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Best podcasts about Hud

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Latest podcast episodes about Hud

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
HUD Approves Demolishing Public Housing Near Norlite

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:48


The federal HUD has given the Cohoes Housing Authority to sell the Saratoga Sites housing complex next to the Norlite hazardous waste incinerator to the City so they can move everyone out and demolish it. This is one of the first such actions by HUD in the country. Joe Ritchie of Lights Out Norlite provides an update. With Mark Dunlea for Hudson Mohawk Magazine.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2900 - Can Anything Be Done About Housing In America? w/ Rachel Cohen & Jessica Preheim

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 69:48


Sam and Emma host Rachel Cohen, senior policy reporter at Vox, to discuss her recent piece "How state governments are reimagining American public housing". Then, they are joined by Jessica Preheim, Vice President of Strategic Planning and Public Affairs at the Houston Coalition for the Homeless to discuss housing policy in the city.  First, Emma runs through yesterday's primaries before diving right into updates from the FBI's January 6th investigations, from the seizing of Scott Perry's phone to the GOP's responses to the Mar-a-Lago raid that vary from “they planted it!” to “they're making it up!” but all seem to recognize an “it” that will be exposed. Then, she's joined by Rachel Cohen as they dive into the state of public housing in the US, with rents reaching record highs and not coming down anytime soon, despite dropping inflation levels. Next, they step back and walk through the history of public housing in the US, with the Federal Government first becoming involved in the lead-up to the New Deal, even with private interests' successful lobbying for limitations and, all continuing through the fifties and up to the creation of HUD, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, in the ‘60s, helping to regulate the federal policies around the matter – seeing a complete cutoff of investment in public housing alongside a subsidizing of white middle-class families moving to the suburbs. Wrapping up the history of US housing policy, they walk through the post-HUD neoliberal era, with the crime panic starting in the 1980s seeing a complete decimation of HUD's budget, and leading into an era void of housing infrastructure. Next, Rachel looks to states like Massachusetts to explore how it seems to be local politics that is actually looking to intervene in this crisis, putting forwards policy that isn't just subsidies for privatized housing, and actually seeks to reinvest in community care and infrastructure, before they wrap up by exploring the future of a reimagined housing system that stems from the states and local communities themselves. Then, Jessica Preheim from the Houston Coalition for the Homeless walks Emma through the incredibly remarkable work that the organization has done over the last decade in Houston, with homelessness decreasing by over 60% despite having the sixth largest homeless population as of 2011 and a crackdown from HUD. They explore how much the most marginalized in society can be helped by just having a roof over their head, the Houston Coalition's tactics to strengthen communities' ability to shelter their citizens (and the importance of supporting encampments' existence when there is no other option) and their emphasis on chronic homelessness. And in the Fun Half: Emma takes a call from St. Paul on a public reserve, based on grain? Tulsi Gabbard teams up with Jesse Watters as she continues her streak of fascist apologia, this time in defense of Donald Trump and tax evaders everywhere, Stephanie from Minneapolis dives into the “manosphere” as a meeting point of the Jordan Peterson “intellectual” misogyny and the more traditional masculine aesthetics, looking at how race plays a particularly central role in the community's pathologizing. They also cover Ilhan Omar's incredibly narrow victory in the Democratic primary, AIPAC's massive influence in pushing conservative Democrats into Congress, Fox and Friends ponders the FBI's ethics for the very first time, and Nathaniel from Fresno dives deep into the re-emergence of book banning. Charlie Kirk calls for retributive raids, plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Rachel's piece here: https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/23278643/affordable-public-housing-inflation-renters-home Check out the Houston Coalition for the Homeless here: https://www.homelesshouston.org/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Smart Poker Study Podcast
Use These HUD Stats When Facing 3bets BEFORE Calling #403

Smart Poker Study Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 12:45


Visit the show notes page for a transcript of today's episode: https://www.smartpokerstudy.com/pod403 The Smart HUD for PokerTracker 4  https://www.smartpokerstudy.com/SmartHUD The Poker Forge  https://www.thepokerforge.com Daily Poker Tips Podcast  https://www.smartpokerstudy.com/podcast-2/daily-poker-tips-podcast/ Books on Amazon  https://www.smartpokerstudy.com/AmazonBooks

Heroes of Healthcare
Providing Affordable Care With Population Health Outreach

Heroes of Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 54:44


How do you provide healthcare to someone who can't afford it, is unable to travel, or lacks any trust in health practitioners? From mental health to discrimination, COVID-19 exposed the flaws and disparities that exist in healthcare, leaving many to look for solutions to these problems. In today's episode, Dr. Alexander Salerno, Physician at Salerno Medical Associates LLP, gives a glimpse into his early career in medicine and the selfless ways he and his team are improving the health of urban communities through population health outreach programs and affordable healthcare. Join us as we discuss: Community focused health programs Providing care in HUD housing. The disparities in healthcare  To hear this interview and more like it, follow Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Heroes of Healthcare in your favorite podcast player.

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth
DGS 180: Allowing Pets vs. Not Allowing Pets In Property Management With Logan Miller Of OurPetPolicy

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 22:28


As a property manager, do your clients and owners allow pets? Do you encourage them to? There is an opportunity to create an additional stream of revenue and avoid fraudulent ESA letters by doing something so many owners are afraid of… allowing pets.  This week, property management growth expert, Jason Hull is joined by Logan Miller of OurPetPolicy to discuss the ins and outs of animals in rental properties and why allowing pets can actually be more beneficial for owners and tenants alike. You'll Learn… [01:31] OurPetPolicy's Mission and Why they Started [04:00] The Big Issues with Not Allowing Pets in Rental Properties [08:06] Reducing Fraudulent ESAs and Creating Better Tenants with Screening [11:46] Keeping Track of Pet Problems with Mapping [14:53] The Financial Gain for Property Managers [17:02] Creating Effective Pet Policies and Rules Tweetables “It doesn't seem to make a lot of sense if you're gonna cut out two-thirds of the potential client base in one fell swoop by not allowing pets. You're not gonna be able to get as many qualified candidates probably for that property now.” “When, you know, there's less of a pool of tenants and a little sparse,  it could take an extra month on average to find that right tenant, you know, if you're not allowing pets and that feeds back into the return on investment for the owner.” “Either you allow pets or they will just bring pets or animals into the property and hide it from you-- is a very common scenario-- and most people would rather be honest.” “It's just another revenue stream that property managers can add is to make sure that they're tacking on pets and people are very willing to pay pet rent or to pay additional fees for a pet.” Resources DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind DoorGrow Academy DoorGrow on YouTube DoorGrowClub DoorGrowLive TalkRoute Referral Link Transcript [00:00:00] There was a property manager who had like over a thousand doors, and he said, "My best secret is I'm really good at convincing owners to allow pets." All right. We are live. Welcome DoorGrow Hackers to the #DoorGrowShow. If you are a property management entrepreneur that wants to add doors, make a difference, increase revenue, help others impact lives, and you are interested in growing in business and in life, and you're open to doing things a bit differently, then you are a DoorGrow Hacker. DoorGrow Hackers love the opportunities, daily variety, unique challenges, and freedom that property management brings. Many in real estate think you're crazy for doing it. You think they're crazy for not because you realize that property management is the ultimate, high trust gateway to real estate deals, relationships, and residual income.    [00:00:46] At DoorGrow, we are on a mission to transform property management business owners and their businesses. We want to transform the industry, eliminate the BS, build awareness, change perception, expand the market and help the best property management entrepreneurs win. I'm your host property management growth expert, Jason Hull, the founder and CEO of DoorGrow. Now, let's get into the show.    [00:01:07] So today ,my guest is Logan Miller of OurPetPolicy, which you can check out at ourpetpolicy.com. Logan, welcome to the show.    [00:01:17] Hi, thanks Jason. Thanks for having me. Excited to be here.    [00:01:21] Cool. So Logan, give us a little bit of background on you as an entrepreneur and your journey into how you kind of got to the point where you decided to start something called OurPetPolicy.   [00:01:31] Yeah. Yeah, so it all started, um, back when I was 23, I purchased my first house and it was a duplex and rented it out and became my own property manager of that. And even rented to college couples, and I was surprised at how many of them being, you know, kind of poor college couples, had pets. And a lot of 'em, you know, would say it was an emotional support animal, and because I lived on the property, I didn't have to accept those. And so, they'd end up paying a $300 pet fee to have it. And typically they're, you know, six or 12 months. And it surprised me that they were willing to pay that, but they did. And eventually between me and family members, grew our portfolio and yeah. Actually just before COVID, you know, we had a no pet's policy on those properties as well, and it surprised me how many ESAs we had-- emotional support animals that we had.    [00:02:19] And we got to a point to where, you know, we really looked into it and there were over three fourths of our rentals-- it all had a no pet's policy-- had animals in them and it's like, man, there's gotta be a better way to verify these emotional support animal letters, and so we talked with other property managers, most of them, you know, just accepting the ESA letters. We found online there was lots of websites that sell these letters and we went and got the letters ourselves and surprised at how easy you can get 'em. Just check a box: "I sometimes feel stressed" and they say, congratulations, you qualify for an ESA letter signed by a licensed health professional. And so we, you know, worked with some lawyers and said, "Hey, there's gotta be a good way that we can shut these down, you know, as they're not legitimate" and figured that out and I was like, "Hey, I'll bet other property managers would like this as well," and so just started a business.    [00:03:08] Okay, so our topic today is allowing pets versus not allowing pets. So why don't we chat a little bit about that, and then we can talk a little bit about how you sort of helped solve this problem. But, I remember being at a conference and there was a property manager who had like over a thousand doors, and I asked him what, you know, maybe his secret is, right? If he has one. And he said my best secret-- and I think he was a property manager in Hawaii-- and he said, "My best secret is I'm really good at convincing owners to allow pets." And I said, "Really?" And he's like, "Yeah, I'm good at convincing them to allow pets because usually children cause more damage than pets do."   [00:03:47] And he said, "So I'm able to talk people into allowing pets, which allows us to rent out more property, more easily at a higher price point and just facilitate things. So that was kind of like his big secret that he wanted to share with me. So, what have you noticed about allowing pets versus not allowing pets? So let's chat about that.   [00:04:06] Yeah. Yeah, no, I a hundred percent agree. If you look at the statistics out there, they say between, you know, two thirds and even as high as 90% of renters have a pet-- or if you're being technically correct-- have an animal because you know, assistance animals aren't considered pets, right? So, over three forces of the renters are gonna have an animal, and you know, I think a lot of times owners are hesitant to allow those animals, you know, on their properties as they've seen, you know, worst case scenarios. But the reality is, looking at the tenant pool, so many of the tenants have animals that if you want a quick turnaround and be able to, you know, charge-- like you said-- a higher monthly fee, you know, you have to accommodate that.    [00:04:50] Yeah, it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense if you're gonna cut out two thirds of the potential client base in one fell swoop by not allowing pets. You're not gonna be able to get as many qualified candidates probably for that property now, but a lot of owners are really afraid of pets. They might not be somebody that has pets or maybe they're just a really terrible pet owner, and they've seen the damage they've allowed their pets to make, maybe. I don't know, but they're afraid or have this fear that: 'if I allow pets in this property, it's gonna be absolutely destroyed.' They're imagining worst case scenarios, cat lady house, full of cat urine, or, you know, dogs with some sort of razor claws like shredding everything and chewing up everything. Right. So with your clients in the past, how did you persuade them to like, let go of that fear or to help mitigate that risk?    [00:05:45] Yeah. And we see this with property managers that we work with. They've, you know, for 20 years have had a no pet's policy but will still have animal issues, you know, as they're getting lots of assistance animals, emotional support animals, service animals, and see that, 'Hey. We're really fighting against this and what, if we move to allowing pets, you know. More than half of them have animals in them already,' and so we go through and, and show 'em, "Hey, you know, first of all, you wanna have really good, specific animal rules and we can talk about those later, but you wanna make sure that those expectation levels are set high so that the tenants know what they're expected to do and to help mitigate that damage potential.   [00:06:28] And then we'll, you know, show 'em the return on investment that they see for allowing animals, which part of it could be renting out faster. Lately, with the rentals, especially around here in Idaho and where, you know, we're helping at, there's a large tenant pool and a lot of applications, and so they haven't seen that here in the past year or so. But when, you know, there's less of a pool of tenants and a little sparse, it could take an extra month on average to find that right tenant, you know, if you're not allowing pets and that feeds back into the return on investment for the owner.   [00:07:02] Yeah. Something else that has come up on some of our group coaching calls in relation to pets is that, you know, either you allow pets or they will just bring pets or animals into the property and hide it from you-- is a very common scenario-- and most people would rather be honest, but they're not gonna give up, you know, having a good place in a lot of situations just because of a pet, right? And they're not gonna get rid of their animal or their pets. And so, what ends up happening is they just hide them, and if they're hiding it. Maybe you won't even see the damage. Maybe there's no damage. Maybe they're able to hide everything really well, but also you're not able to charge pet rent. You're not able to make more fees. You're not able to maybe get some sort of additional deposit or whatever you might do to kind of maximize your fee structure and to reduce risk for the owner and the animals are still in the property. All right. So let's talk a little bit about OurPetPolicy. So what problem does this really solve? I'm curious.    [00:08:06] Yeah. And so like I mentioned earlier that first part where we started off with is, you know, those emotional support animal requests, right? And we see especially with, you know, the younger generation coming and renting, and they're used to finding all their information online and there's so many blogs and posts about emotional support animals, all these websites that are selling these letters, you know, have blogs, YouTube videos and say, "Hey, why pay pet rent?" "If you have a no pet's policy, you know, see if you qualify for an ESA letter and 95% of people do." And so it's really so easy to go get an ESA letter that they're coming in without the pet policy. So we solve that issue and we're able to flag those letters and say, "Hey, you know, would you like to turn it into a pet and pay that pet deposit" or, you know, for the owners that are like, "Hey, I absolutely don't want animals in my property." we help keep their pet policy and go that route, but we do see a lot more and more switching from a no pet policy the pet's allowed.    [00:09:08] And so that's kind of the one, the initial pain point we're solving. But the other thing too is, you know, as tenants come in, a lot of times the damage that their animals cause is because they're naive to their damage potential of a dog or of a cat and they don't know those best practices, and so our goal is to help educate those tenants, and so we have, what's called 'pet curriculum' for those tenants. So it goes through, they're getting a dog, maybe it's for the first time, maybe they've had a dog forever, but they'll go through this interactive training course that says, "Hey, here's the best practices for having a dog," and the common ways that they do cause damage and how to prevent it. And so our goal is to, you know, educate the tenants and make sure that they are responsible animal owners, and I think that, you know, for the owners makes them feel a lot better about having an animal on the property.    [00:09:56] But then it's good for the tenants too, because less damage to the rental is good for the tenant. It's good for the property manager, and it's good for the owner. So that's another way that we're--   [00:10:05] Probably good for the pet.    [00:10:07] So, we've had petscreening.com on our show before, and so I know lots of people listening have probably been using them or have used them before. So how does that compare? What's interesting to me that stood out is you have training material and education, which I don't know if they have that. But that's an interesting take is to also just level up the quality of the tenants in relation to pet care or taking care of their pets or the animals. I don't know if you've done some competitive research. I don't know if these two tools might be complimentary or if they're competitive. So maybe you can just touch on that real quick.    [00:10:40] Yeah. They've been around for a lot longer than we have. We've been out for about two years now, and they started in 2017. And really, you know, in January, 2020, HUD came out with, you know, new guidelines around emotional support animals and those online website letters. That was kind of really our pain point that we were seeing, and so we really took off after that to start with, and then, you know, we were like, "Hey, you know, there's a lot of other issues we'd like to solve with software, our goal is to help manage those pets, you know, from a to Z. So not just the screening side of it, you know, when they're applying, but we wanna have a relationship with those tenants all the way through with the property managers. We do a lot of consulting with the property management companies on best practices and what we're seeing as far as data.   [00:11:25] And like you said, the pet curriculum, we have a pet mapping tool to easily identify the animals. And so, rather than just being on the initial screening side, you know, we try to have a complete a to z pet management system. And so there's a little similarities between us, but in the end, a completely different business model and things that we're doing.   [00:11:46] Got it. So you do do some screening of the pets for prospective tenants and prospective, you know, animals in the properties. What is the mapping tool?    [00:11:59] Yeah. So it makes it real easy to identify the animals that are on the property, and so like in multi-family housing, you get a tenant, take a picture of an animal, send it in, you know, and that's part of our tool as well. The tenants can send in complaints on other tenants in the multifamily housing and it says, you know, "Hey, this dog was digging up the landscaping," or, "Hey, they didn't, you know, clean up after their dog. Here's a picture," and then you can, you know, search that dog real quick, put in the color of the dog, the breed of the dog, whatever, go through all the pictures of, let's say it's a black and white dog. It'll show you all the pictures of the black and white dogs, and you're like, "Oh, they belong in this unit. It's this tenant." And you can attach that complaint right to them, so it makes it quick that way.    [00:12:40] If it's single family housing, what's really nice about it is you can share that with the owners as well. And so if you've got an owner that, you know, maybe that was their house they raised their kids in, you know, they're renting it. They drive by, they keep an eye on it. Instead of them calling you saying, "Hey, I saw an animal in the window. Is it supposed to be there? Is it not supposed to be there?" Going back and forth, you know, they can have access to that, to the pet mapping app and they can look on there and see if that animal's supposed to be in there. If it's not, they can take a picture, submit it directly from there. And so what we're trying to do is, you know, cut down on, on the time spent needed for property managers to do that detective work and figure that out, so.    [00:13:15] That's clever. So if there's an owner that's like going to the property all the time, they probably should just be fired as client, but... all right. So that, that's really interesting. So the mapping tools probably could have been called the snitching tool, which is totally interesting. So I think that's cool. So you're able to map or connect the pet problems to a particular situation or like a particular unit. And now this doesn't expose-- allow neighbors to figure out which neighbor they are or where they're at or anything like that. It just allows the property manager to an identify who has the problem pet.   [00:13:51] Yep, exactly.    [00:13:53] Okay. Cool. Right. We don't want vigilante tenants taking action against a unit.   [00:14:01] Right. Yeah. Right.    [00:14:02] Okay, cool. So yeah, no, this sounds really interesting, and so do you have a background in technology? How did you decide, like, "I want to do this software stuff."   [00:14:11] Yeah, so actually my brother that is the co-founder and he's had a lot technology, you know, startup-- software based startups and businesses and exits. And so he had the software team already built out, and so he's the co-founder with me. So I pitched the idea and and he's like, "Hey, this should be, you know, easy to do. And there's a large market out there and let's go for it."   [00:14:35] Cool. So, can you tell us anything about, roughly about how this works financially, like pricing? Like, does this generally make property managers more money? Is this off set? Like, is this hard for you to sell? Is this easy to sell? Like tell us a little bit about that. I'm sure people listening are curious, so.    [00:14:53] Yeah. Yeah. So our basic fee, like a software fee is 75 cents per door per month. And we go back and show the return on investment with that. And obviously if it's a no pet's allowed policy, you know, it's harder to show that return on investment. But, when the owner looks at it and says, "Hey, it kept this many animals outta my property that I didn't want in there," you know, "Hey, that's well worth it," and especially the education aspect of it, you know, if they are gonna have animals in the property, making sure there is less damage, you know, is gonna turn into that as well. And one thing I also thought'd be good on here talking about allowing pets versus not allowing pets: one of the common discussions we get in with property managers is, you know, what do you charge for a pet deposit? What do you charge for a pet fee? What do you charge for monthly pet rent? And anyways, that's kinda where we go back to that return on investment as well. You know, as we're turning these fraudulent requests into pets paying pet rent is-- you know, if they do charge a pet rent, pet fee, pet deposit, that's where the return on investment, you know, Is huge.    [00:15:58] Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Yeah, it's just another revenue stream that property managers can add is to make sure that they're tacking on pets and people are very willing to pay pet rent or to pay additional fees for a pet. They would expect to, right? They just expect to. If they don't, they're like cool, but you know, they're willing to do it, so. I generally haven't heard people mention challenges or pushback from residents on having to do anything for each individual pet. So, yeah, and if you don't do it, I really think people are just gonna sneak 'em in anyway. They're just gonna do it. So I think there's a serious advantage for people being able to be skilled. So maybe something you wanna add in the future is since you already have the educational platform is you have some sort of video or educational material to sell property managers on the benefits of opening up that pet policy to allow pets and animals in the properties and something they could give to owners to convince them like, "Hey, this is a better way to go because if you don't, this is what generally happens and this is a better way to go and there could be more money involved."    [00:17:02] Yeah, and that's part of what we do, you know, helping 'em go from a no pets policy to allowing pets is we give the property managers all of that data and we go through and build out a custom animal addendum with them to show 'em, "Hey, here's what, you know, the tenants are gonna be required to do the rules that they need to follow and I think all property managers should have that, you know, in their animal addendum and have every tenant go through and read through those and sign it. And one common thing we see that's a problem with property managers is they'll have, you know, pet rules in there and those pet rules don't apply to assistance animals. And so assistance animals, you know, if it's not in there as an animal rule, it's called a 'pet rule,' then it doesn't apply to them. So make sure that all the rules that should be followed, whether it's an assistance animal, you know, or a pet, are listed out as animal rules.   [00:17:54] So, and you will help them put an effective pet policy in place that mentions animals.   [00:18:02] Correct. Yep. So we'll have, you know, there's a pet section that talks about the pet fees, you know, pet deposits and all that, and then pet restrictions, a lot of times, you know, dangerous breeds. There's a lot of, you know, maximum weight limits and et cetera, but then there's a whole nother section that's called 'animal rules' that all animals are expected to abide by.   [00:18:21] All right. So I'm looking at the FAQ on one of your sites here. So what are some of the questions that people typically have? This seems like a big one: do you have pet policies for every state that are applicable?    [00:18:32] Yeah. And so we're moving across the country, so we're available to be in every state, and we work with lawyers in every state, you know, as we go into 'em. So far we're in 20 states across the country, and it typically takes us just a couple of weeks to add another state, you know? And like you said, we go in there. We have the specific rules in there cause it's state by state, they'll have rules saying, "Hey, if you represent in an assistance animal fraudulently, you know, there's a fine for that, and we make sure and put that, you know, in the pet policy as well.   [00:19:04] Okay.    [00:19:05] And go through state by state, make sure we found some specifically cities or counties that have specific rules around not being able to charge pet fees and et cetera. And so we work with lawyers in each state to make sure that we're abiding by all those rules.   [00:19:22] So basically you're leveraging the rules and laws that are in each state. You're able to make the policy sound as scary as possible and leverage the rules and penalties that are possible or applicable.    [00:19:38] Yeah. We want to, you know, educate the tenant as well. Right. That, "Hey, there are laws against this."   [00:19:44] Yeah.   [00:19:44] And you know, you wanna be-- they should be honest, but then also know, "Hey, if you, aren't honest, you know, here's the possibilities of recourse, so basically another educational part of it.    [00:19:55] Right. So if they're gonna take the risk to be fraudulent or do the wrong things, they're more educated on that risk. So, okay, cool. Well, I think this sounds really interesting. I'm sure you'll get some people reaching out after they hear this episode. How can they find you? How can they reach out if they're a property manager that's interested in hearing more?    [00:20:16] Yeah. So our phone number's on our website, obviously, you can always call us. We'd love to talk to you. Send us an email to info@ourpetpolicy.com. We go to a lot of the state trade shows. We were just at Apartmentalize, so national shows. And so, yeah, we're getting out there, but feel free to just reach out to us at any time as well.    [00:20:37] So it's 'our,' O-U-R petpolicy.com.   [00:20:43] Yep. Yeah, ourpetpolicy.com.    [00:20:45] Perfect. All right, cool. So I recommend you check them out. Sounds interesting. I'll push maybe some clients your way and see what they think. And I appreciate you coming out and hanging out here on the #DoorGrowShow.    [00:20:57] Hey, thanks for the invite, Jason, I've enjoyed being here.   [00:21:00] Awesome. Anyway, Logan, appreciate you coming on the show. So check out ourpetpolicy.com and if you are looking for the best in growing and acquiring more doors and growing your business, check us out at doorgrow.com. We've got some really cool stuff that's coming down the pipeline that we are going to be doing for our clients. And we're really excited about this. So stay tuned. And until next time, to our mutual growth. Bye, everyone.   [00:21:24] You just listened to the #DoorGrowShow. We are building a community of the savviest property management entrepreneurs on the planet in the DoorGrowClub. Join your fellow DoorGrow Hackers at doorgrowclub.com. Listen, everyone is doing the same stuff. SEO, PPC, pay-per-lead content, social direct mail, and they still struggle to grow!    [00:21:51] At DoorGrow, we solve your biggest challenge: getting deals and growing your business. Find out more at doorgrow.com. Find any show notes or links from today's episode on our blog doorgrow.com, and to get notified of future events and news subscribe to our newsletter at doorgrow.com/subscribe. Until next time, take what you learn and start DoorGrow Hacking your business and your life.

