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Best podcasts about Columbus Day

Latest podcast episodes about Columbus Day

Your Brain on Facts
This Land is Our Land (ep 173)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:51


In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, and it's been downhill for New World peoples ever since.  Today we look at residential schools, the occupation of Alcatraz by Indians of All Tribes, the Oka crisis (aka the Mohawk resistance), and Sacheen Littlefeather's Oscar speech. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website. Late summer, 1990.  The protest had been going on for two months; tensions were escalating.  Soldiers had been dispatched to enforce the government's will, but the Kahnawake Mohawk weren't going to give up another inch of their land.  14 year old Waneek and her 4 year old sister Kaniehtiio were there with their activist mother when the violence started.  Waneek tried to get little Tio to safety when she saw a soldier who had taken her school books from her weeks prior...and he stabbed her in the chest.  My name's...   One of my goals with this podcast is to tell the stories that don't get told, the stories of people of color and women.  It's not always easy.  Pick a topic to research and it's white men all the way down.  But, even when I haven't been struggling with my chronic idiopathic pulmonary conditions, as I've been for the past three acute months, I've dropped the ball.  Mea culpa.  So let me try to catch up a little bit here as we close out November and Native American Heritage month.  And since the lungs are still playing up a bit, I'm tagging past Moxie in to help, though I've done with I can to polish her audio, even though I lost more than 100 episodes worth of work files when I changed computers and deleted the hard drive on my right rather than the hard drive on my left.     Today's episode isn't going to be a knee-slapping snark fest, but the severity of the stories is the precise reason we need to tell them, especially the ones that happened relatively recently but are treated like a vague paragraph in an elementary school textbook.  Come with me now, to the 1960's and the edge of California, to a rocky island in San Francisco bay.  Yes, that one, Alcatraz, the Rock.     After the American Indian Center in San Francisco was destroyed in a fire in October 1969, an activist group called “Indians of All Tribes” turned its attention to Alcatraz island and the prison which had closed six years earlier.  I'm going to abbreviate Indians of All Tribes to IAT, rather than shorten it to Indians, just so you know.  A small party, led by Mohawk college student Richard Oakes, went out to the island on Nov 9, but were only there one night before the authorities removed them.  That didn't disappoint Oakes, who told the SF Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   11 days later, a much larger group of Indians of All Tribes members, a veritable occupation force of 89 men, women and children, sailed to the island in the dead of night and claimed Alcatraz for all North America natives.  Despite warnings from authorities, the IAT set up house in the old guards' quarters and began liberally, vibrantly redecorating, spray-painting the forboding gray walls with flowers and slogans like “Red Power” and “Custer Had It Coming.”  The water tower read “Peace and Freedom. Welcome. Home of the Free Indian Land.”  And of course I put pictures of that in the Vodacast app.  Have you checked it out?  I'm still getting the hang of it...  The IAT not only had a plan, they had a manifesto, addressed to “The Great White Father and All His People,” in which they declared their intentions to use the island for a school, cultural center and museum.  Alcatraz was theirs, they claimed, “by right of discovery,” though the manifesto did offer to buy the island for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”—the price supposedly paid for the island of Manhattan.     Rather than risk a PR fall-out, the Nixon administration opted to leave the occupiers alone as long as things remained peaceful and just kinda wait the situation out.  The island didn't even have potable water; how long could the IAT stay there?  Jokes on you, politicians of 50 years ago, because many of the occupiers lived in conditions as bad on reservations.  They'd unknowingly been training for this their entire lives.  Native American college students and activists veritably swarmed the island and the population ballooned to more than 600 people, twice the official capacity of the prison.  They formed a governing body and set up school for the kids, a communal kitchen, clinic, and a security detail called “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs.”  Other activists helped move people and supplies to the island and supportive well-wishers send money, clothes and canned food.    Government officials would travel to the island repeatedly to try, and fail, to negotiate.  The IAT would settle for nothing less than the deed to Alcatraz Island, and the government maintained such a property transfer would be impossible.  The occupation was going better than anyone expected, at least for the first few months.  Then, many of the initial wave of residents had to go back to college and their places were taken by people more interested in no rent and free food than in any cause.  Drugs and alcohol, which were banned, were soon prevalent.  Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz after his stepdaughter died in a fall, and things began to unravel even more quickly.  By May, the sixth month of the occupation, the government dispensed with diplomatic efforts and cut all remaining power to Alcatraz.  Only a few weeks later, a fire tore across the island and destroyed several of Alcatraz's historic buildings.  Federal marshals removed the last occupiers in June of the second year, an impressive 19 months after they first arrived, six men, five women and four children.  This time, when laws were passed after an act of rebellion, they were *for the rebels, which many states enacting laws for tribal self rule.  When Alcatraz opened as a national park in 1973, not only had the graffiti from the occupation not been removed, it was preserved as part of the island's history.   People gather at Alcatraz every November for an “Un-Thanksgiving Day” celebrating Native culture and activism. RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL   The American government took tens of thousands of children from Native families and placed them in boarding schools with strict assimilation practices.  Their philosophy - kill the Indian to save the man.  That was the mindset under which the U.S. government Native children to attend boarding schools, beginning in the late 19th century, when the government was still fighting “Indian wars.”   There had been day and boarding schools on reservations prior to 1870, when U.S. cavalry captain, Richard Henry Pratt established the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.  