Podcasts about bipoc

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    Best podcasts about bipoc

    Show all podcasts related to bipoc

    Latest podcast episodes about bipoc

    Teaching Artistry with Courtney J. Boddie
    Episode 53, ACT 2: Margie Johnson Reese - Passing the Baton

    Teaching Artistry with Courtney J. Boddie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 58:15


    Hey, TA PODience! Teaching Artistry podcast is made up of a team of humans that have many identities including LGBTQ+, Black, Jewish, and more. We acknowledge the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade. We are reaffirming our commitment to continue to uplifting and amplifying BIPOC women and other humans who do remarkable work in our field and advocate and fight for justice. We are back with the inspirational second act of our newest two-episode arc. In Act 2 of Episode 53: “Passing the Baton,” Courtney continues her conversation with Margie Johnson Reese, an educator and lifelong advocate for children and the arts. The second half of their chat keeps a laser-sharp focus on legacy that begins with a transition into thinking not only about personal legacy but about what we can do to create opportunities for those who follow. This episode asks the questions: How can we leave doors wide open for younger generations to walk and reap the benefits of our work? What does it mean to stay true to ourselves and our passions in a world that wants us to conform to prescribed constructs? When it's time for us to pass the mantle, what do we want our life's work to have been? Who do we want that work to benefit and what systems can we dismantle, and build up stronger and better, in order for future generations to thrive? You won't want to miss the conclusion of this thoughtful episode.

    BAOS: Beer & Other Shhh Podcast
    Episode #15: Link Up | Shehan De Silva of Lost Craft Brewing

    BAOS: Beer & Other Shhh Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 54:15


    Lost Craft were one of Ontario's first-ever BIPOC-owned craft breweries, and long-time listeners will know that they're close friends of the show, so it was key for us to bring them in for week 4 of Link Up's Series 3. Tiff and Cee sat down with Founder Shehan De Silva to chat about what it was like being the "only one in the room" back in 2015 when he started, whether he has faced microaggressions and racism in the beer industry, how they managed to tap into a diverse consumer base early on, and how breweries can do the same organically and authentically. We cracked their Link Up Dry-Hopped Sour, a 4.8% gem with Galaxy and Vista hops in a dope stubby bottle, bursting with stone fruit, crisp green apple and tropical vibes. This one was an important episode - cheers! About the Link Up season: We're back with a brand new season of BAOS Podcast, and this one is something very special and very close to us. We'll be focusing this entire season on Link Up, a non-profit started by the good folks behind Microbrasserie 5e Baron in Aylmer, QC and Tiffany and Cee here at BAOS and High Season Co. Our aim with this program is to help BIPOC from underrepresented communities learn about and enter the craft beer industry in essentially any area they wish - from a brewing apprentice to taking the Cicerone course for front-of-house opportunities, from hop farming to the yeast lab, from beer media to design and photography, we're here to help diversify an industry that is in dire need of it. Link Up Apply for the program via their website | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook BAOS Podcast Subscribe to the podcast on YouTube | Website | Theme tune: Cee - BrewHeads

    The Hollywood Bound Actor Podcast with Christine Horn: Mindset | Acting | Marketing | Auditioning
    #177: Interview with Tiwana Floyd - Booking Magnet Magic w/ Christine Horn

    The Hollywood Bound Actor Podcast with Christine Horn: Mindset | Acting | Marketing | Auditioning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 78:37


    As we gear up for the Booking Magnet LIVE 2022 Annual Actors Conference, I'm pleased to introduce you to Tiwana Floyd. Enjoy this interview and be sure to connect with us on social media to share your takeaways. Xo! - Christine Connect with Tiwana Floyd here: Instagram- quirkyful Website- http://www.tiwanafloyd.com/ About Tiwana… Recipient of the 2019 NBC-sponsored Bob Curry Diversity in Comedy Fellowship, Tiwana Floyd, is a graduate of Second City Hollywood's Improvisation and Directing Programs. She's a producer, writer, performer, and editor of quirky and uncharted stories with a comedic bend. Tiwana is producer and host of the 22 episode video podcast, Creatives in Quarantine, and her recent venture "Acting Lessons Learned" podcast. She spearheaded the co-founding of the BIPOC sketch team Diversity Higher Comedy. In 2021, Diversity Higher Comedy produced 35 comedic shorts and launched the inaugural Diversity Higher Comedy Short Film festival. Next up for Tiwana, completing a certificate for producing on-air promos in the Promax Promo Pathway cohort. Tiwana's interest lies in the new paradigms of creator culture to greenlight her projects, no longer invested in waiting to be discovered. Please view all of her work on her website. tiwanafloyd.com Join us at the BOOKING MAGNET LIVE 2022 - Actors Conference Learn more: https://bookingmagnetlive.com/ CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/actresschristinehorn/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/actresschristinehorn HBA Website: http://hollywoodboundactors.com/ My Official Website: http://christinehorn.com/ JOIN OUR HOLLYWOOD BOUND ACTORS ONLINE COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/hollywoodboundactors/ JOIN OUR HOLLYWOOD BOUND ACTORS TEXT COMMUNITY: Text the word HBA to (470) 666-7011. Standard messaging and data rates apply. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-hollywood-bound-actor/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-hollywood-bound-actor/support

    The Chismis: Cancelled
    Defining Philippines Independence Day

    The Chismis: Cancelled

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 20:52


    Breaking down a One Down Instagram post! In today's episode, Trace pitches why every BIPOC should have their own podcast, why you should always agree with every one of One Down's hot takes, and why Philippines Independence Day isn't as great as everything thinks it is. Required viewing: https://www.instagram.com/p/CeuewCLpjey/ *** DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed by the podcast creators, hosts, and guests do not necessarily reflect the official policy and position of Podcast Network Asia. Any content provided by the people on the podcast are of their own opinion, and are not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chismis-cancelled/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chismis-cancelled/support

    Counter Stories
    Extraction

    Counter Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 61:30


    Our latest show explores how people of color often experience extractive experiences when in predominantly white spaces. From professional compensation to the reliving of their own experiences, the crew invites listeners to ask themselves, are my personal or professional interactions extracting resource, time, energy from my BIPOC peers? 

    Body Liberation for All
    Meeting Your Needs while Leading Your Revolution with Gieselle Allen