Fly Brothers
Session 38

Fly Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 61:57


In this session, B reviews waters north of Truckee, while Hud shares kayak and surf trips to the salt. Fly Brothers are a pair of fly bum brothers out west, who enjoy exploring new water, a variety of flies , a variety of fish, and sharing good times. Tune in to see where they've been, what they've been researching, and what's next on their agenda to explore. Good drifts and stay tight to the fly friends. Check out old and new episodes. 

Trochu inak s Adelou
Tomáš Hudák

Trochu inak s Adelou

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 27:11


Tomáš Hudák je multitalent. Definitívne som to zistila pri príprave na náš spoločný rozhovor. Ak ho poznáte len ako stand up komika, tak vedzte, že jeho záber je oveľa širší. Nie všetko sa do nášho rozhovoru zmestilo, ale robili sme maximum. A aby sme to všetko stihli, tak Tomáš krotil aj svoje zajakávanie. Aj o tom sme sa bavili. Na záver vás čaká mimoriadne vydarený stand up, ktorý si, verím, predstavíte aj bez vizuálnej prílohy. Zatiaľ vám stačí si predstaviť, ako s Tomášom Hudákom sedíme v žltých kreslách na javisku štúdia L plus S.

ChangeMakers with Katie Goar
Episode 54 | Part Two: Hunter Kurtz, Co-Founding Partner, Gate House Strategies

ChangeMakers with Katie Goar

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 20:46


Katie wraps up her conversation with ChangeMaker, Hunter Kurtz, one of the founding partners of Washington, DC area-based advisory firm, Gate House Strategies. Over the course of his career in affordable housing, Hunter has held several positions at HUD and is a leading expert in both Public Housing and Community Development programs.

Linux User Space
Episode 3:02: The Utopic Tale of Ubuntu

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 111:30


Coming up in this episode 1. The origins of the shirts 2. Ubuntu's history 3. And some thoughts on 22.04 Video version https://youtu.be/PCM-h_0Rqbc Support us on Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace)! Audio Timestamps 0:00 Cold Open 1:30 The Origin of the Shirts 6:43 Lubuntu's in the Backporting Biz 9:45 Ubuntu's History 11:30 2004 17:01 2005 20:11 2006 24:01 2007 29:55 2008 36:39 2009 40:16 2010 47:52 2011 55:05 2012 1:02:35 2013 1:10:03 2014 1:15:00 2015 1:20:19 2016 1:25:26 2017 1:28:49 2018 1:31:17 2019 1:33:49 2020 1:35:55 2021 1:37:19 2022 1:39:43 A Couple Thoughts on Ubuntu 1:48:13 A New Distro, and a Thanks! 1:50:26 Stinger Banter Dan's Shirt (https://southeastlinuxfest.org) Leo's Shirt (https://ubuntu.com/blog/build-a-raspberry-pi-desktop-with-an-ubuntu-heart) Lubuntu Backports are coming! (https://lubuntu.me/jammy-backports-22-04-1-cft/) Announcements Give us a sub on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) You can watch us live on Twitch (https://linuxuserspace.show/twitch) the day after an episode drops.(not this episode but normally.) Want to have a topic covered or have some feedback? - send us an email, contact@linuxuserspace.show Ubuntu The Saga Some fast links: Main Web Page (https://ubuntu.com) Ubuntu Forums (https://ubuntuforums.org) AskUbuntu (https://askubuntu.com) Ubuntu Discourse (https://discourse.ubuntu.com) Launchpad (https://launchpad.net) Official Flavours (https://ubuntu.com/desktop/flavours) Wiki (https://wiki.ubuntu.com) There are way too many links to get them all! We gathered a great deal from the official Ubuntu Blog (https://ubuntu.com/blog/) The Inception (https://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1186095&seqNum=3) Bug #1 (https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+bug/1) October 20, 2004 Warty Warthog 4.10 was the first release. Shipit came about the same time (https://web.archive.org/web/20041210114946/http://shipit.ubuntu.com/) Hoary Hedgehog, 5.04, is released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-5-04-released) adding KDE and the Kubuntu flavor. Ubuntu Foundation is Created (https://ubuntu.com/blog/new-ubuntu-foundation-announced) Warty's 18 months are up (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-4-10-end-of-support-cycle) Dapper Drake, 6.06, is released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-6-06-lts-released). To date the only release that was late. Also, Xubuntu joined the family with the Xfce desktop. Scott James Remnant dubbed it the Late To Ship release (https://netsplit.com/posts/happy-10th-birthday-ubuntu/) Edgy Eft, 6.10 is released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-launches-new-ubuntu-release-for-desktops-and-servers), now with more Upstart (https://upstart.ubuntu.com/) Launch Pad 1.0 Beta released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/launchpad-1-0-beta-released) Dell offers Ubuntu 7.04 (https://ubuntu.com/blog/dell-to-offer-ubuntu) on select devices in the US (https://web.archive.org/web/20070503024310/http://direct2dell.com/one2one/archive/2007/05/01/13147.aspx) first release of Ubuntu Studio (https://launchpad.net/ubuntustudio/+milestone/feisty-7.04-release) Gutsy Gibbon, 7.10 Desktop, is released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-7-10-desktop-edition-released). Mythubuntu and Gobuntu appear here. Launchpad is released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-announces-launch-of-launchpad-personal-package-archive-service-for-developers) System76 joined the fray (https://ubuntu.com/blog/system76-announces-servers-with-ubuntu-7-10-and-canonical-support-services) Landscape, system management and monitoring tools for Ubuntu, launches (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-announces-general-availability-of-systems-management-and-monitoring-tool-landscape-launches-with-free-trial) Hardy Heron, 8.04 LTS, released for Desktop (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-8-04-lts-desktop-edition-released). Wubi is also released. Gobuntu has been made redundant (https://web.archive.org/web/20110929075747/https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/gobuntu-devel/2008-June/000795.html) Launchpad 2.0 released (https://news.softpedia.com/news/Canonical-Presents-Launchpad-2-0-91019.shtml) Canonical open sources Launchpad (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-releases-source-code-for-launchpad) Karmic Koala, 9.10 (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/KarmicKoala/HumanReleaseNotes), is relased and so is Ubuntu One (https://launchpad.net/ubuntuone/) Lucid Lynx, 10.04, released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/reasons-to-celebrate-29th-april-2010) and the first hints of Lubuntu, though not official yet. Unity announced (https://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/383) Ubuntu and Canonical sites get a facelift (https://ubuntu.com/blog/new-ubuntu-and-canonical-sites). See it here (https://web.archive.org/web/20100601092326/http://www.ubuntu.com/) Canonical announces Ubuntu Advantage (https://ubuntu.com/blog/new-canonical-services-help-businesses-get-ahead-with-ubuntu-server-and-ubuntu-desktop) Unity shows lots of improvement (https://ubuntu.com/blog/introduction-to-unity-launcher), but it's NOT A DOCK! (See it in action) (https://vimeo.com/12818039) Quitter talk - Blog post (https://ubuntu.com/blog/quit) Shipit comes to an end (https://ubuntu.com/blog/shipit-comes-to-an-end) Oneiric Ocelot, 11.10, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/OneiricOcelot/ReleaseNotes?action=show&redirect=OneiricOcelot%2FTechnicalOverview) and Lubuntu becomes official. The HUD is introduced. (https://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/939) Precise Pangolin, 12.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/PrecisePangolin/ReleaseNotes/UbuntuDesktop/UbuntuDesktop-12.04) Includes the Heads Up Display (https://web.archive.org/web/20120125082058/https://people.canonical.com/~ories/HUD.m4v) Favorable reviews of Ubuntu as a whole, but also Unity (https://www.techrepublic.com/article/ubuntu-unity-making-the-desktop-seriously-efficient-again/) The traditional installer/live CD is dead (https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2012/09/its-official-the-ubuntu-livecd-is-dead). Ubuntu comes to the phone (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-comes-to-the-phone-with-a-beautifully-distilled-interface-and-a-unique-full-pc-capability-when-docked) Raring Ringtail, 13.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/RaringRingtail/ReleaseNotes) focus on mobile (https://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/1195) ahead of the 14.04 release Wubi has unresolved bugs (https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel/2013-April/036993.html) Ubuntu Kylin was born Ubuntu Edge Announced. (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-edge) Edge fails (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-edge-thank-you) to meet its goal (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/ubuntu-edge#/) Ubuntu Kylin hits 1.3m downloads (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-kylin-booms-in-china-with-over-1300000-downloads-in-less-than) Ubuntu One's file services are being shut down (https://ubuntu.com/blog/shutting-down-ubuntu-one-file-services) Ubuntu Mate Remix is announced (https://ubuntu-mate.org/blog/ubuntu-mate-remix-inception/) Mark Shuttleworth announces "Snappy Ubuntu" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlcTDz9ogug) The BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu edition is available (https://ubuntu.com/blog/bqs-new-aquaris-e4-5-ubuntu-edition-the-smartphone-that-puts-content-and-services-at-your-fingertips) "Snappy Ubuntu Core" on Raspberry Pi 2 (https://ubuntu.com/blog/snappy-ubuntu-core-on-raspberry-pi-2) Vivid Vervet 15.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/ReleaseNotes) Ubuntu MATE, nearly called Mubuntu (https://ubuntu-mate.community/t/why-not-mubuntu/7279/5), gets its first "official flavor" release Snapcraft is announced and Snappy Apps are being called Snaps now (https://ubuntu.com/blog/java-on-snappy) ZFS is coming to Ubuntu (https://ubuntu.com/blog/zfs-licensing-and-linux) Acknowledgement (https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-app-developer-blog-announcing-new-snap-desktop-launchers) that Snaps don't quite look right a lot of times. Mark Shuttleworth announces that Ubuntu's Unity experiement has failed (https://ubuntu.com/blog/growing-ubuntu-for-cloud-and-iot-rather-than-phone-and-convergence) and Gnome, not Unity8 will be the default session in Ubuntu 18.04. This also marks the end of Ubuntu Phone. The next day, however, Marius Gripsgard of UBPorts stepped up to take the reins. (https://fossbytes.com/unity-8-ubuntu-touch-ubports/) Zesty Zappus, 17.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ZestyZapus/ReleaseNotes) and with it Ubuntu Budgie becomes an official flavor. Ubuntu 16.04 shows up in the Windows Store (https://ubuntu.com/blog/windows-10-loves-ubuntu-loveislove), for the Windows Subsystem for Linux. Canonical joins (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-joins-gnome-foundation-advisory-board) the Gnome Foundation Advisory Board ahead of the 18.04 release. Bionic Beaver, 18.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BionicBeaver/ReleaseNotes) and Gnome is the default DE again. Bryan Quigley, looks to drop 32-bit hardware support (https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel-discuss/2018-May/018004.html) Cosmic Cuttlefish, 18.10, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/CosmicCuttlefish/ReleaseNotes) 32-bit support is now in consideration to be removed, so upgrades from 18.04 are forbidden on 32-bit installs. Lubuntu Switches to LXQt from LXDE (https://lubuntu.me/cosmic-released/) Mir 1.0 is released (https://ubuntu.com/blog/iot-graphics-mir-release-1-0) Disco Dingo, 19.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/DiscoDingo/ReleaseNotes) No more 32bit isos, long live 32bit. Ubuntu for WSL2 (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-announces-support-for-ubuntu-on-windows-subsystem-for-linux-2) i386 architecture, or rather 32-bit support, will be dropped (https://web.archive.org/web/20190625190907/https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel-announce/2019-June/001261.html) i386 architecture will not be dropped (https://ubuntu.com/blog/statement-on-32-bit-i386-packages-for-ubuntu-19-10-and-20-04-lts) Eoan Ermine 19.10, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/EoanErmine/ReleaseNotes) Experimental ZFS support on installation is available Chromium is snap-only (https://ubuntu.com/blog/chromium-in-ubuntu-deb-to-snap-transition) Rocco Interviews Mark Shuttleworth on Linux Spotlight (https://youtu.be/UDHL3youjIY) Ubuntu in Pop Culture (https://ubuntu.com/blog/2004-to-20-04-lts-ubuntu-in-popular-culture) Focal Fossa, 20.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/FocalFossa/ReleaseNotes) Hardware enablement is on by default on the desktop. The Snap Store tags in for Ubuntu Software Groovy Gorilla 20.10, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/GroovyGorilla/ReleaseNotes) Active Directory support gets added to the installer (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Ubuntu-20.10-Active-Directory) Snaps get faster (https://forum.snapcraft.io/t/how-to-switch-your-snap-to-use-lzo-compression/21714) Another lurch forward for snap theming. (https://ubuntu.com/blog/snaps-and-themes-on-the-path-to-seamless-desktop-integration) The Ubuntu installer is being rewritten (https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/refreshing-the-ubuntu-desktop-installer/20659) in Flutter. Impish Indri, 21.10, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ImpishIndri/ReleaseNotes) Firefox follows Chromium and switches from a deb to a snap (https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/feature-freeze-exception-seeding-the-official-firefox-snap-in-ubuntu-desktop/24210) - Only for main Ubuntu, not the flavors... yet. Ubuntu gets their shiny new logo (https://ubuntu.com/blog/a-new-look-for-the-circle-of-friends) Jammy Jellyfish, 22.04, is released. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/JammyJellyfish/ReleaseNotes) Better Active Directory integration (https://ubuntu.com/blog/new-active-directory-integration-features-in-ubuntu-22-04-part-1) Flavors follow main Ubuntu and switch to the snap of Firefox. A big push to improve Firefox snap performance (https://ubuntu.com/blog/how-are-we-improving-firefox-snap-performance-part-1) The push to improve Firefox continues (https://ubuntu.com/blog/canonical-ubuntu-core-22-is-now-available-optimised-for-iot-and-embedded-devices) Housekeeping Catch these and other great topics as they unfold on our Subreddit or our News channel on Discord. * Linux User Space subreddit (https://linuxuserspace.show/reddit) * Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) * Linux User Space Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) * Linux User Space Matrix (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) Next Time Our next show will be a topic show. Our next distro is Endeavour OS (https://endeavouros.com) Come back in two weeks for more Linux User Space Stay tuned and interact with us on Twitter, Mastodon, Telegram, Matrix, Discord whatever. Give us your suggestions on our subreddit r/LinuxUserSpace Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. All the links in the show notes and on linuxuserspace.show. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Producer Bruno John Josh Co-Producer Johnny Contributor Advait CubicleNate Eduardo Jill and Steve LiNuXsys666 Nicholas Paul sleepyeyesvince

ChangeMakers with Katie Goar
Episode 54 | Part One: Hunter Kurtz, Co-Founding Partner, Gate House Strategies

ChangeMakers with Katie Goar

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 17:51


This week's ChangeMaker is Hunter Kurtz, one of the founding partners of Washington, DC area-based advisory firm, Gate House Strategies. Over the course of his career in affordable housing, Hunter has held several positions at HUD and is a leading expert in both Public Housing and Community Development programs.

