boosting Student Vaccination Rates

Minnesota Native News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2023 28:36


Hosts Leah Lemm (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe) and Dr. Antony Stately Ph.D. (Ojibwe/Oneida) lead insightful discussions about the ever-evolving landscape of healthcare in Indian Country. They discuss the valuable lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore how Native communities are responding and adapting beyond COVID-19.Today we celebrate the success of Charmaine Branchaud, a Nurse for the Red Lake school district, whose work raised the vaccination rate of her students. She was recently honored as a 2023 Immunization Champion by the Association of Immunization Managers (AIM) and Minnesota Department of Health (MDH).We talk to her about what went into the success and reflect on her experiences as a healthcare worker during the pandemic. We also catch up on where we are in the covid pandemic as we head toward back to school and the end of summer. There's also news of an updated COVID booster on the horizon.The CDC and FDA are expected to release updated boosters in late September or early October. The new booster will target that XBB strain of COVID. Back in June the FDA vaccine advisory committee recommended that the upcoming update focus on that XBB strain. They recommend that the new booster ought to be “Mono valent” meaning that it will only be composed of medicine to combat that most recent strain. As opposed to the bivalent booster we had last year which was Omicron and the original strain. They say it should be as effective as a bivalent and a bivalent booster is not applicable right now.In the Duluth Area, the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) is hosting a COVID vaccine clinic on Wednesday August 30th from 3:30 to 6pm.Dr. Stately would also like to remind listeners that Medicaid certifications were not required to be renewed during the pandemic; this changed with the ending of the public health emergency. Folks with Medicaid coverage are now required to be recertified within the next month. Watch your mail for a notice from your Medicaid provider or visit NACC or another community health center and talk with a patient advocate or a MNSure navigator to complete recertification to keep your coverage.Community Health Conversations is made possible with the support of the Minnesota Department of Health. To find information about COVID vaccines and boosters, please visit MN.gov/COVID19.

Pow Wow Life - PowWows.com
Rez Ball and the Power of Native American Representation in Storytelling - Pow Wow Life 90

Pow Wow Life - PowWows.com

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2023 15:55


Join Paul G for an interview with Byron Graves, an Ojibwe and Lakota author from the Red Lake Indian Reservation. Graves discussed his debut novel, "Res Ball," which delves into the world of Native American high school basketball and the universal themes of dreams, challenges, and self-discovery. This article will explore the importance of Native American representation in storytelling, focusing on the impact it has on youth identity, the growth of a cultural renaissance, and the power of inspiring others through authentic narratives. Show Notes www.powwows.com/powwowlife90 Find a Pow Wow Near You https://www.powwows.com/find-a-pow-wow-near-you/  

CraftLit - Serialized Classic Literature for Busy Book Lovers
625: Chs 23-24 — The Three Musketeers

CraftLit - Serialized Classic Literature for Busy Book Lovers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2023 77:47


Ep. 625: Beam Me! Book talk begins @ 17:08 D'Artagnan's thrilling meeting plan sours as chaos ensues, hinting at Madame Bonacieux's fate. Beam Paints' That that sent me down the rabbit hole and in Ojibwe  (nothing like her others, but fun nonetheless) CraftLit's socials: Find everything here:  Join the newsletter:   Podcast site:  Twitter: @CraftLit Facebook: Facebook group:  Pinterest:  Youtube:   Support the show links: Subscribe to the Premium feed (on the app) here: or on Patreon: (same price, $5/month) Feedback: You can ask your questions, make comments, and let us know what you do when you listen to CraftLit! Let your voice be heard. • Download the FREE CraftLit App for  or  (you can call or email feedback straight from within the app) • Call 1-206-350-1642 • Email: heather@craftlit.com • Use our ! FOR FB EVENT TUES Please Register here to get the meeting link for the FREE weekly chat: FOR FB EVENT THURS Please Register here to get the meeting link for the FREE ongoing weekly chat: 

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Sam Zimmerman's Journey Back to Painting and the Homelands

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2023 28:31


Leah and Cole chat with artist Sam Zimmerman (Grand Portage). After two decades on the east coast in public education, Sam moved back to Minnesota to rededicate himself to his passion for painting and to be closer to his family and community. His artwork explores his Ojibwe heritage, as well as his learnings and experiences in nature after returning to his ancestral homelands. Sam shares about learning language and culture through community collaborations, illustrating books for Native authors, and collaborating with family. He tells Leah and Cole about his path, which began with a college-age passion for painting, and then a love for teaching, and has now come full circle as he returns home. Sam discusses his experience venturing into watercolor painting for the first time, which is showcased in his latest gallery exhibition titled "Indigenous Expressions Love Culture and Reinvention" at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO). This exhibition is a collaborative effort with author and illustrator Tashia Hart, as well as bead artist Chenoa Williams. Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices ShineNative Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.  Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Rhiana Yazzie: Empowering Indigenous Creativity

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2023 28:31


Leah and Cole are joined by the multi-talented Rhiana Yazzie (Diné Nation), a remarkable theatre artist, filmmaker, playwright, and the visionary force behind New Native Theatre. Rhiana shares the latest developments at New Native Theatre, delves into her award-winning feature film ""A Winter Love," and shares about her lifelong passion for storytelling that has shaped her journey from childhood to becoming a leading voice in Indigenous creativity.Native Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.   Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Author Stories - Author Interviews, Writing Advice, Book Reviews
Writing The Great American Saga With William Kent Krueger | SCC 104

Author Stories - Author Interviews, Writing Advice, Book Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2023 32:11


Do you have a recommendation for a guest on the show? Want more of a particular direction of guests? Drop me a line at hank.garner@dabblewriter.com and let me know! Join us at our YouTube channel to join in LIVE for upcoming author interviews!  https://tinyurl.com/dabbleyoutube Raised in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, William Kent Krueger briefly attended Stanford University—before being kicked out for radical activities. After that, he logged timber, worked construction, tried his hand at freelance journalism, and eventually ended up researching child development at the University of Minnesota. He's been married for fifty years to a marvelous woman who is a retired attorney. He makes his home in St. Paul, a city he dearly loves. Krueger writes a mystery series set in the north woods of Minnesota. His protagonist is Cork O'Connor, the former sheriff of Tamarack County and a man of mixed heritage—part Irish and part Ojibwe. His work has received a number of awards, including the Minnesota Book Award, the Loft-McKnight Fiction Award, the Anthony Award, the Barry Award, the Dilys Award, and the Friends of American Writers Prize. His last eleven novels were all New York Times bestsellers. Ordinary Grace, his stand-alone novel published in 2013, received the Edgar Award, given by the Mystery Writers of America in recognition for the best novel published in that year. The companion novel, This Tender Land, was published in September 2019 and spent nearly six months on the New York Times bestseller list.

Minnesota Native News
Community Health Conversation: Navigating Community Health Beyond COVID19

Minnesota Native News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2023 28:25


Welcome back to Community Health Conversations, a special program from Minnesota Native News! Hosts Leah Lemm (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe) and Dr. Antony Stately Ph.D. (Ojibwe/Oneida) lead insightful discussions about the ever-evolving landscape of healthcare in Indian Country. They discuss the valuable lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore how Native communities are responding and adapting beyond COVID-19. On today's conversation, Dr. Charity Reynolds, Medical Director at Fond Du Lac Human Services, joins the conversation to reflect and discuss the significant changes in healthcare since the end of the federal public health emergency. Dr. Reynolds shares her insights on sustaining positive change in healthcare, addressing mental health, the importance of cultural competence and inclusivity in healthcare systems and promoting long-term community well-being.  Dr. Stately would also like to remind listeners that Medicaid certifications were not required to be renewed during the pandemic; this changed with the ending of the public health emergency. Folks with Medicaid coverage are now required to be recertified within the next month. Watch your mail for a notice from your Medicaid provider or visit NACC or another community health center and talk with a patient advocate or a MNSure navigator to complete recertification to keep your coverage!For more valuable insights and conversations on community health, visit MinnesotaNativeNews.org/CommunityConversations.   Community Health Conversations is made possible with the support of the Minnesota Department of Health. To find information about COVID vaccines and boosters, please visit MN.gov/COVID19.

Snapshots
#31 - Reimagining History: Colin Mustful on "Reclaiming Mni Sota" and The Coffee Controversy

Snapshots

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2023 46:27


Today we sit down with accomplished author Colin Mustful to discuss his upcoming alternate history novel, "Reclaiming Mni Sota." As we dive into a conversation about the largely overlooked US-Dakota War of 1862, we explore the unique narrative styles used to bring to life two characters, Samuel and Waabi. Mustful enlightens us about his background, his experience with a vanity press, and his subsequent journey to launching History Through Fiction Publishing. Further, we explore the nuances of revisionist history and alternate history, breaking down the differences with Mustful's insights. He elaborates on the painstaking process of blending history and fiction to create a compelling narrative. Not only do we dive into the details of the book, but also discuss broader topics such as the treatment of Dakota and Ojibwe people. As we wind down, we shift gears to talk about the often overlooked topic of coffee pricing, ignited by a humorous incident involving Warren Buffet's wife. We also recommend a charming South Korean Netflix show "Would You Like A Cup of Coffee?" to our audience. Be sure to listen till the end for a teaser about our special guest in the next episode. Remember to pre-order Mustful's captivating novel, visit his website, and check out other books by History Through Fiction Publishing. Press play, and let's explore history together. _ Produced by Podcast Studio X. Find my book reviews on ViewsOnBooks.com.