This school was not on a reservation, so as to further remove indigenous influences.  The Carlisle school and other boarding schools were part of a long history of U.S. attempts to either kill, remove, or assimilate Native Americans.  “As white population grew in the United States and people settled further west towards the Mississippi in the late 1800s, there was increasing pressure on the recently removed groups to give up some of their new land,” according to the Minnesota Historical Society. Since there was no more Western territory to push them towards, the U.S. decided to remove Native Americans by assimilating them. In 1885, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Hiram Price explained the logic: “it is cheaper to give them education than to fight them.”   Off-reservation schools began their assault on Native cultural identity as soon as students arrived, by first doing away with all outward signs of tribal life that the children brought with them.  The long braids worn by boys were cut off.  Native clothes were replaced with uniforms.  The children were given new Anglicized names, including new surnames.  Traditional Native foods were abandoned, as were things like sharing from communal dishes,  forcing students to use the table manners of white society, complete with silverware, napkins and tablecloths.  The strictest prohibition arguably fell on their native languages.  Students were forbidden to speak their tribal language, even to each other.  Some school rewarded children who spoke only English, but most schools chose the stick over the carrot and relied on punishment to achieve this aim.  This is especially cruel when you consider that many of the words the children were being forced to learn and use had no equivalent in their mother tongue.   The Indian boarding schools taught history with a definite white bias.  Columbus Day was heralded as a banner day in history and a beneficial event for Native people, as it was only after discovery did Native Americans become part of history.  Thanksgiving was a holiday to celebrate “good” Indians having aided the brave Pilgrim Fathers.  On Memorial Day, some students at off-reservation schools were made to decorate the graves of soldiers sent to kill their fathers.   Half of each school day was spent on industrial training. Girls learned to cook, clean, sew, care for poultry and do laundry for the entire institution.  Boys learned industrial skills such as blacksmithing, shoemaking or performed manual labor such as farming.  Not receiving much funding from the government, the schools were required to be as self-sufficient as possible, so students did the majority of the work.  By 1900, school curriculums tilted even further toward industrial training while academics were neglected.   The Carlisle school developed a “placing out system,” which put Native students in the mainstream community for summer or a year at a time, with the official goal of exposing them to more job skills.  A number of these programs were out-right exploitive.  At the Phoenix Indian School, girls became the major source of domestic labor for white families in the area, while boys were placed in seasonal harvest or other jobs that no one else wanted.   Conversion to Christianity was also deemed essential to the cause.  Curriculums included heavy emphasis of religious instruction, such as the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes and Psalms.  Sunday school meant lectures on sin and guilt.  Christianity governed gender relations at the schools and most schools invested their energy in keeping the sexes apart, in some cases endangering the lives of the students by locking girls in their dormitories at night.     Discipline within the Indian boarding schools was severe and generally consisted of confinement, corporal punishment, or restriction of food.  In addition to coping with the severe discipline, students were ravaged by disease exacerbated by crowded conditions at the boarding schools. Tuberculosis, influenza, and trachoma (“sore eyes”) were the greatest threats.  In December of 1899, measles broke out at the Phoenix Indian School, reaching epidemic proportions by January.  In its wake, 325 cases of measles, 60 cases of pneumonia, and 9 deaths were recorded in a 10-day period.  During Carlisle's operation, from 1879 and 1918, nearly 200 children died and were buried near the school.   Naturally, Indian people resisted the schools in various ways. Sometimes entire villages refused to enroll their children in white schools.  Native parents also banded together to withdraw their children en masse, encouraging runaways, and undermining the schools' influence during summer break.  In some cases, police were sent onto the reservations to seize children from their parents.  The police would continue to take children until the school was filled, so sometimes orphans were offered up or families would negotiate a family quota. Navajo police officers would take children assumed to be less intelligent, those not well cared for, or those physically impaired.  This was their attempt to protect the long-term survival of their tribe by keeping healthy, intelligent children at home.     It was not until 1978, within the lifetime of many of my gentle listeners. that the passing of the Indian Child Welfare Act that Native American parents gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.   Though the schools left a devastating legacy, they failed to eradicate Native American cultures as they'd hoped. Later, the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the U.S. win World War II would reflect on the strange irony this forced assimilation had played in their lives.  “As adults, [the Code Talkers] found it puzzling that the same government that had tried to take away their languages in schools later gave them a critical role speaking their languages in military service,” recounts the National Museum of the American Indian.   In addition to documentaries, I'd like to recommend the movie The Education of Little Tree, starring James Cromwell, Tantu Cardinal and Graham Green, about a part-Charokee boy who goes to live with his grandparents in the Tennessee mountains, but is then sent to an Indian school.   There are a number of off-reservation boarding schools in operation today.  Life in the schools is still quite strict, but now includes teaching Native culture and language rather than erasing it.  Though they cannot be separated from their legacy of oppression and cultural violence, for many modern children, they're a step to a better life.  Poverty is endemic to many reservations, which also see much higher than average rates of alcoholism, drug use, and suicide.    For the students, these schools are a chance to escape.   OKA   Some words are visceral reminders of collective historic trauma. “Selma” or “Kent State” recall the civil rights movement and the use of military force against U.S. citizens. “Bloody Sunday” evokes “the Troubles” of Northern Ireland. Within Indigenous communities in North America, the word is “Oka.”  