Mark Simone
Mark Interviews Dr. Ben Carson

Mark Simone

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 11:09


Dr. Ben Carson, former HUD secretary for the Trump administration talks with Mark about the bunk liberals are filling young people's heads with. Critical Race Theory, Transitioning people, and White privilege. Carson said these are things that are not meant to be talked about with young children.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
July 5, 2022: Second daily train service begins Monday; Charlottesville's public housing body briefed on finances

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 15:20


Today we have a 404, as in the 404th edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement. Hopefully this online-only information content is what you’re expecting, whether it’s your first time reading or listening or if you’re a regular by now. I’m your host Sean Tubbs, always scouring the internet to bring you more on what’s happening. Thanks for reading or listening!There are nearly 1,450 email subscribers to this newsletter, and I’ve for you to be the next one. It’s free, but Ting will match your initial payment to help the newsletters flow On today’s show:In six days, you’ll have a choice of when to take a daily train to Roanoke or the District of Columbia The University of Virginia to establish a “sustainable lab” at Morven Farm Governor Youngkin appoints four to the UVA Board of VisitorsThe Board of the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority gets an update on finances And the New Hill Development Corporation gets a state grant to help launch a commercial kitchen to incubate new businesses First shout–out: JMRL to kick off the Summer Reading ChallengeIn today’s first subscriber-supported public service announcement, the Summer Reading Challenge put forth by Jefferson Madison Regional Library continues! You and members of your family can earn points for prizes in a variety of ways, such as reading for 30 minutes a day, reading with a friend, creating something yourself, or visiting the library! You can also get two points just by telling someone about the Summer Reading Challenge, so I guess I just added two more! Visit JMRL.org to learn more about this all ages opportunity to dive into oceans of possibilities! Second daily train between Roanoke and DC to start July 11A deal between the Virginia Passenger Rail Authority and Norfolk Southern closed on June 30, which means additional passenger rail service will begin next Monday. According to a release, the state entity will now own 28 miles of track between Christiansburg and Salem that will allow for the expansion of passenger rail to the New River Valley in a few years.“We have reached an agreement that expands access for passengers and preserves an important link in the supply chain for businesses that rely on freight rail to ship base materials and finished products,” said Norfolk Southern Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer Mike McClellan. “The partnership of our government leaders was critical to making this plan a reality and we appreciate their commitment to the people and economy of Virginia’s Blue Ridge.”The first daily service on the Northeast Regional began in 2009 and ridership was triple what had been forecast. This train was extended to Roanoke in 2017 and this year has seen a return to pre-pandemic boarding levels.The second train will begin on July 11, according to the release. It will stop in Alexandria, Manassas, Culpeper, Charlottesville, Lynchburg, and Roanoke.“Amtrak will now offer morning and afternoon options in both directions between Roanoke, Washington, D.C., and to the Northeast,” said Amtrak spokeswoman Kimberly Woods. To learn more and to book tickets, check out Amtrak’s press release. A study is underway to determine if Bedford would be a viable stop. UVA estate at Morven to become Sustainability LabA nearly 3,000 acre farm gifted to the University of Virginia in 2001 will now officially be used by the institution as a “Sustainability Lab.” UVA Today reported last week that the Morven Farm property now owned by the University of Virginia Foundation will be used as a place to study environmental resilience and sustainability. Morven is currently used for meeting space and is the home of the Morven Kitchen Garden, which has been run by a student group for several years. According to the article, that use will continue and space can still be rented out by educational groups and for nonprofit events. At a bureaucratic level, authority over Morven will remain within the Provost’s office, but will now be transitioned to the Academic Outreach division from Global Affairs. Acting director of programs Rebecca Deeds will become the full time director. “Morven’s remarkable cultural landscape will contribute to a rich program that will address social, economic and environmental sustainability challenges facing society,” Deeds is quoted in the story. “We are excited to activate it as a living laboratory while we pursue new practices and programs that support and elevate UVA sustainability goals, and engage students, faculty and community members.” Morven is located on the other side of Carter’s Mountain in between Trump Winery and Highland. .Four new members appointed to UVA’s Board of VisitorsGovernor Glenn Youngkin has made his first appointments to the University of Virginia with terms that took effect this past Friday. They are:Bert Ellis of Hilton Head South Carolina is CEO and Chairman of Ellis Capital, Chairman and CEO of Ellis Communication, and president of Titan Broadcast ManagementStephen Long of Richmond is president of Commonwealth Spine and Pain SpecialistsAmanda Pillion is an audiologist with Abingdon Hearing Care and Abingdon ENT Associates, and a member of the Town Council in Abingdon, VirginiaDoug Wetmore of Glen Allen is senior vice president of Centauri Health SolutionsThe Board of Visitors next meets at a retreat on August 21 and August 22, followed by a regular meeting on September 15 and September 16. Both events are in Charlottesville. Previous meetings can be viewed on YouTube. I’m hoping to dig back into the June meeting for a future segment here on Charlottesville Community Engagement. Intrigued? Drop me a line via email and I’ll give you a preview. Today’s second shout-out: Frances Brand and Cvillepedia 101In today’s house-fueled public service announcement, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society wants you to know about an upcoming exhibit at the Center at Belvedere featuring portraits of several historical figures active in the Charlottesville area in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Frances Brand was a folk artist who painted nearly 150 portraits of what she considered “firsts” including first Black Charlottesville Mayor Charles Barbour and Nancy O’Brien, the first woman to be Charlottesville Mayor. Brand’s work will be on display from July 5 to August 31 in the first public exhibit since 2004. And, if you’d like to help conduct community research into who some of the portraits are, cvillepedia is looking for volunteers! I will be leading four Cvillepedia 101 training sessions at the Center every Monday beginning July 11 at 2 p.m. Sign up at the Center’s website.Charlottesville public housing board gets update on financesWe’re still just days into Virginia’s fiscal year, but the fiscal year of the city’s public housing agency is now entering its second quarter. The finance director of the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority “Overall against budget we are on target,” said Mary Lou Hoffman, CRHA’s finance director. At the end of the fiscal year, one issue was a backlog of unpaid rent by tenants. CRHA staff continue to find sources of revenue to cover arrears though state rent relief programs and reaching out to local resources. . “Around March, we were at $229,000 but we’re currently at $126,000,” said John Sales, CHRA’s executive director. “And so they’re constantly talking about the tenant accounts which is a big focus that we have to have. It was one of the areas that the [U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development] dinged us on years ago for our accounts being so high compared to the amount we are collecting.” Sales said one issue has been getting into contact with residents to get them set up with rent relief payment arrangements. HUD classifies CRHA as a “troubled” agency due to a pattern of issues over the years. Sales said getting the finances correct alone will not change that status. “The only issue that we have so far in our audits is the physical conditions and so we’re working to address those issues,” Sales said. “We had our physical audit in March and all of the emergency work orders were addressed.”Another issue is tenant damage, which can also affect the HUD status in the audits. Sales said a maintenance plan will address this category. Redevelopment is underway and two sites have been transferred to a new ownership structure in which the CRHA owns the ground and a Limited Liability Company has been set up to own the buildings for a certain period of time. An entity controlled by CRHA known as the Community Development Corporation Commission controls the LLCs. This allows the projects to be financed through Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) as well as other sources.“Technically, they are still our responsibility,” Sales said “We own the land. We own the management agreement. We have several loans attached to each development that will eventually either get paid back or get forgiven when we get the property back, get ownership of the property back in 16 years.” HUD oversight of the public housing projects will continue, but it will be different because there are different kinds of subsidized units. “We’ll have public housing units so one office will be inspecting them, and then another office will get inspections from LIHTC and gert inspections from HUD,” Sales said. The LIHTC units would be inspected by Virginia Housing, which issues the credits in the Commonwealth. Late this month, Virginia Housing’s Board of Commissioners approved low income housing tax credits for this year. Staff recommendations had been not to recommend credits for the first phase of redevelopment for Phase 1 of Sixth Street SE and additional credits for a second phase at South First Street. There are three vacancies on the CRHA Board of Commissioners and Charlottesville is taking applications through August 5. The terms of Commissioners Maddy Green and Laura Goldblatt expired at the end of June, and Green is not seeking reappointment after filling an unexpired term. Council will make the final appointments. New Hill Development Corporation gets $189K state grant for commercial kitchen incubatorA Charlottesville nonprofit created to increase wealth building opportunities for Black community members has been awarded a state grant to develop a place for culinary entrepreneurs to grow businesses. “The New Hill Development Corporation will stabilize and grow food and beverage manufacturing activity in the region by opening an 11,500-square-foot shared commercial kitchen incubator in order to provide food entrepreneurs with a cost-effective space to produce, package, store and distribute tradable manufactured products,” reads a press release for the latest Growing Opportunities grants from the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development. The BEACON’s Kitchen project is the only recipient in this area. According to the release, the project will create 90 new jobs, 28 new businesses, and at least 30 new tradeable food products. New Hill is offering a Food Business Boot Camp on August 3 and August 4. (learn more)The New Hill Development Corporation was created in 2018 and received $500,000 from City Council late that year to create a small area plan for the Starr Hill neighborhood, the site of the razed Vinegar Hill neighborhood. The plan envisioned what a redeveloped City Yard might look like, but was converted into a “vision plan” by the city’s Neighborhood Development Services Department. Other GO Virginia grant recipients in June include:Accelerating Advanced Manufacturing Workforce - $530,000 for Laurel Ridge Community College “to build a strong workforce pipeline for Region 8 manufacturers by offering an advanced manufacturing sector-focused career pathway training program.”Technology Academies for Fauquier and Rappahannock Counties - $402,075 for school systems in those two localities to “develop college-level courses in robotics and drones to high school students and adult learners through a workforce development program.” Talent Supply Connector - $391,528 for Virginia Career Works Piedmont Region to create “a Career Pathway Guide for employers and developing a region-wide database of relevant training offerings” in an area that includes Greene, Louisa, and Nelson counties.Workforce and Entrepreneurship Initiatives in a Regional Makerspace - $324,000 for a company called Vector Space to “facilitate the implementation of expanded programming and equipment centered around workforce development and entrepreneurship for underserved populations” in Bedford and Campbell counties as well as the city of Lynchburg. Read the press release for more.Like the newsletter? Consider support! This is episode 404 of this program and it took me about six hours to produce. That’s because there are fewer segments in this one. I am hoping to get this on a regular schedule, but that’s going to take more personnel. For now, I hope to get each one out as soon as I can. All of this is supported by readers and listeners through either a paid subscription to this newsletter or through Patreon support for Town Crier Productions. Around a third of the audience has opted to contribute something financially. It’s similar to older times when you would subscribe to a newspaper. I subscribe to several, myself!If you are benefiting from this newsletter and the information in it, please consider some form of support. I am not a nonprofit organization and most of my time is spent in putting the newsletter together, which includes producing the podcast.For more information on all of this, please visit the archive site Information Charlottesville to learn more, including how you too can get a shout-out! Thank you for reading, and please share with those you think might want to learn a few thing or two about what’s happening. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Back2BasicsMode
How to simplify our relationship with credit | SE2/EP097 | Back2Basics

Back2BasicsMode

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 34:47


Author, podcaster, speaker, Accredited Financial Counselor®, certified HUD housing counselor, and education manager at Money Fit by DRS, Todd Christensen has facilitated thousands of personal finance workshops and one-on-one counseling sessions since 2004, helping consumers of all backgrounds and income levels regain control of their finances, get out of debt, rebuild their credit, and create a brighter financial future. He published Everyday Money for Everyday People in 2014 and 50+ on FIRE in 2021.Support the show

Unsubs
Season 5, Episode 18: "The Fight"

Unsubs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 49:40


This episode IS NOT IT! But we love Michael Kelly and Forest Whitaker. Even with great actors, a terrible script can do damage. Homeless Resources: HHS, SAMHSA, and HUD. Write to us! Follow us on Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter and check out or website. Merch available on Teepublic. We are not in any way associated with the show Criminal Minds, but sure would love to be. Email us at unsubspodcast@gmail.com.Abigail's podcast BSAS. Mac's podcast is YNA: The Podcast. Mac's Blog.Support the show

Construction Brothers
You Printed A What?? (feat. Andrew McCoy)

Construction Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 48:12


Dr. McCoy is the Director of the Virginia Center for Housing Research at Virginia Tech, the Beliveau Professor of Building Construction, and the Associate Director of the Myers Lawson School of Construction… He has over 24 years of experience in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, including 8.5 years of fieldwork and 8 years of managing a firm that maintained a Class A Virginia contractor license. Dr. McCoy received undergraduate degrees in Architecture and Architectural History from the University of Virginia, and an MS in Building Construction and a Ph.D. in Environmental Design and Planning from Virginia Tech. He has authored of over 100 articles and has been a primary investigator on millions of dollars in funded projects, including ‘green' residential construction practices, building technologies, affordable housing and safety practices in the construction supply chain.  Notable funded endeavors include:  1) Virginia Housing's PACT 3D Concrete House Printing Innovation Grant, 2) The Commonwealth of Virginia's Executive Order 32 study "Addressing the Impact of Housing Affordability for Virginia Economy"; 3) HUD's " Impact of Market Behavior on the Adoption and Diffusion of Innovative Green Building Technologies," A Sustainable Communities Research grant; 4) CREATES, a Department of Labor grant to increase Southwest Virginia Constructors knowledge and application of green technologies; 5) ELECTRI Foundation's 2011 Early Career Award; 6) NIOSH's “The Case for a Whole Industry Approach to Safety,” a grant on safety across cultures and sectors of the construction industry and 7) Housing Virginia's "The Impact of Energy Efficient Construction for LIHTC Housing in Virginia." Another endeavor was the 2009 Department of Energy “Solar Decathlon” competition, in which university teams compete to design, build, manage and operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered house. Dr. McCoy's research won the 2015 Game Changer Award for the State of Virginia and Engineering News Record's 2014 "Top 20 under 40" for the Mid-Atlantic. Dr. McCoy's work also won ASCE's Journal of Architectural Engineering "Top Paper Award 2015" and the American Real Estate Society conference's "best paper prize for the topic of Sustainable Real Estate." Company Website: https://www.bc.vt.edu/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewpmccoy/ Video: https://vtx.vt.edu/videos/k/2021/06/1_r5xrw3ha.html Article: https://vpm.org/news/articles/30733/can-3d-concrete-printing-solve-virginias-affordable-housing-crisis Thanks for listening! Please be sure to leave a rating or review and follow us on our social accounts! SUBSCRIBE! Like us on LinkedIn! Like us on Facebook! Follow us on Instagram! Eddie's LinkedIn Tyler's LinkedIn See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pod with the Baton Rouge Area Foundation
#8 The Pod with Lynn Clark

The Pod with the Baton Rouge Area Foundation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 21:46


Lynn Clark has been with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge since March of 2004. She was the Development Director for 4 ½ years and has had the responsibility of Executive Director of the affiliate since May of 2008.In both positions, Mrs. Clark has written and successfully managed grants of over several million dollars. She also has extensive experience managing HUD grants used to build a total of 34 Habitat homes and complete 35 critical home repairs and weatherizations on homes owned by individuals under 50% MFI.The affiliate has also experienced exponential growth having completed over 260 homes in the past 16 years, tripling the home inventory of the first 15 years of the affiliate.For more information about the work at the Baton Rouge Area Foundation, don't forget to visit braf.org.

Architecture Matters Podcast
#54 Suzette Sutton - Business Development, Affordable Housing, Relationships, Oak Cliff and More!

Architecture Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 82:44


Architecture Matters Podcast was created to enlighten the architectural education process, surviving studio, life after graduation, professional practice, and more. This podcast is intended to reach those who are interested in starting their educational career in architecture, those who have already began the process, professionals who are already working in the field of architecture, as well as those who just love talking architecture. In this episode we are joined by Suzette Sutton, a seasoned Business Developer/Relation Manager. She enlightens us on the business development side of the Architecture world, a new law that recently passed in Colorado in regards in affordable housing, we briefly touch on HUD deals, and what exactly someone in her position does. She goes in detail about the importance of how words matter, that first contact and the on going relationship between clients and developers, and other aspects of her responsibilities that we weren't aware of. For any questions, comments, or topics of conversations to be added onto the podcast. Or, if you would like to be a guest on the show to discuss what you love most, feel free to reach out to us on instagram. Instagram: @archmatterspodcast Also, we would highly appreciate if you would leave a review on apple podcast, or send us a message on our instagram! Thank you! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/archmatterspodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/archmatterspodcast/support

She Boss Talk
BREAKING: SBA EIDL, ERTC, PPP, GRANTS, Q&A | STIMULUS UPDATE | JUNE 20

She Boss Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 52:15


In today's stimulus update, SBA approved $390 Billion EIDL loans; PPP Forgiveness deadlines; SBA launches 5 Women Business Centers; rise of inflation and relief; Student Loan Forgiveness update; States rollout $10 BIllion State Small Business Credit Initiative; State stimulus checks; HUD rollout of 10.3 Billion grants; ERTC $400 billion payroll tax credit up to $26,000 per W2 employee; more grants available. Connect and watch live on Facebook: http://bit.ly/SheBossTalkShow Subscribe to our YouTube Channel http://bit.ly/SheBossTalkYouTube Subscribe to our Podcast https://anchor.fm/shebosstalk Follow us on Instagram: www.instagram.com/shebosstalk Follow us on Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/shebosstalk Opportunities to be part of the Show She Boss Talk Show Guest - Apply bit.ly/SBTShowGuests She Boss Talk Ambassador - Apply bit.ly/SBTAmbassador She Boss Talk Author Spotlight - Apply bit.ly/SBTAuthorSpotlight She Boss Talk Product Reviews - Apply bit.ly/SBTPRoductReview She Boss Sponsorship - Submit http://bit.ly/SBTSponsors Visit us at www.shebosstalk.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shebosstalk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shebosstalk/support

IAQ Radio
Bill Sothern, DrPH, CIH, LEED AP - Chris Mikrut - Michael Berg, PhD - Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-damaged Homes

IAQ Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 61:25


This week we welcome Dr. Bill Sothern, Chris Mikrut and Dr. Michael Berg to discuss their recent paper called Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-damaged Homes. We will look at the current antigen testing being done for mold allergies then discuss their results and what changes could be beneficial. The authors have collected a great deal of data from the real world that will be of interest to our audience and hopefully the medical community. LEARN MORE this week on IAQ Radio+   Dr. Bill Sothern is a Certified Industrial Hygienist, LEED AP, and Chief Operating Officer of Microecologies, Inc., a NYC-based indoor environmental consulting firm he founded in 1993. He earned his Doctorate in Public Health from CUNY, and is a recognized contributor to NYC DOHMH, NIEHS, HUD and WHO guidance documents. Bill is an active advocate for changes in law and policy that can improve health outcomes at the population level. He is the primary author of NYC Local Law 13 - 2014 that prohibits the use of paper-faced gypsum boards in moisture-prone building areas, which serves to reduce the occurrence of mold growth and the incidence of asthma. Bill is an active health researcher and is the lead author of the article Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-Damaged Homes published in the May 2022 issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, he has conducted environmental assessments for schools, NGO's and businesses throughout NYC to assess HVAC systems and implement ventilation controls to reduce airborne concentration levels of SARS-CoV-2 and thereby reduce risk of transmission of COVID-19 in schools and workplaces. Bill currently serves as a court-appointed independent consultant on mold, water damage and ventilation issues to the NYC Public Housing Authority (NYCHA).   Chris Mikrut is a Senior Investigator at Microecologies, Inc., an indoor environmental consulting firm in New York City. He earned his Masters Degree in Environmental and Occupational Health Science from Hunter College where he was awarded the prestigious National Institute of Safety and Health's (NIOSH) Scholarship. Chris is an EPA Certified Lead Risk Assessor and NYS Certified Mold Assessor, and over the past 10 years has conducted over 1,000 indoor air quality and indoor environmental inspections in residential and commercial settings involving water damage and mold growth conditions, chemical vapor emissions, construction dust and crystalline silica infiltration, lead-based paint hazards, and other indoor environmental exposure factors. Chris has been a key contributor to program development for response to mold, water damage, and exhaust ventilation issues in NYC Public Housing Authority's (NYCHA) and administration of classroom and field training for NYCHA staff. Chris has also collaborated on several projects as part of Microecologies' research team and is a co-author of the article Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-Damaged Homes published in the May 2022 issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.   Dr. Michael Berg joined Eurofins EMLab P&K in 2005 and worked as Department Manager, Regional Director and Technical Director. He holds a Ph.D. in Biology from the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany. Dr. Berg researched plant pathology and plant genetics as postdoctoral fellow at Oklahoma State University. He also worked in fungicide research for BASF in Germany. Dr. Berg engages in training and other educational events with focus on the topics of infection control, water risk management and molecular biology.