222 Paranormal Podcast
Haunted Detroit Author and Investigator Nicole Beauchamp Esp. 368

222 Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2023 42:30


Please Click Subscribe, and leave us a positive 5-Star review.  Click here to go to Our webpage. Click here for Nicole's book. Click here for Jens Closet.  Click here to go to Nicole's Page. This espisode we are joined the the lovely and talented author, paranormal investigator, founder of Tri-County Ghost Hunters Society Nicole Beauchamp. Growing up in Bay City, Michigan Nicole's formitive years were spent with a grand fondness for the paranormal. From an Early age, she began to dabble in scary and spooky endevors. As she grew up she started her own tour and investigation group.  With years of experience under her belt, she used her talents to begin writing her now famous book, Haunted Bay City, Michigan which later lead to her releases of Haunted Detroit. And soon coming another haunted book, Haunted Bars and Inns of Michigan. Detroit, the largest city in the state of Michigan, was settled in 1701 by French colonists. It is the first European settlement above tidewater in North America. Founded as a New France fur trading post, it began to expand during the 19th century with American settlements around the Great Lakes. By 1920, based on the booming auto industry and immigration, it became a world-class industrial powerhouse and the fourth-largest city in the United States. It held that standing through the mid-20th century. The first Europeans to settle in Detroit were French country traders and colonists from the New Orleans (the La Louisiane) colony. They were joined by traders from Montreal and Quebec; all had to contend with the powerful Five Nations of the League of the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee), who took control of the southern shores of Lakes Erie and Huron through the Beaver Wars of the 17th century. Also present and powerful, but further to the north, were the Council of Three Fires (Anishinaabe). (in Anishinaabe: Niswi-mishkodewinan, also known as the People of the Three Fires; the Three Fires Confederacy; or the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi Indians) is a long-standing Anishinaabe alliance of the Ojibwe (or Chippewa), Odawa (or Ottawa), and Potawatomi North American Native tribes. The Three Fires Confederacy (Anishinaabe) was often supported by the French, while the so-called League of Iroquois, or Five Nations (Haudenosaunee) was supported by the English and Dutch. Listen in as we talk to Nicole about her ventures into the paranormal.   As always thanks for listening and subscribing. We are glad to bring these episodes weekly, if you like what you hear please consider dontating to the show. A donation button can be found on our website. Thanks! Jen and Joe    

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
John Villebrun: Cultivating the Next Generation Through Basketball

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2023 28:31


Cole and Leah meet and chat with high school basketball coach John Villebrun (Bois Forte Band). John coaches girls' basketball at Mountain Iron-Buhl High School on the Iron Range. The team was recently crowned the Minnesota Class A State Girls' Basketball Champions, and John received the honor of Assistant Coach of the Year! Now as a decorated coach, John remains modest and continues to lead with perseverance and determination, setting an example for the next generation. Miigwech to John for chatting with us! Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine Native Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.   Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Nuances: Beyond first impressions with the Asian diaspora
S3 E04: Teresa Suydam, Filipino & First Nations Ojibwe artist, on being a "Lost Bird", reconnecting with their biological mom, and making deliberate efforts to find their roots.

Nuances: Beyond first impressions with the Asian diaspora

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2023 39:42


GUEST BIO Teresa Suydam is a lost bird songwriter and producer of Indigenous and Filipino descent who makes cinematic pop infused with honey-like vocals. Based out of Denver, Colorado, Teresa chases their own culture and identity with their music, and is a safe haven to other multicultural individuals who don't feel at home in their own skin. In 2022, Teresa's music video for "Take Me to the Water" was nominated for the Native American Music Awards (NAMA).. Instagram | TikTok | Web DEFINITIONS Smudging is a cultural ceremony practiced by Native peoples. It involves burning sacred herbs like tobacco, sweetgrass, sage, and cedar for medicinal, practical, and spiritual purposes. The smoke carries prayers and healing powers. A vessel holds the herbs, and the smoke is guided over the body using a feather (preferably eagle) or hand. Smudging a room involves directing smoke while praying for positive energy and removing negative energy. Ashes are placed outside to symbolize removing negative energy from our lives. Smudging is a cultural ceremony practiced by Native peoples. It involves burning sacred herbs like tobacco, sweetgrass, sage, and cedar for medicinal, practical, and spiritual purposes. The smoke carries prayers and healing powers. A vessel holds the herbs, and the smoke is guided over the body using a feather (preferably eagle) or hand. Smudging a room involves directing smoke while praying for positive energy and removing negative energy. Ashes are placed outside to symbolize removing negative energy from our lives. A powwow is a ceremony held by Native American peoples involving feasting, singing, and dancing. Side note: You may have heard or used the term "powwow" to refer to meetings that are completely unrelated to the original Indigenous context. This is an example of cultural appropriation and is offensive to Native Americans because it strips the word from its great cultural importance. TAKEAWAYS When your people have been driven to near extinction by colonialism and constantly subjugated to brutal treatment, being alive today and occupying space is a form of resistance in itself. For people who have grown up with no connection to their roots, it can take a while to warm up to the idea but with the unrelenting, gentle support of their mentors, Teresa did start to learn more about their cultures. Sometimes we don't know what we've been missing until we experience it. Teresa had this experience both when connecting with their cultures and when reconnecting with their biological mom and described it as feeling more like themselves, more whole, and more at peace with who they are. Learning can feel overwhelming when we know next to nothing, be it a language, a culture, or music production. But it gets easier if we start small and give ourselves some grace to make mistakes in order to learn. CONTACT Instagram | TikTok | Web | LinkedIn | Twitter Host: Lazou --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/nuancespod/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/nuancespod/support

Minnesota Native News
Documentary Preview: Decoded, Untold Stories of Ojibwe and Dakota Veterans

Minnesota Native News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2023 5:00


This week on Minnesota Native News, we preview a new documentary. DeCoded is about Native veterans from Minnesota who used tribal languages to help win World War Two.

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
Nordic Animism - Interview with Rune Hjarnø