That word reminds us of the overwhelming Canadian response to a small demonstration in a dispute over Mohawk land in Quebec, Canada, in 1990. Over the course of three months, the Canadian government sent 2,000 police and 4,500 soldiers (an entire brigade), backed by armored vehicles, helicopters, jet fighters and even the Navy, to subdue several small Mohawk communities.  What was at stake?  What was worth all this to the government?  A golf course and some condos.   The Kanesetake had been fighting for their land for centuries, trying to do it in accordance with the white man's laws, as far back as appeals to the British government in 1761. In 1851, the governor general of Canada refused to recognize their right to their land.  8 years later, the land was given to the Sulpicians, a Catholic diocese.  In 1868, the government of the nascent Dominion of Canada denied that the Mohawk's original land grant had even reserved land for them, so it wasn't covered under the Indian Act. In the 1910's, the he Mohawks of Kanesatake's appealed all the way to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Canada's highest appeals court at the time, who ruled that official title to the land was held by the Sulpicians.  By the end of the Second World War, the Sulpicians had sold all of their remaining land and had left the area. Surely the Mohawk could have their land back now!  Nope.  The Mohawk of Kanesatake were now confined to about 2.3mi sq/6 km sq, known as The Pines, less than 1/10th of the land they once held.  The Mohawk people of Kahnawake, Kanesetake and Akwesasne asserted Aboriginal title to their ancestral lands in 1975, but their claim was rejected on the most BS possible reason -- that they had not held the land continuously from time immemorial.  And on and on.   So you can understand why they'd be a little miffed when plans were announced to expand a golf course that had been built in 1961, expanding onto land that was used for sacred and ceremonial purposes and included a graveyard.  Again, the Mohawk tried to use the proper legal channels and again they got royally fucked over.  That March, their protests and petitions were ignored by the City Council in Oka.  They had to do something the city couldn't ignore.  They began a blockade of a small dirt road in The Pines and they maintained it for a few months.  The township of Oka tried to get a court injunction to order its removal.  On July 11, 1990, the Quebec provincial police sent in a large heavily armed force of tactical officers armed with m16s and tear gas and such-like to dismantle this blockade.  The Mohawks met this show of force with a show of their own.  Behind the peaceful protestors, warriors stood armed and ready.     Let me try to give this story some of the air time it deserves.  April 1, 1989, 300 Kanesatake Mohawks marched through Oka to protest against Mayor Jean Ouellette's plan to expand the town's golf course.  On March 10, 1990, --hey, that's my birthday!  the day, not the year-- After Oka's municipal council voted to proceed with the golf course expansion project, a small group of Mohawks barricades the access road.  With a building.  They drug a fishing shack into the Pines and topped it with a banner that read “Are you aware that this is Mohawk territory?” and the same again in French, because Quebec.  There's a picture on the Vodacast app, naturally, as well as a photo called Face to Face is a photograph of Canadian Pte. Patrick Cloutier and Anishinaabe warrior Brad Larocque staring each other down during the Oka Crisis. It was taken on September 1, 1990 by Shaney Komulainen, and has become one of Canada's most famous images.  It really should be more famous outside of Canada, like the lone protestor blocking tanks in Tiananmen Square or 1968 Summer Olympics, Tommie Smith and John Carlos staged a protest and displayed a symbol of Black power during their medal ceremony.  Check it out on Vodacast and let me know if you agree, soc. med.   during the summer of 1990 the Mohawk warrior society engaged in the 78 day armed standoff with the s.q Provincial Police and the Canadian Armed Forces in order to protect an area of their territory from development known as the pines near the town of oka.   This area was used as a tribal cemetery along with other tribal activities important to the Mohawks.  The oka crisis or also known as the Mohawk resistance was a defensive action that gained international attention,  taken by Mohawks of the Kanna Satake reserve along with other Mohawks from the nearby communities of Kanna waka as well as the Aquosasne on a reservation on the American side of the u.s. Canadian colonial border.  It was one of the most recent examples of Native armed resistance that was successful in stopping construction and development on to tribal lands.  So what was being developed that led to this armed confrontation leading to the death of an sq SWAT officer during that hot summer?  Golf.  The town of oka and investors wanted to expand a nine-hole golf course at the Open Golf Club into an 18-hole course as well as build around 60 condominiums into Mohawk territory.  Since 1989 the Mohawks had been protesting these plans for development by the town of oka and investors of the Golf Course expansion.  Seeing that the local courts were not of any help in recognizing Mohawk claims of the land under development, Mohawk protesters and community members held marches rallies and signed petitions.   Eventually the Mohawks set up a barricade blocking access to the development site on a gravel road.  Later on it was occupied mainly by Mohawk women and children OCA's mayor jean wallet one of the nine hole golf course expanded and filed the injunction against the Mohawks. He went into hiding during the oka crisis. [sfx clip] I will occupy this land for what it takes he has to prove it to me that it's his and I will prove it to him that's mine.  Oak is mayor had stated the land in question actually belonged to the town of oka and did not back down from the issue, but instead filed an injunction one of many that had been issued prior to remove the Mohawks from the area and take down the barricades by force if necessary.  if I have to die for Mohawk territory I will but I ain't going alone are you armed no the Creator will provide in anticipation of the raid by the sq mohawks of knesset Aki sent out a distress call to surrounding communiti.  In the Mohawk warrior society from the Aquos austenite reservation and the American side of the Mohawk reserve as well as kana waka have begun filtering into the barricade area with camping gear communications equipment food and weapons.  It's difficult to pin down just who makes up the Warriors society. the leaders an organization you each depending on the circumstances.  the member roles are  treated like a military secret, which is fitting since many or most of the Warriors were veterans, with a particular persistance of Vietnam Marines.   