Fly Brothers
Session 37

Fly Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 52:46


In this session, Hud and B share another day on the water debriefing  their trip to Sequoia National and their solo trips across California.  Tune in to see where they've been, what they've been researching, and what's next on their agenda to explore. Fly Brothers are a pair of fly bum brothers out west, who enjoy exploring new water, a variety of flies , a variety of fish, and sharing good times.Good drifts and stay tight to the fly friends. Check out prior and new episodes. 

Daily Tech Headlines
Wikimedia Enterprise Announces Its First Customers – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022


Wikimedia Enterprise launched last year but just announced its first customers, Meta will change its ad algorithm for housing ads as part of a settlement with HUD, and Twitter partners with Shopify. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a month here. A special thanks toContinue reading "Wikimedia Enterprise Announces Its First Customers – DTH"

Reverse Mortgage News by HECMWorld
E727: What reverse pros need to know about the Constant Maturity Treasury rate

Reverse Mortgage News by HECMWorld

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 10:31


A reverse mortgage could pay for long-term care, but should you do it? What you need to know about the Constant Maturity Treasury (CMT) Rate Novad protests the assignment of HUD-held HECM servicing to Celink

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台
2022年049期:宝马X1即将大换代,买现款还是等新款?

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 48:04


※ 投稿邮箱:418150505@qq.com※ 本文章发布于订阅号:百车全说,订阅号阅读更加方便,欢迎关注今天这期节目聊聊宝马X1,这款车上市已经6年了,终于即将迎来大换代。6月初新X1在海外首次亮相,按这个节奏推算,国内加长版X1最快也得到明年一季度上市了。再加上刚上市产能肯定不足,前期订单几乎毫无悬念的都是原价销售。那么现款宝马X1优惠都在8万上下,不出意外,随着明年新款上市日期临近,老款会慢慢的缩减优惠,8万变7万,7万变6万,一点一点缩减到5万左右。然后新车上市,4s店再配合一些赠送保养、延保之类的政策,稍微安抚一下第一批原价购车的忠诚用户。这样一来,各位准备放弃现款买新款X1的朋友,你就要计算一下优惠幅度,把握好入手时机了。我个人觉得现在X1目前算是抄底的时机了,因为全新换代的X1在6月初刚亮相。对于4s店来说,这个时间点正好是客户纠结等新款还是买老款的时候,因此老款销售会遇到一些阻力,而厂家还没有停产老款,还是有些库存压力的。因此,6-8月这个时间点,我觉得买X1说不定价格就是抄底,后面再往下降的空间不大,反弹的可能性倒是很大。当然,这仅是我一家之言,仅供参考,买车还是根据自己的需求来定。我们先聊聊现款X1该怎么买,回头再聊聊新款有了哪些变化。现款X1在今年1月还做了一次价格和配置的微调,sDrive20Li,也就是1.5T,售价27.98万的低配,增加了X设计套装、银色外后视镜罩、18寸轮毂样式升级成高配的版本。这么一调整,从外观上就看不出1.5T高低配的差别了,所以也算是给最低配X1增加了一些竞争力吧。sDrive20Li的高配车型,售价29.98万,配置和价格都没有变。sDrive25Li领先型,也就是2.0T低配两驱版,增加了前雷达,售价30.98万,价格没变。而高配xDrive25Li,售价33.98万,减去了HUD抬头显示,指导价下调6000元,变成33.38万。总体来讲,这次四个配置的调整不算很大,但这次应该是X1换代前的最后一次调整了。买宝马X1的客户,其实冲着的无非是车标、空间、还有看的见的实惠。目前卖的最好的版本是sDrive25Li两驱版,指导价30.98万,实际成交价才23万不到,落地25万出头,这车还符合现如今的购置税减半政策,原本购置税2万多,现在1万多。而X1 sDrive20Li,也就是1.5T最低配,指导价27.98万,成交价才19万出头,21万左右就能落地,基本上你买的起合资SUV,都能买的起它。所以,不要看网上一群人喷宝马X1前驱、三缸、双离合。你真的了解一下价格,才知道真的香。但是,还是30.98万的sDrive25Li两驱版卖的好,因为sDrive20Li是1.5T三缸,很多人预算还是能够的到高配29.88万。可是这个版本与2.0T四缸的sDrive25Li两驱版就相差1万1,大多数客户觉得,20多万都掏了也不差这1万了,毕竟三缸还是会有些担心,怕将来抖动变大,噪音变大。而且这1万1不仅把三缸换成了四缸,配置上也多出了定速巡航、感应后备箱、无钥匙进入、副驾驶电动座椅。所以,只要不是预算绝对够不到的客户,应该首选都是这个配置。那么再往上看就是顶配了,xDrive25Li尊享,33.38万这个价格要比30.98万的两驱领先贵了2.4万,增加了陡坡缓降,18寸升级成19寸轮毂,适时四驱,以及爱信的8AT变速箱。我是觉得没必要上顶配,城市SUV四驱用处并不是很大,但这个爱信的8AT变速箱对客户诱惑很大。因为X1四个配置里,只有顶配才是爱信8AT,其他三个版本都是格特拉克的7速湿式双离合,当然也有人说是麦格纳的7速湿式双离合。也对,因为麦格纳收购了格特拉克。有些客户就是担心双离合不稳定,顿挫等问题,想了想,不如再加2.4万一步到位上顶配吧。其实我十分不推荐这种一路往上加预算的购车方式,特别是对于那些原本买20多万的车就有些吃力的客户,一定要理清楚自己的核心需求,在能力范围内消费即可。你为什么买X1,首先它是一台宝马,为了宝马标你得为溢价部分多付出不少,这其实你也知道,20多万预算换成其他品牌,配置、空间和动力还能好不少,但是在豪华品牌里,品牌实力能硬碰硬的,也就是奔驰和奥迪了。可奔驰GLA、GLB明显比X1要贵不少,你买2.0T X1的预算只能买到1.3T的奔驰GLB200,而2.0T的GLB220落地价要比X1贵上大几万。而奥迪Q3对比宝马X1,优势在于Q3的外观和内饰,特别是最新的内饰设计,双液晶屏很能提升车内档次感,这也是让客户甘愿掏钱的原因之一。但是奥迪Q3主售车型是1.4T的版本,售价29.28万的35 时尚动感版,优惠完22万左右,价格也并不便宜。而奥迪Q3 2.0T版本的40 时尚动感,指导价30.58万,优惠之后跟2.0T的X1 sDrive25Li几乎一样。一个宝马,一个奥迪,X1后排空间还比Q3肉眼可见的大很多,从品牌和实用两个角度,客户应该都能找到答案。还有一些二线豪华品牌,比如凯迪拉克XT4,通用的LSY可变缸发动机2.0T 237马力,350牛米,20多万预算可以买到BOSE音响、L2级驾驶辅助、方向盘加热等等配置,也有人冲着这车的动力和配置去买。还有沃尔沃XC40,X1两驱版本的预算可以买到XC40的四驱版本,主被动安全也是一应俱全。还有林肯冒险家,整车隔音降噪做得的确好,全车双层夹胶玻璃同级罕见,但就是造型略显老气,品牌也需要给自己一些信心。总体来讲,二线豪华品牌的紧凑型SUV,在动力、静谧性、主被动安全配置方面都各有特色,但是你回头想想,BBA都优惠7、8万了,二线豪华品牌与BBA的入手价格差距能有多大?微乎其微的价格差距,相比一二线豪华品牌在你心中的地位,答案自然明了。不要说你对品牌没有要求,既然选择豪华品牌,你一定是对品牌有要求的,不要忘了初心,你换车的第一性原则到底是什么?说到底,还是品牌的提升。你实在不会选,也可以去看看销量。去年X1卖了9.39万台、Q3卖了8.11万台、GLB卖了5.38万台、XT4卖了4.75万台、冒险家卖了4.57万台、GLA卖了3.31万台、XC40卖了1.34万台。最后聊聊新老款X1的差别。简单的讲,这次换代后的新X1与现款X1,可以说是500米开外,一眼就能看的出差别。特别是目前曝光的新X1图片,都是M运动套装的版本,看上去造型十分激进,车头和车尾很有宝马性能车M POWER的范儿。我相信新款X1外形方面的改变肯定会是好评,就不知道M运动套装会在什么版本以上标配,还是说跟X LINE版本二选一,不用额外加钱。另外就是新X1的尺寸。大家知道国内X1是在海外标轴基础上加长的,所以这次全新一代X1海外标轴版本又在原有基础上长度增加了43mm、宽度增加了23mm、高度增加了43mm、轴距增加了22mm。海外版本在尺寸增长方面还是比较克制的,毕竟老外看中的是驾驶体验,不是后排空间,海外市场在空间方面没有那么内卷,如果奔驰和奥迪在海外也加长,宝马毫无疑问也要加长。所以,这个尺寸只能是参考,我估计国内版本的加长幅度可能还没有海外这么大,2780mm的轴距,加长20mm凑足2800mm的可能性比较大,毕竟X3至今还没加长,轴距才2864mm,得留一些面子给X3,况且现在的长度和轴距打同级竞品已经足够。下面就是重头戏了,全新一代宝马X1的内饰完全是颠覆性的换代,之前但凡吐槽现款X1内饰不够科技,不够豪华的,现在如果看到新X1肯定不会再有抱怨。新X1的内饰和现在的新7系,还有i3、i4和ix电动车型一样,换成了双联屏设计。10.25英寸全液晶仪表+10.7英寸中控屏,系统也升级成了最新的id.8,毫无疑问5G车联网肯定都得用上。如果说外观方面的变化,有的人还不以为然,觉得老款有老款的味道,新款有新款的感觉,但是内饰的变化,我相信但凡预算充足,能够等大半年以上的,肯定是想入手新款。从这套内饰设计,加上升级后的FAAR平台这两点推测,新X1大概率配置方面也会提升很多,L2级的智能驾驶辅助系统应该会在中低配上就有,不然怎么对得起这样从里到外的改变呢?动力方面,海外由于是柴油版,所以参考意义不大,但是看到柴油版本增加了第二代48v轻混,不知道国内汽油版本是否也会更新成48v轻混版。另外还有插混版X1,以及iX1纯电版本。知道了以上这么多信息,最关键的就是全新一代X1今后售价会不会有变化?我觉得大概率不会有变化,还是维持在27.98-33.38万区间,上下浮动应该不会超过几千元。毕竟这个价位的竞争还是异常激烈的。X1即使换代后竞争力提升明显,也并不代表无论什么价格都让客户非它不买。再加上现款X1大几万的优惠幅度,指导价的变化其实对最终成交价格影响不大,所以指导价不变,或者小幅下调表表诚意才是正确的选择。可以添加微信46415254加入我们的社群音频图文更新在订阅号: 百车全说每期抽三条留言,每人赠168元的“芥末绿”燃油添加剂一瓶点击订阅,每周三,周六更新会有提醒新听友可以搜索:百车全说2014,百车全说2015,百车全说2016,往期300多个小时的节目可供收听

Vetenskapsradion Hälsa
Minihjärnor odlas med hud från personer med psykos

Vetenskapsradion Hälsa

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 19:33


Psykoser som leder fram till schizofreni är komplexa sjukdomar. Forskarna har förstått mycket om genetiken, men nu handlar det om att också förstå exakt vad som händer i hjärnan för att kunna skapa bättre behandlingar. Vägen dit går via minihjärnor som odlas fram i provrör med hud från personer med psykos. Våra hjärnor har mer än hundra miljarder nervceller. Varje nervcell kan skicka signaler till tusen andra nervceller och kontaktas av lika många. Kontakten sker via synapser där nervsignaler förs vidare från en cell till en annan. Den ytan där det sker kallas synapser. I början av våra liv har vi fler kontaktytor än vad som behövs. När hjärnan mognar så tas vissa synapser bort för att hjärnan ska kunna bli specialiserad. Men hos vissa tar kroppen bort för många synapser. Det tycks kunna leda till schizofreni.De gör minihjärnor av nervceller för att förstå schizofreniNu har forskare på Karolinska institutet kunnat visa hur det här går till. Detta genom att i ett forskningsprojekt ta hud från personer som fått psykos och senare diagnosen schizofreni. Huden backas tillbaka till att bli ursprungsceller, och programmeras sedan om till att bli nervceller. Från det skapas konstgjorda nätverk av nervceller som blir som minihjärnor i provrör. Inga riktiga hjärnor, men modeller som gör att forskarna nu verkar hitta vägar för möjliga nya behandlingar. Det handlar om vad som styr beskärningen i hjärnan och hur det kan påverkas via mikroglia. Medverkande: Carl Sellgren Majkowitz, överläkare i psykiatri och forskningsledare på institutionen för fysiologi och farmakologi vid Karolinska institutet, Funda Orhan,postdok vid institution fysiologi och farmakologi vid Karolinska institutet i Solna och Susmita Malwade doktorand vid institutionen för fysiologi och farmakologi vid Karolinska institutet i Sola. Reporter Annika Östman Producent Annika Östman annika.ostman@sverigesradio.se

Gossipnista: A New York City Podcast
Updating In New York City with Harrison Forman (Updating Show)

Gossipnista: A New York City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 60:09


A raw, fun, live, candid, and interactive dating experience unlike ever before, bringing matchmaking to the center stage - the Updating show! The Updating Show has been featured on the New York Post, The Hollywood Reporter, The Today Show and Time magazine to name a few publications - sweeping the dating scene with its interactive comedy style show, making it a must try for singles willing to leave their inhibitions behind. Co-creator, Harrison Forman joins me this week to spill the tea on the show and dating in New York City. He drops exclusive news of an upcoming partnership with a new dating app, HUD, and what the future of the show entails. Harrison also shares his NYC story; best dating tips in the city, how the Updating Show began,  success stories from the show, what he is looking for in a partner, and so much more. Get an exclusive and raw look behind the scenes to one of the co-creators of the Updating Show, with possibly more to come with its other creator, Brandon Bermon. Send your questions! Statistics have men using online dating more so than women, surprisingly, but according to co-creator Harrison Forman of the Updating Show - women participate more than men on the show and on-stage for their show, while also filling up the audience. So…***CASTING CALL FOR MEN***The Updating Show is an inclusive show to all and encourages checking out their website for more casting details. Please subscribe, rate, and review Gossipnista wherever you listen to your podcasts. Follow along on Instagram @GossipnistaPodcast to stay up-to-date on the latest about the podcast, episodes and exclusive content.Thank you for your support.  Enjoy the episode!Xoxo,Gossipnista

Straight Up Chicago Investor
Episode 147: Straight Up Tues Tip 31 - Perry Farella Breaks Down HUD 203k Loan Options

Straight Up Chicago Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 14:26


What is a HUD 203k loan, when does it make sense for investors to leverage this loan, and where do 203k loans fall apart? Connect with Mark and Tom: StraightUpChicagoInvestor.com Email the Show: StraightUpChicagoInvestor@gmail.com Guest: Perry Farella of Prime Lending Link: ttps://perryfarella.com/blog/ ----------------- Production House: Flint Stone Media Copyright of Straight Up Chicago Investor 2022.

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - We Need Shame

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 11:39


Shame is a vital part of a freely functioning society, and it has been disappearing in ours for over 30 years now.There was a campaign in the 1990s to understand and sympathize with those who steal. The classic example used was the struggling single father who needed to feed his baby, and therefore, robbed a 7-11. I'm not even sure this ever happened, but the example was bandied about endlessly as a way to teach us all that there's a story behind everything, and therefore, we should feel compassion towards this mystery father and not only NOT prosecute him, but more importantly, not shame him or those like him who are merely “down on their luck.”Thus began the long and winding road of shaming no one, ever, for anything.From criminals, we moved on to bodies; no one should ever be made to feel “less than” because of their appearance. There's no such thing as “fat,” or “obese” and certainly, no one should ever be called ugly or disgusting because someone somewhere surely finds them attractive and, therefore, we all must.We've gone so far in the body positivity movement that we now shame beautiful people.Yes, you read that correctly; as we remove shame from those who don't fit traditional norms of “beautiful” body size and shape, we have shifted the shame to those who do. Victoria's Secret, for example, got rid of their famous “angels” last year (those women who were of traditional super-model build), and instead created an entirely new group of models who now advertise their products in their plump, oddly shaped, more acceptable ways. https://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/latest/a36766170/victorias-secret-getting-rid-of-angels-launching-the-vs-collective/#:~:text=Victoria's%20Secret%20is%20doing%20away,the%20future%20of%20Victoria's%20Secret.%22Other things and people we've been told over the years not to shame include everything from misbehaved kids in public to pedophiles….and everything in between. https://www.metroweekly.com/2018/07/tedx-speaker-argues-that-pedophilia-should-be-accepted-as-an-unchangeable-sexual-orientation/https://www.cnn.com/2012/06/21/opinion/cantor-pedophila-sandusky/index.htmlThe problem is that when there's no shame in society, there are no rules, no boundaries, and eventually, quite literally, no laws.The past few years has seen a laser focus on homelessness and removing the shame from it. In fact, we're supposed to now call it house-less-ness. They have a “home,” it's on the streets…they just don't have a house, you see. https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/homeless-unhoused#:~:text=In%20the%20mainstream%20discourse%20and,HUD%20uses%20in%20its%20reports.Here's the problem; while there are many legitimate and sad reasons that people find themselves in horrible situations; whether it be an inability to feed their children, or having no structural home to live in, that doesn't change the fact that there must be shame attached to those realities in order to motivate and compel people to do everything in their power to avoid winding up in those situations and to get their asses out of them as swiftly as possible if they ever find themselves there.It's time for that reality check to be re-instilled into our society: Shame is a motivator.The reason we have 11 million job openings in America and an almost record low labor participation rate is that there's no shame in not working. Conservatives will tell you it's because the government is paying them to stay home which is a provable lie, and liberals will tell you that people are both sacred of covid and unwilling to work for big, mean companies who don't offer the proper benefits, which is also horseshit. Regardless of the reasons, the safety net of knowing that there is no shame in not working provides comfort to those spending their days living with enabling relatives, playing video games and draining society. https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/20/6-reasons-why-americans-arent-returning-to-work.htmlhttps://www.rgj.com/story/news/money/business/2021/09/02/great-resignation-why-people-not-returning-work/5661302001/ Having grown up paycheck to paycheck and being told more than once that we couldn't afford to do something I desperately wanted to do, I knew at a young age that I never wanted to feel that way as an adult. I was instantly motivated to make money.Once I ventured out on my own, I remember the pit in my stomach as I stood at the grocery store check out line waiting to find out if my check would clear or my ATM card would be approved. More than once, I was denied…and had to walk away hungry, empty-handed, and ashamed…but also committed to continuing to work my ass off to ensure I would never feel that again.When I started to make what I thought was “decent money,”, particularly for a 21-year-old, I remember heading to Home Depot to buy a fancy new gas grill only to discover I could barely afford a not-even-close-to-what-I-wanted model. I bought it…so that every time I used it I could motivate myself to throw that thing out as quickly as possible after working harder to never again have to disappoint myself or anyone I shared my life with simply because we didn't have the money. Today, as the economy is at its lowest point in 40 years and most people dread going to the gas station or grocery store, neither my wife nor I give it a second thought, and absolutely nothing about our lives has changed. I vividly remember having $5 cash, needing to get to work, and an empty gas tank. Gas cost $2/gallon and I had to stand there at the pump, doing math to figure out if I could get to and from work on only 1 gallon. Never again, I swore.We need shame…we need to inflict it and use it as a motivator. It has its' place.Perhaps most importantly, we need to, at the very least, not remove it entirely and normalize everything. The latest disgusting example of this is the new national campaign that doesn't discourage drug use at all…it just encourages that you do it safely and with friends.No, this isn't a joke.It's called “know overdose…” get it? They're going to teach you how to KNOW how to properly and safely overdose. Billboards, which began in San Francisco (of course) are now spreading to other high use heroin areas across the country teaching people how to do absolutely nothing to stop using drugs and instead to make like-minded friends and have emergency overdose drugs on hand for when things get of control.Rather than encourage people not to use heroin at all, the campaign teaches people to do so in groups because it's less harmful. Which is like saying, "If you're going to play Russian roulette, please do so with plenty of medical equipment handy in case we need to put your brains back inside your skull."The campaign is providing deadly misinformation. Let's go through the three main ideas: · Use with people and take turns. Take turns? If you're the last person to inject heroin, that means everybody else is already blitzed out. Who is going to help you now? Also, the campaign never mentions the importance of not sharing needles, so we can assume that will be happening at these heroin parties. That's an excellent way to spread plenty of nasty infectious diseases. · Get free naloxone. Returning to the Russian roulette analogy, this is akin to saying, "Wear a helmet." Naloxone certainly can save the life of a person who has overdosed on heroin or another opioid, but it doesn't always. One study claims that naloxone, when administered by just an average person, is effective 75% to 100% of the time. That's good, but it also means that roughly 1 in 4 people who overdose on an opioid will die anyway, even if given naloxone. Plus, it completely green-lights the idea of overdosing by saying “hey, we got your back if you go too far.” · Let's take care of each other. Uh-huh. The best way to take care of each other is to encourage people never to take these dangerous drugs. Heroin is inherently unsafe because it's impossible to know what stuff bought off the street is adulterated with. It could be anything from fentanyl (which is far more potent and deadlier than heroin) to rat poison. The neighborhood drug dealer isn't always trustworthy…hard to believe, I know. This is what happens when a society spends decades making up excuses to explain, justify, rationalize, and normalize illegal, idiotic, dangerous, and most importantly, shameful behavior. Having empathy and sympathy for users is the job of counselors who are working with them one-on-one…the job of society is to shame and marginalize them as a lesson for others who consider going down that road.And think about this irony; we just spent the last year dividing an already divided nation even further by shaming, shunning, and punishing people who wouldn't get a controversial vaccine that many didn't even need because they already had natural immunity from having had Covid…and don't start with me, I'm vaccinated; I made that choice, as opposed to the loser downtown making the choice to fill his veins with heroine, bleach, AIDS and god knows what else. He and I are to be revered…the “idiot” that said “no, I talked with my doctor and decided that the Covid vaccine isn't for me?” He should never be allowed to see a concert, travel, work, or congregate anywhere ever again. Great…now the next time I go see a Broadway show I'll be sitting next to some strung-out heroine-addled bum and his wacky friends who are supporting each other as they overdose their brains out. Good times…and totally logical, too.https://harmreduction.org/our-work/action/know-overdose-campaign/https://www.acsh.org/news/2020/08/27/city-san-francisco-pays-billboard-safe-heroin-injection-14994See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
Affordable Housing Debt and Real Estate with Heather Olson and Matthew Baptiste