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2023 77:32


https://linktr.ee/nordicanimism https://shop.nordicanimism.com/shop/9-books-and-calendars/   Remember, we welcome comments, questions, and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com. S4E21 TRANSCRIPT:----more---- Mark: welcome back to the Wonder Science-based Paganism. I'm your host, mark, Yucca: And I'm Yucca. Mark: and today we are excited to have Rune Hjarnø with us who is a thinker and podcaster and pagan animist Norse Animist coming to us from Scandinavia. So welcome Ro Rune: Thank you very much. Super happy to be here. Mark: Rune was suggested to us by one of our listeners who had been listening Toro's work and said that we could have a very interesting conversation. So we are here to have a very interesting conversation. Rune: Totally. Yucca: Yeah. Thank you for coming on. I'm really excited. So. Rune: thanks for having me. It's gonna be super interesting. Yucca: Yeah, do you wanna go ahead and start by just, you know, letting our listeners know a little bit about who you are and what your background and interests are? Rune: Yeah, let me, let me try yeah. My name is Rune I'm a Danish anthropologist of religion. And I, what I'm trying to do on my general platform, which is called Nordic Animism is that I'm trying to use indigenous knowledge scholarship and new animist thinking to look at our own cultural heritage as Euro ascendants because there's this weird assumption in our time that These are ways of thinking about our own culture that are only available if you belong to an indigenous colonized groups. And that assumption is there seemingly in popular culture and in scholarship and, and in all kinds of ways, in spite of the fact that what a lot of indigenous peoples are actually doing is that they're encouraging us as majority populations to start thinking like this about ourselves. But it's a difficult, for a number of reasons to do with cultural politics. It's a diff difficult step to take. So a lot of, not a lot of people are doing it. It's spite of the fact that indigenous knowledge is becoming a big thing. Anyway, so yeah. So that's basically what I'm doing. And I also feel that when I'm doing that I'm, I'm being brought through dealing with a lot of these problems of cultural politics because when you. When you look at, for instance, our culture as euron and people, and also the ways that our traditional culture has been sometimes co-opted then you are necessarily faced with issues such as well, racism, whiteness, the construction of whiteness, the rejection of animism actually as a part of construction of whiteness and these sort of things. So, and therefore it becomes a very, I think a very intersect intersectional work that is basically becomes a form of, of decolonizing. So yeah, and I'm then trying to do this to sort of bring this into popular spaces because one thing is that, you know, I can sit online and I can go blah, blah, blah in my highbrow, you know, academic language and nobody's gonna understand the stand a bloody thing, but what what actually. Or to come out of something like this is popular culture stuff that can be communicated to real people. Stuff that that can also attract actually real people. So, I've launched symbolism of totemic kinship with the world around us. I've written a book about the, the turning of the seasons and I've, yeah. Different, different projects like that. And then I'm continuously communicating on my channel. Yeah. Did that kind of sum it up or did I speak too lo too long? Yucca: No, that's great. And I have to say, I'm so excited to hear you talking about indigenous European cultures because so often the ideas that, that there isn't. And that that's the, that European is the opposite of indigenous, rather than seeing that there's indigenous all over the world, not just from specific groups. And I think that that's really valuable that you're bringing this to light. Rune: Thanks and I, I'll just add one little. Have it at there. And that is that when I'm talking about traditional European culture, I actually don't use the word indigenous. And the reason is that when we talk about indigenous peoples, we mostly talk, or we are generally talking about people who have been exposed to colonialism. That means that if you are in Wyoming and there's a group of Shoshone living there, you know, then when they can then the word indigenous, that to them, that's also a legal category. That it, it means access to fishing rights and land rights and hunting and access to funding, to first language teaching and all these kind of things that we don't need as majority populations. So what, so what I'm basically. This is just, I'm, I'm just saying this as, because this is an important little addition that, that is important to not actually when we talk about indigenous knowledge I mean, and I give you at some level you could call it indigenous knowledge, traditional knowledge, and in majority traditional knowledge and indigenous knowledge are basically the same kinds of knowledge, but the word indigenous is just a little bit touchy. And it's touchy for the indigenous people. So it's important to sort of, move around it a little bit. But like, I, I, I definitely get you a sentiment. We need to be able to speak about our our own heritage in exactly the same, or with those categories that, you know, authors like Robin Kimara and these kind of people are using to understand their culture. Mark: Yes. Yes. I, I think the, the first thing that strikes me as, as you speak is that we are definitely on the same page from a value standpoint. You know, we're, we're very, very adamant about the need for decolonization and the the importance of indigenous and traditional understandings of the nature of the world of development, of reciprocity in our ecological relationships, all of those kinds of values. So, I, I think maybe that's a good place to start from. Our work has been in building community around a science rooted. Understanding of the nature of the world, but a transformation of the value system that informs the way society operates. And it sounds like at least the transformation part of it is very similar ru to what you, you are focusing on. Rune: Totally. And I think I would probably also say the science routing. I'm, I'm not a natural scientist. I'm, I'm, More of a historical religion, anthropologist type. But but I don't perceive and this may be where we differ, I'm not sure, but I don't perceive necessarily a contradiction between, for instance religious languages or animist mythologies, a way of understanding the world and a scientific way of understanding the world. If you look at how an animist mythology, for instance, is typically structured, then you'd find that there are, it's. It's not one package, it's not one worldview that some people kind of buy into. And then to kind of adopt that whole thing as if they're in installing a new operative system on a computer. It's more like a, a, a jumbled up toolbox with a lot of kind of stuff lying in it. And, and then you can use it in different ways and it's kind of combined in different ways for different purposes. And some of these different tools can be contradictory and they can be radically contradict, contradictory. So the same, for instance, animist way of talking about, say, deities can be contradictory from one ritual situation to the next. And this also count, this counts on many levels in religious practices. So if you have a scien, a scientific perception of the world, then in a sense that's also just one toolbox. So if you move out of the, the, the monolithic. Ways of understanding the world that have characterized Abrahamic traditions particularly Christianity where, you know, there's ki there's kind of one worldview and you have to buy into that if, if you, when, when, and I think that would be a pagan step to move out of that. And then science just is just this incredibly beautiful, powerful, deep knowledge system, which in itself is like a web of, of, of roots that, that come from all kinds of different places in the world and kind of come together in, in Occidental science. And then, then that, that does not necessarily need to be in any conflict with creating tali talismans and seagulls and stuff like that, for instance. Yucca: Absolutely. Yeah. Mark: and we do all that stuff. Rune: Yeah. Mark: yeah. And I mean, we understand it as influencing ourselves at a psychological level and transforming our perspective on the world. We've been talking about animism and throwing the word around a lot, and I think it might be valuable for us to visit what we mean by that. I just wrote a blog post this week about naturalistic animism, and I think that one of the things about the, the traditional western colonizers view of animism is that it is a supernatural idea that there, that a rock has a soul in it. And I think that's a very dualistic, very Christian informed way of understanding animism. I see animism as being about what are, what is my relationship with the rock? Do I relate to the rock as a person or do I relate to the rock as an inanimate thing that I can exploit? And that's, that's kind of my take on, on a naturalistic approach to animism. What, what do you think animism is and how does it Rune: I agree and with some of what you say, but not all of it. I think the relationship is absolutely foundational to animism and in a sense, I think that the relating with the rock is more foundational than if there is any sort of faith or belief in whatever figure that lives inside the rock. Like, be and, and that's because the relationship is important. So if you, if you look at how, for instance, new animist theory and, and also the philosophers who are doing panist thinking and all these things. When, when you look at these ways of thinking, then being becomes predicated on relating, I, I relate where, where Decart, the kind of quintessential modernist thinker would say, I think therefore I am. So the world is enclosed in the human thinking space. The, the animist position would, would be, I relate or we relate, therefore we are, and that means that, so that, but, but if, if I should tie that to what you say with supernatural, then in a sense it's, it's extremely sort of, mundane. Like we are we are in a relation right now and we're trying to understand each other and we are sitting in different continents and, you know, we, we have different positions and it's interesting and blah, blah, blah, that defined, but there's also an exchange of value between us. You have a podcast, I'm coming on your podcast. Perhaps some of my followers would go over there and the other way around. And so there's an exchange going on in that, in the relation that we are in right now, our subjectivities are defined in that, in this encounter that we are in now, our subjectivities are defined by that, right? So the con the current perception of a lot of anthropological scholarship would be that, that this relation is inhabited by subjectivity. So subjectivity is not only inside our minds or inside our brains, it's actually in our relation. Now, that means that when the inu eat are relating with the C, which is an all life defining factor in Inuit life, then their relation with the sea is inhabited by subjectivity. That sub subjectivity, that inhabits, that relating, that is the, the, the sea mother sna, the inwar, they would call it the inwar, the relational subjectivity of the sea. So, and whether that should be called supernatural or not, I'm not really sure, but like. I'm not, actually, I'm not really sure about the word supernatural, if it's because it, it, I think it has a heavy, heavy baggage somehow. But an Inuit shaman can actually interact with Sedna, the sea mother, and thereby engage that subjectivity that inhabits the the relation between a group of Inuit and the sea. And that's the same with a stone or with, if, if you have a farmstead in Northern Europe 200 years ago, the stone could be kind of a relational hub for the way that the people in that farm state relates to their land. So it becomes inhabited by, I'm not sure what the word would be in English, but these sort of g like or elf like beings that would typically work as a patron spirit protecting specific farm. Or ensuring basically the positive and mutually giving reciprocal relating between that group of people and the agrarian life sustenance that they are living with and living from. Yucca: So that that spirit would be the relationship itself. Am I understanding correctly? Rune: Yeah. Or the subjective, the the subject, the subjective relationship. Yeah. So, and this is sometimes called the individual. So we are individuals from a moderna's perspective that there's an inside us with. But if you take away the, the, the in Yucca: Mm-hmm. Rune: then we are evi right now because we are producing relating with each other from Yucca: delightful word. Rune: Yeah, it's a lovely word, isn't it?  Yucca: that. Rune: And. Mark: Yeah. Rune: And then what many animists would would say, or animist thinkers would say that that that divi is a central purpose of religion, basically. And that it individuates a relation. So if you have a Santa Priestess who's being possessed by the storm, gods ysa and she's dancing around, then that human being is dividing ysa in a number of ways. One of them is portraying Younga. People see younga in front of their eyes dancing. Another part of the dividuation is that she's initiated, she's crowned as a San Priestess, so, so there's deep mystical individuations that are connected with that and that whole thing. But it's basically about producing. Relating and, and ch challenging that subjective relating into the world. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yeah. Rune: that make sense? Am I, Mark: it. It, oh, it absolutely does. Yeah. It, it, it absolutely makes sense. And that this, this focus on, on the relationship, as I said, I think is very core to the at least to my idea of animism. And so the, the question about the reality of the, the gnome elf figure doesn't really even enter into it. It's, it's not, you know, because this is all subjectivity. It objectivity is not, is is not a part of that model. It's all about what do you see? What do you think about it, and how do you feel in relation to it? Rune: Yeah. Something like that. I would say that the reality or the what, what, you know, post-Christian, it's called the belief in the el that that is it's secondary to the relation. Like if, if you, if you say you have a shamanic perception and you could and you, you bring yourself into a trance and you speak to the elf and you ask the elf so what would you prefer the most? Would you prefer that I cultivate an abstract transcend belief in your transcendent existence? Or would you prefer a ball of porridge? The, the elf is gonna prefer the ball of porridge because that is act that is an actual exchange of of material. And the what, what you could almost call the revelation of that relationship is. That is core, I think, to producing an animist way of being in the world. So that's not only you giving the ball of porridge to the stone that is perhaps inhabited by a stone ina or an elf or what we can call it. But it's also then perceiving the gift being given back from the world now that then you are in a reciprocal relationship with the world around us. Mark: Yeah, and, and it's that, you know, a as you say, as with Robin Wall Kemmerer and you know, writers like that, it's that reciprocity that is so important the. And, and the hardest, I think for us, as, you know, modern Westerners to get our minds around because we are taught as Christianity teaches that the world is essentially inanimate and it's a pile of resources here for us to mine. And that is the diametric opposite of what we're talking about here. Rune: Exactly. Mark: you know, the, the idea that, that we can't just dig a hole in the ground and take minerals out and then leave the hole is completely foreign to the way capitalism works. Rune: exactly. Exactly. And. If you look at how traditional knowledge and tales and traditional knowledge and folklore and the like they actually express and analyze the rupture of these relationships in euros and populations. So, and you see this in a, like, in a wide kind of array of tales, like the most monumental in northern Europe is the Ragner rock, which is the, basically the collapse of the relational cosmos in this kind of e eco cosmos, social complete crashing. Now, some of the scholars who have been working on the Ragnar Rock, they say that this. Myth may have occurred or may have, may have been inspired by the experience of climate change in Northern Europe in the, the mid sixth century. And often when people are relating mythology to natural history events, you should always be a little bit cautious because sometimes it's just like weird, oh shit. But but this exact example the, the emergence of this myth and this event, they're actually historically very close to each other. It's a couple of hundred years, and the event was cataclysmic. It ba in Scandinavia populations collapsed. And there would've been complete social breakdown. So it was a very, very violent event. And what happened was basically that it was a global cooling that lasted I think four or five years and. In Northern Europe, that global, global cooling just meant that summer didn't come for a, a, a, a short period for, for a couple of years. And if you're living in an agrarian subsistence, agrarian community, then that just means that everybody's gonna die. And which is what you see that happened in some areas of Scandinavia. So, so anyway, so, so, when you look at the Ragnarok myth, what you see is that it's, it's very much a myth about loss of connectivity. So the main spark of the myth is a, a divine FRA side. There's God brothers who are killing each other. And then what happens is that the relations between the guards, kind of the forces of order and social coherence and the yna, the giants, the. Forces of nature who are related in all these problematic and crazy and fertile ways, and Nordic mythology, that relation crashes completely. And then they start behaving like Christian angels and demons and basically going into like the state of cosmic total war. So that's perhaps the most iconic tale of losing animist kinship. But you find them by all the way down to today. You see that fairy tales and different stories are sort of this struggling, but also people's experiences. Some farmer, you know, walking up a home from his fields and then he meets a little, meet a little group of elves and they're leaving. So he asked them, why are you leaving? And he, they say, there's too much noise here and too many church bells, so we are moving to Norway. Something like that, you know? And and that is of course a traditional knowledge perspective of basically ruptured relation because this relational subjectivity, which are these Ls that are, that is sub subjectivity, inhabiting human being, human relating with the land, that when that is torn, then that can be experienced as the elves packing, packing their bags and, Mark: Or, or as the magic going away, Rune: Yeah. Mark: which is another, you know, repeated trope in many, many stories about how there used to be magic. You know, we, we used to have, you know, this relationship, right? And now it's drained away, it's gone. And many of those stories are actually specific about Christianity driving the magic away, Rune: Yes. Yes. There, there there's a tension. There's a tension. Like I, I'm not, I'm, I'm generally, I'm, I'm, I'm trying to not, you know, go into this sort of Christianity bashing and all those  Mark: Uhhuh.  Rune: but but there is a tension. The, there's a tension between and sometimes it's, it is pretty intense, like, churches in the landscape in Northern Europe, the, if they're big stones lying in the landscape, then typically people, local people would say it was trolls who were throwing the stones at the churches and all when they were building the churches. So there's almost like a conflict between the, the churches and the, and the landscape itself. Mark: Hmm. Hmm. Yucca: So one of the expressions that I've heard you use a few times is new animism. So how does new animism differ from our understanding of some of the traditional forms? Or what does that mean when you're speaking about new animism? Rune: animism that is a little bit of. It's a scholarship position more than it's a kind of a religious position out in the world. May, but things are also related. But when, when I say new animism, it's because anim, like animism was invented by actually the guy who invented anthropology and cultural scholarship. A guy called Edward Burnett Tyler, who was this sort of Victorian British armchair scholar. And he. Invented cultural evolutionism in which people are first living in these barbers, state of superstition, where they are animist, infantile animists. And, and, and, and that was, that was, that was what he thought of animism. And then you then he kind of developed how humans would develop on gradually improving stages until they became almost like, Victorian, England English people of his own time. Exactly, exactly. That, that was a paradigm for, for the end of history. So, so, so that was, and, and at that point, the idea of animism was just that everything is sort of animate. However up through the 20th century there was the, the, the most progressive anthropologists were the American School of Anthropology, who were at a very early point starting to be permissive to other other cultures, cultural realities and saying, okay, so there are different cultural realities and perhaps they're equally good. And there was a guy named, oh shit, I forgot his name right now. Oh damn. Really important guy whose name I should be able to remember at any given point of time who went and, and learned from the the Jiwei Irving, hallow Hallowell was his name. Yucca: Okay. Rune: So he went and and started learning the philosophy of jiwei indigenous Americans in, in the Great Lake areas. I think he went into Canada a little bit. And he, I think he was the first who was kind of saying, well, he was looking, he was looking at their, their language and saying that they have different grammatical categories and some of these categories indicate animated personal beings. And some of them are like what we talk about. If I talk about this book, then the word book is in, in English is, is just an it, you know. And he noticed that what was called animate and inanimate by the Ojibwe was different. So Stones, for instance, and thunder and number of different things were adamant to the Ojibwe. And he started developing this language where he was like, okay, so these are people, they have a different philosophy about what, where, where there's personhood and where there isn't. So from that came. New animist thinking, which is kind of relieved from or dealing with the this bigoted evolutionist heritage of seeing animist as a animism, as as something inferior. And today, the, this has then become the whole position where where the, the, the understanding of what animism is and how it works is, is then updated. For instance, animism is incredibly complex. It's not infantile at all, and it's certainly not primitive. It's many societies that have animist knowledge systems in them. not something necessarily that children practice, it's something that elders practice. It's something that it takes lifespans to, to understand that at, at a, at a very high level. So, so, so yeah. So that's sort of what's in, in new animism. Yucca: Mm. Thank you. Mark: Thank you for explaining that. Yeah, that's good. So, you mentioned before we started recording that that you sort of take issue with the atheism of our movement or that you have questions about it or whatever that is. So I thought that I would raise that topic and we could discuss it. Rune: I've been sort of thinking about it, kind of atheism. Atheism. No, I, it, it ki I think my, sort of, my, my question. Kind of springs from the whole idea of decolonizing if we have what is called the modern epistemology, like the, the epistemology is the perception, how we perceive the world. Then the modern fundamental to the modern epistemology would be a seclusion between human subjectivity and personhood. An agency which is inside our skulls, and then the, the dead outside. And I can't help seeing an and i atheism as perhaps related to that and that therefore co like actual actually practicing a a decolonizing would be. To say, okay. But subjectivity and agency is not only inside humans goals, it's also, it is something that inhabits the world in a, in a wider in a wider sense. It's something that inhabits our interactions and perceptions in a much wider sense. And yeah, I just had, I just had tr part of my, my problem was to that I have, I have tr, I have trouble reconciling that with, with an, with an atheist position. Mark: Hmm. Yucca: I can certainly say that for my part, my perception of the outside world, I. Is, I don't think that that necessarily reflects my idea that there's this dead outside world, the living me, but rather seeing self as part of this larger system. I'm coming from the perspective of, of an ecologist looking at, you know, my body is an ecosystem that is an open system and things are coming in and going out. I don't see the need to have a, a, a deity or a God or a conscious spirit that needs to be there for me to be part of a, of a living vibrant world. Rune: Makes a lot of sense. Mark: Yeah, that's well said. I, I feel very much the same. Yeah, because yeah, that hard line between the, the inner living world and the outer dead world is definitely not something that I embrace at all. To me it's all living. Right. But because, but just because it's living doesn't necessarily mean that it's conscious or that it's animated by something that one could actually at some point identify and measure. You were talking about toolkits before and I think that it's, it's y part of what we do as Ethiopia, pagans, and, and naturalistic pagans is we understand that in the context of the symbolic world, we suspend whatever disbelief we might have in, in the, the literal reality of supernatural phenomena in order to have a symbolic, metaphorical, psychological, emotional, impactful experience. And that is what brings me into deep relation with the rest of the world. Did that make Rune: Cool. Yes, it does. However, when you are focusing on psychology, then psychology is a space that is characterized by being. Inside human human minds and, and what I would, I don't know fear or my, I think my, my question would then be, if it's psychology, I, you then actually extending that perception of, of personhood to the world, or, I does. Because like when you speak to a lot of, say, scholars today, often psychologies would, or psychology would be a language where, for instance, mythology can be given a space. But that actually maintains the, the the the enclosure. Try to compare this with. With I had this debate with, with a friend of mine who also he was criticizing the literalist idea of mythology. So he was saying, he was talking about, I, I believe Irish mythology, and he was saying, but who, who, who would believe such an grotesque idea as if Ireland were literally plowed with the, the fertility guard dog does penis in a right. And yeah, innocent. But what if you, if we think about relation, if we take relationships as our, our fundamental way of thinking about these things then, and we understand if we understand the plow that the farmer is using when he's plowing his land as imminent with. Dha. See then, then when, when it's imminence, if we understand the the materiality of the plow as n n not as culturally imbued with, but in the materiality, DDA is there right then, then we have actually, then we have crossed out of the modern paradigm and into a this enchanted perception of the world. And I think we, like, I think that is the step, the, that, that's where it becomes real in a sense. And, and there, there, there's a number of co contemporary philosophers and, and, and thinkers who make that, that, that enchanting possible. Bruno Laur the sometimes they call it the ontological turn thinking or the Cambridge School, and they're so difficult to read that it's almost, it's almost impossible to understand what they're saying, but which, which is part of a I think it's, I think it's part of a safeguarding strategy because if you wanna say that ELs and g nos are real, then it's, it's, it's then, you know, scholars are gonna, you know, it's much, much better to say, well, relational ontologies are possible on the basis of you know, concatenated hops of individual re networks or something like that. You know, then people get, get busy nodding and looking like they are trying to look like they look clever, right? But but the idea of imminence that, for instance that that objects act chairs, Invite us to sit on them balls do hold strawberries, they act. And the, the example with plow and DDA would, in that sense be a, a imminent in that sense. Damn, it's, it's difficult for me to to, to get to these things. But does, does it make sense my, Mark: It, it, it Rune: questioning. Mark: it, it does make sense. I do see it somewhat differently, and some of that is because my understanding of the way humans relate with the world is that we create a model of the world in our minds. And we re and we relate to that. We, we perceive, we receive perceptual input, we filter that and massage it, and in some way invent it to some degree. And then, you know, so, all right, I receive all this input and I filter it and I decide what it is. And okay, there it is. There's, there's the bowl, right? And so I can relate in a, in an I vow sort of way with the bowl whether or not the bowl actually has any sort of supernatural el or metaphorical, symbolic, literal nature. Rune: Yeah, Mark: And it's, it's about what's on me to enchant the world. And us as a culture to develop the habits of enchanting the world. So that's, that's how I look at it. And I, I, I mean, I think the way that you look at it is, is perfectly legitimate and useful. It's just, I don't look at it quite the same way. Rune: but I think, I think, I think what