    Body Liberation for All

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 72:26


    Are you a leader of color who wants to lead and empower in revolutionary ways? Then you need Gieselle Allen...Gieselle works with revolutionary leaders of color to support them in expanding their businesses, team, and leadership, while also ensuring their needs are met in the process. In her mindset-first approach, she combines mindset, trauma healing and intuition to help her clients create and expand their businesses and revolutionary leadership practices. If discovering the confidence that comes with: decolonizing your thoughts, owning your identity, and building a thriving life that reflects your values and resonates with your core sounds like a vibe, you don’t want to miss this conversation. This episode we explore What having a revolutionary business entailsThe role that safety plays in learning and healingGetting comfortable with having more than enough Overcoming fear to answer a call to liberatory work Episode Resourceshttps://www.instagram.com/gieselleallen/https://gieselleallen.com/Decolonizing Wellness: A QTBIPOC-Centered Guide to Escape the Diet Trap, Heal Your Self-Image, and Achieve Body LiberationHello and welcome to another episode of Body Liberation for All. I am so excited about today's guest. If you are a leader of color who wants to lead and empower in revolutionary ways you need Gieselle Allen, I was in Gieselle’s coaching program now almost a year plus ago. And the changes that I experienced in the program were enough to sell me on it, but the way it served as a catalyst for growth throughout 2020 was just beyond amazing. Gieselle works with revolutionary leaders of color to support them in expanding their businesses, their teams, and their leadership while making sure all of their needs are met in the process. And this is something that unfortunately, a lot of us have never had the opportunity to experience.So, the ways in which your socialization has affected the way you approach business, the way you approach speaking up, the way you approach really leaning into your identities and feeling safe is something that a lot of us haven't visited before.Having a coach that will specifically address the ways in which your socialization as a person of color has set up barriers that you can step around and circumvent, once you're aware of them its absolutely life changing because this is not the type of instruction or care we're used to.Sometimes it's hard to even know how much of a difference it would make to have somebody tailor an educational program, a coaching program specifically to you and to address the challenges the other people for so long have been pretending don't even exist.I love this conversation with Gieselle. Let's jump right inBody Liberation for All ThemeYeah. They might try to put you in a box, tell them that you don't accept when the world is tripping out tell them that you love yourself. Hey, Hey, smile on them live your life just like you like it is.It’s your party negativity is not invited. For my queer folks, for my trans, people of color, let your voice be heard. Look in the mirror and say that it's time to put me first. You born to win. Head up high with confidence.  This show is for everyone. So, I thank you for tuning in. Let's go.Dalia: I am so excited to have you here.Gieselle: I'm really excited to be here. I'm thrilled. I've been like, I was, I've been like eyeing your podcast for forever. And I was like, when am I, when am I gonna be on this podcast? Like a baby. So, I'm really glad it's working out and that we're here.Dalia: This is awesome.Dalia: I'm glad you asked because as you know, for people who haven't already listened to the episode that I was on with someone else who was in the same coaching group as me, when I worked with you, Gieselle basically is out here changing lives and liberating people in ways that you don't even see it coming.Dalia: So, you think you're just stuck in your business and really, that's not the problem. The problem is mindset, and how we've been socialized is behind it. But I'd gotten a ton of coaching from containers that weren't made for me.  and they really didn't get to the root of my problem. So maybe they got to the root of like Becky's issue and like, oh, why don't I feel comfortable?Dalia: Cuz my Lululemon’s are too tight or whatever, and worked on her visibility problems, but didn't get to me being socialized to not take up space don't challenge authority, and don't you dare do anything culturally distinct because we will. Beat you for it, we'll punish you for it. So being in your container was life changing.Dalia: And Sarah came on the show and discussed how much the changes ripple out as time goes by. But even though I feel like I've grown so much since the container, I still would've thought Gieselle doesn't wanna be on my podcast. like Gieselle's too big, and too busy, doesn't have time.Gieselle: Well, you know, what's funny is I feel like I'm just moving into a season where I have the capacity to like be out and, in the world, and on people's podcasts there, it's not about me being too big.Gieselle: I'm still really small and like the grand scheme, I'm small, I'm intimate. I'm exclusive.Dalia: I love that. Take on it. Yes.Gieselle: Yeah. I'm exclusive. I, and I wanna be exclusive, like, that's my whole thing. I'm the kind of person where like when white folks follow me on Instagram, I delete 'em and like, I'm not gonna respond to your you' like random comment on my stuff.Gieselle: Like, I'm not gonna engage with you if you're white, like I'm very much like I'm for I'm for who I'm for. And if it's not you then like, I'm cool with it. There's enough people in the world. And I don't need that many to be in my community.Dalia: Wow. I mean, even that, how, what had to change for you to be able to get to a point that it feels safe to say that and that you don't feel compelled to explain this doesn't mean I don't like white people. It means my business is not for white people.Gieselle: Yeah. That's a really great question. What had to change? I think what had to change is that scarcity that we've all been sold and the devaluing of folks of color that we've all been sold. Right. Where people, you know, I remember when I was gonna make this change and like a big thing I was scared of and a big thing that like, people still, mostly just my dad at this point, but like people still say to me is like, oh, like how much more money could you make if you are working with white folks?Like we're missing out on those white dollars?Dalia: Those spend better apparentlyGieselle: Apparently, but here's the truth about like, you know, focusing exclusively on BIPOC folks in business and in anything is that BIPOC folks and I know this because I used to work in TV back in the day. And so like, I understand how, I understand all the things we are, the most loyal people ever.We support our people like tirelessly, especially Black folks. Like it's like what, you're a Black person, you're doing a thing I'm gonna, I'm gonna work with you. You know? And so, recognizing that, recognizing how loyal we are recognizing that we are the people of global majority in this world, there are more than enough of us was really huge for me.But I think, I think the thing that it really took for me transparently was recognizing that I'm enough and that like, I was the right kind of Black person to do this work because that was honestly my biggest hurdle. And I think that's the biggest hurdle for a lot of us in being in communities of color, is that we've, we ex exclude we've like inherited these toxic traits in our communities that make us, that make us exclude each other.Gieselle: And we've systemically been ripped from each other through the prison system, slavery, we can even talk about like immigration and the American dream. Like we've been ripped apart from our communities and culture. And so, it doesn't feel, we don't feel like we fit in with them because we're all kind of this like weird hodgepodge.Gieselle: But recognizing long story short that I was enough and that my experience was enough, and that people resonated with it that's really what made the big change for me.Dalia: That is something that I think is a uniquely Black American experience and I could be wrong, but I really haven't heard that message from other folks of color because they did not necessarily experience as much of the deliberate breakdown of community because it's been targeted.Dalia: It's been targeted and not just during the transatlantic slave trade, but it's also been targeted in more recent history, the deliberate creating of more divisions in the Black community. Yeah. So, we don't even recognize each other sometimes. And we can't seem to be cohesive or find common ground even because I've even lately been watching a TikTok’s where there's this running trend where people are explaining when white folks misunderstand them, they take something literally that's from like African American vernacular English, but I know a fraction of them.Dalia: And in the past that would've made me feel, oh, this is more proof, I'm not Black enough. I'm not the right kind of Black. Yeah. And because I'm in a multi, well was from a multiethnic household, even though both of my parents are very Black and very into their Blackness, their Blackness was in no way, similarDalia: And so, we came out a hodgepodge of their two cultures. And so, I may know random Caribbean expressions that no one's ever heard. And I think, oh, everybody says that. And then not understand. I only learned, oh, you really put your foot in it like two years ago. And I've slowly been using it. And seeing if people can tell, like, I'm waiting to see if I did it right.Dalia: But it really is a thing when you feel like. especially in public school, I was told, again and again, that I wasn't talking Black enough. Yep. Totally. And that, because I like to go to the library and inline skate that I was enjoying activities that weren't Black enough.Gieselle:  and I, I, I completely had that experience growing up.Gieselle: One thing I wanna name for the like non-Black POCs that are listening, just to honor them, is that this experience definitely isn't unique to us as Black folks. Like I've seen this so many times in Latin culture, my husband is from Ecuador, but he's white. And so, there's like this strange, but like, it's like whenever he goes to Latin events, he's always like, it's just this big, like contest of, do you speak Spanish?Gieselle: Do you speak Spanish well enough? Do you have an accent with your Spanish? Like how long did you live in whatever country you were from? Oh, you're you were born in America. Like there's all this thing. Asian folks have the same thing. South Asian folks. So, I was like, it's, it's all of us in different ways.Gieselle: The systems that ripped us apart are completely different though, you know?Dalia: Yeah. That makes me really sad because I wanted to believe that other people -somebody's, you know, feeling a sense of belonging in this country that won't allow them to experience a sense of belonging. I was hoping that somebody was out there saying I know exactly who I am and where I fit in. And, but yeah, I definitely have seen that with like how much do you speak the language, and do you have an accent?Gieselle: And how much like how much from your culture do you practice in your daily life? I think that comes up a lot in like non-Black spaces. Cause I think like Black culture, at least as a Black American, like our culture is just. It's pervasive. It's in there. Like you practice it. It's also what creates all other culture in America. Dalia: Absolutely.Gieselle: But yeah, there's so many elements to do I belong as a person of color. Do I belong in this space? Am I enough? And then like, don't even like, then we, we can't even bring like the intersection of like queerness into it. Right. Cause it's like, yeah, well I'm like Blackity, Black, Black, but I'm queer.And that does not roll either in a lot of families and not a lot of places.Dalia: It feels like in the whole country, like not at all. I already had issues with the transphobia and the homophobia and the Black community being another one of the things that would sometimes feel like a reason why I'm not Black enough or the right kind of Black, the Black that people are looking for.And then when I won't even dignify this man by saying his name, but things that happen in the news cycle, remind me of how pervasive it is. Even when I've started to really make an effort to curate my bubble, I'll find that people who say they accept my queerness and accept me and they have queer family will, when someone, you know, is being super transphobic and saying that somehow Black issues, trans issues are two separate things forgetting that there are plenty of people living at both intersections.Dalia: And then they'll explain how well I do kind of think, you know, it's tearing down the community or I think people really are choosing, and they're just seeing it too much and it's exposing them. And these are people that I vetted already. So, they said the right things, but then when they get triggered by something that really is part of the Black American cultural experience then they go back to what they were trained to believe their entire childhood, that queerness is deviant. And it's a tool that the man is using to tear us all down.  and that you're not born this way and you can somehow suppress it and you're better than everyone else.Dalia: If you're straight, basically and you're even better than, you're better than everybody if you're a straight cis Black man and everyone else's needs need to rank below that. And if you do anything to even challenge the authority of a straight Black man, well, of course you got hit of course you maybe got murdered because you're not allowed, and even though no one's gonna say out loud, well, they deserve to be murdered. The messaging is to stop questioning straight Black men.Gieselle:  and this is, this is, this is like so many layers to what you just said. But I wanna name, like, especially when we're talking about these people that you vetted and that you're like, I like did all the things I was supposed to do, and you're still showing this like deep transphobia and queerphobia.Gieselle: Right. This is why it's so important for spaces where like, it's just folks who share our marginalized identities, whether it's spaces for BIPOC folks, whether it's spaces for queer BIPOC folks for trans BIPOC folks. Right. That's so important because. That that's why like, even in the most well-meaning of spaces that s**t goes down because people are deeply committed to upholding their privileges, you know, and especially, I mean, I love us as BIPOC folks, but I feel like BIPOC folks are really, but, you know, I will say it's not just BIPOC folks.Gieselle: Cause this is like white women are the pinnacle of this, where it's like, you hold one marginalized identity and you hold onto that with everything you've got and you refuse to acknowledge like, hey, I've got all these other privileges. So, I wanted to name that piece. There was something else that was coming up for me, but I can't even remember.Gieselle: So, I'm just gonna let it go. It wasn't that important.Dalia: that, that is really important to point out. I think, cuz I think when people have a hard time understanding why you would just delete a white person when they follow you, is that because people's brainwash is so deeply ingrained you may intend to be a safe space, but you can't promise that to anybody.Dalia: And even you can't, when you are holding the same identity, someone else, you may bring your toxic internalized s**t to the table. Yep. But it's so much easier to work on that when that's the intention or you've set the tone for the space and I really appreciate you putting in the work to keep the container safe, which I find a lot of people, they have all these good intentions for inclusion, but they.Dalia: Either don't have the capacity, the understanding or the desire to keep the container safe. It's not safe to challenge people when it's unsafe and they don't put anything in place to make it less scary or traumatic for you to express a concern. It's like, there was no thought that went into things are going to go sideways because this is what happens when you get more than one person in a room.Gieselle: well, and this is something that we talked about. We recently talked about a lot in Revolutionary Rising, which is my program for BIPOC folks. Because like community, we had this moment where a lot of people were joining for community specifically. Like I think when you joined the program and most of y'all joined to work with me, and we had a moment where everyone was joining for community, but when, but like the problem with that, not the problem, but like the challenge with that is that as BIPOC folks, like we've talked about, we've been ripped from, we've been ripped from community.Gieselle: We've all been othered within our communities, unless we fit the very narrow stereotype of what we are supposed to be. And what is the right kind of Black person, Asian person, south Asian person, Latina person. Right. And so, we come into these spaces and even though it's like, okay, I wanted this community.Gieselle: I wanna believe that these BIPOC folks have me. I'm completely shut down. I'm completely triggered and I'm actually completely unable to be here. And so, something that we are in conversation around in the community is difficulty and how like, that's, it's the thing that I feel like we all are trained to avoid in community, but it's actually the thing that brings us together and really creates community is knowing that, like you said, I can show up, I can say this s**t isn’t working for me.Gieselle: That was fucked up, like all of the things and knowing that someone's gonna hold that and see it and say, okay, let's, let's make this right for you. But it's hard. It's really, really hard, especially when none of us like. Literally, none of us on this earth, I think, or very few people on this earth really know and know how to do community and have a wide capacity to do community in the way that it was intentionally meant to be.Dalia: And then it makes me wonder too, are some of our concepts of scaling and like how a business must grow incompatible with community. Because I wondered, I noticed and some other people noticed too, the bigger the group got, the less people were engaging. And I didn't know if it was because they didn't feel safe anymore because it felt like you're in a room, but people keep coming in.Dalia: And it has nothing to do with who those people are. It's just that they weren't there a few minutes ago. You're just like, whoa, who's that? You know, it's like this natural response or is it that people think once we get to a certain size, well, someone else will comment on it. And I'll just pop in when I need something.Dalia:  Gieselle: I think it's so many things. It's so, so many things, and it's been a big learning and process for us over this past year. Me and Olivia, our lead coach, but what I think it really comes down to is safety. Like, even like in the way you said it, right? It's like, oh, there's a new person. It's like your nervousGieselle: system's like, oh no, who's there? What is this? And I didn't think of that. And the person who taught me this strategy was spoiler alert, white and not creating safe spaces. Right? Like really just creating. I don't know, spaces, you know, for lack of better words. And so, we had to really look at and reevaluate.Gieselle: Okay. How are we bringing people in? Who are we bringing in? And how can we bring new people into this space without it feeling like horrible on folks, nervous system and making it even more difficult for them to step into this space? Because the reality is that even if it was like six people for a year, it would still be a hurdle for most people to show up in that space and feel safe.Gieselle: At least for the first like three to six months, because you just need time to build community. And I think that's one of the hard things, like when you are running a business, when you are building communities do you, you know, something that we've been really thinking about is the word community, and there's so many things you need.Gieselle: And one of the things is, is time is like, do you actually have the time to build the community in the well-intentioned way that you want to? I don't know. So yeah, long story short, we've been really thinking about that for ourselves in scaling and recognizing that. Yeah, it's harder. My, I was just talking to my coach about this yesterday.Gieselle: And I still want to find the way to make it bigger. Not for money's sake, but because I genuinely want there to be a beautiful thriving community of women and femmes of color interacting with each other. Right. And supporting each other and loving up on each other, but we've gotta find the way.Gieselle: And that's just the reality of it is that like, it's gonna be a process to find our way there, but I believe we can get there. And I also have to expand my capacity to hold that as well. Dalia: That makes sense. It's really interesting to see you open, not totally openly, but pretty openly growing even after you've reached a point of success that so many of us are just trying to get to so what has that been like?Dalia: Understanding that it's never over. And what, let you know that you had the wrong people in the container. I know there's like five questions and one. And how did you feel safe enough to say there's enough money out there? There's enough people out there for me to set you free, like, not necessarily fire a client, but like set you free to find a table that's right for you at this point in your life and with your growth.Gieselle: Yeah. So, one thing I will say, like, let's talk about like the firing of folks or not the firing folks, but like, because usually I would say it's mutual. Like it's just, ain't working. And for me as a person, like I, there's no amount of money that's worth working with somebody who's not a fit for the work that I do. Because as a coach specifically, if you don't trust me, if you are not down for the work we're doing, you're not gonna get results. And when you don't get results, it makes me miserable. Because I question if I'm a decent coach, like, or even a good, you know, so for me, it's just not worth it.Gieselle: And it's not fun at the end of the day, nobody starts a business to do, to be miserable. We, none of us did that. And so, I want it to be fun. I want there to be trust. I want there to be love if that can't be there. And that's not, if you're not either ready for it, if you realize it's not gonna happen with me or whatever happens then, like, I, I want you to go eat just as much as just as much as you wanna go.Gieselle: So that's the thing for me. And it's a great question about recognizing that, but I, I do wanna bring in like the abundance piece of it, because I think that's something that a lot of folks struggle with, especially when they're in the earlier stages of business, cuz it doesn't always feel abundant. It does not always feel abundant.Gieselle: And I think the truth is I'm like I'm sitting with this question cause I'm like, when did I get to the point where I knew that.Gieselle: I think it was when I got to a point where. I knew that even if I didn't generate like a billion manillion dollars, that I could strip everything down and do a workshop and still bring in some leads and bring in some folks who were interested in working with me recognizing that it doesn't have to be big.Gieselle: It just has to be a couple people. And that something else is coming. And I think if you're, you know, if we're talking to folks who are even newer where you're like, I'm not even at that stage, like, I, I can't build a workshop. I can't bring in a couple people. Like I'm still before that. What I would tell you is that everything's a building block and that's something that I've learned and that, and that's something that I'm trying to lean into.Gieselle: And so it's like every, no is a building block to a, yes, every silent post is a building block to a post that actually gets like one, like, you know, it's all a building block. And so that's something that I try to look towards as well and believe as well. Alongside the fact that like, we don't have these like, callings because they're not supposed to work. Like, that's just not like the universe, our ancestors, like all the things that give us these callings, they, they are not cruel. And so, it's supposed to work. We've just gotta keep building the blocks and then it will.Dalia: I was going to ask, like, what's the difference between a revolutionary entrepreneur?Dalia:  what else we see out there, but I'm hearing some themes already, cuz you definitely don't hear love, fun, and a calling really emphasized like sometimes you hear people throw out calling like kind of in a cavalier way, but in the container, I really felt like. I, I already knew this intuitively at least for me, maybe it's not true for everybody that your business can be an extension of your spiritual practice.Dalia: And that, that also might be beneficial for someone who is used to the concept of throwing your worries or questioning on your deity or your ancestors. And that sometimes that's the only way you can move forward because you can focus on, well, what can I do? And I'm just gonna trust that the other things will fall into place, which even if you don't believe that you know, that taking action versus doing nothing is gonna get you different results.Dalia: But for you, what are the main differences between the way you believe if you're really called to do something, you should look at business or can look at business versus what's usually taught to us.Gieselle: Yeah. I love what you caught that should cause I was like, well, there's no should but for me, revolutionary businessGieselle: it's all about at, at its like simplest terms, wanting to do things differently. And when I say differently, like wanting to do things in ways that are human, that respect not just your needs as an individual, but the needs of your people. And it's a business that prioritizes people over profits at the end of the day.Gieselle: I actually think that would truly be it in its simplest of forms. But it can look a lot of different ways. So, for example, you know, one thing that I do in my sales process is my sales process is intentionally I've intentionally slowed it down so much because. I wanna know you deeply, and I want you to know me deeply and I wanna feel really, really good when you come into my space.Gieselle: And I want us to both feel, to feel on an alignment. Something that I feel is revolutionary is pricing your offers, not just based on like what you can charge people, but what you need and letting there be a limit. A lot of times these days, when I tell folks my one-on-one prices, I mean, they're still like pretty decent.Gieselle: But a lot of times when I tell folks my one-on-one prices, they're like, oh, I was expecting it to be more. And I was like, I just don't need more. I just don't like, there's no reason to charge you thousands upon thousands of dollars for something that, I mean, I hate, I probably shouldn't say this as a coach, but I just don't think there's coaching.Gieselle: That's worth a hundred thousand dollars, unless you are a straight up millionaire. Revolutionary business is one that prior, like I said, prioritizes your body. And so, what that means is you leave space for your cycles, your ebbs and your flows, and you do things slowly and you aren't working 24 7.Gieselle: That's what I think of when I think of revolutionary business. And it's one where at the end of the day, it's really for the collective liberation of folks of color. Like that's, that's what I think about. Like, even if you know, not anyone listening to us is white, but like, even if you're white at the end of the day, like your revolution should start with the, with the collective liberation of folks of color.Gieselle: That's where everything starts at the end of the day. So that's what I think of when I think of when I think of revolutionary business. Dalia: Oh, I love that. And we would probably be surprised because that was something that I think I learned in the program, but also had reinforced by white friends who said, they have to be told don't come in for them to, for it to even occur to them that maybe not all spaces are for them.Dalia: Totally. So, they said, they would absolutely still go into a conference that says African American, blah, blah. They said it wouldn't even occur to them that maybe they're not supposed to go in there. And so, we may very well have a lot of white listeners, you know, because luckily for them they've been socialized to feel welcome everywhere they go.Dalia: Just so y'all know that it's not a universal experience. And all I can say is, must be nice, but it's interesting howGieselle: like literally kicking my feet in joy at that must be niceDalia: but it has been interesting starting to accept more how much like you said, everything is a building block and how much of our experiences, while of course you don't wanna suffer for the sake of suffering.Dalia: But it is interesting how much, if you survive and experience, it is a catalyst for growth. And that even though systemic oppression blows and racism sucks, it does help you build skills. And it creates an opportunity for you to get to know yourself in a way that people are not likely to experience if their existence isn't constantly challenged. And if their worth isn't constantly challenged. But the thing is, you get to opt out of doing that. Like you can just suffer and not grow. And sometimes depending on your trauma, that is where people hang out. And that's been one of my biggest challenges with wanting to work with people who have a lot of racialized trauma or who have a lot of trauma around gender identity and community is some people are in a place, like you said, where they're totally shut down. They can't connect. And so, you show up and you do things and all the people that come forward don't have the trauma that you were seeking to help them with and you're like, is anybody listening?Dalia: So, was there ever a point in your work where you started to wonder, is this going to work? Should I give up or should I pivot?Gieselle: Every day literally every day. I won't say it's a rational thought. I think that that hasn't been a rational thought for me in a really long time. But I actually did do a little bit of a pivot this year.Gieselle: Because for the past year, I've been speaking specifically to revolutionary business for folks of color. And then I did this small pivot to expand the message for like all change makers, all revolutionaries. And I did that and it was like crickets, absolute crickets. And I was like, okay,Gieselle: something funky is happening here. It also didn't feel quite right to me if I'm like looking back at it. It just, I knew here's what I knew about my work is that at the end of the day, what I, what I love about the work is not what context and what, like situation we're talking about, talking about. It is like, I love working with great BIPOC folks.Gieselle: And so, and I want this work to impact as many incredible BIPOC folks who are ready for it and need it as it can be. So that's why I made that. Like I opened it up for a little bit and then after having that experience of like, okay, thriving stuff, like it's kind of radio silence, like not fully working, it's not feeling fully aligned.Gieselle: That's when I came back to, okay, its still revolutionary business, but it's just a different level. It's people who are even who are more resourced, not resourced. And when I say resourced, I mean resourced in their somatic capacity and their like ability to do the work and because we can go deeper and further.Gieselle: And because, you know, as I'm working with leaders, like you talked about earlier, it ripples. And so, the more impact I make with leaders, the more they're gonna go out into their individual revolutions and be able to serve more, more, more and more. Long story short, I think about pivoting every day.Gieselle: Not right now, right now. I'm like, but I wonder I'm like, I don't know, is I, is anything