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 27:41


Jon talks about Affordable housing debt and real estate with Heather Olson and Matthew Baptiste, Managing Directors with Berkadia Affordable Mortgage Banking. Heather Olson, Managing Director at Berkadia, specializes in Affordable Housing debt originations with a focus on developments that utilize low-income housing tax credits and tax-exempt bonds. Since 2012, she has been directly involved in over $1 billion of loan financings from various capital sources, including Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, life companies, and HUD. Prior to joining Berkadia, Ms. Olson served as Senior Director at Walker & Dunlop. She joined W&D through the acquisition of CWCapital in 2012. While at W&D, Ms. Olson assisted in originating Freddie Mac's first ever Tax-Exempt Loan (“TEL”), a debt structure that leads the industry in 4% LIHTC debt financing. Ms. Olson holds a Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance from Kennesaw State University and earned her Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) designation in 2014. She was honored in 2018 as a Young Leader by Affordable Housing Finance and with the 2019 Women with Vision Award. She is an alumni member of MBA's Future Leaders Class of 2019 and was awarded ULI Atlanta's Emerging Leader award in 2020. Beyond the company, Ms. Olson is a member of the Board of Directors of HOPE Atlanta. HOPE Atlanta is one of Georgia's oldest non-profits whose mission is to make homelessness in Georgia rare, brief and non-recurring. She is also an active supporter of two non-profits the Georgia Ovarian Cancer Alliance and Goshen Valley Boys Ranch. — Matthew Baptiste, Managing Director, brings close to two decades of commercial real estate experience to Berkadia. Mr. Baptiste focuses on loan originations through Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, HUD and Private Debt funds. Mr. Baptiste has extensive affordable housing experience, structuring complex finance executions, including tax-exempt bonds and federal and state tax credits. Before joining Berkadia, Mr. Baptiste was a Senior Director with Walker & Dunlop's Multifamily Finance Platform. He has structured and originated over $1 billion of new mortgage debt during his tenure. Mr. Baptiste joined Walker & Dunlop in 2012 through the acquisition of CWCapital LLC. Prior to CWCapital, he began his career in the commercial real estate industry at Berkely Point, formerly known as Deutsche Bank Berkshire Mortgage. Mr. Baptiste attended West Virginia Tech University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Management and a minor in marketing. Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Heather Olson and Matthew Baptiste: Website: www.berakdia.com

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台
2022年046期:smart精灵#1,开局就是王炸?

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 54:12


※ 投稿邮箱:418150505@qq.com※ 本文章发布于订阅号:百车全说,订阅号阅读更加方便,欢迎关注前两天smart精灵#1正式上市,售价18.16-22.66万。这款车在男生和女生眼中,有着截然不同的两种评价。男生觉得,有20多万还不如买特斯拉Model 3,为啥要买这么小一台车。空间又不实用,性能也一般,续航也就是正常水平。但是女生觉得,我的妈呀,太好看了,外形奶凶奶凶的,内饰一股浓浓的奔驰味儿,才20多万就能买到这么漂亮的车车,还看什么Mini,赶紧买买买。所以,smart精灵#1上市当天服务器都被挤爆了,大家永远不要低估女性的消费能力,太可怕了。很多客户坚持不懈地点击下单页面,花了4个多小时才付款成功,真的是花钱的比收钱的还着急。为什么大家这么急着下单呢?因为早定早提,现在都是APP下单模式,大定支付之后,就会有一个订单号,都是系统自动生成的。今后这些订车的车主会在一个群里聊天,谁先提,谁后提大家都一清二楚。今天最新的消息,smart精灵#1在6月6日20点上市,截止到6月7日22点接到的订单数量已经超过2022年全年排产数量。换句话说,当你今天听到这期节目,再去订购smart精灵#1,提车时间铁定是在明年了。如果明年才能提车,这里就存在两个不确定因素了,一是国补,二是购置税减免。大家都知道,买新能源车国家是有补贴的,俗称国补。自2022年1月1日起,续航里程大于等于300km且小于400km的车型补贴9100元,续航里程大于等于400km的车型补贴1.26万元。插电式混合动力(含增程式)乘用车,纯电动续航里程≥50(NEDC工况)或纯电动续航里程≥43(WLTC工况)补贴4800元。如果有朋友在2021年咨询过电动车,到了2022年就会明显感知价格变贵了,相较于2021年,2022年国补退坡30%。至于2023年,国补还能给多少,是再退坡30%吗?错,2022年12月31日之后上牌的车辆不再给予补贴。所以,各位看看今年是不是各大车企都在涨价,对外解释的原因是缺芯,是真是假只有他们自己知道。但是我总觉得,这一轮新能源车价格上涨,跟2023年取消补贴多多少少有些关系,厂家摸准了客户心里,今年不买,明年至少国补12600元你铁定是拿不到了。所以你看今年的涨价幅度,超过1万的都很少。至于购置税,明年新能源车到底还会不会像现在这样全免,这也很难说,哪怕象征性地收一点,对于像smart精灵#1这种20多万的车来说,也是几千上万的费用。所以认定今年要提车的准车主们,肯定是早早锁定自己心仪的车型,就等着一上市就下订单,然后尽快提车。按照smart官方说法,Premium版本10月开启交付,Pro+版本11月开启交付,Pure版本12月开启交付。也就是说,最早一批买顶配Premium,赶在年底前提车应该问题不大,中配Pro+就有点悬了,最低配Pure版估计更悬。如果现在还没订车,那今年提车就更别想了,除非你买最顶配,而且得出现大批顶配车主退订,你顶上去才有可能年底提到车,那赌的就是运气了。smart精灵#1性价比高吗?smart精灵#1这款车其实谈的不是性价比,而是喜欢。在喜欢的人眼里,其他车与它没有任何可比性。虽然在网络上,有拿欧拉好猫、芭蕾猫,甚至比亚迪海豹、大众ID.3和ID.4去对比这款车,实际我与一线销售沟通下来,几乎没有客户对比过这些车,都是看一眼就决定买了。这跟买MINI的客户是一个道理,看上了MINI,你还能对比什么车呢?人家就是冲着颜值买的,不是价格高低问题。smart其实在很多小姐姐眼中,等同于奔驰,这个品牌的溢价能力其实不低。虽然中间停产了好几年,但是smart这个标的认知度还是很高的。如果你仔细看smart精灵#1这款车,在B柱位置上还有一个小铭牌,英文写着STYLED BY,旁边是奔驰三叉星标志。就这么一个小目标,在小姐姐眼里整个车的档次一下子拉高了。不要小看这一个细节,相信我,很多小姐姐可能不关心续航,不关心功率扭矩,不关心车联网和智能驾驶,但一定会对这个标记忆犹新。当年腾势X在翼子板和内饰面板上,也曾有过Styled by Mercedes-Benz,可惜没有奔驰三叉星标志,差点意思。再加上腾势这个品牌知名度太低,从里到外都透露着浓浓的比亚迪气息,就算放在奔驰4s店卖,客户的接受度还是太低。而smart精灵#1就不一样了,虽然用的是吉利SEA浩瀚架构,但是外观和内饰由梅赛德斯-奔驰全球设计团队负责操刀设计,所以从里到外都是浓浓的奔驰气息,特别是内饰,我相信小姐姐坐进去就走不动路了。我们也不用去比较它有多像奔驰,至少一坐进去就给人感觉是“精装修”,小姐姐拿着20万预算再去看其它车,恐怕很难再找到这种装修风格,还是要回头看这车。而SEA浩瀚架构下量产的第一款车极氪001,口碑也不错,所以小姐姐如果要咨询男朋友的意见,男朋友一查这车的背景,发现平台架构上与极氪001同根同源,也不会有多大意见。总结下来就一句话,这台车大概率是女生买来自己开,或者男生买来给女生开。另外,这台车的上市也让欧拉芭蕾猫压力巨大。芭蕾猫在5月20日预售,预售价19.3-22.3万。据官方说,5个小时订单破3万,我们可以相信这个数据。毕竟有欧拉好猫,平均月销1万台左右,女性消费者开始熟悉这个品牌,也愿意花10几万去消费这个品牌。芭蕾猫无非是把客户预算从10几万价位拉高到了20几万。只不过万万没想到,smart精灵#1不按套路出牌,一开始预售价19-23万,最终正式上市增加了一款最低配,一下把价格拉低到了18.16-22.66万。入门价位比欧拉芭蕾猫低了1万多,顶配也没比芭蕾猫高出多少。这两台如果硬拼性价比,欧拉芭蕾猫肯定打不过smart精灵#1,这两款车都是选顶配得最多。22.66万的smart精灵#1对比22.3万的欧拉芭蕾猫,配置上多出了一大堆,而且smart精灵#1还是无框车门,单就这一点也可以让客户做出选择。如果男生对比的话,可能还会看出来,smart精灵#1是后置后驱,芭蕾猫是前置前驱。不过,论颜值来选车的话,小姐姐可能还是会有很多喜欢“甲壳虫”的设计,不喜欢smart精灵#1这种普通suv的造型。所以芭蕾猫大概率会就目前订单和产能的配比,以及新增订单和退订客户比例情况,来决定即将上市的价格,以及大定客户的权益。不过我相信,芭蕾猫不会跟smart精灵#1打价格战,因为这种车型搞定的是“感性客户”,对价格敏感度不高。不可能因为芭蕾猫比smart精灵#1便宜5000块钱,小姐姐转身就去买了芭蕾猫。不信你可以问问身边的女孩子,是不是这样。smart精灵#1三个配置怎么买?smart精灵#1一共有三款配置,根据一线销售反馈,9成以上客户定的都是顶配车型。是因为小姐姐们头脑发热,无脑冲吗?不可能,因为每一个小姐姐身边都有好几个可以帮她做参谋的小哥哥。smart精灵#1顶配Premium版本定价22.66万,低配Pure版本定价18.16万,差价4.5万,再感性的小姐姐看到这个差价也会变的理性。但是再看这4.5万差价换来的变化,小姐姐们又回归感性了。她们一咬牙,一跺脚,要不还是一步到位吧,因为顶配实在是太香了。让小姐姐选择顶配的原因,不仅是配置上更丰富,像是Beats音响、全景天幕、矩阵大灯、真皮座椅、HUD、手机无线充电、感应后备厢,自动泊车,L2级智能驾驶辅助等等都配齐了。更重要的一点,是在色彩搭配上,smart精灵#1部分颜色只能顶配可选,这样一来小姐姐们的选车思路就彻底改变了。之前领克也有过类似玩法,比如领克01,领克05都有类似中高配可以“换皮肤”的选项,像是车身的撞色饰条颜色可选,还有内饰蓝白配色高配专属等等。这次smart精灵#1更直接,在APP的选车页面上,直接分为“更看重性能,从基础配置开始”和“更看重外观,从颜色选择开始”。如果你选择“更看重外观,从颜色选择开始,”那么直接进入颜色选择界面后,你连车辆高中低配都看不见,选不同颜色,下面的车价就会直接变化。我估计有的小姐姐直到订车,可能都没搞懂车价与颜色之间的关系。实际上,smart精灵#1理论上有9种颜色可选,免费的有三种:白、黑、银;加3000元可以再多选两种颜色:红、黄,但是仅限中高配可选,低配不可以;加5000元可以再多选三种颜色:时光绿、时空蓝、波普粉;加6000元可以独享哑光灰配色,但是以上四种配色仅限顶配才可以选。smart运营团队真的太懂女性车主了,想赚她们的钱,就应该在配色上玩些花样。配置对她们来说,其实没有那么重要,L2级智能驾驶辅助,估计没有多少小姐姐真的敢用,如果单从配置上选装,我估计大多数小姐姐就买低配了。很多女生特别喜欢波普粉和时光绿这两个配色,那对不起,你就必须买顶配。女生买车真的跟买衣服一样,这套选车逻辑肯定是女性想出来的,直男就算熬成了秃头,也不可能想出这种方法。不过就算从配置上选装,我相信大多数人也不会买低配和中配,因为最低配Pure版还是手动织物座椅、手动空调,没有全景天幕,甚至连倒车影像都没有,更别提什么L2级智能驾驶辅助了。中配Pro+版其实配置已经足够小姐姐们用了,19.66万与顶配差价3万,一方面前面说了颜色选择倒逼她们买顶配,另一方面,HUD抬头显示、手机无线充电、Beats音响、车内香氛、加热座椅、还有smart广告里那套炫酷无比的流光粒子格栅、D柱发光灯、迎宾灯、流水灯,这些都只有顶配才有。只要有一样能戳中小姐姐内心,甭管差价3万还是4万,铁定拿下。所以我在想,理论上Premium版本10月交付,Pro+版本11月交付,Pure版本12月交付。9成客户定的都是Premium顶配版,我估计年底能把顶配交付完就不错了,Pro+客户能否提到车都悬。smart精灵#1的销售政策smart精灵#1的销售政策也挺有意思,之前交了500元小定的客户,在9月30日之前交大定,就可以获得1000元尾款抵扣。现在订车的客户,截止到7月底,低配可以抵扣2000元,顶配可以抵扣9000元,这里很有意思,中配一分钱抵扣都没有。其实这玩的是心理战,就是让你买顶配,所以明面上看,中配和顶配差价3万,实际上只是差价2万。不仅如此,9月底之前交大定,选颜色还可以抵扣2000元,大家回想一下之前选颜色的时候,顶配加了5000元是不是,现在又抵扣2000元,是不是更坚定买顶配了?这一套组合拳真可谓是拳拳到肉,小姐姐们哪里见过这么深的套路,顶配,必须顶配。除此之外,为了防止小姐姐们后悔,大定之后,在7月31日前不想买了,还可以退定。而且据我所知,大定之后,在7月底之前如果颜色反悔了,还可以进行修改,真的是把女性心里拿捏得死死的,买完就后悔的情况太多了,我估计今后还得有专属客服负责安慰劝导工作。另外,9月30日前订车,还赠送充电桩,首任车主三电系统终身质保、老smart车主和直系亲属赠送礼包,这些就很平常了,不用多说。总体来讲,smart精灵#1的销售政策,还是偏向于引导客户直接上顶配,而且出手比较大方,9000+1000+2000元,拿满等于抵扣了12000元。所以,我说后期欧拉芭蕾猫上市,肯定要在销售政策上做文章,因为smart精灵#1并不是按指导价销售,客户实际到手价格是厂家补贴后的。另外,买这种车型还要注意一点,那就是后期的社群福利。欧拉的社群运营能力是否比smart强我不清楚,但至少从吉利品牌整体运营线下社群的能力上看,是优于长城团队的。所以我登录smart官方APP看了一下,发现还真是这样。车一台还没交付,全国各地的车友群已经建立起来了,还有什么篮球、健身、羽毛球、撸猫、撸狗、露营群等等。这类主打时尚女性和年轻人的车型,私域流量真的非常关键,后期持续的竞争力高低,完全取决于社群的运营能力,产品一战定胜负,这种车型后期也没有太大的提升空间,无非加个电机出个性能版,或者搞些跨界联名出些特别定制版。电动车造的好不好看技术,电动车卖的好不好看营销。传统合资品牌为什么做电动车不难,卖电动车那么难,主要是在新能源领域的品牌影响力太弱了,弱到几乎可以忽略不计。现如今,年轻客户在新能源领域的消费理念、消费方式都在发生非常大的改变,不能再用传统燃油车那套方法来卖车了。smart精灵#1为什么与老款smart差别这么大?我觉得吉利真的非常聪明,他们摸透了smart这个品牌的价值,也摸清楚了一部分客户,特别是女性客户对于电动车的真正需求,品牌、颜值和社群服务。品牌和颜值交给奔驰,社群运营和电动车底层技术吉利自己来弄,这样合作出来的产品正好是取长补短,发挥各自的优势。有人说现在的smart已经不是当初的smart了,这有什么关系呢?samrt客户根本就没有情怀,不像mini客户,还有一些迷恋它的赛道基因,多少有些情怀。smart也正是因为没有情怀,所以才敢于抛弃原先的设计思路,在吉利入股奔驰之后,重新规划和设计这个品牌,我觉得smart这个起步可以说非常完美了,今后只要产品不要爆出质量问题,服务能做到位,持续热销的概率还是非常大的,我很看好这个品牌。说不定有一天,媳妇跟我说,这车挺漂亮的,我可能就把家里其中一辆卖了换smart精灵#1,不过对于不缺车用的客户来说,建议还是等等看MINI纯电后期上市是什么表现,毕竟还有一点情怀在里面。MINI纯电之后还是那个MINI,但是smart纯电之后已经不是当初那个smart了,你说对吗?可以添加微信46415254加入我们的社群音频图文更新在订阅号: 百车全说每期抽三条留言,每人赠168元的“芥末绿”燃油添加剂一瓶点击订阅,每周三,周六更新会有提醒新听友可以搜索:百车全说2014,百车全说2015,百车全说2016,往期300多个小时的节目可供收听