you say there makes a lot of sense. Like, and it's important to, to, I might also be hashing it out in a little bit extreme. Terms here, because of course, humans do create models of the world, and we are imaginary beings that we have this capacity of, for instance, imagining stuff that doesn't exist already. And then by this insane capacity of projection, we are able to, to create stuff in the world that, that no other creature is, is capable of. And, and that capacity is in a sense, I think related to also the story of Dhada and all this. However, when you are then talking about the bowl and you're talking about. What its literal external nature is then what you're doing, I think, is that you are actually, you're reaching across the divide and you're talking about it in this, what can't would call the ding, the, the, you're talking about it in itself as, as completely detached from human perception. And and I I would say that that is probably so difficult to talk about that, that we almost can't. So perhaps there only is a cultural reality available, and then enchantment becomes then it kind of becomes a, a question of do we want a boring, interesting a boring uninteresting reality? Or, or do we want a reality where, you know, We have sex on rock car rings and dance around meadows and wear their elves and trolls and, and stuff like that is enchantment. It becomes more of, of a kind of enchantment or no enchantment than a, a question about that. There isn't exterior truth that defies in. Gentlemen, oh man, I feel I'm have trouble speaking in state terms here. Mark: No, you're, you're absolutely making sense. The place where I think we may differ is that, I find the world as revealed by science to be utterly enchanting. It is miraculous the nature of the universe. It is so inspiring and wonder and humility and awe and inspiring that I feel that without that, even without populating it, with those kinds of figures, I can still just be in this kind of open-hearted wondering, loving relationship with the nature, with the world itself in a way that demands that I have reciprocal relationships with things rather than rather than object, defy relationships with things. And so, you know, that may just be the path by which I got here. Which was through a lot of science. But yeah, I mean that's, that's the world that I inhabit is just, you know, that this world is just knocked down, drag out amazing. And I still want to dance around stones and have sex on beaches and all that kind of stuff. Rune: No, man. Thanks for that. That, yeah, that's, it's, it's, it's beautiful. And I totally, I totally follow what you're saying. I think, I think science is, is an incredibly beautiful and powerful way of looking at the world. And, and it has. And part of, I think part of what I'm, what fascinates me with science is that it, it has a trickster nature. Science, that thing about always questioning things. That thing about always being critical and being inherently critical of power, for instance. And also being playful proper science. Like a lot of contemporary scholarship, you know, a lot of contemporary cultural, cultural and social scholarship. It isn't playful for shit. It's just boring ass. They should, they should, yeah. They should do something else, like pick strawberries or something. But but but, but scholarship when it's real science, when it's real, it has a playful or in it. And and that's something that, that that yeah. But I then what I also think is that if we talk about atheism then I would say that if we look at research, history, history, It's probably a very fairly brief bleep in the history of science that science have understood itself as particularly atheist. And today with, for instance, new animus scholarship and these things, it's kind of, we're kind of, we're kind of moving theves back into the beauty of the scientific perception, so, Mark: Well that's, that's interesting. I mean, one of the reasons that. I mean, science is young for one thing, science other, other than just sort of the standard trial and error that leads to discovery, which all people have always done the  Yucca: in our instinctual way of understanding the world. Right. But  Mark: but formalized, the scientific method is only a few hundred years old and during most of that time, there has been a domination by Christianity mostly in the West, such that you couldn't actually say that you were an atheist, whether you, you whether your work pointed in that direction or not. So I think that, you know, the liberty, I mean, to be honest, it wasn't really until Richard Dawkins and the, you know, the four horsemen who I have many problems with, let me. Say to start with many problems. But it wasn't until they started standing up and saying, yes, we're atheists at the end of the 20th century, that it really became sort of more acceptable for a part of the population to start to express that. So it's new. It is. It's, it's a new thing. But when you look like at ancient Greece, there were people that were questioning whether the gods existed in any meaningful sense. Yucca: And I Rune: you, and you. Yucca: oh, I was just gonna say that I think that the, the common perception of what atheism is, is dominated by that very recent, very vocal and kind of, very negative kind of, no, no, no take on the world instead of a, a yes. Embracing take on the world. Mark: Yes. Rune: I wanna add one specific perspective to the to the understanding of history of religions in relation to this. And that is that if you look at the history of religions of Europe, then you have what you call like, normative knowledge forms. And and then what you also have is a. Considerable space of rejected ways of knowing all kinds of ideas that have been there through history, and they gone in all. And, and that's what's sometimes called esotericism. So Esotericism is this label that basically sort of gives an umbrella term for all the weird shit that's been happening for the last 2000 years outside of the normative knowledge hierarchy. So all the Astrologies and the Kabbalah and the spiritists and the, the philosophers and all that stuff, that, all that stuff is, is esotericism. And when you look at European history, a lot of a a lot of is, people are always like when we talk about intellectuals, that there will always be this sort of at least a kind of a consciousness that. Esoteric, non-normative ways of knowing are there, but sometimes also direct practice. I think that Darwin was an esoteric I think that a lot of the and I don't remember, I think he was Alchemist or something like that, and practicing some  Yucca: Newton certainly was. Rune: Newton new. Sorry. Yes, you are. You are, you are right there. That was the important name I was looking for. No Darvin yeah, that was a different story with him. But I think that that part of the, like if you look at the last 150 years is that, that I think in the eight late 19th century, you started having positivism. If I remember correctly. And that's sort of where you get the very strong split between or where science starts to see itself as in some sort of opposition to other ways of of thinking. And yeah, like, the there, there was an old Icelandic professor at the University of Coing in and my old professor remembered him from his student years. And he had, had, he had had this this Christmas lecture about gnomes and that was early 20th century. And as these sort of learned, super white scholars were sitting there and they were listening to him and he was talking about gnomes, at some point, they, it, it dawned on them that, That he he believed in grunes and he told about how he had met them when he was a, he was a child and these kind of things. And so that was sort of the, a, a clash between an early 20th century scholar from ICE Iceland, which is a bit of a particular story in these things. It's a little bit of kind of a insular bobble in in some respects. And in Copenhagen they were like, but, but about, about this Icelandic professor talking about G norms. But yeah. Yucca: Well, one of the things before we started recording that you had mentioned was that I'm trying to figure out how quite how to word this but you're very interested in to today and some of the political implications of some of the work that you're doing. Is that something you wanna speak to a little bit? Rune: Yeah, it's, I mean, when, when I started working on Nordic animism, I well, I knew all the time that it was important and that it's something that you can, like, you can never, you turn your face away from it, you have to look it straight in the eye, just all the time. I just, the word these words, Nordic Norse, Viking stuff, you know, all that kind of stuff, it just has a load of having been co-opted by all kinds of, Horrid political movements and, but it's actually deeper than not just that, like, it's not just hillbillys who are, you know, driving around in pickup trucks with guns and calling themselves some militia and waving Thor hammers and these kind of things. It, it's, it's, it's on, I think it's on deeper layers of our self image and, and self perception as people racialized as white and and yeah, and, and I, I, I feel that I'm getting new realizations of this more or less all the time. No, not all the time, but, but often reckon with a certain regularity that that when you are thinking with Euro traditionalism, then. Then it's just there. For instance, I, I think that today I think that that whiteness is almost like shaved, like a ball just talking about balls. It is almost as if whiteness is shaped a little bit like a ball. So if you wanna move out of it, then you come close to the borders and then it intensifies and scares you back in. So if you wanna if you wanna basic, yeah. Basically move out of the, the whiteness complex, then you're gonna have to start looking to Euro traditionalism. And as soon as you come in contact with that, you, you will start seeing ruins and. May Pires and stuff that has been co-opted by Nazis or other nasty people. So, so that, and that is sort of a, an inherent paradox, which is a condition for working with these things if you're a white person. And realizing that that paradox, realizing the nature of it and, and starting to cope with it, is an important feature. So that's one rea fairly reason realization. I also encounter policing actually where most non-white peoples would be like, well, decolonizing white people. What's not to like and what took you guys so long? Then scholars, white scholars, they, they often have this sort of they, they, they don't like that whole idea. And and, and then they often frame it as, oh, there's an inherent potential for nationalism in what you're doing. Or something like that, you know? And which there might be, there might be, and I'm fucking dealing with that all the time. And, and in the dealing with it, That's when the stuff becomes very applicable actually for, for thinking about how to be a respectful, kind, contemporary human. So today there are actually I'm familiar with two, perhaps perhaps even three, like systematic programs that use Nordic animism thinking for Deradicalizing right. Extremists in, in prison systems and, and these kind of things. So, so, so, so you see that, I think that when you're moving close to some stuff that feels dangerous and feel problematic, then you're also finding the solu, you're finding solutions on that path. Mark: Hmm. Hmm. It, it's, it's interesting as, as I listen to you, because what you say makes absolute sense to me in the context of Europe. In the United States, it's a little different because here we are in this completely colonized place, and many of us, like, you know, I've, I've had my d n A study done. I'm English, English, English, English, English. Nobody ever stepped out of their lane. And actually, you know, even married an Italian for God's sake. And, but my people have been here for 400 years. I have no ancestral or familial memory of any kind of tradition from England. And so my approach has been I need to create this anew. I need to, I n I need to start from values. Values like inclusiveness and kindness and you know, those compassion, those kinds of values reverence for the earth. And then from there, build a practice which can draw on some of the symbols and and, you know, folkloric practices like maypoles and things like that, but is fundamentally about not stealing from the indigenous people of this place. And instead creating my own understanding of a sacred landscape that I inhabit, that I can share with other people that derive from the same kind of lineage that I do. And with everybody else who wants it. I mean, you know anybody who wants it, but I understand that people who have been marginalized, they probably want to reach back to their ancestry, right. And pull that forward. I really don't, I, I don't feel a kinship with England. So it, it, it's just, I, I'm just struck by the difference. I don't have any firm fast conclusions about it. I just, it, it is a d a different experience. Rune: No, I think, I think what you're doing is probably very important and, and give like, like I. I'm kind of operating in this field where, where as an old world, I sometimes feel a little bit like a target for sort of old world nostalgia and these kind of things. I'm probably wearing a kilt and speaking all Gaelic all the time and all these things. But but what I actually think is that, that over there in Turtle Island, the cultural situation is such an intense mix of and, and it's as if the, the problems of our age are intensified on your side of the pond. The fact of, of living on genocided land in a highly cre and cre realiz culture. With the, the, the descendants of, of victims of colonization in your living space, probably every single day. Maybe not for all of you, but for many of you probably, right? And also immersed in, I I I perceive Americans as very immersed in ideological structures that are that are sort of connected with the problem. Now, that means, I think that means that, that the, the real answers in a sense are, are, are, are gonna probably come from, from America and, and, and stuff like what you are doing when you're thinking like this, mark. I think it's beautiful and, and it's, and I think it has an aspect of. Playfulness in it to say, Hey, I've been listening a little bit to your, your, your podcast and how you are thinking with different things, and you also like playing with seagulls and, and, and have been working on wheels of season like me and these sort, sort of things. And I think that playfulness will be an important voice in producing the answers that will bring us to a to a a decolonial future. I also think that one question that I meet a lot and which you also touch a little bit here is the question of cultural exchange. And I think that the ways that people have been talking about cultural exchange in American spaces in the last couple of years have a, have a problematic aspects. When we are not allowed to or when, if, if all cultural exchange is universally cri criticized at as cultural appropriation for instance, that is an essentially nationalist idea, which I've tried