happening even though I know it's just the crazy space. I do know that for myself.Dalia: And did it feel scary to feel like, oh, I'm, niching down even more to people who clearly have the capacity. It makes sense if there were people in the container that weren't ready for it yet, but I would imagine it would also feel like ekk now I'm narrowing in even more.Gieselle: It feels really scary and really vulnerable. Every time you make a change in your business, there's no place where you're going to get. If you are someone where you've been generating income, even if you're not generating it at the level, you want to, you know, that when push comes to shove, you'll be able to generate some income.Gieselle: So, it's less scary for me because I know that my business could really, truly, never die. I mean, maybe like I'm gonna knock on this bamboo, what I've got over here. but. I have the skill sets to revive it if something were funky were to happen but making that change feels really vulnerable and putting out my new season of my podcast, it's all around revolutionary leadership and it, it, it is interesting.Gieselle: You know, I know I have those revolutionary leaders in my audience. I know so many of my folks wanna be those revolutionary leaders as well. And so, it's just about me believing, and this is really at the end of the day, this is all of it. And this is what brought me to serving BIPOC folks. This is what brought me to serving BIPOC folks in that way.Gieselle: It's just about believing that if you have the calling for it, if you feel it, if it feels right to you, it's right. And even if you don't fully believe it in the moment, even if your head is like, should we jump ship every single day? It's about knowing like, no, I'm still gonna like, hold my feet to the fire because I know that this is what is right.Gieselle: And this is what's meant for me. I just have to wait for it to actually come to fruition.Dalia: How do you get back to that place when you're in a position where you feel like you're doubting? There's a lot of people out there who are so good at communicating what they do.  and which is basically marketing that they know, Hey, I can just, you know, Put up a tent somewhere and I can sell some things and there's a lot of people who don't have that and they don't have that confidence, but business comes to you in different ways and that's okay too.Dalia: But what do you do when you can't seem to reconnect to that belief that, oh, this was an actual calling. How do you stay connected to that? MmGieselle: that's a great question. I tap into like, something that I really work to do every day is like to tap into some kind of divination tool or something that like does ground me in my spirituality.Gieselle: So, like right now I'm playing with tarot. I'm like getting to know the tarot again. And so, I'm pulling tarot cards or some things that like, honestly, the most important thing for me, like aside from like the spirituality, cause even that sometimes like can't fully ground me is having space held for me where I can name all of the fears and be reoriented and shown different perspectives. And so, for me, coaching is really helpful. I know that's like such a coach thing to say, but it's the truth is that like, I wouldn't be able to do like all of the things that I've done in my business, all of the shifts and changes and pivots and growth that I've had would never have happened without having like a really good coach.Gieselle: And when I'm talking about coaching, I'm not talking about people who just like showed up one day and said that there are coach, like I'm talking about like real skilled coaches who can hold space powerfully, who aren't trying to tell you what to do, but really understand the sole job of a coach, a true coach is to ground you back into that knowing and that feeling.Gieselle: So, someone that can bring you back there even more powerfully than you might be able to in that moment that's, that's been like the most helpful thing for me is so even if you're like, I'm not resourced enough to have a coach right now, having someone who it is capable of supporting you in a way where they step aside.Gieselle: And it's just about you, because I think that's the problem with relying on friends and family and stuff is that you always have energetic connection, like even with a coach, right. But it's, it's like their interests are somehow still intertwined with yours when you are talking to a friend or a family member.Gieselle: So, if you have someone who's able to like step back and be like, I literally don't matter here and you can feel safe just like, and we'll just dance with it from your space, then that can work too.Dalia: Yeah, it's really tricky learning how so I am in the process. I've already done my 125 hours, but I have not done all the coaching practice hours that I need to finish my PCC, but I should be done by this summer.Gieselle: Look at you go.Dalia: But it's been interesting seeing in the training, the biggest problem that I needed to suppress was the desire to offer a fix. When I felt like I knew exactly what they should do and how often they had an answer. That was not my answer. That was the perfect answer for them.  and how, even in the practice sessions.Dalia: I might say what I hear you saying is, and there's one word that I added that changes the tone that they're like, well, I don't really think it's that, but it reflects how I perceive their problem.  and usually it's because I don't relate to it. And I'm like, I'm imagining that this is how people must feel when they have these kinds of problems.Dalia: Or it could be that I relate to it so much that I'm projecting. It's just been interesting. Practicing, listening just to reflect back to the person what they're saying and what they actually want, not to help them with anything.Gieselle: It's so rare that we get that in this world. And I feel like that's so often all we crave at the end of the day, right.Is someone to see us and to it's really just for someone to see us. And that's 99% of what coaching is and being, and I wanna like take it outta the context of coaching and like being truly supported is right. It's like knowing that someone sees you and they're with you. It's like, if you're an, if you're sobbing, it's like, I don't have to sob, but like I'm here.Or if you're elated, it's like, I'm also there. But it's hard. It's hard to do because we're so used to, like, I'm sure you, you notice that someone who's like getting their PCC, but even as like a friend and an individual, right. It's like, oh no, this person's got something going on. How do I fix it? I'm like, what do I do?Dalia: Absolutely. And I've become more aware of when I want to fix it. Or I wanna bring in all this previous knowledge I have about the friend. And tell them, like I, in this case, do know what's right for you because I've known you for like 30 years . And trying to understand that that still doesn't make me the authority on their life. They are the authority. And the best thing I could do for them as a friend is try and help them see that they are the authority , but usually in reality these days, I'm like, I'm gonna tell you what to do first. And then I'm gonna ask you, like, what do you think you really wanna do? It's just so hard.Dalia: you're so to turn it off, I'm like, you know, I'm gonna be right. It can take years, but you'll come back. but the, the true training has been so helpful. But one thing I did wonder about is how did you survive coaching training and all the different containers you've been in that were not made for people of color. And come out with a skillset that is so perfectly tailored for folks of color.Gieselle: Yeah. That's a really great question. So, I will say I'll be like completely honest where my journey to like decolonizing and like being where I'm at, it's pretty, fairly recent. Like it was like a deep dive and like a going straight, to the deep end.Gieselle: But when I did my coach training, I can't remember what year years are gone to me, but like four or five years, five years ago, I think at this point. I was not bothered by being in fully white spaces yet because I was so used to it. And we were still at that point in society where like, I think we were still in that point where everyone was pretending like life was post racial, like Obama was president and like, like it's all good.Gieselle: And, you know, I was just starting to get, I had actually just had my first real life experience where I genuinely felt like my success was impacted by being Black, where I had never well, I will say I had never felt like I had that experience before. Like I feel like I was lucky for the most part.Gieselle: And I still found where I was able to go despite being Black. That being said, I really like these days, I really hate when people say that. Cause I'm like, yeah, yeah, right like Blackness, like never came into play in your success.Dalia: Well, what's so funny is the conditioning is so good in some areas. That you don't know, you don't know exactly you and you may end up doing the same things as your white peers. But what you don't know is how much more you had to do to get it. Exactly. Cause I even look back at what I've had to do for certain credentials.  and I never, in a million years would've thought to go to the professor and say, I'm just overwhelmed.And they say, don't worry about it. Or you can turn in a fraction of it. Or you can turn everything in late with no penalty. I did not know these things were a thing and then they start being revealed and I'm like, oh, I didn't even know how differently I was being treated.Dalia: Or when people only network with their white students, they don't announce that they're going to network with them. You know? So, it's interesting how sometimes you may not have felt it or noticed it, but definitely doesn't mean it didn't happen, but at least you didn't lose sleep over it.Gieselle: I didn't get sleep over it for sure.Gieselle: And so that was like my initial coach training. So, like, I didn't. So, like then I was like, oh, I don't know. Like, but I was really lucky. And, and when I say lucky, I mean, like it's obvious in retrospect that the majority of my clients this entire time have been folks of color. So like, to this day, if you get on a sales call with me and you don't tell me your like racial or ethnic identity, I mean, I can't go like as granular as country, but I can typically tell you like, okay, you are you've been an American for a few generations, one generation you are an immigrant, you are Latina, you are Asian, you are south Asian.Gieselle: Cuz like I just worked with that many people and I've seen like the typical, like there are typical things that come from each culture. And they manifest in different ways. So that's what really created my experience was just doing the work and doing it with the people.Gieselle: But I have had experiences where I didn't survive the container. And one of those was the precursor to creating. My to like creating my work in the shape that it is now where like long story short, I was doing this leadership program, which it's one of those things whereas a person of color, I look back at that leadership program and I'm like, so mad that it's so exclusive because it was great.Gieselle: But it was, it was my first experience being in a white space and feeling suffocated by whiteness. Like, I literally felt like I was losing my mind. And I remember my husband he's very rarely like actually great with these things. Juan is racially white, ethnically Latino, but it's, he's like very, he's very rarely good with these things.Gieselle: And he very rarely can like actually relate to my experience as a person of color. Cuz he is white, he reads is white. And so, but I like called him crying and I was like, I'm losing my mind out here. It didn't help that this program had, this program was one of those many like white spiritual programs where it had borrowed from a lot of different cultures.Gieselle: And they just felt like if they had the right intention that we should be able to do all of the things. And people had started talking about race because because they were using the word tribe and they refused to like, just let it go. Why white people insist on keeping words that aren't theirs, it never ceases to amaze me.Gieselle: Like I just don't understand it at all.Dalia: That's so interesting, cuz I was gonna ask like how was it suffocating you?Gieselle: So yeah, it was like, we were constantly having conversations about race that the people of color had to carry. And like I, as the sole Black person, there's a difference right in what you carry because as the Black person, everyone turns to you first around these things and then there's everyone else. And in the space, everyone only wanted to talk to me about racial things sometimes. Like we did this exercise, oh my God, this exercise. So, we did this exercise, which I actually think is a really beautiful exercise, but it's basically like assuming that your thoughts around people like your judgments around people and how they feel about you are probably incorrect.Gieselle: So, you clear it, you just say like, Hey, I feel like you think I might be talking too much and it's like, they don't need to respond. They don't need to do anything cuz you know, it's all about you. It's all in your head. Right. And you just release it. But everyone's the teachers literally said do not go up to Gieselle and every time say, say something about race.Gieselle: like, they literally said that and 90% of people still came up and did it anyways, did it anyways thinking they were special little butterfly.Dalia: That's so interesting. Like that goes back to it almost being impossible to keep certain environments just are not going to be safe. They're inherently unsafe.Dalia: So maybe the people who led it, maybe the people on stage, if it had just been you and them, it would've been fine. But all these other random, oh,Gieselle: not even them. not even that the woman who led it, white woman teared me the first day. And, and we talked about holding onto your marginalized identities, she's Jewish.Gieselle: And so she was like very much holding onto the like marginalization that Jewish people feel and like incapable of seeing like her impact in other ways .Gieselle: So, yeah, it, it was inherently unsafe and it was something that I didn't know going in, but it's known about this program. I think there are so many spaces that we all know, like I think about MFA programs sometimes I think about getting my MFA. I'm like nonfiction or fiction. And, but I'm not willing to intentionally go into unsafe spaces anymore. But we, we do that all the time as folks of color.Gieselle: We intentionally step in unsafe spaces because we wanna get that information. We wanna get the knowledge and the only way to get it, sometimes it feels like is to make yourself onDalia: Set yourself on fire. Yeah. That is interesting because in the end, even when you're not recognizing that what's happening to you is unfair and there's a disparity there, the stress that you carry and how hard just thinking about how much harder somebody has to work when every time they go into a space, they feel unsafe.Versus if you come in the space and you feel like totally at home and comfortable, just the amount of emotional and cognitive energy that goes into learning and staying on alert.Gieselle: Absolutely. Well, and when we talk about the way that, like our nervous system functions and our brain functions, when you are at alert, you don't have access to the higher parts of your brain that can process information, analyze information, like and so it, it really is impactful.Gieselle: It really is a detriment because you are not physically capable of taking in the same amount of information as someone who feels a hundred percent safe. And like, this is why I do my work. Because if you don't feel safe in the places where you're being supported, you can't actually get the support you need.Gieselle: Like you're only getting a percentage of it because you're like trying to navigate being in a space instead of just actually allowing yourself to let go and be.Dalia: That resonates so much. And that really explains how you can go into healing space and get virtually nothing out of it. Because the space itself was not safe.Dalia: Like I went into a container that a white friend recommended and they said, oh, he's so great. He's so intersectional. He's so progressive. So this is another person who had multiple marginalized identities, but still cis white man  . And I will say he did feel like a very safe person, but his container, you can't control these people.Dalia: No one said anything that was blatantly problematic, but I only went to one live meeting. Cause I was like, I am too tired to even deal with people, treating me like seeing me is some kind of event, you know, totally or recommending other Black resources to me when I didn't ask them for that. Like, people can't conceive of how peculiar that feels.Dalia: When somebody, you meet someone, you don't know them from Adam and they're not a person of color. And they're like, oh, you're this color. Here's this resource. What makes you think I need you to come rescue me? What makes you think you're an expert on what kind of community I need?Dalia: And did I ask you? I don't know you like that. What makes you think I take referrals from just anybody? And that's another thing that I feel like is unique maybe not across the board, but it's a necessary function of being in a country that's always like trying to kill you or make you feel like s**t is that, you know, better than to just take referrals from just anybody.Dalia: Like you don't know this person and they don't have the same lived experience as you for all I know she just saw a flyer somewhere or I could show up and they could, it could be 100% hoteps all the way through everybody transphobic and bananas, and to just not know that you really just shouldn't be offering all this information, willy nilly to people of color.Dalia: Who said we would respond to that? So that was just enough for me to feel like, oh, well, I'm a freak show here. And everyone is aware of my color and no one's just seeing me as a person. So these other people, you're just meeting a person. And when you are meeting me, all you're seeing is this is a Black person.Dalia: And you're trying to think about what you're saying or you're trying to do the right thing. It just felt hella awkward. And I was like, I don't have time for this s**t.Gieselle: And this is like the problem. Yes. I, number one, I see you. I completely see you and like, this is the problem, right? Because it's not that we don't wanna be seen as Black or whatever we are.Gieselle: It's like we wanna be seen in all of our identities and we don't want to be special or fetishized or marginalized because of them. And there's so very few people in very few spaces that are capable of holding both. I see you in the beauty of your identities and also you're still just a person than me.You know, like you're still just a regular degular person and those get to coexist and yeah, it's really hard to find that. And that's where I think we see a lot of folks. I see so many folks of color being like, I don't want people to see me as Black. I don't want them to see me as this thing first.Gieselle: It, and it's like, well, no, like, I think you do. like, I think you want them to like, acknowledge who you are because you know, when it comes to like, I, I feel like racial identity and I think, yeah, well, I'll, I'll just stick with racial identity cuz that's where I'm most well versed, but it's like, it's one of the most important identities to you.If not the most important identity to you, cuz there's so much culture and love and joy baked into that.Dalia: Most people really take issue with people saying they're colorblind because , that reads as I refuse to acknowledge your cultural distinctness,  in any way, I am not capable of celebrating that you have a culture.And that's a problem as well  and acting like, oh, I'm gonna give you permission to assimilate is some kind of a gift doesn't vibe with me. But I would like to be seen as like a whole ass person, like, yes, I am Black. And guess what? There's something that comes after that.  but people are so used to this really flattened image of anyone.Dalia: Who's not like them.  that they don't always understand. This is a complete person. This is not a caricature. You don't know anything about me if all you've done is look at me. You literally don't know anything about me. You wouldn't look at somebody white and think, oh, you know, I know most likely where they live, how much money they make, but other people make all these assumptions.Dalia: And all they've done is look at you. And they're convinced that they don't have a problem. And in a lot of these containers, you can't convince them of otherwise.  . So when did your interest in leadership become really clear for you? And I know you mentioned that because you can have the greatest impact with people who are leaders.Dalia: What does that even mean to you? Who is a leader?Dalia: That'sGieselle: such a good question. Everyone's a leader first and foremost. I mean, we really are, right. Like, even if you're just leading yourself, like, first of all, leading yourself, isn't just leading yourself because the way that you show up does impact other people and the way that they show up.Gieselle: But sometimes leadership is like being a supporter. Sometimes leadership is being a mother sometimes, or a parent. Sometimes leadership is just being a sibling or a friend or the person who says, Hey, let's get pizza tonight. You know? So I, I wanna say that that leadership is everyone. And also what I.Gieselle: The reason why I decided to lean into revolutionary leadership. And the definition that I am leaning towards with it, which is folks who have been on this train, right? They're on a decolonial train. They've been UNlearning. They've been doing all the things. They're in the process of creating an impact.Gieselle: They have a revolution that they likely are already leading. The reason why I decided to work with them is cuz I wanted to . Oh, IDalia: love that answer. That's not what I expected.Gieselle: It's and I will say it just feels right. To me, it really, I think something for me, because I think at the end of the day leaders, the leaders that I'm most excited to work with are coaches, healers, guides, like people who are really in the, in the trenches serving 24 7, or who have some kind of like deeper calling.Gieselle: I've always been fo been focused on people who have a calling. So like creatives, I love working with creatives as well. I, I completely forgot what I wanted to say. So I don't know. It's a half thought.Dalia: I, I was thinking the other day, like something I realized, well, a friend helped me realize, and I think I was afraid to step into this or accept it is that the work that I do also is not for beginners. Yes, but because of my fear of there not being enough people or my fear of nieching down too much,  or really having a laser focus that it would hurt me.Dalia:  I kept accepting people who were nowhere near ready. Yes. Like if you haven't done any healing work, I'm not for you.  . If you have no concept of the fact that you can internalize messaging, that doesn't serve you, that  works an opposition to your identities, then we're not ready to work together.Dalia: If I'm having to convince you that it's safe to start trusting your body, we're not ready for each other. Like if we're not, you are at the point where you believe it, but you're trying to get there. You have some concept of it and you're looking for an opportunity to do deeper work, then we're ready. Yep.Dalia: But it's just been tricky for me to acknowledge too, because of how marketing generally works or is presented to people what I am always hearing about is like how to just speak to pain points. And I think the pain points for somebody who's deeper in the work is gonna be different. And it probably won't sound as, I don't wanna say dramatic, but  the person might not even recognize it as a problem.Gieselle: Yes, absolutely. Because you've already done healing work. Right. And like, I mean, I always try to stay away from pain points in general because like it's manipulative and it's based in like sales psychology, which is like just manipulating our brain. Really when you're working with someone who isn't a beginner.Gieselle: And I think that's really what I, what made me want to move more towards leaders and people who like already have this language are already thinking about these things. They're like thinking deeply. And we're just exploring in a deeper way. Same as you is that it's just more fun. It's just more fun.Gieselle: And they're actually ready for the work that you're capable of doing and that you wanna do with people. But what you're getting to expand them into is something that I think as folks of color, we don't get to expand into enough, which is just having more, like more than enough. You know, I think it's tough with like both of the kinds of works that we do, cuz it's not just like, oh, well I'm gonna go make you like $10,000 in one day.Gieselle: And like for your work, because you're doing wellness in a decolonized way, you might not lose weight or you might not do this thing that that you think you want, it's not the sexy thing. And also it's allowing you to expand into this moreness this space that we very rarely allow ourselves to even dream of, because it feels so hard to access as a person of color.Gieselle: We're always just fighting for enough. We're fighting for the scraps, the thought of having abundance and more, it's hard for us, especially as revolutionaries where, I mean, we could even talk about the concept of more it's like, well, how much is too much and then when are we hoarding and blah, blah, blah. So yeah, this it's this really difficult concept for us that comes into play..Dalia: Yeah, that brings up, this is one of my big questions. How do you reconcile the fact that some people feel like everything has to be accessible to everyone? And the people who will feel kind of like butt hurt because it's for advanced people or it's for people who have more resources and the people who feel like thriving rates, shouldn't be a thing.I was listening to something Sonya Renee Taylor was explaining was that she's not trying to be out in these streets, starving, you know, dying with an unmarked grave or doing some Zora Neale Hurston type of s**t. Like we are not, you don't have to do that. But the criticism that comes at you, especially if you're assigned female at birth, if you are not like, Hey, I just wanna bleed and give, give, give, give, give, I don't need anything.Dalia: I'm just gonna eat s**t and say, thank you. Like, how do you reconcile the part of you that does want to help  and the part of you that you were not called to do entry level s**t. and like, do you explain that to people or do you just let it go? You just say like, Hey, there's a bunch of tables out there go find another one. Like, how do youGieselle: handle that?Gieselle: Well I'll say first and foremost that I do not have the kind of personality where people feel comfortable stepping to me in that kind of way, like in any way, shape or form. So I'd never worry about someone actually saying that to my face, but to, for people who are thinking that, you know, I know that in my work, cuz people tell me all the time, like I have fundamentally shifted the way that people think just from my free content and just from the emails I sent and the Instagram posts I make in my Facebook group, like I'm constantly educating there, perspective shifting there.Gieselle: And there is so much available to you and so much growth available to you if you just hang out in my world. Which I'm always shocked by because because like at the end of the day, like I know that the real juice is in the actual coaching and then at least that's how I've always felt. Right. But there are so many people who tell me, like, I think about this thing completely differently because of these emails or this, that, so that's what I say is that like, my work is a hundred percent accessible.Gieselle: If you follow me for free, if you go to my stuff there's an abundance of information for you to sit with to process, like, sure you're not getting the like coaching side of it, but for, it's not, it's also, that's not always necessary for every single person. Like some people really just need to hear something a different way.Gieselle: And then it just like changes everything for you. And the last thing I would say to anyone who's like coming at me with that, is that what are you doing, policing what I do with my money and my and my life. Like, I am not a billionaire. I think that there's a really interesting societal, like investigation we can do here.Gieselle: Right. Because we actually so very rarely interrogate billionaires around this kind of thing. We are just like, well, they worked really hardDalia: and theyGieselle: deserve it. They're a genius. And then us like the people who are out here doing like the real work to help liberate people were expected to bleed and to do it happily.Gieselle: And that's just an, I, I would really tell anyone like, If you're gonna be like coming for somebody, go to Jeff Bezos, don't be stepping to me talking about how I should charge $1. And you're still ordering s**t off of amazon.com. Okay. Dalia: Yeah, that really says something because you'll hear people even argue like, well, the more money you send in that person's direction is gonna generate jobs.Well, who says that I wouldn't be a good steward of that money. Cause so there's multiple layers there. What makes you think the money isn't better off in my hands than someone else. And why would you want me to have to work insane hours at a job that supports me so that I can keep bleeding for you doing labor for free, like sure.Dalia: It's a labor of love, even podcasting  but the key word there is labor.Gieselle: well, and this like comes all, it, it comes back to all of our relationships with capitalism, right? It's we all are so used to living in a system where we're supposed to work 24 7, and we're supposed to exploit ourselves for someone else's gain that.Gieselle: It feels right to people and it feels it, well, let me rephrase this. It feels wrong to people when you honor yourself and your needs, that is actually like, feels wrong in like a problem to them. And so that's the real issue around it is that there's some deep internalized capitalism that anyone who's questioning that really needs to look at.Gieselle: And question, if they're coming to any person of color questioning what they're charging and they're thriving because we are all owed so much more than we could ever get in this lifetime. I don't know, maybe not Oprah. Like she's good, but but everyone, but everyone else, like, no, we we've got more than enough coming to us.Gieselle: There is, we got more than enough generations of wealth that we deserve. And if we want it, I'm not someone where I'm like out here trying to generate tons of generational wealth or things like that. That's not really what I care about at the end of the day. But if that is what you care about, and that's something that you're wanting for yourself, I support you.Gieselle: And I love you because you deserve that thriving. And it's been stripped of us for so long. Get it while, get it in this lifetime. If it feels right for you.Dalia: I love the freedom that you give people to find their own solutions and understand that the answer might not be right for everybody because we know it in general, the way things are set up now it's predatory.Dalia: Yep. People aren't prioritized, but there are a lot of people out there acting like, well, you need to burn it all down and you shouldn't accept money for anything. And you should just like live under bridge. Well, why are you out here trying to take people's freedom of choice away from them to decide like, do I wanna try and thrive?Dalia: Do I feel like I can do more if I make sure my revolution is sustainable and maybe your revolution looks different and we don't have to put that on other people. And that's, to me, that's also a sign of really quality, authentic coaching is that you give people m