Hacks & Wonks
Emily Alvarado, Candidate for 34th LD State Representative

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 34:40


On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Emily Alvarado about her campaign for State Representative in the 34th Legislative District - why she decided to run, how the last legislative session went, and her thoughts on how to address housing affordability and zoning, Washington's regressive tax structure, homelessness, climate change, public safety, drug decriminalization, COVID response and recovery. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Emily at https://www.facebook.com/emilyforwa.   Resources Campaign Website - Emily Alvarado: https://emilyforwa.com/   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm very pleased to welcome to the show - Emily Alvarado, who is a candidate for the 34th District State Representative seat in Position 1 - welcome to the show. [00:00:48] Emily Alvarado: Thank you so much, Crystal. It's good to be here. [00:00:51] Crystal Fincher: Good to be here, great to meet you. I wanted to start off just talking about what made you choose to run? [00:00:59] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, well, I'm running for the State Legislature because I believe that government has an obligation to meet the basic needs of all people, and because I've spent my entire career in public service fighting for just that. I'm a lawyer - I went to the University of Washington School of Law, where I was a Gates Public Service Law Scholar. I'm a Latina, raised in a multicultural household, and I'm committed to advancing racial equity and defending civil rights. I'm the child of public school educators and the parent of two kids in Seattle Public Schools, and I care about the future of our public education and the future of our environment. I'm also running because housing is a human right - everyone deserves access to safe, affordable housing, and I'll bring over a decade of experience to the Legislature to address housing affordability. [00:02:00] Crystal Fincher: Well, that is a huge thing - it's a crisis, as you are very aware of. So what should we be doing to make housing affordable, and is part of the solution increasing density in single-family neighborhoods? [00:02:16] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, thanks for that question. Clearly, our housing system is broken and needs to be repaired. We do not have enough housing choices throughout the state. We have a shortage of hundreds of thousands of homes to meet the needs of people, so we do need to pursue options to create more housing choices in all communities. We need duplexes, triplexes, ADUs in all communities - so we have options for multi-generational households, for first-time home buyers, for seniors to live with their grandchildren, so that we can have inclusion and diversity. We need more density by our public transit investments so that people can have access to their jobs and to transit, and we can address climate change through our housing policy. We need more from the market, and we also know that the market is necessary, but it's not sufficient, to solve our affordable housing crisis. It has not, and will not, be able to serve the needs of extremely low income people, people with no income, people on a fixed income, people working part-time jobs at minimum wage. So I think we also need significant and deep and sustained investment in publicly-financed, permanently affordable housing - including housing to meet the needs of people experiencing homelessness, like permanent supportive housing, which is the proven evidence-based cost-effective and humane solution to addressing homelessness. And we need deep public investments in housing for seniors, for people with disabilities, for low income working families - we need those investments. And third, to help take bold action for housing, we need to make sure that we're protecting tenants and homeowners. Tenants cannot be subject to excessive year-over-year rent increases that exceeds the wages and wage increases of normal families. We can't have year-over-year rent increases that really hamstring people on fixed incomes. So I would take action to make sure that we're providing stability and that we're providing access for tenants. We have to make sure that people who have criminal histories have access to housing, so we're not continuing recidivism and a cycle of incarceration. So there's a lot of steps to take on housing, and I'll put together that bold plan rooted in experience, a deep understanding of what all levels of government - local, state, and federal - what we can do to work together. And I'll build coalitions because this is urgent and it's time to take action now. [00:05:15] Crystal Fincher: You bring a wealth of knowledge with you as a former director of the City of Seattle Office of Housing - you talk about a lot of different tools and we certainly need to be taking a lot of action, varied types of action, to address this crisis. So it sounds like social housing should be on the table, rent control should be on the table - have all of the tools available at our disposal - and those are the types of things that you would be voting to enable or implement if you were in the Legislature. [00:05:46] Emily Alvarado: Absolutely. We need all of the tools and we need significant resource to invest to make the tools actionable. We know that - [00:05:57] Crystal Fincher: Where do we get those resources? [00:05:59] Emily Alvarado: Right. Well, we know that Washington State has the most regressive tax system in the entire country where poor people, low income folks are disproportionately paying a higher percentage of their income to contribute to really critical public necessities - like housing, like education and childcare, like shared investments in transportation and our infrastructure. I believe we need to fix our regressive tax system and we need to do so with urgency. I support a range of strategies to create more progressive revenue, and I think we need to act quickly because that's the kind of scale and resource that it's going to take to solve our most pressing issues. [00:06:49] Crystal Fincher: I think we absolutely need so many of these things - that you are bringing tools to the table that have been shown, have been proven to help in these crises. Looking at how we've been handling the homelessness crisis - you talked so eloquently about supportive housing being critical - we have seen over the past few years, an approach that - it seems sweeps-focused and the criminalization of homelessness and moving the unhoused population around. Okay, you can't be here - we're sweeping your location without providing those services, or without ensuring that services that are relevant to the people needing them are available. Have we been taking the wrong approach by doing that? And what should we be doing? [00:07:51] Emily Alvarado: It's not acceptable to simply move people experiencing homelessness from one place to another. What people need is housing, and they need services and supports to live healthy and stable lives. What we're seeing right now are the outcomes of 40+ years of intentional policy from the federal level - disinvestment and privatization that has really exacerbated and created the homelessness crisis that we see today. Housing is one of the issues in our country where - there is no entitlement to housing. At the federal level, if you need affordable housing, if you have an extremely low income, you apply to a lottery to receive a Section 8 voucher. We can't have a lottery system driving the extent to which people are able to meet their basic human needs. We need to ensure that all people have access to housing. And I think first and foremost, that means that we need our federal government to step back up and reinvest in housing, and reinvest in human services and in social services, and in homelessness supports like through the McKinney-Vento Program, like through the Section 8 voucher program, like through investments in public housing and the National Housing Trust Fund and HUD 202 and 811 - so many sources that we've seen disinvestment from. We need the federal government to reinvest. While they're working on doing that, we need to continue to take action at the local and at the state level to meaningfully solve the problem. And we know what works. As I mentioned earlier, permanent supportive housing works - to move people into a home and give them the necessary behavioral health, substance abuse, social supports that they need to be stable and safe. Unfortunately, we do not have the resources to adequately and sufficiently scale up our permanent supportive housing response to be able to provide the housing that's necessary. In addition, Washington has one of the worst behavioral health systems in the nation. And so we've seen that people's behavioral health challenges have increased significantly throughout the pandemic, across the board - in our schools, in jails, in hospitals, and on the street - you see this and yet more than half of the people who need support of mental health services can't access those services. There's nowhere to go. And the people who are providing those services are burnt out and there's not enough of a workforce to be providing adequate mental health and behavioral health supports, especially when people are in a time of crisis. We have to invest deeply in our behavioral health system - make sure that it's a one-stop place where people know how to get care and treatment. And I believe that those kinds of investments that I would work deeply on as a State legislator, paired with really thoughtful, scaled investment in permanent supportive housing and other measures to address poverty like universal basic income and other kinds of supports will make a meaningful difference - and we'll actually solve homelessness and provide dignity and stability to people who are suffering. [00:11:36] Crystal Fincher: So we just came out of a legislative session where some good things happened, some not so good things happened. What was your evaluation of this past session? [00:11:49] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, well, I think there were some significant record investments in areas in which we have under-investment, and we showed that the Legislature can lead. Good examples are in housing - the Legislature made record investments in housing, both in purchasing and acquiring buildings to help move people out of homelessness into housing, new resources for the state Housing Trust fund to invest in community development, equitable development, and affordable housing projects across the state. New resources in housing, especially to help make sure that frontline human service and homeless service workers have compensation for the hard work that they've done during the pandemic. On that end, there were great strides. Similarly, record level of investments in transportation with a real emphasis on creating investments in mobility, in electrification, in buses and Metro and ferries. Those really show that we're moving in the right direction of knowing where we need to invest our resources. Unfortunately, I think we didn't make as strong strides on the policy end. And I know that it was a short session and I look forward to entering the Legislature next year with some strong plans to really move the needle, especially on housing policy, but on other issues as well. We need to make sure that we're bringing together coalitions of people and we're establishing policies and plans now, that can help impact generations to come. Another place where generational-level policy is needed is around planning in our communities for growth. It was really unfortunate last legislative session - that we lost the chance to include in our Growth Management Act and in our comprehensive planning policies - a focus on climate change and on environmental justice. We could have said that all communities under GMA that are planning are prioritizing efforts to address climate change, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to reduce vehicle miles traveled. And instead, we were not able to bring that across the finish line. I'll work hard to make sure that, from a policy perspective, in addition to investments, we're planning thoughtfully on issues like climate change, like housing, like healthcare - to make sure that we have strong, progressive, forward-looking policy. [00:14:44] Crystal Fincher: I think you bring up a number of excellent points. And I do think it was really critical that we saw the types of investments in mobility and transit, and the types of transportation that will move us into a sustainable future. One of the things that a lot of folks talked about and saw was that while we were doing that, which is great, there were also a significant amount of investment in highway expansion and the types of things that - if we take two steps forward with the record transit investments, we take a step back with increasing, continuing to invest in highway expansion. Should we be investing in further highway expanse? [00:15:31] Emily Alvarado: I don't believe that's our priority. I don't think that investments in highway expansion have ever demonstrated that they serve the needs of community in a way that really focuses on equity, that focuses on mobility, that focuses on livability for communities. I would prioritize continued investments in public transportation, in connectivity, in multimodal transit and mobility - to make sure that people can really access communities in a way that is effective, efficient, affordable, and also people-centered. That's the kind of communities that we need to be building for our climate future - we need dense communities where people can walk, where we can have thriving small businesses, where people can bike, where people can commute with their children safely from one place to another. And as a legislator, those are the kinds of investments I would prioritize. [00:16:37] Crystal Fincher: I definitely want a legislator who prioritizes those types of things - will make life just better in so many ways for so many people. What more should we be doing to meet our 2030 climate goals? There's a lot of action that has been taken, but it doesn't have us on track to achieve our goals yet. What more do we need to do? And what will you lead on? [00:17:01] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, well, we obviously have a lot more to do. We have to move towards electrification of our transportation system, and we need to do so urgently and aggressively, and I'd support all of those efforts. As I've mentioned before, affordable housing policy is climate policy. And until we create the policy to build a future of having dense, compact, livable communities, we are never going to address the emissions that come from driving. And we need to prioritize that - one of the things that the state can be doing is to have more alignment in our investment around housing and transportation. I've spent a lot of my career at the local level working on equitable transit-oriented development - really making sure that we're purchasing property or using surplus property by our transit investments to create dense, affordable housing with community facilities, with cultural assets, so that we can both avoid or mitigate or prevent displacement. And also, so that low income people have an opportunity to live in communities by jobs and by transit - many of whom are the most transit-dependent people in our state. So alignment of our housing and transportation investments can make sure that we're creating the dense communities that are needed. We also know that from a carbon emissions perspective, our housing stock is one of the greatest drivers of carbon. And so we really need to take seriously an effort to not only build towards the future, where we're building buildings that are climate resilient, but also looking at our existing building stock. We need new financing tools, new partnerships to meaningfully upgrade and retrofit our existing buildings to move away from fossil fuels towards electrification. And we need to do so with a prioritization on the people who are low income so that they are achieving the benefits, not only of climate justice, but also of electrification, which can bring air conditioning as we see changes in our weather and climate. [00:19:32] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. [00:19:32] Emily Alvarado: So I'll pursue continued strategies to build climate resilience through our housing policy. And lastly, Crystal, I don't want to move on from this topic without saying that - a focus on our climate justice work has to be environmental justice. We need to be investing in communities that are most impacted by air pollution, by water pollution - whose impacts are often aligned with the same impacts of housing policy, including redlining and racially restrictive covenants. We need to start by investing in those communities through grants and partnerships and resources so that there is genuine environmental justice planning that happens, that helps to build the policy platform and strategies for our future. And those are the kinds of strategies that I would follow and invest in. [00:20:32] Crystal Fincher: Our Legislature certainly would benefit from an increased focus and centering and prioritization of that, and I appreciate you prioritizing that. We, in this last legislative session - the Democratic majority and the Legislature overall also took some new action, reversed some prior action - when it comes to public safety and police accountability reforms. Do you think they did the right thing? [00:21:05] Emily Alvarado: I completely support the efforts that were made two years ago to make sweeping reforms in police accountability. And I'm glad that we really took the steps to take meaningful action - it's necessary. I would not have supported the rollback of those laws. That's not the right direction. We need to be intentional and focused on addressing racial bias in policing, on addressing over-policing of communities of color. And I would make sure that we continue to have systems of accountability that can help to repair trust and help to get us back on a path towards real community-led, community-driven public safety. I think, outside of the conversation about the police accountability and police reform measures, we need to take public safety seriously by investing deeply in communities that have been impacted by violence and by intentional disinvestment for decades. And I would start by making sure that people have access to basic needs of housing, healthcare, education, that we have investments in youth activities, in civic infrastructure, in community facilities - so that we have healthy communities. We know that healthy communities are safer communities, they're less violent communities. That's where I believe that true public safety begins. I also think, as I mentioned before, that we need to be investing in a system of crisis response that's actually meeting the needs of what crisis people are facing. If people are facing a behavioral health crisis, we might want to respond with a behavioral health response rather than a police response - and law enforcement agrees with that. So again, we need investments in those kinds of behavioral health crisis responses so that we can meet people where they are and treat people as they need to be treated. I also believe that we need to seriously address gun violence in order for our communities to be safe. I appreciate the efforts of the state to create the new Office of Firearms, Safety and Gun Prevention, Violence Prevention. As a legislator, I would make investments in that office. I would scale the work of that office and make sure that they are prioritizing - themselves - investments and a commitment to communities that are most impacted by gun violence. [00:23:57] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely makes sense. Another area that does impact how safe we are - how we're meeting people's needs who are in crisis - are those who are dealing with substance use disorder. And we've had this War on Drugs that - it's pretty universally recognized as a failure and ultimately as counterproductive. What should the approach to possessing drugs be - should it be treated as a criminal activity or a public health problem? How would you address that? [00:24:29] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, I would definitely start by treating substance abuse as a public health problem. And we know right now that - one, our laws have primarily been designed in a way to focus on criminalization and to focus on over-policing of communities of color. That's how our drug policy for decades has been designed at the federal level and locally. We need to undo those kinds of policies. We also need to make sure that people who are often caught up in systems of incarceration - that we're putting better interventions in place. People should not go to jail because they have a substance abuse disorder. They should be treated for the substance abuse disorder. And that's an investment in public health, that's an investment in our healthcare systems, and in investing in public health and healthcare in a way that's also meeting people where they are - through community-based health care centers, through street-based outreach and services, so that people can get treatment. As I mentioned earlier, too, part of the cycle of recidivism and incarceration is because we put intentional barriers up that don't allow people to live healthy, stable lives. We need to take action now on ensuring that people who have criminal history in the criminal justice system can access housing. People need to be able to have safety and security of a home - and without that, there continues to be people who are caught up in systems over and over again. And then our laws on drug possession and others become other tools by which we continue incarceration. I'll oppose those. [00:26:32] Crystal Fincher: We are still in this time where COVID is spreading, still impacting people. In fact, right now the rates are increasing and even the hospitalizations are increasing. And it seems like a lot of people have just decided to be done with COVID, even though COVID has not yet decided to be done with us. What more should the Legislature be doing to help prevent the spread and mitigate the impacts of COVID? [00:26:59] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, well, first of all, we need to make sure that our healthcare system, which has been serving and supporting people through the pandemic for three years now - over two years now - has the resources that it needs to really serve people. And we know that right now we have a nursing shortage. We know that many of the people who work in the healthcare industry are burnt out, or are quitting, and are overworked. And we need to address that kind of a staffing issue if we want to provide adequate safety for our community, and we want to provide appropriate health care for our community. So I would work on efforts that didn't move forward last legislative session - to make sure that we have staffing safety for nurses and for nursing workers, so that we can have a strong, robust health workforce. We need that as part of our future. We also have to continue to invest in the underlying systems that make people feel comfortable taking days off when they're sick and being at home with their children. Unfortunately, we do have so much economic insecurity and job insecurity that people can't be at home. I'll fight hard for safe workplaces and to make sure that we work on policies so that when people are sick, they can be at home. I'm proud to have support from many labor organizations because I'll fight to make sure that workers can put themselves and their health and their safety before overworking. [00:28:53] Crystal Fincher: Well, and as we conclude this conversation today, I'm wondering - if you're talking to a voter, who's trying to decide between you and your opponent, trying to decide who's most aligned with their values, who they can most count on to fight for what they need - what would you tell them in terms of you versus your opponent and how they should approach that decision? [00:29:20] Emily Alvarado: Look, I believe that we can build a future that works for all Washingtonians. I am hopeful. I believe that investing in robust housing, in healthcare, in childcare, in education and infrastructure - I believe that's absolutely necessary to build strong communities and a thriving middle class. In a state and a region with incredible opportunity, I believe we can have shared prosperity, I believe we can solve our biggest challenges. The difference between me and my opponent is that I've spent my entire career working for social justice. I've spent my life fighting for families who need housing, for individuals experiencing homelessness, for people who want connection and belonging, and for communities who want safe thriving neighborhoods. I have a track record of not only advocating, but also on delivering, on implementing policies, on investing in housing and services for people who need it, and advancing creative solutions. My track record and demonstrated commitment is clear. My personal commitment to social justice and progressive change is clear, as is my ability to bring people together and solve our biggest challenges. [00:30:42] Crystal Fincher: Appreciate that. And just final question - as director of the Office of Housing, certainly you have a lot of responsibility. You were working within an administration that some people have a lot of questions about when it came to their commitment, particularly with former Mayor Jenny Durkan, to the same kinds of values that you talk about. How would you characterize your work within that administration, or your work despite that administration - whichever one is more appropriate - when people are trying to figure out how you fit within that and how you were aligned with Mayor Durkan and her approach? [00:31:21] Emily Alvarado: Yeah, thanks for that pointed question - I appreciate it. I think that the track record that I have of creating progressive outcomes as director at the Office of Housing, at one of the more challenging times of our recent history with tense political tensions, is demonstrative of my success and the effectiveness that I would bring to the State Legislature. I got things done at a time when council and the mayor didn't agree. At a time when I didn't always agree with the mayor, we still moved progressive policy. Just remember - during that time, I was able to make record investments in affordable housing - record investments. I made the greatest number investments in BIPOC-led community-based housing organizations that have ever been made. We implemented a permanent supportive housing pilot to triple our annual production of permanent supportive housing as a COVID response, including by using federal resources. We got more resources to buy buildings and buy land - to move people out of homelessness. We passed record policies on addressing displacement, community preference policy - making sure that communities can stay in place and access affordable housing. I created a rental assistance program during COVID and invested in BIPOC-led, community-based organizations to provide resources to the most impacted communities. I implemented foreclosure prevention policies targeted in communities facing the highest risk of displacement. So outside of the administration, I delivered clearly on the values that I hold dear and I'm transparent about. I worked deeply with community and maintained and built strong, authentic community relationships. And I brought people together to get things done - that's what we need in the Legislature - someone who's going to bring people together and get progressive policy accomplished. [00:33:45] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much for your time today, for this conversation, and appreciate the time that you spent. Thank you so much. [00:33:53] Emily Alvarado: Thank you, Crystal - I appreciate it. [00:33:55] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

Syndication Made Easy with Vinney (Smile) Chopra
Trends in Multifamily Financing

Syndication Made Easy with Vinney (Smile) Chopra

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 48:45


Welcome to Syndication Made Easy with Vinney Chopra! Today's we have the Managing Director/SVP of Northmarq's Orlando office  Melissa Marcolini Quinn as a guest on our show. Melissa has been actively involved in the commercial real estate industry since 1996. She joined the Orlando office of NorthMarq Capital, LLC in 2004 and has become one of the company's top real estate investment bankers specializing in the origination of Debt, Joint Venture Equity, and Structured Finance.  Melissa has closed a variety of commercial real estate transactions across the country that included multifamily (both market-rate and affordable housing), hospitality, office, industrial, and retail. In just the past two years she has originated transactions within 13 different states and the District of Columbia. What will you learn: Commercial real estate Refinance How the HUD lenders work Fixed and variable rate mortgage  Equity financing  In this video, learn how to build generational wealth and more #realestate strategies with Mr. Smile. ------------------------------------------------ About Vinney (Smile) Chopra: Vinney is a real estate investor, syndicator, International best-selling author, host of 4 podcasts, multifamily educator, mentor, dedicated husband of over 40 years and father of 2 children-Neil and Monica, residing in Danville, California (near San Francisco) for 40+ years. Vinney came to this country with only $7 in his pocket and a dream. Vinney has now built a portfolio of over 6,500 units amounting to over $650 Million in the multifamily, senior assisted living and hospitality arenas. He is passionate about helping others achieve financial freedom and giving back to our seniors who have given us so much. Learn more about Vinney: https://vinneychopra.com/ Learn more about investing with Vinney: https://vinneychopra.com/investor/ Apply for Mentorship: https://vinneychopra.com/mentorship/ Vinney's Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/VinneyChopra/videos Vinney's Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vinney-smile-chopra/ Vinney's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vinneychopra/ Vinney's Free Book: https://vinneychopra.com/freebook/ ------------------------------------------------

Fly Brothers
Session 36

Fly Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 51:10


In this session, B shares his time on a kayak pack trip on the western slopes of the Sierra, while Hud reviews his luck fishing some private water on the cusp of Big Sur.  Spring is heating up, and so are adventures for the fly brothers. Tune in to see where they've been and what's next on their agenda to explore. Fly Brothers are a pair of fly bum brothers out west, who enjoy exploring new water, a variety of fly tackle, a variety of fish, and sharing good times.Good drifts and stay tight to the fly friends. Check out prior and new episodes. 