to criticize it which is difficult because you also have minorities. Who have been sitting there and their traditional culture has been completely overrun with like swarms, like locusts of white hippies. And they've been giving statements like, please stay away from our traditional spirituality. And of course, when that is the case, then that makes things fairly easy. You stay away. That's the respectful thing to do. But but there's also stories that, that I'm hearing a lot and I'm hearing 'em sort of in direct personal ways and that I'm not seeing so much in public space. And that is stories about mors who are perhaps in very, they're perhaps white Americans or Canadians, and they're in very deep and respectful rela learning relationships with, for instance, indigenous elders. Now, if that's the case, then that transfer of knowledge, if there is a teacher present, Then that knowledge is legitimate. Because if you wanna challenge that knowledge, then you're challenging the legitimacy of the teacher. And that is a, is, is a that can very easily be a colonizing practice. If you say, no, no, no, that Arapahoe elder there, he doesn't have the legitimacy to teach a white kid how to give tobacco to a stone because that's cultural appropriation or something like that. Then you're actually challenging the, the, the author, the ownership of the Arapaho elder. See what I'm saying? Mark: Yes, Rune: So, so, and, and I, I think, yeah. So anyway, I just wanted to mention that because you mentioned appropriation now. I think it's, it's important that, that the, the way that we are thinking about cultural exchange is, is is relieved from. What I think is, is a bit too unambiguous condemnation in, in the appropriation discourses. Mark: I, I really agree. It's, it's nuanced and Americans are not good at nuance. We, we just, we really are not, we're very, very black and white thinkers, most of us. And you know, a lot of good and bad, and usually we are good and somebody else is bad, and it's, it's an unhelpful way to approach the world. But certainly, I mean, if I were welcomed into a space where an indigenous person wanted to teach me some aspect of their culture, I would feel given permission absolutely entitled to incorporate that into my practice. I wouldn't feel entitled to teach it but I would feel entitled to incorporate it into my practice. That hasn't happened to me yet. So, Rune: But if you, if you, if you were part of that practice for 25 years and and then the person said, now you are a teacher. Mark: well then, yeah, Rune: You see? Yucca: But we run into the tricky problem of the outside perception and other people trying to gate keep that. And, and it's just such a very, it's a very raw, it's like when you, when you've been wounded and it hasn't healed yet. And there's just so many feelings and the nuance and it's, it's really, it's something that we, you know, we are just grappling with all the time. And I think that there's in certain directions that, you know, the pendulum swung really far in some ways, but it's not just one pendulum, right? There's so many pendulums going in every single direction at once, and you're just trying to sort through all of this generational trauma and guilt, and it's just a really heavy topic. Rune: No, thanks for that. Thanks for that. You okay. That was, that was really well said. And, and I sometimes also feel a little bit like an elephant in a porcelain shop when I'm, I'm, I'm talking to Americans about these things because I'm sitting on this side of the pond. And when you're interacting with Americans specifically, you, you get the feeling that, that, because these things are so intense, then you're talking to people where every single individual is on an MA level in, you know, critical race studies. Be because it, because, because it's so intense. Or, and that also means that, you know, I need to be a little bit careful when I'm kind of throwing out my state. Ah, come on. You guys need to calm down a little bit on the, on the, on the critical,  Yucca: it's good to have an outside perspective too, though, right? It's very valuable to hear that. And just hear w you know, what it looks like from the outside because we don't see ourselves from the outside. We just see ourselves in the midst of it going, oh, my ancestors murdered and raped my other ancestors. And you know, I don't know what you are feeling. And you're feeling and everybody's angry at each other. And you know, sometimes it's good just to have that outside perspective going, Hey, this is what I see from the outside, you know, Mark: and particularly in the United States, we have been so adamant about denying our responsibility for the Gen, the American genocide, the enslavement of Africans. We're still denying those things, and to the degree that in right wing states, they're banning teaching about them. And what that means is that because we won't acknowledge the wound, we can't heal it, and. And so the, the subject becomes very, because it's an open wound, it's very sensitive, you prod at it at all. And immediately people have these really vehement reactions. Rune: Yeah. Mark: And my hope is that as we go forward, I mean, this younger generation seems to have more comprehension about these issues. My hope is that as we go forward into the next generation, we'll start to come to grips with some of that horrible history. But it's very difficult to come to some kind of reconciliation with people who have been horribly colonized and abused when you won't even admit that you did it. Rune: Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. And I think also like with these sort of processes, I think the, the kind of cultural spaces that we are inhabiting today, primarily the internet cultural spaces I think they're probably also doing some unfortunate things to us, like, A tendency such as narcissism on social media platforms, speaking as a person who has a social media platform. Mark: me too. Yucca: that's all of us here, right? Yeah. Rune: it's like, it, it's, Yucca: double-edged. Yeah. Rune: it's a very dominating feature about how how people are reacting and or how people are, are interacting. And, and, and like I feel that, that, I almost feel that if we have the, the modernist subject here, the modernist idea of the subject that I spoke about before where, where humanity is inside a case, and if you, if you move into a if you move back in time where people would meet a group of elves that are moving away, that's because. Their subjectivity is not as encased as ours today. It's a little bit more fluffy like that then it is as what has it is as if what happens today is that these, these shells, they become hotter. They become like crystal, they become brittle. And it's as if I, if they touch each other, then it just goes. And, and then we have these, the, these so it's almost as it's almost as a kind of an in intensification of the, the modern subjectivity. And I don't know what's gonna happen, but I hope that what's gonna happen is that it's gonna open somehow again and hopefully in a way where it doesn't explode and then everybody just go mad. Which actually sometimes I feel that's what you're seeing. I, I've, sometimes I feel there's quite a lot of madness going around, like rather crazy reaction patterns. Mark: Mm-hmm. Rune: And unfortunately not only on the right wing, I mean, of course the right winging is like supreme when it comes to madness. Like, I mean now here in 2023, it feels as if, if it's such a long time ago that Donald Trump was the president in the us. But when I think about how, how was even, I'm not living over there. I'm living here, and it just feels like, oh fuck, you don't know if there's gonna be a civil war in America and what's that's gonna do to the world. Like the, eh, it was such a madness dominated situation, such a madness dominated situation, and it just felt like. It just felt like, it really felt like madness had had just taken up this gigantic space in the world that, that it, it, it didn't use to have and like, yeah. Anyway, you, you probably Yucca: Absolutely. Yeah. Rune: agree even. Yeah. Mark: Yeah. Rune: And I thought it was something I wanted to say about this whole thing with yeah. But, but I also think that like, with these strong reaction patterns and these intensifying subjective borders Then I also think it, that it's important to be a little bit like, okay, so now I'm just gonna say it, you know, all cultural exchange is not cultural appropriation. And sometimes when people shout cultural appropriation, it's actually not legitimate. Yucca: Yeah, Rune: they, there are many cases where, where it's super legitimate, but there are also cases where people are shouting it, where it's not legitimate. And there are legitimate cases of cultural exchange even within, between white and indigenous groups. You. Mark: Sure. And, and there are, there are over claims. I mean, I read a rant by an indigenous man who argued that no one should be allowed to use feathers in any kind of religious or ritual context except for indigenous Americans. People have been using feathers and seashells and pine cones and other  Yucca: we were humans. Mark: since, since before we were humans. That is a birthright of every homo sapiens. And I mean, I, I mean, I understand the person's outrage about cultural appropriation, but that's just a little much. Rune: yeah. It becomes, it it like I spoke on my channel to this Irish, amazing Irish guy called Monan. Magan who and he was telling about how his ancestors was a Phyla, a a poets an Irish poet. And that, that he was the last person to legitimately carry a feathered cloak, a specific cloak with made with crimson feathers that were part of their tradition, their and and I later I heard Monon there, he spoke with an. Aboriginal Australian author that I'm quite fascinated by, Tyson, young Porter. I really recommend his book, sand Talk. And Tyson, he was telling him, Hey man, you should go to you should go to New Zealand because the Maori, they have actually feather cloaks. They make feather cloaks. And that is a specific it's a specific sign of, of specific status among the Maori. So if you want to. Recover this ancient Irish symbol of a specific cultural status as a, as a poet, a speaker of which, which is also cosmologically super important in, in moron's tradition there. Then he might be able to learn some of that from or he might be able to learn something about it or rebuild it with inspiration from the Maori. Now I think that something like that would be an that, like if something like that would become possible, that would be very, very good. Very, if people are ha have wounds that are too deep for it to be possible, then of course, you know, Respecting people's feelings is it's a condition of building positive relations, which is the whole thing is about. Mark: Right? Rune: So, but but if stuff like that could be possible, that would be, I think, very beautiful to reach that point. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: And so, can we talk about your book for a moment? Because it seemed your book is something that you have Done digging into the literature in many different languages and, and brought forward some some traditions to that people might be really interested in. Rune: Yeah, I don't know if I've been digging in literature in many different languages, Yucca: well,  Rune: I, but like, I'm a  Yucca: least two and it's in English, so we got three languages Rune: yeah. Yeah. Well, yeah, I'm, I'm a, I'm a Skiddish movie and so, so, so I read read Danish and Swedish, and, and that's, that, that's an advantage of course, because a lot of the re and I'm a scholar, you know, I'm a nerd already, so, so that means that reading these kind of old, weird folklore compilations is, is available to me, but it is, or more available to me than for perhaps to you. Right. So, so what I did with this calendar book here, which is called, it's called the Nordic Animist Year, was that yeah, I was in, there was a couple of different Cal Calend traditions that I was interested in communicating. One of them was the ROIC calendar, where every day, around the year used to have two runes attached to it. And these runes, like from a, from one perspective, they just place the day in, in relation to a week. So if there's one specific room and in a given year, then it means it's a Tuesday and next year, perhaps it, that same room would be a Monday. But then you can look at your room staff and you can see if, if it's a Monday tomorrow, right? And the other then marks. There is a line of ruin that where one of the ruins marks the new moon. So you know when the lunar month begins and those two. The weeks they're fixed on our year. So that means that it represents a solar and the lunar moons then represents the lunar cycle. So that was a beautiful, beautiful example of an animist tradition that nobody, it seemed to me that nobody really sort of was so aware. Yeah, yeah. You know, you could meet scholars who knew that it was there and a couple of nerds here and there, but it wasn't really communicated into, into public space that that system even existed. So, so I took that system and then I sort of worked through also a number, a bit of scholarship on on all the different holidays around the year because the The the traditional animist year used to be actually rather dense with all kinds of traditions. And and so, so I was, I was also kind of inspired again by indigenous scholarship where these people are often, they at least in North America and also in Australia they sometimes work with calendars as a way of getting back or maintaining or getting back into, into connection with traditional ways of knowing. And that partic I think it's just a very strong intuition and like you've done it yourself. Mark and I, you know, you can see on your podcast that you were talking a lot about sewing and Belton and, and, and all these different holidays. So, so I basically, yeah, did, did this, this little book as a, as a. Kind of a cursory introduction to the the entire year in the, in the Nordic in Nordic area. Mark: Hmm. Yucca: Wonderful. Mark: Well, we'll definitely put a link to where people can buy it in the show notes for the, for the podcast. I wanna read it myself. It sounds, sounds great. Yeah. Yucca: And so where else can people find you? Rune: Oh my God. Yeah. I'm on, I'm on, I'm on all those social media platforms that I can't be bothered to mention. But, but, but particularly, particularly look for my, for Nordic animism on my YouTube, because my YouTube channel that's kind of the, the backbone, but then I'm also on, you know, Facebook and Instagram and even on TikTok and Yucca: well, we'll include the links in that then in the show notes for everybody. Yeah, and thank you so much. This was really amazing. You gave us so much to think about. I'm gonna be thinking about this for a long time, so really, really value you coming on and spending this time with us. Thank you. Rune: Thank you very much. It was so nice to meet you guys. And and, and have a chat here. Mark: Yeah. Really enjoyed it. Thank you so much. I. Rune: You're welcome.    