why the Warriors exist is easier to answer   mohawk have closed off the Mercier bridge sparking a traffic nightmare.  Provincial police arrived at dawn secure position in case of Mohawk until 8:00 to clear out.  The natives stood their ground the battle for the barricade started just before nine o'clock on one side heavily armed provincial police bob tear gas and stun grenade power [sfx reporter] a 20-minute gun battle ensued dozens of rounds of ammunition were shot off and then the inevitable someone was hit a police officer took a bullet in the face which proved fatal that seems to turn the tide the police has been advancing until then turned tail and fled leaving six of their vehicles behind.  The Mohawk celebrated when the police left celebrated what they called a victory over the qpm.  Most of the Mohawks each shot that the raid had taken place they said they were angry - angry that a dispute over a small piece of land had ended in violence.  [sfx this clip but earlier] I mean the non-indians that initiated this project of a golf course and then and then trying to take the land away because it's Mohawk clan it's our land there's a little bit left they're sucking the marrow out of our bones.  [sfx this clip, little earlier] we've kept talking in and saying you know what kind of people are you there's children here and you're shooting tear gas at us we're not we're on armed and you're aiming your weapons at us what kind of people are you.     The police retreated, abandoning squad cars and a front-end loader, basically a bulldozer.  They use the loader to crash the vehicles and they push them down the road, creating two new barricades, blocking highway 344.  The Mohawk braced for a counterattack and vowed to fire back with three bullets for every bullet fired at them.  due to the inability of the SQ to deal with the heavily armed Mohawks   The Canadian government called in the Royal Canadian Armed Forces to deal with the Mohawks. As the army pushed further into the Mohawk stronghold there was a lot of tension with Mohawk warriors staring down soldiers getting in their faces taunting them challenging them to put down their weapons and engage in hand-to-hand combat.   this is how the remainder of the siege would play out between the Warriors and Army as there were thankfully no more gun battles. [Music] as the seige wore on and came to an end most of the remaining Warriors as well as some women and children took refuge in a residential treatment center.   instead of an orderly surrender as the army anticipated warriors simply walked out of the area where they were assaulted by waiting soldiers and the police.  50 people taken away from the warrior camp including 23 warriors, but that means right over half the people taken into custody were non-combatants.   by 9:30 that night the army began to pull out, at the end of their two and a half months seige  a number of warriors were later charged by the sq.  5 warriors were convicted of crimes included assault and theft although only one served jail time.  during the standoff the Canadian federal government purchased the pines in order to prevent further development, officially canceling the expansion of the golf course and condominiums.  Although the government bought additional parcels of land for connoisseur taka there has been no organized transfer of the land to the Mohawk people. investigations were held after the crisis was over and revealed problems with the way in which the SQ handled the situation which involved command failures and racism among sq members.   Ronald (Lasagna) Cross and another high-profile warrior, Gordon (Noriega) Lazore of Akwesasne, are arraigned in Saint-Jérôme the day after the last Mohawks ended their standoff. In all, about 150 Mohawks and 15 non-Mohawks were charged with various crimes. Most were granted bail, and most were acquitted. Cross and Lazore were held for nearly six months before being released on $50,000 bail. They were later convicted of assault and other charges. After a community meeting, it was the women who decided that they would walk out peacefully, ending the siege. With military helicopters flying low, spotlights glaring down and soldiers pointing guns at them, Horn-Miller carried her young sister alongside other women and children as they walked to what they thought was the safety of the media barricades.  They didn't make it far before violence broke out. People started running, soldiers tackled warriors, fights broke out and everyone scrambled to get to safety. Up until that point Horn-Miller said she was able to keep her older sister calm by singing a traditional song to her.   LITTLEFEATHER on the night of 27 March 1973. This was when she took the stage at the 45th Academy Awards to speak on behalf of Marlon Brando, who had been awarded best actor for his performance in The Godfather. It is still a striking scene to watch.  Amid the gaudy 70s evening wear, 26-year-old Littlefeather's tasselled buckskin dress, moccasins, long, straight black hair and handsome face set in an expression of almost sorrowful composure, make a jarring contrast.  Such a contrast, that is beggered belief.   Liv Ullman read the name of the winner and Roger Moore made to hand Littlefeather Brando's Oscar, but she held out a politely forbidding hand.  She explained that Brando would not accept the award because of “the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry.”  Some people in the audience applauded; a lot of them booed her, but she kept her calm.  Here, you can listen for yourself.  [sfx clip]  At the time, Wounded Knee, in South Dakota, was the site of a month-long standoff between Native American activists and US authorities, sparked by the murder of a Lakota man.  We're used to this sort of thing now, but on the night, nobody knew what to make of a heartfelt plea in the middle of a night of movie industry mutual masturbation.  Was it art, a prank?  People said Littlefeather was a hired actress, that she was Mexican rather than Apache, or, because people suck on several levels at once, that she was a stripper.  How did this remarkable moment come to pass?   Littlefeather's life was no cake-walk.  Her father was Native American and her mother was white, but both struggled with mental health.  Littlefeather had to be removed from their care at age three, suffering from tuberculosis of the lungs that required her to be kept in an oxygen tent at the hospital.  She was raised by her maternal grandparents, but saw her parents regularly.  That may sound like a positive, but it exposed her to domestic violence.  She once tried to defend her mother from a beating by hitting her father with a broom.  He chased her out of the house and tried to run her down with his truck.  The young girl escaped into a grove of trees and spent the night up in the branches, crying herself to sleep. r   She did not fit in at the white, Catholic school her grandparents sent her to.  