She Boss Talk
BREAKING: SBA EIDL, ERTC, PPP, GRANTS, Q&A | STIMULUS UPDATE | MAY 31

She Boss Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 53:52


In today's stimulus update, Federal Govn't spent $5 Trillion on stimulus; states are issuing stimulus checks; Proposals for Inflation Relief; President Biden considering $10,000 Student loan cancellation; States rollout $10 BIllion State Small Business Credit Initiative; State stimulus checks; HUD rollout of 10.3 Billion grants; ERTC $400 billion payroll tax credit up to $26,000 per W2 employee; more grants available. Connect and watch live on Facebook: http://bit.ly/SheBossTalkShow Subscribe to our YouTube Channel http://bit.ly/SheBossTalkYouTube Subscribe to our Podcast https://anchor.fm/shebosstalk Follow us on Instagram: www.instagram.com/shebosstalk Follow us on Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/shebosstalk Opportunities to be part of the Show She Boss Talk Show Guest - Apply bit.ly/SBTShowGuests She Boss Talk Ambassador - Apply bit.ly/SBTAmbassador She Boss Talk Author Spotlight - Apply bit.ly/SBTAuthorSpotlight She Boss Talk Product Reviews - Apply bit.ly/SBTPRoductReview She Boss Sponsorship - Submit http://bit.ly/SBTSponsors Visit us at www.shebosstalk.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shebosstalk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shebosstalk/support

Hacks & Wonks
Leah Griffin, Candidate for 34th LD State Representative

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 42:35


On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Leah Griffin about her campaign for State Representative in the 34th Legislative District - why she decided to run, how the last legislative session went, her priorities, and her thoughts on addressing issues such as housing affordability and zoning, homelessness, drug decriminalization, public safety, climate change, and COVID response and recovery. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Leah at @voteleahgriffin.   Resources Campaign Website - Leah Griffin: https://www.voteleahgriffin.com/   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I am very happy to welcome a candidate for the 34th legislative district to the program, Leah Griffin. Welcome to the show. [00:00:47] Leah Griffin: Thank you so much for having me, Crystal. [00:00:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you for coming on. So starting out, what motivated you to run? [00:00:55] Leah Griffin: Well, I am somebody who never thought that she would run for public office. I am a school librarian - I love being a librarian - getting the right books into the hands of kids at the right time is a really wonderful thing to do with your life. And then in 2014, I was sexually assaulted and what I encountered was a healthcare and legal justice system that was fundamentally broken. Everything about the system that I encountered was flawed. I went to the closest emergency room and they shrugged their shoulders and said - we don't do rape kits here. The police refused to investigate or test the rape kit that I did eventually get, the prosecutors victim-blamed and threatened me if I continued to push. It was really a horrible experience, and so I knew that if the system didn't work for me - a white educated person with access to transportation, no kids, access to information - and I couldn't make this work, then it was absolutely broken and nobody was making it work. It wasn't working. And I knew that I couldn't let it persist, so I reached out to every single lawmaker that I thought would be able to make a difference - hundreds and hundreds of emails, and very few people responded. This is 2014, this is before the Me Too movement. This is a problem that has persisted from the beginning of time until now. And the first person that got back in touch with me was Senator Patty Murray, and I went into her office and told my story, and she was appalled that there were hospitals in the state that were turning survivors away without being able to care for them. So she commissioned a Government Accountability Office report and we found that only one in five hospitals in the United States were fully equipped to provide sexual assault exams to survivors who came to the emergency room. So together we wrote the Survivors' Access to Supportive Care Act, I traveled to DC a couple of times to lobby for the bill, I ended up getting bi-partisan co-sponsorship with Lisa Murkowski, and after eight years of work we passed the Survivors' Access to Supportive Care Act as part of VAWA [Violence Against Women Act] just this March. So that was pretty incredible. We got $150 million to train and pay sexual assault nurse examiners around the country. At the same time, I had been working with Representative Tina Orwall and Senator Dhingra on the Sexual Assault Forensic Examination Best Practices taskforce, and we have passed about a dozen reforms, more than a dozen reforms, to transform how survivors interact with the systems that failed me. Police wouldn't test my rape kit, so I made them test all 11,000 of the untested rape kits in Washington. We got trauma-informed training for police officers. We got survivors' rights, the first-in-the-nation rape kit tracking system, so we've been really making transformation. At the same time I worked to organize every Democratic organization in the state, the county, and the LDs for Referendum 90 to ensure that we had comprehensive, age-appropriate, medically accurate sexual health education in Washington. So this has really become my full-time unpaid job in addition to my full-time job as a librarian. When we passed the Survivors' Access to Supportive Care Act in March, the very next day I got an email from Representative Eileen Cody letting me know that she was retiring. And that timing to me felt like purpose, so I called the consultant that I've been talking to over at Upper Left and we launched a couple of days later. And running this campaign as somebody who just is a real person, who has led with vulnerability and passion and drive to make substantive change is, feels correct, right now. [00:05:16] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and the timing was right there. And I just want to say thank you for working so hard and for willing to put yourself and your trauma out there to help so many other people. It is - I wish so many people weren't surprised by how the system can revictimize survivors of sexual assault, and it's absolutely traumatic. It prevents so many people from coming forward and seeking justice in the first place, which just makes us all less safe because there's no accountability for folks who do this. And people know that odds are - it's not going to be pursued if you do violate someone, and to be part of turning that tide and changing that is just so important to so many men and women. I just really appreciate all the work that you've done for all that time. Just looking more at your campaign, just starting with how this legislative session, this past legislative session shaped up - there were great things that happened, there were some not so great things that happened. What was your evaluation of this past session? [00:06:36] Leah Griffin: It was short, and I think there were some real disappointments. Paramount for me was the un-passage of the Keep Our Care Act because we knew, the people that are in this work knew, that Roe was going to fall. And it - likely, it is. And we have this, I think, misconception that we're safe here in Washington. And I do not think that that is true. And we have a situation right now where religiously affiliated hospitals are taking over our hospital beds here in Washington State. And those religiously affiliated hospitals are limiting access to abortion care, they're limiting access to end-of-life care, and they're limiting access to gender affirming care. And that is dangerous for so many people and tragic for so many people. And this law would have - and I think it was no money either, there wasn't a massive budget implication even - would've given the Attorney General oversight into these mergers so we could prevent more of them from happening. So I think that bill not passing is a tragedy. The other bill - there's two others that I was really disappointed not passing - was the unionization of Legislature staff. I think that if we're going to have strong government that is working and functioning to make our communities' lives better, those people need to be paid and compensated and treated fairly. And to have our legislative staff making less than minimum wage is just wrong. So I was disappointed in that. And then the third thing that really was a disappointment was the Lorraine Loomis Act didn't pass. Salmon recovery is so important to our ecosystem, to our orcas, to the whole Puget Sound. And to have a bill like that not pass because of a 10% disagreement where farmers didn't want to pay the 10% of the total funding that was going to go into this bill - and I understand that - farmers are struggling too, and it disappoints me that lawmakers couldn't find that extra 10% and move that across the finish line, because I think that's the kind of compromise that we need to do to address the urgency of our environmental problems. [00:09:14] Crystal Fincher: It makes sense. And I should note that that staffer unionization bill died, but then was resurrected and it came back, and passed - and in a different iteration than was originally there. I think a lot of us definitely preferred the original bill and wish that would have been what passed out. Looking at, just what you're looking to do - what are your priorities? [00:09:42] Leah Griffin: So my number one priority is access to behavioral health care. When I look at the problems that our society faces with everything - with public safety, with homelessness, with education - so much of our challenges boil down to trauma. And we are not addressing that trauma in a meaningful and substantive way. So in my conversations with community, what I'm finding is that so many people are touched by behavioral health care needs. When I've talked to union reps - the number one issue of the firefighters union, without hesitation when I asked, was mental health care. And so my number one priority is making sure that people have access to the care that they need at the point of need. I know - I'm a school librarian - I see kids in school, especially after this pandemic, really struggling with their mental health. The isolation was hard, what we've experienced is a national trauma. When we look at kids - I saw you tweeted just the other day that Black students are much more likely to die by suicide than white students in our school systems locally, and we have to do something to address that. So part of the solution is making sure that we're incentivizing education and mental health care practitioners, because we simply do not have enough of them. The other part of that is that we need to embed those mental health care practitioners at the point of need. So one, make sure that they're in schools. In 2014, the people passed by initiative increased staffing, educational support staff and the Legislature never funded it. And we owe it to our kids to make sure that we're funding the support staff that is going to help them succeed. And right now, we - of course, need more librarians - but right now that really means mental health care practitioners. So we need that. I want to embed mental health care practitioners in unions. The suicide rate among labor is massively high - we have to address trauma, or we're going to keep perpetuating the same problems over and over and over until we do. So, that's number one. The other thing that I really want to lead on is access to abortion care. Like I said before, Roe's falling - talking to Planned Parenthood, we know that we're going to have a 385% increase in pregnant people coming to Washington to receive care. And we have to be ready for that. We have to be ready for that by limiting the acquisition of religiously affiliated hospitals, we have to make sure that we're funding abortions for people who come here - because as the increase happens, it's going to get more expensive because that's how our for-profit healthcare system works. So we need to make sure people can afford it until we can get a single-payer universal healthcare system, which is also absolutely a priority of mine. And we need to make sure that we're training doctors because other states are going to cease training in abortion procedures and we have to pick up that slack here. We have to. So I am fortunate that I've spent the last almost decade working in this space of training for healthcare practitioners and really excited to get in there and make sure that we get that done. Third, housing. We absolutely need to build more housing. That is the solution to our housing crisis. One of the areas that I particularly care a lot about is the missing middle housing, and it was a shame that that also didn't pass this year. But I'm really fortunate that I was able to purchase my house in 2015 via a HUD program that no longer does it - it's a stagnant program now, but it was a program that took government foreclosures and sold to first-time home buyers who are going to live in that home. So it cut out all of the foreign investors, all of the flippers, other investors and said that this is available for people in the community. So I was able to purchase a house for $225,000 in 2015. And that is the only reason that I, as a school librarian, am able to live in the City of Seattle. And I want that opportunity for more of my neighbors. And the state could be doing more in that regard. [00:14:48] Crystal Fincher: So should we be increasing density in single-family neighborhoods? [00:14:53] Leah Griffin: Yes, we have to. The days of - we have to increase density because we are so far behind in having the number of available units that we need in order to house people that if we're not increasing density, we're creating sprawl. And the impact on the environment, the impact on emissions, the impact on the quality of people's lives - is not fair to ask people who are lower income than the high-wage tech workers who live in Seattle to have to have an entirely different type of life because they can't afford to live where they work. I work in the service industry or have - I'm a school librarian, but I don't make enough to support my family. So during the summer, I waitress and bartend every summer until the summer before the pandemic, to earn enough money to be able to afford to live in this city. And my colleagues who waitress full-time or bartended full-time - it was so much harder to be able to make it here. And they should not be having to drive hours away in order to make a living to support their families. And the only way that we can make sure that people don't have to live that lifestyle is to build more housing. [00:16:39] Crystal Fincher: It makes sense. Related to housing is homelessness and the homeless crisis that we have. A lot of policy regarding homelessness is determined at the local level. What can you do in your capacity as a legislator to reduce the amount of people who are living outside? [00:17:00] Leah Griffin: At the state level, what I think that we need to do is make sure that we are reforming our tax structure so that we can have a more equitable society. Everything is - every policy is every other kind of policy. That makes sense, so every housing policy is also an education policy is also a climate policy is also a transit policy. So what we can do at the state level is make sure that our infrastructure, that our education system, that our healthcare system is funded and robust. Our for-profit healthcare system is bankrupting families, and that leads to homelessness. So we need to make sure that people can get healthcare without losing their homes. People don't have jobs that pay enough in order to afford housing, so we need to make sure that we have strong apprenticeship programs and strong education. Our number one priority in the Legislature is fully funding public education. That is anti-homelessness policy. And then for the less than a third of people experiencing homelessness who have substance abuse disorder, funding the behavioral health care access is homelessness policy. And those are all things that the state can do. [00:18:32] Crystal Fincher: Certainly agree with and appreciate you engaging with just the reality that behavioral health care is critically important, substance use disorder treatment is really important. Should possessing drugs be a crime, or is it more of a public health problem than a criminal problem? [00:18:54] Leah Griffin: I think possessing drugs should absolutely not be a crime. I think that it is absolutely a public health issue and it goes back to what I talked about at the beginning - is addressing trauma. And when we are punishing people for seeking respite from trauma, and we are compounding that trauma, we are compounding that behavior. So I am somebody who has been working in this criminal justice space as a survivor of violent crime. And I think that gives me a lot of privilege and leeway to say that our criminal legal system is horrendous. I know that we both did the IDF program - and as part of the Institute for Democratic Future program, I had an opportunity to tour the Monroe Correctional Facility and it shook me to my absolute core when I walked into that facility. Seeing these men in cages, with their faces through a small glass square just looking out into an empty room, was devastating for me to see. And then to learn that these men were laboring for 32 cents an hour in those facilities is devastating and wrong. So I think that when we think about our criminal justice or legal system, a lot of people want to see people punished and what I would really love, as a survivor of violent crime, is if we could shift the narrative from punishing people for misdeeds to giving people the tools and resources that they need to be better neighbors. And especially when it comes to drug use, that is an area where we can provide people with the tools to meet their needs. I would love to focus on a system that is less based on a carceral model and more based in the therapeutic model. If we're going to put people and separate people from society, then we need to be giving them the mental health treatment that they need to be better neighbors, the education that they need in order to come back out into our community and get a job, the access to community support that they need to maintain healthy relationships and learn relationship skills. Our neighbors deserve all of those things. And we, the victims of violent crime, deserve a system that is going to actually solve a problem and not just spend a ton of money to inhumanely house somebody for a couple of years and then put them right back on the street no better than they were when they went in. That doesn't serve anybody. So, I forgot where we were going with that, what the original question is, but - no, I don't think that we should be putting people in prison for possessing drugs. [00:22:27] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I'm with you. And I think you get to the heart of the matter in that what we're doing isn't working right now. It's not working for anyone - you speak so eloquently about how the system is failing survivors of violence of all types, and of crime of all types really. And right now, there is a lot of angst among people looking around and going - okay, well, I'm not feeling very safe right now, I feel like crime is increasing. I can see cops on the street and that seems like something even if I know maybe that is not the perfect solution. What would you tell someone who is saying - yeah, I recognize that what we're doing isn't working, it's not ideal. But how do we transition to a model that does - how do you make them safer? [00:23:28] Leah Griffin: It is so big, right? It is a monumental task, and that requires so many people in so many agencies and so many governing bodies working together to try to make this change. What I would say is that we have to fund our services and we can only fund our services through tax reform. And I am fully supportive of the Wealth Tax that people are talking, that Noel Frame is talking about. And I am one who is really hopeful about the future possibility of an income tax in Washington State - let me tell you why. What I've learned over the last eight years is that culture and policymaking have to move in tandem together in order to be effective. And how I know this is that I fought for years to end the rape kit backlog in Washington. And it was pushing against a wall for several years because sexual assault victims were not the priority. People did not care - tina Orwall cared, Senator Dhingra cared, Pramila Jayapal cared, Patty Murray cared - but there were people who didn't prioritize it at all. And this is an issue that is not super controversial. Most people would agree - yes, we should test the rape kits of sexual assault survivors. And then the Me Too movement happened, and we were able to pass that bill, we passed other reforms, really make a dent in how survivors interact with our systems. Right now, I think what the pandemic has done is shown us - us, the people, real working people - that we can have it better. It has shown us that there is opportunity to change systems in meaningful ways if we have the desire to do so. And I think that we see this in the push to unionize in the private sector - we're seeing huge gains there. And I think if we start talking to people, real working people, about what it actually looks like to have a progressive income tax, but also be able to roll back some of our other regressive taxes, like sales tax, like B & O tax. How would that look for people's lives? And I think that we can get enough people in business, that we can get enough people across our society to say - yes, that really makes sense. And we can have the votes to do the constitutional amendment to have a progressive income tax. I think that is possible. I think that is possible sooner than later, because I think people realize that we deserve better and we can have better. And if we work together and we tell our stories - that's my campaign theme - because I know that stories is how you change hearts and minds, connection is how you've changed hearts and minds - that we can have it. So that's what I think that we can do. [00:26:55] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, no that completely makes sense. And I really appreciate you speaking on your perspective as a survivor. So many times people try and speak for them, and you've spoken eloquently about this before. And really a lot of times what people characterize or try and score political points with by saying - well, think about the survivors - does not match what survivors are actually saying themselves and there are so many. [00:27:22] Leah Griffin: No, and it drives me - it drives me bonkers when people try to say - we can't have reformed systems because what about rapists? And I think to myself, the rapists are fine. They're not the ones going to jail. It's Black and Brown people possessing drugs, not rapists, and that's wrong. [00:27:49] Crystal Fincher: It is. Well, another thing that's wrong is our Earth hurdling towards a future that is in jeopardy because of how we're not taking action to address our climate. What should we be doing? What more should we be doing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and meet our climate goals? [00:28:15] Leah Griffin: We got to cap carbon. We got to stop big polluters from polluting - because we can recycle as many plastic bags as we can as individual consumers, but if we have corporations pumping CO₂ into the atmosphere at monstrous levels, then my plastic bag isn't going to save us. So one, we need to stop polluters. Two, we need to really speed up the shift to clean energy. And that's what's really exciting for me in the 34th, is that we just got in redistricting the whole manufacturing industrial area into the 34th LD. And that to me is a huge opportunity to invest in infrastructure for clean products, for solar production, for wind energy production. There's so much potential there for the shift that I'm really excited to talk with business leaders and look at the potential for that. I think that we need to be working towards a just transition from fossil fuels to clean energy. We need to be training people to work in that industry. We have an opportunity in Washington to really invest in tidal energy which is really exciting. And I think that we should be doing more - more of all of it. I grew up in the nineties, I'm a nineties kid, and I remember watching Fern Gully. I don't know if you remember Fern Gully - it was terrifying, absolutely a terrifying children's film - and being really scared and angry about what the polluters were doing to our environment. And now I'm 36 and I teach high school and I see that same anger in the faces of the teenagers that I teach. And I think to myself, where were the adults that were supposed to take care of this over the last 20 years? And this is part of why I'm running is because I'm that adult. And let's get it done. Let's stop not passing laws that are going to help restore salmon habitat over a 10% funding shortfall. Let's find that money and do it. Let's invest in energy production. Let's find ways to increase credits for electric cars. Let's increase density 'cause like I said before, every issue is every other issue. Let's increase density so that we have walkable neighborhoods so that people can get out of their cars. Let's invest in transit. I'm honored to have the endorsement of the local Amalgamated Transit Union. Let's get people on bikes, on transit, on buses, trains because good public transit is good climate policy. So many things that we can be doing and should be doing - really impressed with the transportation package last session. That's a highlight that the Legislature did before, so there's so many opportunities to help our planet and I'm excited to pitch in. [00:31:40] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, there are. You mentioned the transportation package, which did include record investments in transit, in non-car transportation, in building the infrastructure to support that and make it accessible and attractive to people which was really exciting. Some folks were not excited - I'm actually one of those folks who was not that excited - to see more highway expansion also included in that, just because our transportation sector is responsible for so much of our greenhouse gas emissions and it feels taking two steps forward with the transit investments and then taking a step back with - the highway expansion is a step back that we can't afford given the urgency of the action that is needed to mitigate the impacts that are coming. Would you support a package that included further highway expansion? Do you think we should be accelerating advancement and limiting it to our transportation investments into things that do reduce greenhouse gas emissions? [00:32:55] Leah Griffin: Yeah, I'm with you. But it's also really easy for me to sit here in the 34th legislative district in the City and say - of course, I don't want any highway expansion. Because I don't - there's no need for that here, anywhere close to here. I mean, I think about really rural areas and safety. And as we - unfortunately I do think that there is going to be climate refugees coming to the Northwest. This is one of the best places in the country to live. And, if Washington - Washington can't solve our climate crisis on our own, right? So no matter how much work we do, it is possible that things continue to get worse and people are going to come here. And I think there are universes where there are cities, more cities, more towns in what are now rural areas of Washington, where somebody could make an argument for a highway for safety purposes - being able to get to hospitals - but that's, I think that's like a hundred years out. So I think I can safely say with certainty that I would not support any highway expansions. And wish that that hadn't happened. [00:34:22] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and it does seem like there's so much, as you alluded to before, just opportunity to build more resilient communities, support communities to upgrade to more resilient infrastructure that reduces emissions, that is healthier for everyone. That that can be a transition that does create so many jobs and so much opportunity there. One conversation that a lot of people are still in right now is about the pandemic and that COVID is still spreading. A lot of people in society are over it and wanting to move forward and get on with it. And - hey, let's just live with it. A lot of other people are saying - I don't think we quite understand yet what living with COVID truly is, and that's a very risky proposition and just preventable. And seems to be having negative impacts on the supply chain, on companies' ability to hire, and just kind of our regional capacity to get things done in the way that we used to. Do you think we're doing enough to mitigate COVID, should more be happening as we work through this and try to move forward in what this new normal is, should the Legislature be doing more? [00:35:55] Leah Griffin: Yes, there's definitely more to do. I think that there are business owners that are still suffering and struggling because of the impacts of the pandemic. Schools, certainly, are still struggling and suffering because of the impact of the pandemic. Our hospitals, our nurses - my best friend is a nurse down in Burien, and I know that they're still struggling with being able to have sometimes even basic PPE still, which is ridiculous. So I think that - absolutely, we need to be funding our infrastructure. We also need to make sure that that our public health system is fully funded and supported by the Legislature. And this is all going to go back to our tax structure, right? Things cost money. If we want to have nice things, if we want to have systems that function, if we want to have public services that meet the needs of our community, that all costs money. And we need to transform our - we're the worst in the country, it's so embarrassing. Washington State is the absolute last in the country for fair tax structures, and that is priority number one. We have to change that so that we can have the things we deserve. And that includes fully funding education, that includes fully funding public health, that includes making sure that people have access to healthcare in a meaningful way that doesn't bankrupt them - which is why I support single-payer universal health care and think that we're gonna get there. And we need more people that believe that that's possible to get into the Legislature so that we can make it happen, because we deserve it, we can have it. I think what the pandemic also showed us is that when we need to provide every single person in this country with a free vaccine, we can do it. So let's keep doing that. [00:38:07] Crystal Fincher: I am with you. I'm with you right there. As we wrap up today, what would you tell voters who are considering you, your opponent in trying to make their decision about how to vote? What would you tell them about how their lives would be different with you as their legislator? [00:38:27] Leah Griffin: I don't know much about my opponent. I know that she's a lawyer and was Jenny Durkan's housing director. But what I know about me is that one, I'm a librarian. And the thing about being a librarian - I think we need a librarian in the Legislature and this is why. We have plenty of lawyers. Librarians, I always say to my students - if you ask me a question, there's a chance I'll know the answer to that question, but there's a chance that I might not, but I know where to find the answer to that question. So when you hire a librarian to work in the Legislature, what you're getting is somebody who knows how to research, who knows how to leverage connections with community and with experts, somebody who is able to bring people together to come to a solution that prioritizes the voices of people most impacted by the problem. You get somebody who is thoughtful, who is empathetic, who cares about you and your story and making sure that your story is represented in the policy that we produce. I am somebody who has put in thousands of hours of unpaid labor to make substantive change just because it's the right thing to do. I have no lofty intentions of moving on to other political office. I'm running for State Legislature because I love passing laws in the State Legislature. I'm really good at it. I think the other thing to think about is that we had so many people retire this year from the State Leg that - there's a lot of institutional knowledge that is walking out the door this year. And I would urge my neighbors in the 34th to vote for me because you know that I know how this works. I've been involved in the process from the first idea for a bill, to drafting the bill, to working through committees, to testifying, to building coalitions, to looking at what happens to the policy after we pass legislation and making sure that things are working correctly. I know how this works, and so I'm ready to get in there Day One and start passing laws - let's go. So I'm really excited - not only for this campaign that is, has so much momentum - the amount of momentum is overwhelming, the community support has been huge, the support from lawmakers at all levels - state all the way down to the Port of Seattle, who I see huge opportunities to collaborate with. I have relationships from the federal government to the King Conservation District Board, and I value all of those relationships and am excited to work with everybody, including you listener, to make real change. [00:41:39] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you so much for your time. Appreciate you taking this time and we'll certainly be following along as you continue on the campaign trail. [00:41:48] Leah Griffin: Thank you so much for having me, Crystal. [00:41:50] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 24, 2022: Belmont Condominiums project reviewed at meeting; Charlottesville changing mechanism for real estate tax relief program