Middle of the Rez Road
Season 2 Episode 4: In the Middle of Connecting One on One

Middle of the Rez Road

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2023 28:10


Today we are in the studio sharing our thoughts and beliefs about our Ojibwe communities and culture, sharing our journeys through life, and highlighting how far we have come as Ojibwe people.

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Native Lights At The Four Sisters Farmers Market Pt. 2

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2023 28:28


Leah and Cole take a trip to Four Sisters Farmers Market in Minneapolis! It's the first market day of the year, and our hosts chat with poet, playwright, and author Marcie Rendon; Janet Court from the East Phillips Neighborhood Institute (EPNI); and The Pretendians who played music at the Farmers Market! We also hear Pretendians songs “For the Sun” and “The 38” from their upcoming album Stories From the Fire Four Sisters Farmers Marketis every Thursday 11am to 3pm during the summer and fall at The Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI) in Minneapolis. Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices ShineNative Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.   Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Native Lights At The Four Sisters Farmers Market Pt. 1

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2023 28:28


Leah and Cole take a trip to Four Sisters Farmers Market in Minneapolis! It's the first market day of the year, and our hosts chat with nature-inspired jewelry designer Lali Aguilar from Corn Silk Daughter; food and plant loving Rivianna Zeller, a Farmer & Distribution Coordinator with Dream of Wild Health; Native book publisher Tom Peacock from Black Bears and Blueberries Publishing; and Destiny Jones, Food Sovereignty Coordinator and Farmers Market Manager at Four Sisters Farmers Market at NACDI.  Stay tuned for part two of our trip to the market! The Four Sisters Market is every Thursday 11am to 3pm during the summer and fall at The Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI) in Minneapolis. Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices ShineNative Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.   Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery
A Life Spent Helping and Healing

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2023 30:18


Serving as Chair of the American Indian Advisory Council and spending the past twenty years as an addiction counselor for his Native brothers and sisters, Donald Richard Wright, Elder of the Leech Lake band of Ojibwe, is still finding ways to lift people up and bring them home. Now he joins host Andrew Williams to talk about his journey and how we can better serve the Native community moving forward.

Minnesota Now
It Happens Here: how the U.S.-Canada border disrupted existing boundaries

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2023 8:00


MPR News Host Cathy Wurzer turned to WTIP producer Staci Drouillard and Native Lights Podcast host Leah Lemm for a story about the creation of the U.S.-Canada border. Drouillard and Lemm co-host the podcast "It Happens Here: The Roots of Racial Inequity on the North Shore,” which is produced by Drouillard. In a recent episode, they discuss how the border upended spatial relationships in Ojibwe communities.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Tuesday, June 13, 2023 – Native Bookshelf: Warrior Girl Unearthed by Angeline Boulley

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2023 56:25


Where else can you get a young adult mystery and a lesson in the Native American Graves Protection Act but from Ojibwe writer Angeline Boulley (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians)? In Warrior Girl Unearthed, a follow-up to her debut novel The Firekeeper's Daughter, Boulley catches readers up with the Firekeeper family's subsequent generation on Sugar Island. As the title suggests, the young protagonist digs into connections to her people and culture she never realized were there.

North Star Journey
Heart work: Training social workers to keep Native children home

North Star Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 4:38


Forty-five years ago, Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act to address a crisis. Native American children were being removed from their homes at alarming rates. Studies found that more than a quarter of all American Indian children were taken from their families, placed in foster care or put up for adoption — typically in non-Native households.  ICWA was designed to counteract decades of policies and systems that uprooted Native American children from their families and culture — from boarding schools, to the Indian Adoption Project, to the disproportionate removal of Native American children by child welfare agencies. Minnesota even has its own version of the law, called the Minnesota Indian Family Protection Act, or MIFPA, that lawmakers strengthened this year in case ICWA is struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court in a case scheduled to be decided later this month. But while experts insist ICWA has helped, Native American children living in Minnesota remain 16 times more likely than white children to be removed from their homes and placed in foster care. ICWA compliance still a problemNearly a half century after the law was passed, systemic bias still plagues the child welfare system, and many social workers are still not complying with it. “I think that comes in because people don't understand why these laws are so important,” said Larissa Littlewolf, a Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe member who co-directs the Tribal Training and Certification Partnership at the University of Minnesota-Duluth.“They're told they have to check off this list, how do you comply with the law? Which is important! But I think that there is a need to know why, right? Like, why do we work with American Indian families differently than non-Indigenous families? Why do Indigenous families get these special protections?”When social workers understand why these rules are in place, Littlewolf said, they are much more likely to act in “the spirit” of ICWA, and work to keep Native children close to home. “They deserve their community. They deserve their identity. That's what's going to help them to be happy and healthy and whole.”In 2021, Littlewolf and others at UMD launched a two-day training on ICWA that's now required for all child welfare professionals across the state. Since it began, about 1,500 county and tribal social workers have gone through the training, which now gets an annual $1 million appropriation from the state. It's the only program like it in the country. ‘Heart work'To help participants understand why ICWA is so important, the training focuses first on what Littlewolf calls “heart work — understanding the historical trauma, the correct history of Indigenous families.”To do that, community trainers walk participants through a history of U.S. government policies that were intended to break Native families apart. That includes nearly 100 years where Native kids were forced to attend boarding schools, where they were forbidden from speaking their language or practicing their culture. Abuse was rampant. “And this wasn't just like hundreds of years ago. This happened to my grandparents,” community trainer Lynn Brave Heart told about a dozen social workers from around the state during an online training held last month. “Many tribes tried to hide their children in the woods to keep the government from coming and taking the kids.”Another trainer, Kat Preuss, from the Upper Sioux Community in southwestern Minnesota, shared a story of her mom driving her grandma to visit the boarding school she attended in South Dakota. “‘There's a swing in the back, can you go to that swing in the back?'” her grandma asked. “So my mom drove around, and sure enough, there was a swing there. ‘Do you want to go sit on it?'” her mom asked. Her grandmother walked over and sat on the swing, and began to cry. “‘All my life I wanted to sit on this swing,'” she said. “‘But we were never allowed to.'”“She finally got her chance when she was 72 years old,” Preuss said. The training connects the dots from boarding schools, to the current overrepresentation of Native youth in the foster care system. It describes how historical trauma becomes contemporary trauma, which Preuss explained is reflected in the stark economic and health disparities that exist today. “So all of that historical trauma has really done a number on our people. So when you're working with our Native American families, keep that in mind. It builds that understanding,” she said.Perpetuating traumaWhile compliance with ICWA has improved recently, last year the Minnesota Department of Human Services found that 21 out of 37 counties it reviewed failed to comply with specific requirements of the law. When counties are out of compliance for two consecutive years, they lose state aid. That money used to get redirected to the general fund. Now it gets funneled to UMD to help pay for its ICWA training program. St. Louis County was one of those counties penalized for failing to comply with the law. It's now under a performance improvement plan with the state. The county now requires everyone working with children and families to take the training, regardless of what unit they work in. “When people have that deeper understanding, we're able then to empathize more, and to show up in a way of compassion, understanding that there's this historical trauma that impacts families today,” said Nishah Dupuis, Indian Child Welfare Supervisor for St. Louis County. Natalie Hanson, who's worked as a social worker in St. Louis County for the past decade, said the training she took last month made her realize for the first time how she could be a part of the continuation of generational trauma. “As a government worker, when I take a Native child and place them in a non-Native home, absent their culture, I'm perpetuating that trauma,” Hanson said. The training helped reinforce for Hanson “why there are Indian Child Welfare placement preferences, and that we have to go through these steps to try to keep children connected to their culture. And when we don't do that, it's similar to the boarding school era."Working to keep more Native kids connected to their families and their communities is more than simply reducing disparities, and complying with federal law, said Larissa Littlewolf. It's about the very future of tribes. “The children in our communities are our future leaders,” Littlewolf said. “They're our future nurses, doctors, culture carriers, language carriers, spiritual advisors.”

Story Paths
Father's Day Special

Story Paths

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2023 75:09


What is a man? Who can father? When does it go right, and how can it go wrong?Poems by John O'donohue and Grace PaleyReflections by Amora Sun and Chay Beriault, and my weird self.Mentioned in the episode:The Outside Circle graphic novel, written by Patti LaBoucane-Benson and illustrated by Kelly Mellings.The Ojibwe author Richard Wagamese This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit storypaths.substack.com/subscribe

Autumn's Oddities
The Evil Spirit That Devours Mankind

Autumn's Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2023 35:22


The Wendigo is a horrifying creature of Algonquin Native American legends said to devour human flesh, although it can never be satiated. But are they only part of Native American mythology or are there really cannibalistic creatures waiting for their next victim in the forest? SOURCEShttps://www.britannica.com/topic/wendigohttps://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/lost-tapes/creatures/wendigo/https://www.legendsofamerica.com/mn-wendigo/The Appropriation of the Windigo Spirit in Horror Literature; Kallie Hunchman, Ball State UniversityThis show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5307439/advertisement

Washington Post Live
Best-selling author Angeline Boulley on new novel ‘Warrior Girl Unearthed'

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2023 24:08


Washington Post senior writer Frances Stead Sellers speaks with Angeline Boulley, the best-selling author of “Firekeeper's Daughter,” about her new thriller, “Warrior Girl Unearthed,” as well as her work to spotlight the Ojibwe community and her path as a writer. Conversation recorded on Thursday, May 25, 2023.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Lake Superior: Honoring and protecting Minnesota's natural wonder

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2023 47:53


Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world in terms of surface area and it's not immune to climate change — it's also one of the fastest-warming lakes in the world.  MPR News guest host Dan Kraker speaks with a scientist who studies Lake Superior about the allure and science of this deep, clear and cold lake and how it's threatened by climate change. Plus, we hear from two artists — a photographer and a writer — about the lake's significance and healing presence. Guests:  Bob Sterner is a biology professor and director of the Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota Duluth which studies Lake Superior and other big lakes around the world. He's also president of the Northeastern Association of Marine and Great Lakes Laboratories.  Halee Kirkwood is a writer, teaching artist and a bookseller at Birchbark Books & Native Arts in Minneapolis who will be retracing the Ojibwe migration around Lake Superior and writing about it through a Jerome Hill Artist Fellowship. They grew up in Superior, Wis. and are a direct descendent of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. Christian Dalbec is a photographer based in Two Harbors, Minn. known for his photographs of Lake Superior waves and other scenes, taken while wearing a wetsuit and photographing from within the lake. Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.  Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation.   