    The Daily Shine
    Honoring BIPOC Mental Health Month

    The Daily Shine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 10:33


    Today marks the start of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color Mental Health Month. Join us in honoring our BIPOC community members and setting an intention to care for your mental health this month and beyond. A note from Shine: If you're struggling with your mental health, know that seeking help is a strength, not a weakness. Take the first steps to get support with these resources from Mental Health America.

    Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
    Darek DeLille's Gift for Building Up Community & Audio Arts

    Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 28:28


    On today's show, we talk with Darek DeLille (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa/Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Artistic Producer at New Native Theatre, community organizer, musician and audio artist. Darek now lives in Southeast Minneapolis after living on Fond du Lac for many years.Darek considers himself the “Anishinaabe army knife” who is always ready to learn and expand his knowledge while uplifting the people around him. Recently, Darek has started producing audio plays with New Native Theatre, managing the Four Sisters Farmers Market in Minneapolis and helping to organize the inaugural Two Spirit Pow Wow in Minneapolis.We loved hearing about Darek's love for community and his wisdom about life. Miigwech Darek DeLille!Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

    Minnesota Native News
    Minneapolis Pow Wow Celebrates Two Spirit Indigenous Identity

    Minnesota Native News

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 4:59


    The Twin Cities Pride Festival celebrated its 50th anniversary last weekend. Just a few miles away, local organizers held a different type of pride celebration. Feven Gerezgiher reports.Around two hundred people gathered on June 24th for the inaugural Two Spirit Pow Wow in South Minneapolis.This is head dancer Nina Berglund, a descendant of the Oglala Lakota and Northern Cheyenne nations."I hope for all the young people, to see them all dancing and to really be included, to understand that you have a place, you have a place in the circle, you have a place in our communities, and you have a place in our ceremonies," said Nina, addressing the community.New Native Theatre partnered with the Minnesota Two Spirit Society to put together an evening centered on “reclaiming identities.”Em Matson - from the Sault Ste. Marie Ojibwe of the upper peninsula of Michigan - was one of the pow wow coordinators."The label Two Spirit has come about because people have felt the need to walk between two worlds or choose between two worlds: either be LGBT or be Indigenous, and the Two Spirit label and Two Spirit spaces bring people to be able to be both. And to be able to have their gender identity, which is often tied to their cultural identity, celebrated. Because a lot of times in mainstream LGBTQ spaces, people just don't understand an Indigenous gender identity. They don't understand the cultural roles that come with it or the responsibilities." said Em.Em said Two Spirit pow wows have become more prevalent in the past ten years."A lot of times not everyone feels safe or properly gendered at traditional powwows. There's a lot of gendered categories there. And sometimes in spaces, people encounter transphobia and homophobia that was kind of imprinted on us because of colonization, and so this pow wow is sort of a re-assertion that this - It's a reclaiming of our genders that existed before colonization. It's creating safe community spaces for us to celebrate being together and be able to you know, go out there and dance and be in ceremony with one another," said Em.The Minnesota Two Spirit Society aims to support Two Spirit community with issues they often face - things like homelessness or even missing cultural clothing."So one problem a lot of Two Spirit people face is they don't have regalia a lot of times because regalia is often passed down in families or made by family members, and those who have been disconnected from their families due to homophobia and transphobia just don't have access to the same regalia. So we had ribbon skirt making ribbon shirt making. We're hoping to do more things like shawl making, just to get people clothing where they can feel like they can enter the ceremony circle," said Em.Many participants had never been to an event specifically for Two Spirit people."My name is Connor Big Eagle. I'm 13 years old and I'm Dakota Lakota Sioux."Connor said he wanted more events like the pow wow because it was great to meet other Two Spirit people."It feels great and I really I think that they picked a perfect day because the weather's amazing…I really enjoyed the drum songs and the ice cream truck," said Connor.Alex Golden-Wolf from the White Earth Nation was both shocked and honored to see queerness celebrated."I think it's very important because, like, it seems like not a lot of pow wows that I've been to have honored the Two Spirit indigeneity. And so like, it's probably like, for me, it's the first that is there's been and I wish that in the future that there's gonna be more to come like this specifically for Two Spirits and like non-binary people alike, and I wish like, I want there to be more people here to experience the love and joy that comes around, like being in pow wows and stuff," said Alex.With the event running smoothly, organizers said they plan to make the pow wow an annual event.For Minnesota Native News, I'm Feven Gerezgiher.

    Founding 4 Podcast
    A New Era Begins!

    Founding 4 Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 66:50


    The Founding 4 Podcast is back! Erica L. Ayala is joined by a new co-host and dear friend Angelica Rodriguez for the first show of the brand new era of the Founding 4 Podcast, now part of Black Rosie Media. Angelica & Erica start the show talking about Hockey Canada and the (delayed) repercussions of their lack of transparency regarding sexual assault investigations. The show then shifts to Nazem Kadri and the Colorado Avalanche aka the 2022 Stanley Cup Champions. The two New Yorkers then get loud about Title IX and who has been predictably left behind before closing with PHF offseason news. Stories we mention: Hockey Canada is being held to account  - SportsNet Nazem Kadri is SO IMPORTANT - CBC Title IX didn't guarantee an equal playing field - FiveThirtyEight Title IX - An Unfulfilled Promise - Ms. Magazine Carly Jackson is Just Getting Started - The Ice Garden -------------------------------- ABOUT BLACK ROSIE MEDIA -----------------------------------Black Rosie Media is a community for Black women and melanated creators in sports media.We are committed to showing up as advocates for the visibility of Black women and creators of color through original content, events, partnerships, and more. Our goal is to create a space online where Black women and other BIPOC creators are celebrated, appreciated, and equitably compensated for their work.Not only is Black Rosie Media a community for Black women and melanated creators, but it's also a standalone media conglomerate giving these creators a platform for their work. We are a space for news, game coverage, and creative sports content. Subscribe to get 

    Inciting A Riot
    ”Pre-K pause...What's it like being a teacher?” with Tell Williams

    Inciting A Riot

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 72:19


    Pre-K pause. If you've been online in any capacity in the last year, that phrase probably conjures up the face of Tell Williams. He was a pre-K teacher for 9 years before resigning to pursue a Master's in social work. Along the way he accidentally found viral fame when a video he posted about the realities of being a teacher hit the algorithm jackpot. He's gone on to try his hand at stand-up comedy, being the face of a nail polish brand, and even act in the new show The Book of Queer that just premiered on Discovery+. Despite sitting atop the influencer game, we had a lengthy conversation about his offline life. What it means to be a visibly queer, visibly BIPOC teacher right now when every news cycle seems to both praise teachers and vilify them. What it means for content to be “age appropriate”, and just how much our kids actually understand at a young age. I do want to warn you, we do touch on the subject of school shootings, though we do not go into specific details about any one shooting, however if that topic is sensitive for you at this time please listen with care.  If you like this show and want to support it, there are a number of ways to help. Share it with your friends on social media. You can also like, rate the show 5-stars on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, and leave a review. Reviews help recommend the show to other listeners like you. Help keep the show free and producing regularly by joining my Patreon on a monthly basis. Patrons receive additional audio and video content as well as archived episodes, a private Discord server, and a monthly book club! Sign up at Patreon.com/headonfirepod. Or if a one-time donation is more your speed, you can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/headonfirepod.   Social links: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/headonfirepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/headonfirepod TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@headonfirepod   Support my work on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/headonfirepod   Subscribe to the Head On Fire podcast Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/head-on-fire/id337689333 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4qTYYhCLMdFc4PhQmSL1Yh?si=5387b774ed6e4524

    Brown Vegan
    180. What It REALLY Takes To Live In A Tiny Home with Destiny of Lez Go Tiny

    Brown Vegan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 46:33


    Blog post for this episode  Destiny and Brianna bought their tiny house on wheels in January 2022 and officially moved into it in April 2022. They are currently living in Portland, Oregon and plan to move their home again within the next 3 years.  As a young, Black, queer couple, finding an affordable and safe space to live was a top priority and going tiny was an important investment for them. They enjoy traveling and going tiny allows them to explore different cities while not having to worry about finding a place to live.  Lez Go Tiny was created to share their experience within the tiny movement and they plan on making resources for other BIPOC looking to go tiny.  In this episode we are talking about: Choosing a tiny home over van life Destiny & Brianna's experience planning for a tiny house build The process of finding the right tiny home builder and what the process was like Financing options and unexpected costs associated with tiny living Different state laws that affect where you can live in a tiny home How tiny living can be more economical than purchasing a full sized home Whether tiny living is worth the hype and the pros and cons of tiny houses The most stressful part of the tiny home process in Destiny's opinion Vegan cooking in a tiny house kitchen and how it changed Destiny's cooking process

    Rebel Buddhist
    Judgment and Blame

    Rebel Buddhist

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 47:32


    This episode is all about releasing one of the most common toxic patterns many of us have (and that easily that hooks me, personally): judgment and blame. Judgment and blame are really pervasive in our workplaces, our personal relationships, and in society at large. As we've experiences, it causes a lot of suffering when we label others as “wrong” or “bad” in some way. We can also get hooked by blame, and when it becomes habitual, it also keeps us stuck. These reactions can arise with little things, like when someone forgets to do a simple favor you asked of them. And it can happen in moments of anger and unforgiveness from a deep wound or betrayal. When resentment is chronic, it can really weaken and damage our relationships as well. When we're blaming or judging, it makes it hard for us to be compassionate or to soften around the wall we've built up around our hearts to protect us. We can end up putting people in a box, seeing them as an “unreal other,” and closing off to the idea of an interaction.  It's important to know this is totally human, totally expected when born in a body with a brain that evolved the way it did, so we need to be compassionate towards ourselves too. AND when it happens on a bigger scale, when we look at this as a baseline of so many people on the planet, we can also see the suffering it creates. If we want to genuinely move toward healing, peace, and helping the Earth heal, it will be helpful for us to practice letting go of blaming and “othering.” So how do we explore this without offending someone else or turning into the “blame police”? And without making ourselves “wrong” for getting hooked by judgment and blame? You've probably heard me talk about the evolutionary aspects of our brain and development before. Well, it applies here, too, with the stress response cycle of fight/flight/freeze/fawn. Blame is an expression of “fight.” It's part of the human condition and it's a universal response to when we feel threatened. Then, due to our negativity bias, we're consistently scanning for what's wrong, or assuming there is something wrong, because evolutionarily, that kept us safer. It literally kept us alive! On a societal level, we see this pattern a lot, and unfortunately, we perceive the most threat, and therefore blame, toward those that we perceive are different from us - religion, morals, politics, race/culture/ethnicity... We have a default response of “others” being more likely to be perceived as threats to our safety and most likely to be the target of our blame. Since this is the default of our brain, the first way we can examine this is to just be aware of it happening.While we know the possible negative effects of judgment and blame, there is a sneakier reason for their bad reputation: Many people have a common belief that we shouldn't be angry. But as weknow, anger is intelligent. It let's us know we need to take action, that something is wrong, that we aren't getting our needs met. So anger itself isn't the problem – getting stuck in it is (via judgment and blame). We've all been wounded by others. As we've seen recently in the U.S. with women's rights, and with BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ and Gender non-conforming friends, entire populations have been devalued and systematically oppressed. This should make us angry.  So we use anger to awaken and mobilize. But not to hang out in.  Make no mistake, we need anger. . If we suppress anger and, say, prematurely forgive, we're not going to fully attend to our wounds and therefore won't be able to effectively protect ourselves from more harm. But when we are in a trance of blame all the stories that feed the blame replay over and over. When this happens, we have less access to our wise mind, so we get reactive and lash out or withdraw. When we get stuck in that trance of blame, our perception of the other person also narrows. They become “unreal” or less human to us. Someone we can't relate to easily. And if we look closely, not only are we creating an unreal other, we're also creating an unreal self. We're not connected to our own wholeness. We are in some limited story of a victimized self. We can start to wake up to how blame is impacting our perceptions of both the other person (or people) and of ourselves. Ask ourselves - what's the role I'm in? And most important, do I like myself this way? Is it who I really am? We also have to acknowledge that undoing the toxic habits of judgment and blame is hard. And it's usually hard because we are protecting ourselves from suffering. One question we must ask ourselves is, what makes us hold so tightly to blame? What parts of us are we protecting? We can ask ourselves, “If I let go of thinking this way, what unpleasant feelings would I have to feel?” Because there's really a whole constellation of vulnerable feelings that can show up under the armor we've put up. Sometimes we hold onto blame because of misunderstandings about forgiveness. We may worry that forgiving someone will remove accountability or any possibility of change for the other person. Or that it condones harmful behavior. But this is a misunderstanding of forgiveness that can block our healing. There's also a question of whether we can make a difference in the world if we let go of blame. We think it fuels change. But we need to remember that forgiveness doesn't mean passivity or inaction. We can seek justice and reparation for oppressed people AND release the hatred or blame towards those who are benefiting from and perpetuating the oppression. There are three steps I use in my own life to leave the blame behind and begin to forgive:Awaken the intention to forgive – authentic desire to forgiveLook inward at ourselves with compassion and wisdom to see what's going on under that armorWiden the lens and see each other as our true selves with more open hearts In each of us, beyond our ego, there's a wisdom that knows that until we let go of the armoring around our hearts, we can't be happy. We can't love freely. So there is something in all of us that knows that if we want to have a free heart - and we're all about Freedom here -  a big step is to let go of blame.  In this Episode you will learn:// Why our brains are designed to blame and judge// Why anger isn't the problem… and why we actually need it// How to recognize when you're in a trance of judgment and blame// How to stop the cycle of blame and let go// What role the “two wings” of mindfulness and compassion have to shift us out of the stress response// What we are running from when we blame - and how to turn towards it Resources:// Episode 19: Anger // Episode 34: How to Forgive // Episode 87: The Problem with Being Right // Episode 106: Empathy vs Compassion // Check out this article I wrote for the Elephant Journal on Walking Each Other Home // For ways you can take action to protect women's reproductive rights, check out ReproductiveRights.org or PlannedParenthoodAction.org // Did you know I lead silent mindfulness adventure retreats? Our next one is in Baja, Mexico in the week of March 26th, 2023. Save the dates. You will want to be on the early notification list! // If you want to start integrating all of you into this one precious life we have, apply for the Adventure Mastermind. It's Soul Work. Deep work. Important, necessary, and essential to what the world needs right now. Be a part of it. If you're remotely curious, apply. It will help you get clear, and then we can chat to see if it's actually a good fit. Trust me – it's an intense 6 months so I am just as invested as you are in making sure it's an amazing match. Head over to AdventureMastermind.com and apply for the next cohort. We have 2 altered states retreats, weekly coaching, virtual retreats, and more. I've got you! // If you're new to the squad, grab the Rebel Buddhist Toolkit I created at RebelBuddhist.com. It has all you need to start creating a life of more freedom, adventure, and purpose. You'll also get access to the Rebel Buddhist FB group, and tune in weekly when I go live on new topics. // Want to dive into this work on a deeper level on your own time? To study it and practice it together with a group of people with the same goals of freedom, adventure and purpose? Check out Freedom School – the community for ALL things related to freedom, inside and out.

    Side Hustle School
    #2007 - TBT: Brooklyn Clothing Boutique Scales Up

    Side Hustle School

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 9:52


    In this week's “Throwback Thursday / Where are they now?” segment, we hear from the owner of two businesses in New York City: a clothing line *and* a fashion boutique that features 25+ BIPOC-owned brands.  Side Hustle School features a new episode EVERY DAY, featuring detailed case studies of people who earn extra money without quitting their job. This year, the show includes free guided lessons and listener Q&A several days each week. Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.