At age 12, she and her grandfather visited the historic Roman Catholic church Carmel Mission, where she was horrified to see the bones of a Native American person on display in the museum. “I said: ‘This is wrong. This is not an object; this is a human being.' So I went to the priest and I told him God would never approve of this, and he called me heretic. I had no idea what that was.”  An adolescence of depression and a struggle for identity followed.   Fortunately, in the late 1960s and early 70s Native Americans were beginning to reclaim their identities and reassert their rights.  After her father died, when she was 17, Littlefeather began visiting reservations and even visited Alcatraz during the Indians of all Tribes occupation.  She travelled around the country, learning traditions and dances, and meeting other what she called “urban Indian people” also reconnecting with your heritage.  “The old people who came from different reservations taught us young people how to be Indian again. It was wonderful.”  By her early 20s Littlefeather was head of the local affirmative action committee for Native Americans, studying representation in film, television and sports.  They successfully campaigned for Stanford University to remove their offensive “Indian” mascot, 50 years before pro sports teams like the Cleveland Indians got wise.  At the same time, white celebrities like Burt Lancaster began taking a public interest in Native American affairs.  Littlefeather lived near director Francis Ford Coppola, but she only knew him to say hello.  Nonetheless, after hearing Marlon Brando speaking about Native American rights, as she walked past Coppola's house to find him sitting on his porch, drinking ice tea.  She yelled up the walk, “Hey! You directed Marlon Brando in The Godfather” and she asked him for Brando's address so she could write him a letter.  It took some convincing, but Coppola gave up the address.   Then, nothing.  But months later, the phone rang at the radio station where Littlefeather worked.  He said: ‘I bet you don't know who this is.'  She said, “Sure I do.  It sure as hell took you long enough to call.”  They talked for about an hour, then called each other regularly.  Before long he was inviting her for the first of several visits and they became friends.  That was how Brando came to appoint her to carry his message to the Oscars, but it was hastily planned.  Half an hour before her speech, she had been at Brando's house on Mulholland Drive, waiting for him to finish typing an eight-page speech.  She arrived at the ceremony with Brando's assistant, just minutes before best actor was announced.  The producer of the awards show immediately informed her that she would be removed from the stage after 60 seconds.  “And then it all happened so fast when it was announced that he had won.  I had promised Marlon that I would not touch that statue if he won. And I had promised [the producer] that I would not go over 60 seconds. So there were two promises I had to keep.”  As a result, she had to improvise.   I don't have a lot of good things to say about Marlon Brando --he really could have had a place in the Mixed Bags of History chapter of the YBOF book; audiobook available most places now-- but he had Hollywood dead to rights on its Native Americans stereotypes and treatment, as savages and nameless canon fodder, often played by white people in red face.  This was a message not everyone was willing to hear.  John Wayne, who killed uncountable fictional Natives in his movies, was standing in the wings at that fateful moment, and had to be bodily restrained by security to stop him from charing Littlefeather.  For more on Wayne's views of people of color, google his 1971 Playboy interview.  Clint Eastwood, who presented the best picture Oscar, which also went to The Godfather, “I don't know if I should present this award on behalf of all the cowboys shot in all the John Ford westerns over the years.” In case you thought fussing out an empty chair was the worst we got from him.  When Littlefeather got backstage, people made stereotypical war cries and tomahawk motions at her.  After talking to the press --and I can't say I'm not surprised that event organizers didn't spirit her away immediately -- she went straight back to Brando's house where they sat together and watched the reactions to the event on television, the ‘compulsively refreshing your social media feed' of the 70's.   But Littlefeather is proud of the trail she blazed. She was the first woman of colour, and the first indigenous woman, to use the Academy Awards platform to make a political statement. “I didn't use my fist. I didn't use swear words. I didn't raise my voice. But I prayed that my ancestors would help me. I went up there like a warrior woman. I went up there with the grace and the beauty and the courage and the humility of my people. I spoke from my heart.”  Her speech drew international attention to Wounded Knee, where the US authorities had essentially imposed a media blackout.  Sachee Littlefeather went on to get a degree in holistic health and nutrition, became a health consultant to Native American communities across the country, worked with Mother Teresa caring for Aids patients in hospices, and led the San Francisco Kateri Circle, a Catholic group named after Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint, canonized in 2012.  Now she is one of the elders transmitting knowledge down generations, though sadly probably not for much longer.  She has breast cancer that metastasized to her lung.  “When I go to the spirit world, I'm going to take all these stories with me. But hopefully I can share some of these things while I'm here.  I'm going to the world of my ancestors. I'm saying goodbye to you … I've earned the right to be my true self.”   And that's...Rather than being taken to the hospital for the stab wound a centimeter from her heart, Waneek and the other protesters were taken into custody.  Thankfully, she would heal just fine and even went on to become an Olympic athlete and continued her activism.  And little Tio?  She grew up to be an award-winning actress, best known in our house for playing Tanis on Letterkenny.  Season 10 premier watch party at my house.  Remember….Thanks...       Sources: https://www.history.com/news/how-boarding-schools-tried-to-kill-the-indian-through-assimilation http://www.nativepartnership.org/site/PageServer?pagename=airc_hist_boardingschools https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17645287 https://hairstylecamp.com/native-american-beard/ https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/03/i-promised-brando-i-would-not-touch-his-oscar-secret-life-sacheen-littlefeather https://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/reflections-of-oka-stories-of-the-mohawk-standoff-25-years-later-1.3232368/sisters-recall-the-brutal-last-day-of-oka-crisis-1.3234550 https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/oka-crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOIdwcj2w8 https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago  