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 18:02


After today, 80 percent of May’s Tuesdays will have happened, leaving one more to go. While this one is with us, there are plenty of fake holidays to ponder including National Escargot Day, National Caterers Appreciation Day, Aviation Maintenance Technician Day, and National Scavenger Hunt Day. Can you find the clues in the May 24, 2022 edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement? If so, please let me know so I can also try to figure it all out. I’ll reveal who I am at the end of the program. Send this newsletter and podcast on to someone else so we can grow the audience!On today’s program:Charlottesville City Council holds first of two readings on new mechanism to provide tax relief for city property ownersA public hearing is held for a segment of an east-west commuter trail The candidates are in place for the 5th District Congressional race this November The General Assembly will head back to Richmond on June 1 Details on a planned condominium complex in downtown Belmont Shout-out to Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards In today’s subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement, the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards continues to offer classes this spring and summer to increase your awareness of our wooden neighbors and to prepare for the future. Coming up on June 7 is a tree identification course taught on Zoom by tree steward Elizabeth Ferguson followed by a separate hike on June 11 at the Department of Forestry’s headquarters near the Fontaine Research Park. That’s followed by a tree identification walk at the University of Virginia on June 12 for the public. On June 14, Rachel Keen will give a lecture on Zoom on the Social Life of Trees. Do trees really communicate with one another? What is a 'mother tree'? Can a tree do anything to repel a pest? Learn more at charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org.Republicans nominate Good for re-election to Fifth District We are now three days into the general election stage for Virginia’s Fifth Congressional District now that both major parties have selected their nominees for the November 8 ballot. On Saturday, Republicans who attended a convention at Hampden-Sydney College in Prince Edward Category overwhelmingly selected incumbent Bob Good of Campbell County to seek a second term. According to a raw vote count, incumbent Bob Good received 1,115 of the 1,303 votes cast. Of the 24 localities with Republican committees, challenger Dan Moy of Charlottesville performed best in Albemarle County where he got votes from 43 of 128 convention delegates and in Charlottesville where he received 15 out of 28 votes. However, the convention used a weighted system which gave Good 1,488 votes to Moy’s 271. (view the vote tally)Democrat Josh Throneburg got straight to work with a press release pointing out that the number of votes cast in the convention were less than 0.02 percent of the population of the Fifth District.  Throneburg became the nominee by default when all other candidates failed to qualify for the primary ballot. Other resources: 5th District Republicans nominate Good to represent party in November, Lynchburg News & AdvanceGood defeats challenger at convention, will be on November ballot, Chatham Star-Tribune NewsRep. Bob Good wins GOP nomination for 5th District, NBC29Virginia Public Access ProjectVirginia legislators to return to General Assembly on June 1A date has been set for the Virginia Senate and the Virginia House of Delegates to return to Richmond to complete the special session that convened on April 4. The two Chambers will convene at 10 a.m. according to the Legislative Information System.One of the major pieces of business left to complete is the state budget and a slate of legislators from both Houses have been seeking to work out a compromise to reconcile both versions.  There are also several bills that passed both Houses but also have to be reconciled before it can be sent to Governor Glenn Youngkin for action. These include a sales tax exemption for food and personal hygiene products, changes to the make-up of the State Board of Elections, and the establishment of a Virginia Football Stadium Authority.  City Council holds public hearing on trail connectionA new partnership has formed between the City of Charlottesville and an entity that secures open space easements in Virginia, and that will slightly increase the cost of land transactions. “We have a property owner that we’ve been negotiating with and we have a granting agency in the Virginia Outdoors Foundation that’s providing the funding which has already been appropriated,” said Chris Gensic, a planner in the Parks and Recreation Department. When complete, the transaction will trigger a $3 fee for recordation of most deeds to go toward a pool of money to allow the Virginia Outdoors Foundation to purchase more land. Gensic said most localities of Virginia already have this arrangement but the city has yet to record an open space easement within its borders. The property in question would allow for the 250 Bypass Trail to continue on an already paved trail in the woods to the south of Charlottesville High School toward the Piedmont Family YMCA to the east“The parks department has been working diligently over the past few decades to acquire pieces of property to stitch together a trail network per the Comprehensive Plan,” “We’ve been discussing this particular acquisition that’s on the western end of McIntire Park.” The public hearing was held to move the transaction forward, but Council took no action. That will come when the deal is nearing completion. Rex Linville of the Piedmont Environmental Council said the parcel in question was significant. “It is a crucial link in the multiyear effort to create a shared-use path that will connect McIntire Park, the YMCA, and Charlottesville High School to Hydraulic Road,” Linville said. “This parcel is also a vital part of a larger four-mile loop that will connect these public resources to Michie Drive, the Greenbrier neighborhood, and the John Warner Parkway.” No city funds will be directly used in the transaction, according to Linville. Council approves action plan for federal HOME and CDBG fundsCity Council has approved an action plan for federal funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for the next fiscal year. Staff had suggested making some changes to the process in order to meet HUD’s guidelines, but some groups pushed back on some of those proposals. (read the staff report)“Staff will no longer request that the task force be changed to staff advisory,” said Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders. “Instead we’re going to focus on identifying income eligible participants to ensure that the diverse voice is always available.” Sanders said the city cannot use federal funds to pay participants to sit on that task force, but local funding can be found for that purpose should Council want to ensure participation by low income individuals. Charlottesville will also stop the process of designating a neighborhood to receive funds for three-year periods at a time. In recent years, projects in Belmont received those funds despite an influx of wealth. “Instead we will continue to work to identify projects that prioritize investment in those areas for the targeted low-income population to benefit from,” Sanders said. A project that had been recommended by the task force was $186,376.16  in funds for sidewalk improvements in the Ridge Street neighborhood, the current priority neighborhood. That will no longer be part of the action plan due to a concern that the project would not be completed in time to meet HUD’s deadline. Instead funds for project will be returned to the pool to allow for other proposals from the community to be funded for the Ridge Street neighborhood.  A second reading and vote on this year’s spending will be on Council’s agenda on June 6. City changing mechanism for property tax relief City Council will hold a work session with the Planning Commission this afternoon but before the joint session on transportation matters gets underway, there will be a second reading of an appropriation of $1.5 million in city funds to be used as grants to low- and middle-income property owners. This would replace the long-running program Charlottesville Housing Affordability Program (CHAP) that the city had been using to provide tax relief. Todd Divers is Charlottesville’s Commissioner of Revenue. “We’ve kind of scrambled to put together a program that I think is going to get us close to what we were doing,” Divers said. Divers said the previous tax relief program had been justified by the City Charter, but now a second avenue to justify the program will be used instead. “The Director of Social Services as the local Social Services board will be the official administrator of this program though I will be working in a cooperative agreement with her and we’ll still be effectively managing the program the way we always have,” Divers said. The move also allows the city to increase the threshold for eligibility for participation to a home value of $420,000, which is the average assessed value of a residential parcel in the city. The income threshold will be increased to $60,000. “This a grant program,” Divers said. “This is a grant for needy folks and the way that we are defining that is folks who make less than $60,000 a year and who own a home in the city of Charlottesville.”Divers said he estimates an additional 100 people will be eligible. The second reading is being held today to speed up the process to allow the process moving forward for this year. Shout-out for an ACHS program on the Fields of Honor This year, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society has been working with a group called the Fields of Honor to identify soldiers who were killed in action in the Second World War. Since February, ACHS researchers have helped locate several photographs of the fallen, including that of Private Clarence Edward McCauley who was tracked down through high school records. There are 18 remaining photographs to be found, and on Thursday, May 26 at 7 p.m. the ACHS will host Debbie Holloman and Sebastian Vonk of the Fields of Honor Foundation to talk about how you can take part in their volunteer efforts honoring the service and sacrifice of US WWII service members buried or memorialized at US war cemeteries in Europe. That’s Thursday, May 26, at 7 p.m. via Zoom or Facebook Live.Site plan meeting held for Belmont Condominiums projectOfficials with Riverbend Development have offered details on a proposal to build dozens of condominiums on undeveloped land in Charlotteville’s Belmont neighborhood. “I know on this site in particular I have been working with the neighborhood off and on for at least five years regarding this site and we’ve owned it for well over a decade now I believe,” said Ashley Davies with Riverbend Development.A previous submission that looked more like neighboring City Walk Apartments had gone to a site plan review conference in 2018 but that version did not move forward. “A lot of the feedback that we got from the neighborhood from that time is just that it felt like these two buildings were too big compared to what you see in the rest of the neighborhood,” Davies said. This development would include 130 total units and it needs city approval on three applications. Both a major subdivision and a site plan can be approved by staff, but a third requires endorsement by elected officials.“A critical slope waiver due to impacts to critical slopes requires a City Council action,” said city planner Matt Alfele said. “This means that application will go to the Planning Commission for a recommendation and then City Council for a final decision.” No date has been set for that Planning Commission meeting and a public hearing is not required. The six acres of property span many parcels which would be combined in the major subdivision. Since 2003, the zoning has been for Neighborhood Commercial Corridor which allows for mixed-use. Most of the buildings would be constructed in a form known as a two-over-two. “It looks like a townhouse style unit on the outside but once you go into the unit it actually has two units each two floors tall and there’s garages on the backside that have parking internal to those units,” Davies said. Davies said Riverbend has built these types of units at Brookhill in Albemarle County and they have proven to be popular. Eight of the units would be designated as being sale to households and individuals at a certain income level. The property is currently being used for automotive repair. One neighbor asked if the site needed to be remediated due to potential contaminants in the soil. Scott Collins is an engineer working on the project “As far as contaminants, they’ll be testing the soil as well when the asphalt and concrete is removed and checking the consistency of the soils and making sure it’s not contaminated and if it is, there are remediative measures that have to be in place,” Collins said. The site plan must be approved by staff if it meets all of the technical requirements. Staff has not yet completed the comment letter that will go to Riverbend. People still have until June 15 to make a comment about the site plan or to ask a question. But Council will have to approve a critical slopes waiver and one Councilor who attended the May 18 site plan conference did not like what he saw in the current project, taking his cues from a speaker from the Piedmont Environmental Council. Michael Payne said he preferred the previous approach Riverbend had taken. “I just would say that I’m pretty disappointed at where this has ended up,” said Michael Payne. “I feel like where this ended up is the worst of all worlds in terms of as Peter Krebs [of PEC] said the most impervious surfaces, the least compact and clustered development. And also the least affordable development. It seems like its the most sprawled version which will have the most expensive units and I think this project just would have been much better off to be more clustered and have more apartments similar to the Belmont Lofts project or City Walk for that matter.”  One neighbor suggested the city make a swap with the developer.“Wouldn’t it be lovely if the city could do an exchange with the owners of Belmont Holdings and give them the existing Clark School which is a gorgeous building with high ceilings and let them turn that into condominiums and turn this site into either a school or a park?” commented Deb Jackson. This is not likely to occur. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Lumber Prices Headed Lower, New FHA Foreclosure Rules, Google's New Tool for House Hunters

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 5:37


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending May 14th, 2022… why lumber prices are falling, what the FHA is doing to discourage investors, and the new Google mapping tool that could help house hunters.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week. Inflation appeared to slow down a bit last month. The government reported a slight decline in the Consumer Price Index from an annual rate of 8.5% in March to 8.3% in April. But that's coming off a 40-year high, so we haven't come down much. Plus, the so-called “core rate of inflation” - which omits prices for food and gas - was .6% higher. That was a disappointment on Wall Street because analysts had forecast a lower .4% increase. (1)As reported by MarketWatch, many economists expect inflation to slow down, but they say it will probably take a while for that to happen. Supply chain issues and the labor shortage are two big reasons that prices keep rising.The decline was also not enough to put consumer minds at ease. The University of Michigan says its consumer sentiment index fell to a ten-year low as of this month. It went from a reading of 65.2 in April to 59.1. A survey shows that most Americans expect overall inflation to remain at the 5.4% level for the next year and at 3% for the next five years. (2)Mortgage RatesMortgage rates also crept a little higher last week. Freddie Mac says the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rose 3 basis points to an average of 5.3%. The 15-year was down 4 points to 4.48%. (3) The mortgage company says that many homebuyers are continuing with their plans but are paying about one third more per month than they would have a year ago.In other news making headlines…Builders Getting a Break on Lumber PricesLumber prices are headed lower. They fell below $800 per thousand board feet last week. That's about 30% lower than they were at the beginning of the year, but they are still much higher than they have been historically. The National Home Builders Association says they've been so high that homes were $18,000 more expensive than they were in previous years, just because of high lumber prices. (4)A recent survey by John Burns Real Estate Consulting shows that prices may be coming down a little because of softening demand for entry-level homes. And, the COO of Sherwood Lumber, Kyle Little, told Insider: “We expect prices in the long term to be challenged with the affordability and rising interest rate headwinds.”Landlords Lose in Appeal to CA Supreme CourtThe California Supreme Court rejected a request by landlords to review a lower court ruling that impacts the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act. If you haven't heard of Costa-Hawkins, it's legislation enacted in 1995 that prevents California cities from imposing rent control on single-family homes, condominiums, and residential properties built after 1995. (5)There was concern that San Francisco landlords were circumventing eviction laws by raising rents so high that tenants would move out. The city called them “bad faith” rent increases that were used to evict tenants. The city then passed an ordinance in 2019 to prevent that from happening. It included a way to compare rent increases to market rates, and to check if there had been a recent eviction attempt. Landlords sued, but lost their case in lower courts. In 2020, a Superior Court judge said: “Costa-Hawkins does not protect a landlord's right to use a pretextual rent increase to avoid lawfully imposed local eviction restrictions.” The high court's decision last week, allows the lower court ruling to stand.FHA Gives Owner-Occupants First Dibs on ForeclosuresThe Federal Housing Administration will make investors wait their turn, for a look at foreclosed properties. The FHA announced that owner occupant buyers, government entities, and HUD-approved nonprofits will get first dibs during a 30-day exclusive time period. It will also provide time for buyers to get a loan if they need one. (6)The FHA says it's doing this to support a goal to reduce the number of homes that investors are buying and turning into rentals, and to help people who want to become homeowners. Buyers must provide a signed statement saying they intend to live in the home. They also have 15 days to back out of a deal if they get “buyer's remorse.”Google Street View Get “Immersive”Google is adding a new feature to its mapping software that will help house hunters. It combines satellite and street view images so that users can fly over an area and then drop down to street level to take a closer look. Some people say the aerial view looks like you're flying over a property with a drone. Google calls it an “immersive view.” (7) It's being introduced in New York and Los Angeles. Google plans to expand soon to new areas.That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-inflation-rate-slows-to-8-3-cpi-finds-after-hitting-40-year-high-11652272713?mod=home-page2 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/consumer-sentiment-hits-ten-year-low-amid-high-prices-umich-survey-finds-11652451173?mod=economic-report3 - https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms4 - https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/05/11/lumber-prices-tumble-to-lowest-level-of-20225 - https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/State-Supreme-Court-rejects-a-challenge-by-17166499.php6 - https://caanet.org/calif-supreme-court-snubs-appeal-of-costa-hawkins-case/?mkt_tok=NTU5LVRFTi05NDgAAAGEXbZRUIFaYfDr8n_JnaducPEN7VatF5PpAR34RTKWv7UiK3Y8lW_ce1Ko7WQ8Ot94wKy1cFzjQ3HgtJy6wLdJXjpjwPON50XI1dFc5Q7 - https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/05/11/fha-gives-buyers-exclusive-sneak-peek-at-foreclosures8 - https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/05/11/fha-gives-buyers-exclusive-sneak-peek-at-foreclosures9 - https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/05/12/new-google-map-feature-offers-immersive-view-of-streets