    Room to Grow Podcast with Emily Gough
    321. Room to Grow After Dark: Abortion, Women's Rights & Tough Conversations with Sara Silverstein & James Walsham

    Room to Grow Podcast with Emily Gough

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 84:08


    Today, we're talking about abortion.    Because as women, men, all genders, all nationalities, all abilities, all income levels and beliefs, we don't talk about it enough.   Or seemingly ever.   Even as a Canadian, I was overwhelmed with emotion this week following the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that made abortion a constitutional right.    The news and ensuing wave of emotions rippled across borders and even continents.     I immediately thought of the millions of American women and child bearers whose lives will be seriously threatened because of someone else's beliefs.   I immediately thought of my friend Sara.   Sara Silverstein is a Breathwork Facilitator, Aura Photographer & Female Sęxuality Specialist who had an abortion at 16. Like many others, she has carried the emotional weight of both the decision and the abortion itself, but wrapped much of it up in a veil of stigma and unease.   Now, Sara and many others are starting to speak up publicly about abortion in hopes to inform, educate and instil compassion and understanding in everyone.   Sara, together with James Oliver Welsham, “The Compassionate Man” and host of The Honest Bloke podcast are here for a special episode of Room To Grow™ “After Dark” which was recorded in front of a live audience and included Q&A.    This incredibly candid and detailed conversation about abortion features both male and female perspectives and personal experiences of abortion, as well as view points from Canada, The United States and The United Kingdom.   It's not a lecture.   It's storytelling.    A chance to speak, listen and open our minds.    “I think this is going to be the beginning of another uprising.” - Sara Silverstein   In this episode, we're talking about:   Why this decision in the US affected so many people around the world Abortion statistics, including first-time abortions and the number of women/people who abort pregnancies The arguments against abortion as a “method of contraception” Why abortion rights have a greater impact on ethnic minorities, BIPOC, transexuals and other marginalized groups Why we need to start having more open conversations about abortion First hand abortion stories from both Sara and James Why men struggle with the topic of abortion The role men play in supporting women/childbearers when it comes to pregnancy and abortion What men can do to educate themselves on abortion and the physiology of pregnancy Why politician need to become more educated and aware of trauma How people of other nationalities can support American women who may lose their ability to safely access abortion The influence of capitalism on banning abortion Why this may be the start of an uprising around abortion rights An America and around the world   I want this podcast to open the floodgates for you to feel like you have somewhere safe to discuss the topic of abortion. If you were unable to join this recording live, I encourage you to reach out with questions, stories and compassion.    I have also provided helpful abortion resources below.   Finally, please share this episode with someone you know who needs to hear it.   We need to keep talking - and learning from others - about abortion and our fundamental human rights. REFERENCES:   Sara Silverstein on Instagram   James Walsham on Instagram Episode 266 | Not All Men, But Almost Always With Traver Boehm Of Man Uncivilized   Episode 282 | The Fear Of Communication, Asking For What You Want In The Bedroom & Embracing Your Sensitivity With Sara Silverstein   Episode 288 | Tantra, Polarity, Pleasure & The Strong Independent Woman With Sophie Josephina   From the New Yorker “We're Not Going Back to the Time Before Roe. We're Going Somewhere Worse”   Brandon Kyle Goodman on Instagram   Cam Fraser  ABORTION RESOURCES   https://abortionfunds.org   https://www.arcc-cdac.ca   https://www.asn.org.uk/   https://exhaleprovoice.org   https://aidaccess.org   https://digitaldefensefund.org   https://fireweedcollective.org CONNECT WITH EMILY Book a private coaching call with Emily to work together. Your FREE 15-page foundational guide Where Do We Begin. Jump on the waitlist for Becoming YOU, my 6 week women's group coaching program re-launching Tuesday, July 12. Men's group coaching program coming in August 2022 – waitlist here. Instagram: @emilygoughcoach info@emilygoughcoaching.com   Emily Gough Coaching Room to Grow Podcast

    The Grape Nation
    Kilolo Strobert

    The Grape Nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 87:20


    Brooklyn's own Kilolo Strobert is a true Crown Heights Affair. After attending high school on the Upper West Side, culinary school at Johnson and Wales, her love of wine, hospitality, helping friends with wine pairings and recos solidly pushed her into wine. She has worked all aspects of the business including retail at Morrell and Le Du's and Fresh Direct, the Hotel Parker Meridien, Zagat and more. 18 years ago, she took a job at a wine store in Prospect Park, today she is now the owner of that same store, Fermented Grapes. Kilolo is committed to wines that are natural, highlights diversification, globalization, women and the BIPOC winemaking community.Photo courtesy of Clay Williams.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support The Grape Nation by becoming a member!The Grape Nation is Powered by Simplecast.

    Game Dev Unchained
    0308: Onsen Master with Derrick Fields

    Game Dev Unchained

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 58:36


    About this episode: Derrick Fields is an artist, professor, and game designer based in Chicago, Illinois where they advocate for increasing the visibility of BIPOC individuals involved in games and the provision of resources to young creators who are considering a path in the medium. His recent game Onsen Master is partly a tribute to his appreciation of Japanese culture and his time living in Japan, but overall it's a game produced by his studio Waking Oni Games. https://wakingonigames.com/ https://twitter.com/wakingonigames https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrVT4b_DLTn_TuOEjWtgZ6A https://whitethorngames.com/ Connect with us: •

    Healthy Black Girl Podcast
    Roe vs. Wade Overturned! Black Women. Black & BIPOC Birth Workers & Healers

    Healthy Black Girl Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 25:38


    What does this mean for Black and BIPOC families, birth workers, practitioners, and healers? Is it time to reimagine and broaden your scope of practice? Is it time to expand and explore where and how you practice? Is it time to redesign your life, move outside the United States, and become part of the Black Exodus? Are you tired of living under an oppressive system never designed for you? You can rewrite your story and become a part of the solution for all birthing people, worldwide. I'm the CEO & Founder of the National Black Doulas Association®, NBDA Leadership Academy™ and NBDA Worldwide™. The largest Black & BIPOC Birth training and database company in the world. Are you looking to get trained as a Doula? https://www.blackdoulas.org/ What to find a Doula in your area? https://www.blackdoulas.org/national-... Would you like to list your Doula business (NBDA Worldwide™) https://www.blackdoulas.org/national-... Information on becoming certified through the National Black Doulas Association®https://members.blackdoulas.org/certi... Parents, would you like to connect with a Doula in our network to ask general fertility, pregnancy, postpartum-related questions? https://nbda.vsee.me/ Join my private Global CEO community. Where private business mentorship is offered https://www.traciecollinsofficial.com Text the word “BLAXIT” to 770-626-5188 IG https://www.instagram.com/traciecollins/ TikTok https://vm.tiktok.com/ZTd3GgnRc/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/traciecollin...

    Where We Live
    Hartford, New Haven food incubators see growing demand from women, BIPOC food entrepreneurs

    Where We Live

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 49:00


    Fifty-one percent of adults in a 2022 report from the Restaurant Industry Association say they aren't eating at restaurants as often as they'd like – an increase of 6 percentage points from before the pandemic. That's led to a rise in demand for home-delivered food, takeout, and curb-side pick up – an attractive option for small-scale food start-ups. This hour on Where We Live, we hear from a food entrepreneur about her plant-based, Caribbean-infused meal delivery business, and how she learned to cook at the age of 8 in her father's kitchen in Kingston, Jamaica. We talk about food businesses launched by BIPOC and immigrant women entrepreneurs through reSET and City Seed's food incubators in Hartford and New Haven, the entrepreneurial ecosystem needed to succeed, and funding available for start-ups. Also, the manager of a ‘pay what you can' cafe and shared kitchen discusses food trends. GUESTS:  GiGi Lawrence: Master Chef, RastaRant – Caribbean inspired vegan cuisine Sarah Bodley: Executive Director, reSET Cortney Renton: Executive Director, City Seed in New Haven, and Sanctuary Kitchen by City Seed Molly Reynolds: Manager, Shared Kitchen and Cafe, Hands on Hartford Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Dreaming in Color
    Carmen Rojas, Ph.D.: The Promise & Curse of Philanthropy

    Dreaming in Color

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 36:52


    Show description Welcome to Dreaming in Color, a show that provides a platform for BIPOC social change leaders to candidly share how their lived experiences (personal and professional) have prepared them to lead their work and drive the impact we all seek.  In this episode, Dr. Carmen Rojas, the President and Chief Executive Officer at the Marguerite Casey Foundation, joins the show. She shares stories of her upbringing as a child of Venezuelan and Nicaraguan immigrants, confronts the complexities and contradictions of the social sector, and offers us a space to think and dream boldly. We learn of the familial roots and values that shaped her path toward a Ph.D., brainstorm around collective liberation in an age of mass wealth and inequality, and discuss how philanthropy can sharpen its focus on social justice. Join us as we bask in Carmen's wit and wisdom.  Jump straight into: (00:21) - Introducing Dr. Carmen Rojas, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. (1:51) - Carmen shares a quote on optimism from Freedom is a Constant Struggle by Angela Davis. (03:24) - Moving to the US ​​at the peak of the civil rights movement: A cultural perspective on Carmen's roots and the family dynamics that shaped her. (09:19) - Liberation for the public sector: The people and events that encouraged Carmen to focus on social work. (14:18) - Everyone should be able to dream: Discussing the radical change that Carmen is working to achieve. (18:51) - Our collective being: How Carmen embraces the concept of contradiction to make it powerful and meaningful. (22:24) - The urgency of naming: Working to repair a broken system and shift philanthropy in a new direction (32:27) - A world organized around liberation: The hopes Carmen carries for our future Episode resources Follow Carmen Rojas through https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmen-rojas-phd-she-her-1b521316/ (LinkedIn) and https://twitter.com/crojasphd (Twitter) Read https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/780-freedom-is-a-constant-struggle (Freedom is a Constant Struggle) by Angela Davis Read https://www.amazon.com/Song-Solomon-Toni-Morrison/dp/140003342X (Song of Solomon )by Toni Morrison Learn more about Dr. Manuel Pastor's https://dornsife.usc.edu/eri/manuel-pastor/ (research) Know more about https://www.caseygrants.org/ (Marguerite Casey Foundation) Learn more about https://greenlining.org/ (the Greenlining Institute)  Learn more about https://www.kaporcenter.org/ (the Kapor Center) Learn more about https://sff.org/team-members/fred-blackwell/ (Fred Blackwell) and https://sff.org/ (the San Francisco Foundation) Thank you for listening to Dreaming in Color a https://www.bridgespan.org/ (Bridgespan) supported https://www.studiopodsf.com/ (StudioPod) production. Nicole Genova is the Show Coordinator and Teresa Buchanan is the Show Producer. The production team from The Bridgespan Group includes Cora Daniels, Michael Borger, Christina Pistorius, and Britt Savage. Additional music and editing provided by https://nodalab.com/ (nodalab).

    Sex Ed with DB
    Abortion Research with Ushma Upadhyay, PhD, MPH

    Sex Ed with DB

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 36:20


    DB speaks with Ushma Upadhyay, PhD, MPH, a public health social science researcher who studies abortion access, safety, and the impact of state-level abortion restrictions. They discuss Dr. Upadhyay's latest research publication about abortion clinic closures and projections after the repeal of Roe v. Wade. --- Sex Ed with DB, Season 6 Team: Creator, Executive Producer, Sound Engineer, and Host: Danielle Bezalel (DB) Co-Producer and Communications Lead: Cathren Cohen Website: Evie Plumb --- Sex Ed with DB, Season 6 is Sponsored by: Clone-A-Willy, Lion's Den, Fun Factory, Uberlube, Beducated (http://beducate.me/bg2151-sexed-podcast), and Exsens. --- Love Sex Ed with DB? Email us at sexedwithdb@gmail.com. --- About the podcast: Sex Ed with DB is a feminist podcast bringing you all the sex ed you never got through unique and entertaining storytelling, centering LGBTQ+ and BIPOC experts. We discuss topics such as birth control, pleasure, LGBTQ+ health and rights, abortion, consent, BDSM, sex and disabilitity, HIV, sex in the media, and more. --- Follow Sex Ed with DB on: Instagram: @sexedwithdbpodcast TikTok: @sexedwithdb Twitter: @sexedwithdb Facebook: @edwithdb ---

    Do The Kids Know?
    ...About Digital Blackface?

    Do The Kids Know?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 30:26


    Following our last episode, we talk about the phenomenon of "Digital Blackface", what it means, and if it's ok to use memes of Black people if you're not yourself Black. ------Do The Kids Know? is a biweekly series of discussions between community workers and educators, Prakash and Kristen, that unpack race, media, popular culture, and politics in KKKanada (That's Canada spelled with three K's) from an anti-colonial perspective.Our goal is to bring nuance to sensationalist media as well as to uncover the ways in which white supremacy, capitalism, and colonialism is shaping our movements and behaviours. Keep tuning in to be a part of the conversation… don't be a kid who doesn't know!Find us: @dothekidsknow (Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, TikTok)Email us: dothekidsknow@gmail.comTip us: patreon.com/dothekidsknowNewsletter: tinyletter.com/dothekidsknow Artwork by Daniela Silva (instagram.com/danielasilvatrujillo)Music by Steve Travale (https://stevetravale.com)DTKK is recorded on the traditional and unceded Indigenous lands of the Kanien'kehá:ka Nation. We are committed to working with Indigenous communities and leaders locally and across Turtle Island to fight for Indigenous rights, resurgence, and sovereignty. Until next time. Stay in the know~!Support the show

    Every Day is a Food Day
    Cookies: Double Stuffed - Part 2!

    Every Day is a Food Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 59:53


    We're back with Part 2 of “Cookies: Double Stuffed” Get ready for an extra deep Deep Dish with our Foodlosopher, Anna Van Valin, as she dives into one of the most epic food business rivalries in history: the century-long battle between Oreo and Hydrox. When a ruthless lawyer and two bitter baker brothers collided at the beginning of the 20th century, it led to the creation of the very first food conglomerate, a world-changing invention, and the most popular cookie on earth. She tells us which cookie really came first (it's not the one you think!!) and how some of the best and worst marketing played a big role in who came out on top. It's a story STUFFED with corporate backstabbing, petty revenge and so much shade. Milk isn't the only thing Oreo's been DUNKing on!*If you need reproductive care, want to learn more about your reproductive rights, or find out how to help, visit choice.crd.coMore info from the show:* Watch the deliciously dramatic “Cookie Wars: The Food That Built America” from the History Channel * Oreo's delightful 1980 commercial*Hydrox's questionable commercial from 1966*Hydrox's VERY questionable 1988 commercialConnect with us!*Want to support our women and BIPOC-created independent podcast? Buy us a coffee!* For more great content about the stories & foods we talk about on the show (plus a peek BTS) follow us at @FoodDayPod on Instagram, Twitter & Facebook or check out our webpage.* Join our mailing list for extra content and to keep up with all the exciting things we have planned for this season.*Get yourself a delicious Yumday snack box

    One Small Bite
    How To Decolonize Your Plate with The Black Nutritionist Dr. Kéra Nyemb-Diop

    One Small Bite

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 68:55


    Decolonize Your Plate!Dr. Nyemb-Diop invites black people to decolonize their plate. The idea of a healthy plate consists of European centric foods. This systemic racism affects how nutrition services are provided to black people.  Black culture can create their plate their way by decolonizing it. Cultural foods are healthy and healing. Forget the whitewash of healthy food lists.Highlights of this episode:Dr. Nyemb-Diop's Decolonize Your Plate approachRacism within nutrition and dietetics practicesSystemic oppression in healthcareBody and food shame within black communitiesHealing through cultural foodsGuest Info: https://www.instagram.com/black.nutritionist/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/keranyembdiop/https://fierce-originator-7182.ck.page/73c6d6e0b1Resources: Get Your Copy of the book - One Small Bite: Anti-Diet Stories that Empower You To Build a Positive and Secure Relationship with FoodGet Unstuck Class Classes are on Zoom, so no travel necessary. Read about it here: https://orozconutrition.com/courses/Where do I go from here?If you like this episode, then download the show wherever you listen to your podcasts at Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Google, iHeartRadio, Castbox, etc!Hit that subscribe button so you won't miss another episode. Big Ask: Leave a Review! Please, take a few minutes and leave me a review on your podcast app. Each review helps other listeners find the podcast, which provides me with the ability to continue bring you unique content. So spread the love. Loss for words? Just write what you like about the show.Share the show with friends.If you want to work with us, schedule an appointment or a free 15 minute discovery call. Explore our website and click Schedule an Appointment. Or, reach us by email info@orozconutrition.com or phone 678-568-4717. Chop the diet mentality; Fuel Your Body; and Nourish Your Soul!