western canada canadian playboy pr students california american music audible black indian god home world war ii freedom english oscars history french nope boys north america hollywood army city council british rock aids poverty san francisco peace girls land brainiac united states manhattan federal tennessee warriors government education drugs clint eastwood academy awards pennsylvania new world mississippi native americans native thanksgiving natives memorial day navajo alcatraz reach roger moore francis ford coppola hang jokes indians mexican soldiers aboriginal creator cross golf john wayne navy dominion quebec stanford university national museum pines columbus christianity catholic oak oca northern ireland bs olympic games brando south dakota apache godfather american indian psalms surely roman catholic bureau swat john ford marlon brando tio tribes john carlos naturally coppola troubles discipline mercier anishinaabe moxie carlisle summer olympics graham green judicial committee privy council mea mulholland drive conversion mother teresa columbus day cleveland indians beatitudes provincial lakota amid ten commandments storyid golf courses tanis tuberculosis mohawk burt lancaster wounded knee oka sq kanna letterkenny alcatraz island code talkers bloody sunday tiananmen square iat mohawks liv ullman american indian center james cromwell residential schools carlisle indian school commissioners aki little tree akwesasne oakes kent state canadian armed forces red power kahnawake oka crisis tommie smith sf chronicle saint j native american heritage pageserver anglicized indian act sacheen littlefeather pilgrim fathers minnesota historical society indian child welfare act curriculums navajo code talkers richard henry pratt kanesatake richard oakes
Now & Then
Encore: Creating Federal Holidays, July 4th to Juneteenth