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Wednesday, May 17, 2023 – Accessing boarding school records

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2023 56:25


The National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition (NABS) is readying a new tool to help people search for information about their relatives who attended more than 500 U.S. boarding schools. The online archive will start with digitized versions of 50,000 federal documents. Those organizing the project hope to build on the number and scope of the records over time. Tens of thousands of Native children attended the schools. Some never returned home. What records there are for those children are scattered among various institutions. The NABS's efforts are among a handful aimed to increasing and consolidating access to information about the boarding school era. GUESTS Selena Ortega-Chiolero (Tarahumara), museum specialist for the Chickaloon Village Traditional Council Fallon Carey (Cherokee Nation), digital archives assistant for the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Deidre Whiteman (Meskwaki, Dakota, Ojibwe, Hidatsa), director of research and education for the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Shelly Lowe (Diné), chair of the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Writers Series Podcast
Ross Gay Discusses His New Book of Essays, "Inciting Joy"

The National Writers Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2023 86:41


The National Writers Series is pleased to partner with Interlochen Center for the Arts for An Evening with Ross Gay. NWS will livestream the event from Interlochen's Corson Auditorium. NWS and Interlochen Center for the Arts welcome Ross Gay who will discuss his latest book, Inciting Joy. Throughout the book, he explores how we can practice recognizing that connection, and also how we expand it. In an era when divisive voices take up so much air space, Inciting Joy offers a vital alternative: What might be possible if we turn our attention to what brings us together, to what we love? Full of energy, curiosity, and compassion, Inciting Joy is essential reading from one of our most brilliant writers. Ross Gay is the author of four books of poetry: Against Which; Bringing the Shovel Down; Be Holding, winner of the PEN American Literary Jean Stein Award; and Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. He has released a new collection of essays, Inciting Joy. To ensure broad access to the transformative Interlochen experience, a portion of the proceeds from this event supports student scholarships. Guest Host Ari Mokdad is the National Writers Series new education director. She's a Detroit-born choreographer, creative writer, and passionate educator. Ari holds a Master of Arts in English from Wayne State University and three Bachelor of Arts degrees in dance, English and writing from Grand Valley State University. Ari will receive a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Warren Wilson College and participate in the Centrum Artist Residency in 2022. She lives with her husband in Traverse City on the ancestral and unceded land of the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Pottawatomie people, The People of the Three Fires. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/nationalwritersseries/message

FoodCrush
Wisconsin's Miijim to contribute to Indigenous food renaissance

FoodCrush

Play Episode Play 41 sec Highlight Listen Later May 7, 2023 75:51


Around the country, restaurants led by Native chefs are reimagining what “American” food means. In doing so, they are also reclaiming an important culinary culture that has been long buried and inaccessible, even to Native people. In the Midwest, that includes folks like Sean Sherman, founder of The Sioux Chef, Owamni and the Indigenous Food Lab in Minneapolis. But it also includes up-and-comers like Bryce Stevenson, a native of Red Cliff, Wisconsin who also happens to have deep ties to Milwaukee.This week, we're sitting down with Stevenson, who candidly shares his personal story, from growing up on a reservation in Northern Wisconsin to beginning his journey to reconnect with his Native roots. Along the way, he shares his food story, from his motivation to enter the restaurant industry to the experiences that led him to pursue a better understanding of indigenous foodways. Stevenson also paints a picture of what guests can expect at his first restaurant, Miijim, which will open this spring on Madeline Island, a sacred cultural hub for the Ojibwe.

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
An Garagiola's Gift For Bringing Indigenous Values to Academia

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2023 28:28


Today Leah and Cole chat with An Garagiola, a descendent of the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa, and the University Coordinator and a Lead Researcher on the TRUTH Project. An shares about researching archives from the University of MN and the MN Historical Society, findings from the TRUTH Project, and how she's bringing Indigenous values to Academia and research.The Towards Recognition and University-Tribal Healing (TRUTH) project has released a report detailing the “persistent, systemic mistreatment” of Indigenous people by the University of Minnesota. As a land grab/grant university, the U of MN received stolen land as investment capitol from the US Government through the Morrill Act in 1862. The TRUTH project looks at different points of history within the U of MN and how it affected Native people, with input and research from the 11 Tribal nations in Minnesota.This is the third episode of a series with some of the leaders of the TRUTH research project: Listen to our interview with Misty Blue, and Audrianna Goodwin as well. Find out more about the TRUTH project: https://mn.gov/indian-affairs/truth-project/ In a statement to MN Native News, the University of Minnesota said “In recent years the University has committed to acknowledging the past and doing the necessary work to begin rebuilding and strengthening relationships with Tribal Nations and Native people. Openly receiving this report is another step toward honoring that commitment. While documenting the past, the TRUTH Report also provides guidance as to how the University can solidify lasting relationships with Tribes and Indigenous peoples built on respect, open communication and action. As we engage in the important discussions that will now follow, that guidance will be invaluable.”Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine Native Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.    Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Angeline Boulley on New YA Thriller

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2023 27:49


Author Angeline Boulley, author of the bestselling YA thriller Firekeeper's Daughter, is back with a new novel. Warrior Girl Unearthed features a young Ojibwe teen in the U.P. caught up in a complex web of murder and theft, politics, and culture. GUEST: Angeline Boulley, writer ___ Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work. Music from Blue Dot SessionsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Minnesota Now
How Grand Portage Anishinaabe was erased from Isle Royale National Park — and fought for inclusion

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2023 10:36


If you visited Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior 50 years ago, the story you heard about what makes this place special would have left out quite a bit — specifically, the sites' connections to Ojibwe people, past and present. We heard about that history in a past episode of the award-winning podcast, “It Happens Here,” by WTIP North Shore Community Radio. In this next episode, producers Staci Drouillard and Leah Lemm explain how the Grand Portage Band of Superior Chippewa and allies in the National Park Service worked to rectify the erasure of Ojibwe people from the National Park.

DCOMmentaries
BUFFALO DREAMS

DCOMmentaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2023 55:04


Al & Val went to the Buffalo Preserve and sang a little Bill Withers to get through Buffalo Dreams. This flick is a little tough to get through, but the cast is star studded, and this episode is silly.Buffalo Dreams (March 11, 2005)IMDB WikipediaDirected by David Jackson (Miami Vice, 21 Jump Street, Swamp Thing, Nash Bridges, The District, One Tree Hill)Written by Marjorie Schwartz Nielsen (wrote 5 total things, this was the last)Starring: Reiley McClendon as Josh Townsend (Eddie's Million Dollar Cookoff, The Kid, Pearl Harbor, The Fosters) Simon R. Baker as Thomas Blackhorse (North of 60, Shanghai Noon, I Robot, Murdoch Mysteries, Outlander)Graham Greene as John Blackhorse (Dances with Wolves, The Green Mile, Snow Dogs, The Red Green Show, Man on the Train, Defiance, Wind River, Molly's Game, Longmire, Red Dead Redemption, The Last of Us)Tessa Vonn as Scout Blackhorse (stopped acting in 2008)Max Van Ville as Moon (Big Momma's House 2, Drillbit Taylor, Mr. Woodcock, stopped acting in 2012)Chris Hunter as Kyle (The Amanda Show, That's So Raven, Phil of the Future, South of Nowhere, stopped acting in 2009)Adrienne Bailon Houghton as Domino (Cheetah Girls 1-3, Coach Carter, 3LW Music Videos, mostly music videos)Geraldine Keams as Abuela Rose (Skinwalkers, Edge of America, Rutherford Falls, Reservation Dogs)Christopher Robin Miller as Virgil (Going to the Mat, Return to Halloweentown, Hatching Pete, Professor Layton, Mythica, The Wingfeather Saga)George Newbern as Dr. Nick Townsend (Adventures in Babysitting, It Takes Two, Father of the Brides, Bull, Providence, Justice League cartoon, Final Fantasy, Kingdom Hearts, Star Wars: The Old Republic, Scandal) Jane Sibbett as Blaine Townsend (Santa Barbara, Herman's Head, It Takes Two, Friends, Snow Dogs, Seth Packard as Wylie (Dadnapped, Hatching Pete)Chris White as J.G. (Read it and Weep)Synopsis: In this thought-provoking story, two teenage boys struggle to become friends despite their different racial and cultural backgrounds. Josh has relocated to New Mexico where his father works in a research lab. Native American Thomas Blackhorse allows Josh to join his group of friends, but the boys will have to work hard to bridge the cultural gap and make their friendship work.Fun Facts: Disney Channel's one of the most unknown movies after The Jennie Project (2001) and Ready to Run (2000).Land Acknowledgement: Shikaakwa, traditional land of the Potawatomi, Odawa, Sauk, Ojibwe, Illinois, Kickapoo (Kiikaapoi), Miami (Myaamia), Mascouten, Wea, Delaware, Winnebago, Menominee, and Mesquakie Next Movie: Go FigureCreators & Guests Val Agnew - Host Allie Ring - Host ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Audrianna Goodwin's Gift of Being a Dreamer

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2023 28:28


Today Leah and Cole chat with Audrianna Goodwin, a Red Lake Nation citizen and part of the core research team for the TRUTH Project where she has been appointed tribal research fellow for Red Lake Nation. Audrianna shares her outlook as a ‘dreamer' and how family and community helped her along her path. She explains her TRUTH Project research that examines medical research done to Red Lake children by the University of Minnesota and how Indigenous-led research is vital to healing and recognition The Towards Recognition and University-Tribal Healing (TRUTH) project has released a report detailing the “persistent, systemic mistreatment” of Indigenous people by the University of Minnesota. As a land grab/grant university, the U of MN received stolen land as investment capitol from the US Government through the Morrill Act in 1862. The TRUTH project looks at different points of history within the U of MN and how it affected Native people, with input and research from the 11 Tribal nations in MinnesotaThis is the second episode of a series with some of the leaders of the TRUTH research project: Listen to our interview with Misty Blue. Find out more about the TRUTH project: https://mn.gov/indian-affairs/truth-project/ In a statement to MN Native News, the University of Minnesota said “In recent years the University has committed to acknowledging the past and doing the necessary work to begin rebuilding and strengthening relationships with Tribal Nations and Native people. Openly receiving this report is another step toward honoring that commitment. While documenting the past, the TRUTH Report also provides guidance as to how the University can solidify lasting relationships with Tribes and Indigenous peoples built on respect, open communication and action. As we engage in the important discussions that will now follow, that guidance will be invaluable.”Native Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Minnesota Now
'It Happens Here' explores contrasting views of land ownership

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2023 9:05


We have been talking with people who are trying to make a difference through their land. But not everyone has the same ideas about what it means to have land, or to own it. This episode of the award-winning podcast, “It Happens Here: The Roots of Racial Inequity on the North Shore contrasts traditional Ojibwe views about land with the U.S. government's approach. Producers Leah Lemm and Staci Drouillard explore how the disconnect has played an important role in the ongoing history of treaties and tribal sovereignty.

The Dictionary
#D270 (dream to dredge)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2023 35:15


I read from dream to dredge.     Dreamcatcher comes from an Ojibwe legend. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamcatcher     "Dreamtime", or The Dreaming", is "a religio-cultural worldview attributed to Australian Aboriginal beliefs." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dreaming     "Dream vision" in literature. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dream_vision     The word of the episode is "dream world".     Theme music from Tom Maslowski https://zestysol.com/     Merchandising! https://www.teepublic.com/user/spejampar     "The Dictionary - Letter A" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter B" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter C" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter D" on YouTube     Featured in a Top 10 Dictionary Podcasts list! https://blog.feedspot.com/dictionary_podcasts/     Backwards Talking on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIujMwEDbgZUexyR90jaTEEVmAYcCzuq     dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar https://www.tiktok.com/@spejampar 917-727-5757