    Show Up With Christine Chang
    #273 Brittany Grey-Yadav: Taking Space To Find Yourself When You're In A Relationship

    Show Up With Christine Chang

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 41:54


    Brittany Grey-Yadav is a Wife, Entrepreneur, Humanitarian, and Mindfulness Coach. Needless to say, she is a badass high-performing woman. In this episode we talk about her marriage - what she has learned since meeting her husband (they met on OkCupid!), and how they both have changed throughout ten years together. There was a point where Brittany took a year to travel the world solo in order to find and connect back to herself. How did they navigate the time apart? We also talk about: A VERY important trait to look for when you are datingHealing childhood traumaDoes your partner need to be into personal growth the same way you are?Intercultural marriage (she is from Detroit by way of Tennessee, while her husband is from India)! Brittany is founder of Influence Hers - a platform celebrating women of color influencing positive change around the world, and Visible - a BIPOC-led content marketing agency.Brittany Grey-Yadav's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brittanygreyyadav/

    Hacks & Wonks
    Pastor Carey Anderson, Candidate for 30th LD State Representative

    Hacks & Wonks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:28


    On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Pastor Carey Anderson about his campaign for State Representative in the 30th Legislative District - why he decided to run, how the last legislative session went and his thoughts on addressing issues such as housing affordability and zoning, homelessness, public safety, LGBTQ+ rights, and climate change. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find more information about Pastor Carey at https://www.electpastorcarey.com/   Resources Campaign Website - Pastor Carey Anderson: https://www.electpastorcarey.com/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Well, I am just delighted today to welcome to the program, a candidate for State Representative in the 30th Legislative District down in Federal Way, Pastor Carey Anderson. Thank you so much for joining us today. [00:00:53] Pastor Carey Anderson: Crystal, it's an honor to be with you, and let me just say right off the bat - thank you for inviting me to be a part of this wonderful, wonderful podcast. I'm just elated to be invited today, and I appreciate the work that you do. [00:01:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. I appreciate the work that you do, my South King County brethren and leader of so many, and just appreciate the time that you've taken to join here. So I guess I wanna start off asking - you've done so much, you've accomplished so much. What is it that made you think - you know what, it is time for me to run for office? [00:01:33] Pastor Carey Anderson: Well, that's an excellent question. Let me say to our audience - the 30th district is a new district, and I'm running to bring proven new leadership to the new 30th District. The realignment of the boundaries from the 2020 Census shows that Federal Way is a BIPOC-majority city now, the 30th District is growing. I live in Federal Way, I'm the pastor of First AME Church in Auburn and Seattle - Seattle is the mother church. And about 19 years ago, we saw the trend of gentrification and so we started a satellite in the south portion of King County. So, First AME Church is the oldest Black church in the state - 1886 - and so, we see it as a part of our mission to always speak truth to power. So I am running to bring proven new leadership to the new 30th District. And if I could just take a moment - when we're talking about the crime, we're talking about the homeless, we're talking about the issues of housing, we're talking about funding of our schools, we're talking about public safety. Well, these are things that I have been doing in my entire ministry - 44 years in ministry, 38 years as a senior pastor, 18 years as the pastor of First AME Church - matter of fact, in its 100+ years of existence, I'm the longest serving pastor. My boots have been on the ground, fighting all of those things and addressing all of those things. And I want to do it in this open seat - no one has ever served the new 30th District before. And it is time for proven new leadership for the new 30th District. And I'm sure we'll get into some of the specifics a little later. [00:03:34] Crystal Fincher: Well, and looking at this new 30th District - you're running for the seat that is being vacated by Representative Jesse Johnson, who has done a lot of work in the community, certainly made his imprint on the Legislature in the time that he was there. Some of that, including police accountability legislation and other legislation that we saw passed in 2020, and then rolled back in 2022, along with a number of other things. We're dealing with a - how we're gonna treat revenue - are we gonna raise more progressive revenue, or move - continue to move - in a regressive direction. Action on the transportation package, stagnation on affordable housing and the middle housing bill there - as you evaluate this past legislative session, what did you think about it? What did you agree with? What did you disagree with? [00:04:40] Pastor Carey Anderson: Well, first of all, let me commend the work and applaud the work of Representative Jesse Johnson. When he was first running for City Council, we supported him. When he went into the State Legislature, First AME supported him. He came and presented at our church and at both campuses, matter of fact, and we supported him wholeheartedly. I was disappointed to see him leave the seat because we need that type of leadership. And certainly with the police accountability reforms that he pushed through the Legislature - it was a herculean job, but the job is not complete. And so when we talk about fighting crime, let's just stay right there for a moment. I applaud the work of our police force and law enforcement. However, I don't believe that we should put the entire burden of fighting crime on the police. There are other matters and other variables that go along with property crimes and low-level offenders such as drug abuse, mental health, and some of those types of things that cause an environment for crime. And I am trained as a substance abuse counselor, I am trained - I'm the only candidate trained in mental health. I did it, I've been doing it for some 30+ years. And so these are some of the other things that we must address because when we talk about crime and we talk about housing, it's not enough just to find affordable housing and place people in affordable housing. But many times, if they have mental health issues, if they have, if they're suffering from addiction, we need wraparound services. And so this is going to take critical thinking, it's going to take people that have been in the field to know what to say, how to say it, and drum up the support to build collegiality - to really change our community and change the 30th LD. So these are some of the things that I hope to bring to the State Legislature, as a legislator. [00:07:00] Crystal Fincher: You talked just a little bit, just now - obviously issues of addiction, in addition to homelessness. Housing affordability is such an important issue and one that a lot of people are struggling with - the cost of rents have been skyrocketing, cost of daycare skyrocketing - so much is making things really hard for people just to survive. They can be working one, two jobs - it's still not enough. Minimum wage is not sufficient for allowing people to live independently and to afford an average rent. What should be done to make housing more affordable in the 30th District? [00:07:47] Pastor Carey Anderson: Well, thank you for that question - it's really a challenging question, but I do want our audience to know, I've been involved in affordable housing for many, many years, even in my first church in Nevada - we built housing, affordable housing for seniors. First AME Church has been involved in the housing arena through our nonprofit since 1969. And we had three apartment complexes in Seattle, and we formed about five or six years ago - the FAME - Equity Alliance of Western Washington, which is another housing corporation that I serve as the chair of the board. And we just broke ground in January of this year on a $36 million, 119-unit complex - the Elizabeth Thomas Holmes - in South King County. So we're moving down this way - it's an issue that's very personal to me, I've been involved in it. I know that we have to find more housing for struggling families, and the Affordable Housing Trust Fund has money in it. We got to move it quickly and quicker than we have been moving it so that we can build a housing inventory for persons that are really trying to build a home for their loved ones, their children, their families, for sustaining the family unit. And these are things that I've been involved in, engaged in - and you would not imagine, Crystal, how many people come to First AME Church asking for rental assistance, needing food - which we try to provide on a regular basis, since the pandemic in particular. And we do that because we understand the need - I see it on a regular, regular basis. We even have a home, a parsonage - that we rent it out, bringing it out for, since my time, is 18 years at First Family Church. And so during the pandemic, those families that were living in the home could not pay their rent. And so we elected a moral decision to let them stay and not evict them. Matter of fact, we were - they were part of the persons that came for food every Friday in our Friday drive-by - I'm not talking about shooting, I'm talking about groceries. And so we would feed them, give them groceries - I'm not talking about meat, cheese and milk. I'm talking about more than that - meats, vegetables, wholesome grains - so that the family could be fed a nutritional meal. And also we provided vaccinations for COVID-19, as well as boosters. We continue to do that, and so we boosted and vaccinated over 6,000 people - and fed them as well. So we elected to eat the rent so that these families could stay in their home and not be put out on the street. And the Lord makes a way, somehow. So, we're involved in it and engaged in housing - I will continue to do that as a State legislator. [00:11:14] Crystal Fincher: One of the big issues this past legislative session was the missing middle housing bill. And you're absolutely right - we need to designate more housing as affordable housing, find affordable housing. One of the big problems is just that there just is not the supply of housing at all - of all different types and at all levels. Here in the state, we have not been building to keep up with the increase in population and the trends in the flow in population. And so allowing more density, more inclusive zoning was put on the table and all of the data shows that's a necessary ingredient of increasing affordability, of helping to stem the skyrocketing costs of rent and housing. Would you have voted for that missing middle housing bill? [00:12:16] Pastor Carey Anderson: Yes, I would. And let me say this - we have to have more deep-dive conversations for this issue of affordability and housing. And the conversation should center, not so much on - do we wanna build a threeplex or a fourplex in a single-family neighborhood - or what do we really value? If we as a state, if we as people value sheltering and allowing people the opportunity to live a decent life like you are living, then we're gonna have to have those types of conversations. But I believe that there are ways in which we can build housing in single-story homes and two-story homes that are aesthetically beautiful. It would not really disrupt the aesthetic beauty of the community and the neighborhood. These are discussions that I believe would prove to be very valuable instead of just a NIMBY attitude, because today they're homeless, today they're in need - but you miss a couple of paychecks yourself, you get laid off of your job, let another pandemic come and affect and impact your family - you may be the one next in line. And so we have to be very careful at the rocks we throw and the fingers we point because it could easily - you could be up today and you can be down tomorrow. So it's a collective effort - it's going to take collective and courageous conversations so that we could truly address the problem of affordability and density and providing the needed housing inventory for families to live sustained lives. [00:14:11] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Absolutely well said. We talked about public safety earlier - certainly talked about policing, have talked about the need to intervene in a lot of different ways. Safety is a really big conversation, and right now there are a lot of people in our communities fearing for their safety. Hate crimes are near all-time highs, we're seeing hate and bias-motivated crimes, we're seeing harassment and targeting of the LGBTQ community and others for their ethnic heritage, for their religion. What do you say to people who right now are scared and worried, and who are looking at the two parties going in very different directions, and worried that they can't count on the Supreme Court for safety or rights anymore, and increasingly they're relying on local leadership to make sure that people are safe and respected and protected in communities. What do you see as your responsibility in that area, and how will you lead to make sure that everyone in our communities feel safe? [00:15:36] Pastor Carey Anderson: Thank you. Excellent question, Crystal. Public safety is a major issue today, and I believe that we have made some major strides, but there's still a long way to go. And as I had said earlier, I believe that - I don't believe that we should put the entire burden on fighting crime left to law enforcement. When George Floyd was murdered and the unrest happened in Seattle in particular - but across the country - the East Precinct in Seattle was overtaken by the protestors. The East Precinct in Seattle is two blocks from First AME Church. I led the charge in convening the mayor and her staff, the Chief of Police at the time and her command staff, and the leaders of CHOP to come to First AME Church - there was about 75 of us in total. We did so with the sole purpose of learning how to talk, learning how to listen to one another. You have to understand - lives had been lost, bloodshed had been spilled on the pavements and on the streets of our cities behind the George Floyd murder. But out of the conversations - without news media, without the news outlets, without reporters - we were able to come and de-escalate the tension. And out of that, we were able to encourage Mayor Durkan, who was serving at the time, to put money into the BIPOC community - $30 million. She formed a task force that I was privileged to be a founding member of - the Equities Community Initiative Task Force - where we put together teams to talk about what are the central and acentric needs of our BIPOC community. Housing was one, entrepreneurship, looking at closing the wealth gap between Black and Brown people against the dominant culture. And so if we were able to do that there, I believe through our State Legislature, we can form ways of bridging some of these issues. Let me say this, Crystal - every first responder doesn't need to have a gun and a badge. Some of the things that we're dealing with now, we need to put funding into training more officers, law enforcement sensitivity training, cultural sensitivity training. I'm an endangered species as an African American male, even at my age - I'm not 25 - but I'm still an endangered species when pulled over by law enforcement. And so we've got to find ways of how to communicate better, how to empower faith groups, how to empower addiction counselors, how to empower and utilize mental health professionals and social workers to become our first responders. There was a time, a couple of summers ago, when the City SPD, Seattle Police Department, used the United Black Christian Clergy of Western Washington, which I'm a member of, and they would call us in dire situations with street violence amongst gangs. And we were able to find family members, we were able to find gatekeepers to try and de-escalate some of the violence as opposed to law enforcement just going in and pointing a gun and wearing a badge. I think that we must work collectively in this issue, if we're going to really bring about public safety, [00:19:35] Crystal Fincher: I completely agree with that. And then also talking about people's basic rights and people remaining safe regardless of who they are, what their background is, what their gender or sexuality is. [00:19:52] Pastor Carey Anderson: And can I say this - when you talk about the LGBTQIA+, we have to understand - they are a part of our community, just like we are a part. There's a collective we, and the Pride Parade in Seattle was right at the Central and the Capitol Hill area - where is First AME Church, right in the Capitol Hill area. We have always been, and there were even members of the 30th LD Dems, who said I was a homophobe. I said, how dare you? If you even Google Pastor Carey Anderson, you will find out that we are a welcoming church, a welcoming faith group. I am certainly not a homophobe - if anybody is, it's you - because we have always had our doors open for any and everybody. And we'll continue to do that - that's who we are, that's our value. God is a God of love. And so we must precipitate that type of love no matter who you are, and whose you are, because we're all children of God. I have walked with our Jewish brothers and sisters when Temple De Hirsch - our sister congregation right across the street from First AME Church, within walking distance - when they were defaced, their building was defaced, there were bomb threats. I stood with the Jewish brothers and sisters - Rabbi Weiner is a brother of mine from a different mother, we eat together, we worship together. And the Muslim community - we are tight with them - when they were going through threats, bomb threats, defacing of their temples and their mosques, we were right there with them standing by their side. And when Mother Emanuel AME Church back in 2015 lost nine people inclusive of the pastor - this is an AME church. First AME Church was the hub for the Seattle Pacific Northwest area, and we held prayer vigils, we led a 3000-person march through the City, and we engaged peace talks, and with celebratory singing. But we have to stop the killing, and this is what it's about. This is who we must become, and this is what I want to do, as the next voice in Olympia for the 30th District. I'm not talking about what I'm going to do, I'm talking about what I've done and what I continue to do. [00:22:40] Crystal Fincher: And I guess my question - especially, you've been doing work - in your capacity as a State legislator, particularly at this time where there are so many attacks on people because of their identity. And as we see rhetoric ratcheting up - the type of rhetoric that we know leads to violence - what more can be done to protect our LGBTQ community legislatively, to help protect people's rights, to help keep people safe, to help people just feel loved and seen in our community. What can be done in your role as a legislator? [00:23:26] Pastor Carey Anderson: Well, first of all, we need to enforce our equal protections under the laws even more. And we've got to not just put it out there in writing, but we must practice it indeed. We must have an open-door policy, we must train the legislators in terms of what a community looks like from people that are other than you. They look different, they have different values and culture, but they're still a part of this community. So I can love you no matter who you are. Although you may not have the same value that I have - just because you're a person, I am obligated to love you, and to stand in your shoes, and to understand your pain, understand your wants, and understand your desires and your hopes. This is what we must do if we're gonna represent all of the people that we are elected to serve. [00:24:27] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. We also are facing a climate crisis. We are at a point where climate change is happening, we are experiencing extreme heat, extreme cold events, flooding. Marginalized people in our community, lower-income people, BIPOC communities are being hurt worst and first by this climate crisis. And we have work to do to keep it from getting worse, we have work to do to mitigate the impacts that it's currently having. So I guess in - as you're looking at running, as you're looking at legislating, what action would you take to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollution? [00:25:19] Pastor Carey Anderson: Well, first of all, when the dominant culture sniffs, has the sniffles, those who are in poverty, those who are living beneath the poverty line, catch the flu. And so we've got to, first of all, realize the disparities, the health disparities. I'm so thankful for the Governor's supplemental budget, that calls for $64 billion, over $64 billion, of priority areas. One of those areas is climate. And so I would be supportive of the Governor's supplemental budget for 2022. Also, when we look at that, one of the other priorities is that of poverty. One in five persons are living in poverty. There are 1.7 million people in this state that are living in poverty. So when we're talking about climate change and gas emissions and things of that nature - trying to be a 2035 clean air environment, which is a very ambitious goal to meet, but we gotta start somewhere. But when we look at the disparities, 1.7 million are living in poverty. And then when you go a little deeper, you find out over half, or nearly half, are people of color. So we are the ones that are the most impacted, as you have so eloquently said. So as a State legislator, I would be in support of the Governor's supplemental plan and would be pushing for the implementation of it. I'm not gonna be Black when necessary and BIPOC when convenient. I am who I am, and these are priorities and we've got to speak truth to power. We've got to have these courageous conversations and that's what I'd be willing to do, as your State legislator. [00:27:16] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely - also in this, transportation is the sector most responsible for greenhouse gas emissions in our state. We just passed, as a state, a transportation package that had record investments in transit and mobility - which we all desperately need - but also continue to widen highways and invest billions in doing that. And especially with the impacts, as you just talked about, in the BIPOC community - just people who are in close proximity to roads and highways - the pollution that comes from those are disproportionately causing asthma, heart disease, lung disease in our communities. We now have tons of data showing that widening highways doesn't reduce traffic, it increases traffic and increases emissions. Would you be supportive in future highway packages of highway expansion, or do you think we should cap it at where it's at and focus on investing more in transit and mobility solutions for people who walk, bike and ride. [00:28:43] Pastor Carey Anderson: Yes, excellent question. I think we need to take a serious look at a moratorium on expansion for our highways and really look at some of the measures to bring public transportation and make that more accessible. Here in the 30th District, the transportation - Sound Transit - is moving this way. And a lot of people, though we may live in the Federal Way, 30th District area, we are working in Seattle - let's be clear about it. And so, once that is really completed - that project - that will help ease some of the traffic flow and the emissions that are going out, because I'd rather spend a minimal amount of time and read a book while I'm traveling quickly and swiftly to my job in Seattle, than being stuck in traffic and then having the propensity to get into an accident or having someone hit me or falling asleep while we're in a dead zone deadlock and gridlock and those kinds of things. So I know that a lot of the transit money has already been bonded out. So it's gonna be a difficult thing to look at, but I'd certainly be in favor of a moratorium. [00:30:09] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that makes sense. And as you are considering your race, your opponent, just the dynamics of what is happening in Federal Way today and what residents are going through and what they want. Why are you the person who they should choose to represent them? [00:30:33] Pastor Carey Anderson: Russell Wilson used to say this when he was with the Seahawks - why not me? So, when we look at public safety, when we look at safe neighborhoods, funding our schools, affordable housing, quality healthcare for seniors, clean environment, and issues surrounding equity for all - I'm the only candidate who has been a K-12 public school teacher. And I'm for state funding - I'm the only candidate who has championed $400 million of state funding for immediate reinvestment into our communities. We've got a $200 million allocation that's gonna drop next month. And the RFPs are soon to be online. And so I was one, along with four others, who helped champion that $400 million state funding for immediate reinvestment into our communities. I'm the only candidate who has been using our church as a clinic for patients, for COVID vaccinations and boosters, and feeding people - to the tune of feeding, we've done nearly 15,000. For boosting and vaccinating people, over 6,000. And we continue to do that through partnerships. I'm the only candidate that provides jobs through affordable housing - our affordable housing projects and my church-based nonprofit organizations. And as I had said earlier, our project just broke ground in January 2022, providing 119 units of affordable housing at a cost of over $36 million. No one else has done that, no one else has been involved in leading the community. I'm just talking about - I'm not talking about Emmett Till, but I am talking about Trayvon Martin, I am talking about Michael Brown, I am talking about the mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. I am talking about George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery. First AME Church, through this pastor and the leadership that I provided for this community - I was the one out in the street, I was the one organizing these marches along with my colleagues, I was the one that's speaking truth to power, I was the one that convened the mayor, the chief of police who has endorsed me. WEA has endorsed me, the Retired Public Employees Council has endorsed me, and we're still getting endorsements as we speak - because my boots are on the ground. You don't have to wait for Day One to start pushing the button - what are you gonna do? I'm gonna continue to do what I've always done. And so this is my pledge, this is who I am as a person - and preaching and politics have never been separated in my book. And from the historical tradition of the African Methodist Episcopal Church - we were the first to seek public office in state and federal levels in our denomination and have led the charge and led the way. The Reverend Raphael Warnock is standing on the shoulders of historical path and I'm standing on those same shoulders. [00:33:48] Crystal Fincher: We're at an interesting time in our country and there certainly is a lot going on. You're coming to this race as a pastor. Your faith has informed how you have walked through life and how you have chosen to serve others in the community. We also see examples of some people who may be opposing you in this race, and some churches that are much more exclusive, that talk much more pointedly about who is and who is not welcome, who is and who is not moral or just or right in our society, allowed in our society. And we're having lots of conversations about what is the appropriate delineation between church and state. As someone whose faith is important to them, who you are walking into this role as a pastor, what role does faith play in how you serve, and I guess, through this candidacy. And what would you say to people who look around at other examples of religious leadership that they don't feel loved or included by - that you, as a pastor, would be the right choice. What would you say to folks who are thinking that? [00:35:17] Pastor Carey Anderson: Well, you've asked a series of questions, actually. I would like to start by saying - we sang a song when I was coming up in California and They'll Know We Are Christians by Our Love. And so my faith is rooted and grounded in love - love for neighbor, and love for self, and love for a community. And so, this is what informs my walk, it informs my talk. I want to be able to stand in the shoes of other people. It's not until you stand in their shoes that you understand their pain, and once you understand their pain, then you can begin to have discussions on how to mitigate the pain, how to address the pain, and how to walk with them through the pain. And so this is what I endeavor to do. The Bible says in the New Testament - we walk by faith and not by sight. So faith is what leads me, every morning, to get up. And it doesn't matter to me if you're Muslim, Jewish, atheist, or whoever you may be. You are a person, you are valued, and you are loved. What is it that we can do to help your walk? What is it that we can do to inform your viability, sustainability for you and your family and your loved ones? That's what we should be about. [00:36:57] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much, Pastor Carey. If people wanna find out more about your campaign or get involved, where can they go to find out more information? [00:37:06] Pastor Carey Anderson: Google me and go to my, our website - Pastor Carey Anderson or Reverend Dr. Carey Anderson. But our campaign website is electpastorcarey.com and you can go there, and we're still getting lots of hits and the phone number is there 253-296-6370. Well, you're welcome to join us, you're welcome to wave with us, you're welcome to walk with us, you're welcome to phonebank, textbank with us, and to follow us as we follow our call and commitment. So, these are simple ways, but it means so much - reaching people one at a time, one neighborhood at a time, one household at a time, one person at a time. And that's what we're about. [00:38:05] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you so much for spending time with us today, Pastor Carey Anderson. Thank you so much - we'll continue to follow you on your journey. [00:38:14] Pastor Carey Anderson: Thank you for having me, Crystal. It has certainly been an honor, and it's certainly been a joy to see the work that you and your team are doing. And I am not going to turn this off. I'm gonna keep you in my heart and I'm gonna keep the work that you do in my soul. So thank you so much. God bless you and God keep you. [00:38:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