Now & Then

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 53:48


As we come out of Thanksgiving and welcome in Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas, and New Years, we revisit Heather Cox Richardson and Joanne Freeman's look at the American debates that accompanied the creations of July 4th, Columbus Day, and Election Day. Why do Americans celebrate? Why do we fight about our holidays? And what role have economics, popular culture, and governmental politics contoured our national festivities? NOTE: This episode was originally released on July 6th, 2021. Join CAFE Insider to listen to “Backstage,” where Heather and Joanne chat each week about the anecdotes and ideas that formed the episode. Head to: www.cafe.com/history. Sign up for the CAFE Brief, a free weekly newsletter that features analysis of news at the intersection of law, politics, and history: cafe.com/brief For references & supplemental materials, head to: cafe.com/now-and-then/encore-creating-federal-holidays-july-4th-to-juneteenth The executive producer is Tamara Sepper. The editorial producer is David Kurlander. The audio producer is Matthew Billy. The Now & Then theme music was composed by Nat Weiner. The Cafe team is Adam Waller, David Tatasciore, Sam Ozer-Staton, Noa Azulai, and Jake Kaplan. Now & Then is presented by CAFE and the Vox Media Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Fundamental Shift with Grace and James
TBT: This Land Is Whose Land?

Fundamental Shift with Grace and James

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 11:43


Note: This episode was originally featured in the Fundamental Shift feed on November 24, 2020.Grace and James reflect on the history of Columbus Day and Thanksgiving as we continue our focus on Decolonization.Trying out an Indigenous recipe this season?If you decolonize your table this Thanksgiving, be sure to share it with us on social media using the hashtag #FSPFocus!Whose land am I on???To find out which Indigenous nation once lived on the land you now occupy, check out NativeLand.ca; text your zip code or city/state to (907) 312-5085 or to LandAcknowledgement on Messenger; or download the NativeLand app for iOS or Android to search by location.Recommended Resources from AnaYelsi:1. Anything from Kimberlé Crenshaw and her Theory of Intersectionality for those working to understand multiple forms of oppression and oppressive systems. Begin with her 2016 TED talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/kimberle_crenshaw_the_urgency_of_intersectionality2. Anything from Patricia Hill Collins for the same aforementioned reasons3. Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza for those feeling like they have a foot straddling two worlds4. Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass for those that are in the process of better understanding our relationship to the earth, plants, animals...5. NAIITS - An Indigenous Learning Community for those that are Christian practitionersAlso referenced in this series:Processes of Decolonization (Poka Laenui, aka Hayden F. Burgess)Be sure to subscribe, rate, and review us on Apple Podcasts and/or your preferred podcasting platform! It helps new listeners find us more easily. Also leave comments on our social media pages, email us, text us, and leave us voicemails with your questions and comments. We want to hear from you!Interact with Fundamental Shift on:Web | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | 704.665.7473Music by '86 Aerostar

All Over The Road With Victor DelGiorno
AOTR / ASTROWORLD FESTIVAL 2021 / CANDID CALLS / COLUMBUS DAY

All Over The Road With Victor DelGiorno

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 40:29


AOTR NOLA *Brought to you by Coin Trader Inc*ALL OVER THE ROAD - Originates in New Orleans, LA...Hosted by Victor DelGiorno "The King Of All Podcasting"CANDID PHONE CALLS TO:-Michael Semper (Teds brother) in Chicago-Gwen Loria (Micahs mother) DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW:- Are The Muppets the same as Sesame Street?- Astroworld Festival Tragedy - Travis Scott- What is Indigenous Peoples Day - Columbus Day!- Vic's doctor visit- Teds flat tire ?Support the show (https://www.allovertheroadpod.com/)Share your story at the 24 hour listener line:  CALL 601 ROUTE 66Support the show (https://www.allovertheroadpod.com/)

Fundamental Shift with Grace and James
TBT: Decolonize! With AnaYelsi Velasco-Sanchez

Fundamental Shift with Grace and James

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:33


NOTE: This episode originally played in the Fundamental Shift feed on November 17, 2020.It's Colonization Season in America! The U.S. recently observed Indigenous Peoples' Day, a.k.a. Columbus Day, and Thanksgiving is around the corner. This week, special guest AnaYelsi Velasco-Sanchez sits down with James to talk about the importance of Decolonization.Recommended Resources from AnaYelsi:1. Anything from Kimberlé Crenshaw and her Theory of Intersectionality for those working to understand multiple forms of oppression and oppressive systems. Begin with her 2016 TED talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/kimberle_crenshaw_the_urgency_of_intersectionality2. Anything from Patricia Hill Collins for the same aforementioned reasons3. Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza for those feeling like they have a foot straddling two worlds4. Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass for those that are in the process of better understanding our relationship to the earth, plants, animals...5. NAIITS - An Indigenous Learning Community for those that are Christian practitionersAlso referenced in this episode:Processes of Decolonization (Poka Laenui, aka Hayden F. Burgess)Be sure to subscribe, rate, and review us on Apple Podcasts and/or your preferred podcasting platform! It helps new listeners find us more easily. Also leave comments on our social media pages, email us, text us, and leave us voicemails with your questions and comments. We want to hear from you!Interact with Fundamental Shift on:Web | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | 704.665.7473Music by '86 Aerostar

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning
Columbus Gets His Day Back In Rockaway Township

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 9:22


The Rockaway Township Board of Ed had a change of mind and voted 5 to 2 last night to restore Columbus Day on the school board calendar. Yet another victory for the Italian American One Voice Coalition and all Italian Americans who showed up last night at the meeting.