    Taste Radio
    Buyers Were Initially Skeptical About His Brand. Now, It's An Anchor For A Fast-Growing Set.

    Taste Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:01


    When Ibraheem Basir launched A Dozen Cousins in 2018, retail buyers questioned the marketability of the brand's first products, a line of premium-positioned cooked beans. Four years later, those buyers are asking a different question: “How do we keep up with consumer demand?” A former marketing executive with General Mills, Basir founded A Dozen Cousins to increase accessibility of better-for-you food within Black and Latino communities via healthy ingredients, authentic seasonings and convenient preparation. Available in varieties such as Mexican Cowboy Pinto Beans and Trini Chickpea Curry, the beans are packaged in microwavable pouches that can be heated in 60 seconds. As A Dozen Cousins expanded distribution, the brand found traction with a broad variety of consumers seeking a quick, flavorful meal or side dish. The company has since added two complementary product lines – bone-broth cooked rice and seasoning sauces for rice and meat dishes – and widened its presence in stores across retail channels, including Whole Foods, Walmart, Trader Joes, Kroger and REI. In an interview featured in this episode, Basir spoke about how the brand's initial focus has evolved, working with co-manufacturing partners to ensure quality standards, why sampling was critical to its development and why keeping a foot in the familiar is a key tenet of its innovation strategy. He also explained why A Dozen Cousins is relatively quiet about raising capital and shared his take on improved opportunities and continuing challenges for BIPOC food entrepreneurs. Show notes: 0:42: Interview: Ibraheem Basir, Founder & CEO, A Dozen Cousins – Basir spoke with Taste Radio editor Ray Latif at NOSH Live Summer 2022 where they discussed their shared experience growing up in large families, alternate names for A Dozen Cousins and how the brand addresses “two different levels” of consumer needs. Basir also spoke about how he prepared for a national launch at Whole Foods while the brand was still in its infancy, the impact of his experience as an employee at a large food conglomerate, what social media taught the company about the unexpected ways consumers used the beans and what moved the needle for retail buyers that were initially skeptical about the brand. Later, he explained why the launch of A Dozen Cousins' rice was about creating something “additive” to the category, why he wants the brand to be “in the middle of the spectrum” when it comes to innovation, the reason the company isn't vocal about funding and why he points to the lack of “insider knowledge” as a hurdle for BIPOC founders. Brands in this episode: A Dozen Cousins, Annie's

    Circulation on the Run
    Circulation on the Run: Come Meet the CardioNerds™

    Circulation on the Run

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 24:12


    This week's special podcast features the CardioNerds. Join Maryjane Farr, Vanessa Blumer, and M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn as they interview Amit Goyal and Daniel Ambinder, who started the Cardio Nerds podcast, website, and learning resources. Dr. Maryjane Farr: Welcome, everybody, to Circulation on the Run. My name is Maryjane Farr from UT Southwestern, and here we have an opportunity to take a week from Circulation on the Run and let our social media editors take over and do an interview of their choice. To welcome both two of our social media editors, first, Vanessa Blumer, who is going to be doing her postgraduate year seven in Cleveland Clinic, in advanced heart failure, and Trey Martin, who is a newly-minted faculty member in heart failure and amyloidosis and population health at the Cleveland Clinic. And they've chosen to interview Dan Ambinder and Amit Goyal of CardioNerds. Dr. M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn: So, thanks to Vanessa and to Dr. Farr for setting this up, and thanks for Amit and Dan for being here. Really excited to talk to you guys. The first thing I want to start off with is to get a little bit of an origin story about CardioNerds. And if you could tell us how you got started and how this all came to be, I think the listeners would be interested to hear that. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: Thank you so much, Trey, and it is really great to be here and nice to meet you. This is Dan. So, the origins of CardioNerds actually began early 2019. One of our mentors put us together, Dr. Reza Manesh, who's one of the co-founders of Clinical Problem Solvers, and thought that we should be thinking about potentially starting a podcast. And that definitely lit the spark and is it going to be something that's worthwhile pursuing? Dr. Daniel Ambinder: And so, we said to ourselves, at rounds we could teach five people at Noon conference, maybe we could reach out to 20 and to 40 people, but maybe with a podcast, we could reach 500 people at a time and that would be something that would be really worthwhile. So let's just sit down, create a script and start from there. And we created the first episode, aortic stenosis, and we did the recording and we just loved that process. And after that, we said, "This is worth it." So we made a couple more episodes- Dr. Amit Goyal: Hey, I'm just going to chime in here real quick. This is Amit. And I'll start off by saying, thank you so much for this invitation and what a joy it is to be doing this with two people who we respect so much, Vanessa and Trey. The process of creating this podcast and education, we learned so much. And it was so much fun that we decided why don't we just give it a shot and trial it by creating maybe three, maybe four episodes and seeing how it goes from there. So that was a backstory. Dr. M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn: I was curious how you guys thought about initially getting traction. Because that, I think, is the really challenging part and how you thought about getting listenership for your podcast and expanding. And was it focusing on the product, obviously? But I was curious how you, because now you have, you guys have this gravitational pull of prominent faculty and trainees that want to work with you, but how did you get there, and what was the strategy in doing that? Dr. Amit Goyal: I'll say that, initially, like Dan said, that we went out with the idea of just giving it a shot, seeing if it fit with our schedules, seeing if we enjoy the process and if there was enough of a need and a desire for this. And so, we said, why don't we create a short number of episodes? And if we could get 500 listeners, that would be the biggest audience that we have individually reached. And before you knew it, the 500 per episode turned into 5,000 per episode. Dr. Amit Goyal: And we realized that, even without actively and very deliberately trying to promote this, there was already a need and a desire for this. There was a niche that we were filling that we hadn't realized. The value of asynchronous medical education for people within or people who are interested in the care of patients with cardiovascular illness. So I think that's one. I think that's one takeaway, that there is value for open access, asynchronous education that is high quality. Dr. Amit Goyal: I think from there, our next big major pivot was well into COVID-19 when ACGME and the bodies decided that we should have virtual recruitment. This is when, enter Dr. Nosheen Reza, who was the chair of ACC FIT section at the time. And she messaged us on Twitter early afternoon, one day, saying, hey, is there maybe a way we could potentially use social media and the growth that cardio nurses has already had up until that point to maybe help connect residents with programs, ACGME accredited cardiology program, to have their fellows present a case, use one of their experts to provide an editorial expert commentary and then had the program director have a message for the applicants. Dr. Amit Goyal: And in discussing the case, the fellows would also talk about the program. And what that did was, I think, internally for us, it helps us realize that this just made it so much, the quality of the content and the breadth of the content, the depth of content just skyrocketed, right? I mean, we had fellows bring us cases of preeclampsia and bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis with pregnancy. I mean, it was just, it was incredible that CardioNerds wasn't just about what we wanted, it was very rapidly turning into a communal entity that other people could take pride of. And so, that became really important to us. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: Yes. And I'll just add, again, as Amit's explained is, it happened sequentially. But it was actually a pivotal moment, right before the CardioNerds case report series was launched, where things were feeling stale. We definitely love to teach, there's no doubt about it, and that is a huge part of this. But there was a certain point where we were teaching and we just felt like there needs to be something more. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much, Dan and Amit. I mean, I think everything that you do, this is Vanessa. I think everything that you guys do, it's so inspiring for, I think, all generations, right? I think it's inspiring for future generations, but I think you guys inspire people at all levels. When you think about CardioNerds, what is your purpose? What drives you? What is your motivation? What do you think is your ultimate, why? Dr. Daniel Ambinder: While we had this passion to educate, that is not necessarily the why. And all of a sudden, as soon as we took off, there was multiple opportunities and multiple things dragging us in different directions. And we immediately sought out our mentor, Dr. Sanjay Desai, who is our program director at the Osler Medical Residency, and he said, "You got to find out your why right away." So, now our why includes to create and disseminate education, promote diversity, equity, inclusion, foster wellness, and humanity in the field of cardiology and in life, and provide mentorship and sponsorship and invigorating a love of cardiovascular medicine and science. Choices were easy. We can just say, "Does this fit the rubric of our mission? Is this an opportunity that we want to pursue? Is this something that's going to enhance this mission?" Dr. Amit Goyal: Putting words to a mission was extremely helpful for us. And actually, part of that conversation we're having at that time was around diversity and inclusion, because that's when Sanjay was saying you have to define what your organization stands for and what is a mission, and who are the people that are going to represent these cardiology fellowship training programs, in the eyes of residents who are thinking about a field in cardiology, and how deliberate we want to be about asking program directors to be cognizant about representing diversity in the fellows that they have representing the programs. And so, around these discussions, that's when Sanjay said, okay, there are a lot of things that you can do with CardioNerds, but before you do that, figure out what is your goal and how every action fits into that goal. Dr. M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn: Thanks, Amit. So, keeping that mission that you described in mind, what do you think is the ultimate goal of CardioNerds? Or, I guess I should say, where do you see CardioNerds being in five to 10 years? I know that's far out and some of the days you're just trying to get through the day you have in front of you. But if you could envision a future and, in the structure or the mission, keeping that in mind, where do you see CardioNerds in five years, let's say? Dr. Amit Goyal: Yeah, thanks, Trey. That is such an important question and a very difficult question to answer. I will say that things have evolved so quickly. And so, I think our one challenge that we talk about that we don't know how to resolve just yet is how to build CardioNerds in a way that's scalable, that outlives us. How do we make CardioNerds go beyond us? And that's Dan and I, but also everyone else within CardioNerds, a generation later. How do you maintain CardioNerds? Dr. Amit Goyal: And I think the logistic part of that is probably not that hard to figure out, right? You need admin support, you need resources, you need to delegate, you need leadership structure, but how do you grow it and have it outlive you in a way that still continues within the ethos of how you started it, within that mission, within the goals that you set it out to? And I think that's really something that we have to figure out, but that's going to be probably a deliberate way of how we grow it and how people grow into a leadership structure within it, how we design the programs. So I think that that part of the growth depends on the actions and the decisions we make today. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: Yeah. I definitely agree with all of that. And just to be brief, I just reiterate, CardioNerds is really for the people and what people want changes. And so, we're always listening and we're getting tons of feedback. And as the network grows, people are coming to us with projects and ideas, and we always try to find people that are just really passionate about what they want to do and give them a space to do it and try to give them as many resources and mentorship and sponsorship as we can, and then get out of the way. And so, that has already been a great recipe for a lot of different outpouchings and outgrowths of CardioNerds that really, again, goes back to the entire mission. And so, it's almost really hard to predict what will happen in five to 10 years, but we are ready and listening and looking to see what we can help the community with and vice versa. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much, Dan. And I mean, these answers have been fascinating, honestly. This interview, in general, has just been so enlightening. Dan, I think you touched on the point of democratizing cardiovascular education, which I think is, or should be, one of the highlights of this interview. Can you maybe touch a little bit more on this? And we talked about the why, can you talk about the how and see how you see this moving forward? Dr. Daniel Ambinder: Yeah. Thanks so much, Vanessa. We agree, democratization of cardiovascular education, what does that even mean? But what we mean by that is that why should somebody, somewhere off in a distant country, not have the ability to take care of their patients in the most topnotch way, because they may not have had the exposure to a particular part of cardiovascular education? Breaking down some of the formal barriers between levels of trainees, so, for example, CardioNerds' journal club really encompasses that. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: Once a month, our CardioNerds Academy, which you haven't talked about, puts on an amazing show. It's really a way where journal club hits Twitter in a traditional format, same process of discussing the article, but in the Twitter format. So it allows for this amazing group of, usually hundreds of people, honestly, to come together and discuss. And what's so amazing is that the scientific community has really gotten on board. So we often have authors of the papers that we're discussing join the actual Twitter club. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: And then we have medical students that are asking questions of the authors and this amazing engagement between multi-levels of education coming together. There are certainly ways that some, I wouldn't say the barriers, there are certain ways that these things can be helpful, like traditional learning and formats like that, but sometimes not. And so, we aim to be constructively destructive in terms of that way. And that's what we've done with democratization of cardiovascular education. Dr. Amit Goyal: If I might just add, then when we think about democratizing cardiovascular education, it's both for the learner, in terms of making high-quality education available and accessible, but also for the educators, right? I had a conversation with a mentee when he was a resident, and he called me and said, "Amit, I want to be an interventional cardiologist, but I also want to be a medical educator. How does that work?". And the fact that he was asking that is, for me, a problem, right? Dr. Amit Goyal: I've had this conversation with Dr. Katie Berlacher, who was also a medical educator, but is a cardiologist. Why does there seem to be strain between becoming a medical educator and becoming a cardiologist, right? That's not there for hospitalist medicine and other fields. So that's part of the reason we really enjoy having all sorts of trainees and faculty come on and teach on the show and be deliberate about how they want to teach on the show. Dr. M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn: Thanks a lot, Amit and Dan. In some ways, it sounds like you guys have been able to democratize another area other than education, which is clinical trials. And I wanted to get your perspective and hear a little bit more about the CardioNerds Clinical Trials Network. It really seems like an amazing program you guys have set up. Dr. Amit Goyal: It all goes back to the mission, but the origins of that is, Dr. Starling, he was a pretty early adopter for CardioNerds. He was a part of our very early heart failure series back in early 2020. And he was such a great supporter and source of encouragement and mentorship for so long. And Trey, I know you understand this, and Vanessa, you too, but he, for one reason or another, he brought up CardioNerds at a meeting about PARAGLIDE-HF. And I think present were Dr. Eugene Braunwald, who's part of the steering committee and Dr. Robert Mentz, who is the lead principal investigator, began recruiting around the time of COVID-19, affecting recruitment for a lot of trials. Lot of challenge there that I think we can all understand at this point. Dr. Amit Goyal: And we said, "Okay, well, not sure. We haven't thought about clinical trials, but why don't we think about it and get back to you?" So then, we said, okay, well, what's the core strength of CardioNerds? It's the people, right? After we did the CNCI recruitment series, hosting fellowship training programs, we realized that that worked out really well, because brilliant fellows from all these different programs came and elevated the education. So we established the Healy Honor Roll, after Dr. Bernadine Healy, of training programs who are part of the honor roll by nominating a FIT ambassador, a fellow and training ambassador, who's interested in education. Dr. Amit Goyal: We said, okay, well, why don't we just extrapolate that to a clinical trial? Instead of fellowship training programs, it would be trial sites that have training programs affiliated with them. Instead of a program director nominating a FIT ambassador for education, it would be the site PI nominating a FIT trialist for recruitment. But how would that fit as part of the mission? Well, with the Healy Honor Roll, with the academy, with everything else, hosting people on the podcast, it's always been, how do we pair content creation with personal and professional development? Dr. Amit Goyal: So, with a clinical trials network, the question was, how do we pair equitable trial enrollment with FIT personal and professional development? How do we meaningfully engage the fellows in the conduct of clinical trials, but also meaningfully help develop their interest in clinical trials and academic careers? How do we equip them with important skills and knowledge in the space? So we created a curriculum that's related to career development and equitable enrollment. And then, also, how do we make sure that they have, and deliberately, they have networking and mentorship as part of this? Dr. Amit Goyal: Since then, after we got all the fellows involved, the impact has been absolutely amazing. Because there are two goals here, right? There's equitable recruitment and there's fellow development. And just by having these meetings, by having the curriculum, the fellows are already engaged. So at the very minimum, half the mission is working out really well. But what about the other half, and that's equitable recruitment. So I will say from the time of the first FIT-recruited patient up until June 2nd, okay? So, that's February 8 to June 2nd, we account for 16% of all trial sites, but 49% of patients enrolled. Dr. Amit Goyal: Of the patients that we have enrolled, 54% are women compared to 47% for the non-CardioNerds sites. And 80% are BIPOC, or Black, Indigenous and people of color populations, compared to 19% for patients not enrolled by CardioNerds fellows. So, the impact there is, I think it's flooring, honestly. It is earth shattering and we are all amazed by it. And part of the question has been, can this be consistent, right? Is this a fluke? But since, when we had 30 patients enrolled, then we had 35 patients enrolled, we had 40 patients enrolled, these numbers had stayed relatively consistent. Dr. Amit Goyal: The question now is why? How is it that we've been so effective in disproportionately recruiting patients who had been historically underrepresented? And that's a very important question that we are really excited to dive deep into the data and try to understand. So our plans with Rob Mentz and the rest of the people who really made this possible is to really look at the numbers in terms of recruitment. Dr. M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn: That's really amazing, guys. And I have to applaud you on the vision to do that, and then to think about how to meet your mission, and then also to meet an unmet need that is... Because clinical trial enrollment, when you go through it, it's always slower than you hope. And this is such a great way to light that, to one, ignite a new generation into how to do clinical trials on the ground floor, but then also to increase the diversity of enrollment is amazing and you guys should be applauded for that. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: I also want to congratulate the both of you. Thank you. You guys are trailblazers and definitely are changing the world for all of us and making it a better place. So, we're so proud of you. We have to wrap up, so maybe just one last question before we go. So, maybe a two-part question, or you can choose to answer one or the other. But what do you guys feel most proud of? And what do you guys think has been the most important lesson that you have learned in the CardioNerds journey so far? Dr. Daniel Ambinder: Thanks, Vanessa. It definitely always helps to emphasize this. We really started this right before COVID. We had no idea COVID-19 would hit. And, really, the whole world was lurched into this virtual space. And there was always the hashtag, in real life? Is this even real life? And there was a sense that maybe it wasn't. And when we went to ACC and we met our people in person, and relationships were, not like they were just starting, but they had been ongoing for years. We really, really felt that this is something so real, and that is the lesson of CardioNerds. The lesson of CardioNerds is that the cardiovascular community is a real cohesive, beautiful community, and there's a lot of CardioNerds out there that embrace their nerdom when it comes to cardiology. Dr. Amit Goyal: I think in terms of what I'm taking away from this journey and what I'm going to keep relying on, the lessons I'm going to keep relying on, are one, is just find something you love and lean in. Right? I mean, when we first started telling people, "Oh, we're going to make a podcast and, hey, by the way, we're going to call the CardioNerds," the reactions we were getting from people, people we deeply respect and look to for advice and for role models, there were a lot of people who said, "Oh, that's great. It's so nice to have a hobby, but what are you going to do during your research block?" Right. That's great. Dr. Amit Goyal: But I think the reason why we've been able to stick with it is because we found something that we genuinely love to do. And so, I think that's really, whatever it is for you, that's really important. I think the second thing that's been extremely important for us is to surround yourself by people who inspire you, who push you, who will advise you, who make you want to be better. And that's people who are senior to you, people who are your peers, people who are junior to you, right? Because you can get as much inspiration from somebody who's 10 years your junior as you can from somebody who's 10 years your senior. Dr. Amit Goyal: I know I've taken a lot of inspiration from Vanessa and Trey and have relied on both of you for advice. I remember Vanessa, I think I had a very, a specific conversation about the clinical trials program when it was just a burgeoning idea way back when. And if number two is to take inspiration, take advice, take mentorship, number three is give. To flip that around and try to just give yourself and make yourself available to as many people around you, because that's how you build a community and that's how you give back and thank the people who give to you. Dr. Maryjane Farr: Okay, great. So, thank you. Thanks all of you. Four contemporaries who are leading the way into the future of cardiovascular medicine, science, and education. So, on behalf of Circulation on the Run, we have been so delighted and honored for you to spend some time with us, have a podcast about the podcasters. But you're not just podcasters, this is a real and amazing and innovative platform, and we are so excited to see where you go next. Any final, last words from Trey and Vanessa or Amit and Dan? Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much to Circulation on the Run and Dr. Farr for this opportunity. Amit, Dan, like always, it's such a pleasure. I learn so much from you every single time that I get the opportunity to interact with the both of you and you are an inspiration to all of us. So thank you so much for this platform. Dr. M. Trejeeve (Tre) Martyn: Thanks to Dr. Farr for Circulation on the Run, for this platform, Amit and Dan for taking the time out of their evening to be here, Vanessa, for joining me in Cleveland. And I would say that you guys, the CardioNerds founders, you're an inspiration that you don't necessarily have to wait to make an impact. Dr. Amit Goyal: Yes. Thank you so much. I don't even know what to say. I'm speechless. I'll say that, for Dan and I, we're still just a couple of nerds. I do my recordings in my attic, Dan's in his home office. I think if you, we're still besides ourselves with disbelief that we are a topic of conversation for a platform like Circulation on the Run. It is absolutely a privilege and an honor for us. And so, I think all I can do is just say thank you so much, and then to Dr. Farr for the invitation to have this conversation for Circulation, and Dr. Hill for giving us this platform. I think this is just such a... Again, we are speechless. Thank you. Thank you so much. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: I'm equally as speechless and this podcast, Circ on the Run, really reminds me of my earlier roots, reaching out of my own institution, because it was a Circ social media team that first gave me a great glimpse at what happens outside of the institution that I had been training at for many, many years. And to see how the sausage is made, in terms of how research is vetted and undergoes a strict peer review, was really amazing. And I had the opportunity of meeting Dr. Hill and also being part of the team as COVID was revving up and Circulation had to... We're getting bombarded with all these COVID-related articles. And there was just a very important understanding that what gets published is going to be really, really important. Dr. Daniel Ambinder: So, watching that from the sidelines, under the mentorship of Dr. Amit Kara, just seeing how that happened, gave me such an important understanding that what you put out into the world, whether you're Circulation or writing a personal tweet or putting something out on CardioNerds is just really important and treat it as if it's something that's going to be there forever. And I learned so much about collaboration and I also learned so much about podcasting, because of Circ on the Run, it was actually the first podcast I was on and I don't like to listen to that very often. So thank you so much. This is such an honor to bring this full circle and come back and join you all. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, please visit ahajournals.org.

    YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show
    EP 1102B - Permission to Come Home: Reclaiming Mental Health as Asian Americans

    YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    "Permission to Come Home" is a crucial resource for the rapidly growing community of Asian Americans, immigrants, and other minorities.  "Permission to Come Home" is a crucial resource for the rapidly growing community of Asian Americans, immigrants, and other minorities and marginalized people to practice mental and emotional self-care. It helps readers to work on their mental health while understanding and honoring the richness of their heritage and embodying a new, complete, and whole identity. This book is meant to be a resource for those seeking to take steps to confront and improve their mental health and wellness, through their unique cultural lens. Author Dr. Jenny Wang offers practical advice, opportunities for readers to apply what they've learned, and, by way of her own story and those of others, readers will find comfort in knowing they are not alone."Permission to Come Home" gives readers of all backgrounds a true sense of agency and empowerment in a world that is constantly trying to tell them how to think and feel.Dr. Jenny Wang is a Taiwanese American clinical psychologist and national speaker on Asian American mental health and racial trauma in Asian American, BIPOC, and immigrant communities. Her work focuses on the intersection of Asian American identity, mental health, and social justice.

    RadioMD (All Shows)
    EP 1102B - Permission to Come Home: Reclaiming Mental Health as Asian Americans

    RadioMD (All Shows)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    "Permission to Come Home" is a crucial resource for the rapidly growing community of Asian Americans, immigrants, and other minorities.  "Permission to Come Home" is a crucial resource for the rapidly growing community of Asian Americans, immigrants, and other minorities and marginalized people to practice mental and emotional self-care. It helps readers to work on their mental health while understanding and honoring the richness of their heritage and embodying a new, complete, and whole identity. This book is meant to be a resource for those seeking to take steps to confront and improve their mental health and wellness, through their unique cultural lens. Author Dr. Jenny Wang offers practical advice, opportunities for readers to apply what they've learned, and, by way of her own story and those of others, readers will find comfort in knowing they are not alone."Permission to Come Home" gives readers of all backgrounds a true sense of agency and empowerment in a world that is constantly trying to tell them how to think and feel.Dr. Jenny Wang is a Taiwanese American clinical psychologist and national speaker on Asian American mental health and racial trauma in Asian American, BIPOC, and immigrant communities. Her work focuses on the intersection of Asian American identity, mental health, and social justice.

    Buffalo, What’s Next?
    Buffalo, What's Next: Extremism and Examining Health Equity

    Buffalo, What’s Next?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:59


    WBFO's Tom Dinki synthesizes his four-part series on extremism in WNY with news director, Dave Debo. Kelly Marie Wofford, Director of Health Equity in Erie County talks with Brigid Jaipaul-Valenza about health outcomes and the challenges BIPOC communities face.

    The Morning Beat With AJ and Mikalah

    We are back from our hiatus! AJ is a married man and he is still on vacation, so we are join our pop culture correspondent Shar Jossell.  We discuss what happens now that Roe. vs. Wade di get overturned, is the community next? Also, what exactly is gay stuff? This boyfriend is not happy with his partner!  Special guests: Paula Canny - Attorney. Dr. Alfiee Breland-Noble, mental health correspondent, and founder of AAKOMA Project, a BIPOC mental health organization.

    Femme Lead
    S04 E07 Ramaa Mosley, Film Director & Founder at Adolescent Content. Gen Z & the new generation of content creators.

    Femme Lead

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 36:20


    Director | Career Path | Media Industry | Gen z | Adolescent Content | Advertising Agency | Promoting Talent | Entrepreneur | Diversity & Inclusion | Content Creators | New Generation | Ramaa Mosley is a commercial director, filmmaker, and advocate. Ramaa came across her passion for content creation and advertising at the young age of five when she directed her first documentary, screened at the United Nations, by the time she was 15. Not long after that, she began directing commercials and music videos and now has hundreds of commercials, feature films, and numerous documentaries under her belt. Today you'll find Ramaa as the founder of Adolescent Content, a Black - and female-founded Gen Z media company with an advertising agency, content studio, digital platform, app, and global network of over 4,000 GenZ, Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) and LGBTQ+ creators in 20 countries. She found her inspiration beyond the agency, not only because of her extensive experience but also because she wanted to bridge the gap between agencies and Gen Z creators by starting an agency to help support them to thrive in creating branded content they care about. In this interview, we discuss a filmmaker's career path in the creative realm, entrepreneurship lessons, and how Ramaa plans to inspire the new generation of leaders to be more inclusive through her work.Follow Ramaa on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ramaa-mosley-02a73211b/ Follow Ramaa on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ramaamosley/ Check out Adolescent Content: https://adolescentcontent.com/ Episode timeline: 02:15 What is Adolescent Content and how did you decide to start the business?05:10 What are some key differences when you look at the consumer behavior of GenZ? 07:50 How should we promote more women & people of color in the audio-visual space? 13:00 What feedback do you receive from Adolescent Content clients? Tell us more about the impact GenZ creators have?16:47 What traits do you see in an entrepreneur to succeed in the media industry?20:25 When it comes to difficult moments, how do you handle situations when things don't work your way? 25:10 You started your career as a director: What inspired you to pursue this career path?31:10 How do you see the field changes since you started your career? 33:07 Final 5 Fire Questions.

    The Laura Flanders Show
    Militarization and Uvalde: the Context Media Coverage Omits

    The Laura Flanders Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:20


    Whether it's Buffalo, NY, Uvalde, TX or Philadelphia, PA — we are witnessing an unprecedented wave of terror at the muzzle of a gun. But all mass shootings are not covered in the same way. What determines the nature of the coverage? And what is the media getting wrong — or right — on gun violence reporting? In this episode, Laura Flanders welcomes back Mitra Kalita and Sara Lomax-Reese of URL Media, a network of independently owned and operated Black and Brown media outlets, for this month's “Meet the BIPOC Press.” Our returning guest Michelle García is a Texas-based journalist whose searing reporting in the aftermath of the Uvalde shooting honed in on the structures of militarization that devalue the lives of local residents.“I'm not here to humanize anybody. I'm here to understand what forces are dehumanizing people and to look that in the face.” - Michelle García“When you are surrounded by people, the adults, the politicians describing your home as a war zone, as unlivable and peddling images of violence —  does it not potentially normalize violence itself?” - Michelle GarcíaGuests:Michelle García, Journalist & AuthorS. Mitra Kalita (Co-Host), Co-Founder, URL MediaSara Lomax-Reese (Co-Host), Co-Founder, URL Media We are listener & viewer sponsored. Full episode notes including related articles and LFShow episodes to watch and/or listen to are posted at https://Patreon.com/theLFShow. Patreon Members receive access to the FULL UNCUT CONVERSATION. The show airs on 300+ Public Television households across the U.S., on over 40 community radio stations and as a podcast.

    Heaving Bosoms: A Romance Novel Podcast
    Ep. 246 - Fire Island Part 1 (Movie!)

    Heaving Bosoms: A Romance Novel Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 76:38


    Hey everyone! https://www.instagram.com/hollyenchanted/ (Holly), https://sarawhitney.com/ (Sara), https://www.instagram.com/justasknat/ (Nat), and https://www.instagram.com/melodycarlisle2.0/ (Mel )are here to recap Fire Island on Hulu. And we loved it so much that it's gonna be two parts! This is the best adaptation of Pride and Prejudice ever (fight me). Bonus Content: Nat's cheese pocket forever, Margaret Cho is here!, Quibi inside jokes, middle school attempts at flirting, rich people cheese, rewriting misogyny in daycare, how to prep for guests, and being hot enough to be that annoying!! Donate to an abortion fund https://abortionfunds.org/funds/ (here)! And read https://prismreports.org/2021/12/15/we-dont-need-an-abortion-underground-railroad-black-and-brown-people-already-lead-the-most-powerful-abortion-fund-network-in-the-country/ (this piece) by Jessica Pickney about BIPOC activists paving the way in this arena as well. Make sure to check out Mel's new podcast https://bonkers-romance.captivate.fm/listen (Bonkers Romance)!  Subscribe! Rate! Review! Tell all your friends :) Get more content on https://www.patreon.com/heavingbosomspodcast (PATREON!!) Sign up for our https://www.heavingbosoms.com/ (Newsletter)!  MERCH! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/heaving-bosoms-podcast?ref_id=13852 (Teepublic), https://chicalookate.myshopify.com/collections/heaving-bosom (Chicaloo Kate), https://www.redbubble.com/people/heavingbosoms/shop?asc=u (Redbubble) Make your life better and https://justasknat.com/ (hire Natalie) to assist you!!! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heavingbosoms/ (@heavingbosoms) Twitter: https://twitter.com/Heaving_Bosoms (@heaving_bosom)s Mentioned in this episode: Listen to Storybound! Storybound is a radio theater program designed for the podcast age. In each episode, listeners will be treated to their favorite authors and writers reading some of their most impactful stories, designed with powerful and immersive sound environments. Brought to you by Lit Hub Radio and The Podglomerate. https://heaving-bosoms.captivate.fm/storybound (Storybound)