Gentlemen's Agreement
FANTASY FOOTBALL COLLUSION!!!!

Gentlemen's Agreement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 110:14


It's been awhile but the GA BOYS ARE BACK!!! On this week episode, the guys talk about black TV sitcoms, comedians & Dave Chappelle special, Fantasy Football collusion on BamBeatz Football Club, Midnight Mass, consciousness & death, praying in religion, Kyrie Irving & the jab talk, Joe Rogan, Haiti & 3rd world countries, Columbus Day vs Indigenous Day, China, dB going to Spain & the growth of Kendall in Miami-Dade and MORE!!!!

Travel Guys Radio
Hotel occupancy in the US hits a post-COVID high

Travel Guys Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:11


Listen Now On the Sunday, October 24th edition of The Travel Guys…  In the Travel News, hotel occupancy in the US hits a post-COVID high over Columbus Day weekend, and the White House says the vaccine mandate won't get in the way of holiday travel. Hotel taxes are climbing in Hawaii, Lyft finally shares a report on sexual assaults. Maybe we should have seen these numbers earlier. Our Smarter Traveler segment takes a look at...

For Kids By Kids Podcast

Today we learned about Columbus Day and how it became a national holiday! SUPPORT OUR PODCAST: anchor.fm/forkidsbykids/support ----------------------------------------------------- Poshmark For a limited time, use code GORGEOUSGURLS at checkout to save $10! https://poshmark.com Honey joinhoney.com/ref/fyjitvt Smile Direct Club https://bit.ly/ForKidsSmile Merch! https://bit.ly/baconline ------------------------------------------------------ PODCAST SURVEY : https://bit.ly/3b3bwDg Email us : AlvinandAlana@Gmail.com If your birthday is coming up, fill out the information here : https://bit.ly/3aUmivr Visit our website at : https://bit.ly/2zVkBkP Follow us on Instagram at : https://bit.ly/2xuK9o1 Visit our about.me page https://bit.ly/3f9IVQ5 For Business Inquires only; Email Us at : ForKidsByKidsPodcasts@Gmail.com ----------------------------------------------------- DISCLAIMERS & DISCLOSERS We provide our podcast for entertainment and promotional purposes only. It is your responsibility to evaluate the accuracy, timeliness, completeness, or usefulness of the content, instructions, and advice contained in our episodes. The For Kids By Kids Podcast is not liable for any loss or damage caused by your reliance. Some of the links provided are a result of our participation in the affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to affiliated links. Thanks for your support! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/forkidsbykids/message

Keepin It 100 with Konnan
Ep 277! Mark Madden returns! Plus mailbag & WWE Crown Jewel!

Keepin It 100 with Konnan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 136:33


On the 277th episode of K100 w/ Konnan & Disco, "The Super Genius" Mark Madden returns to discuss the NHL, AEW & Tony Khan. plus Disco's stay-cations! The listener mailbag covers Columbus Day, Lesnar vs. Reigns w/ Heyman, Canadian wrestlers & affirmative action?, and Adam Page's character, plus a WWE RAW & Crown Jewel Roundtable with Jose Sanchez, Omar Foncesa, and Hughezy, and what's going on with the sound effects in the intro?Get Interactive on Twitter @Konnan5150 @TheRealDisco @MaskedRepublic @JFFeeney3rd @TheCCNetwork1 @K100Konnan Check out our Patreon site at Konnan.me and Patreon.com/Konnan for extra audio, FULL AD FREE episodes, exclusive video, listener roundtable discussion shows, weekly watch-a-longs, call in shows with Konnan and DI, plus so much more! Go to Manscaped.com and use our new code K100 for 20% off all your below the belt male grooming needs, including a trimmer, razor, cologne, wash and deodorant and more! PLUS, the NEW Lawnmower 4.0!Check out LegacySupps.com and use the code K100 for 10% off of their fat burner, pre workout, testosterone supplement, and sleep aid! Brought to you by friend of the show, Nick Aldis! Plus they now carry Women's supplements, brought to you by Mickie James!Go to betterhelp.com/konnan and receive 10% off online counesling sessions if you are having issues with depression, anxiety, stress, sleeping properly, anger, grief, and more. Receive treatment within 48 hours!Get 15% at lovedagainmedia.com/k100 on albums, DVDs, Blu Rays, video games and more! Support the show and bulk up your collection, they have anything and everything you could want or need!Get your Raycon Wireless Earbuds, and courtesy of K100, get 15% off your order at buyraycon.com/k100! Thats 15% off at buyraycon.com/K100, the best wireless ear buds out there!

Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!
Episode 778: Jack Benny Podcast 1951-10-14 (778) Jack Takes His Song to the Publisher and PHAF 1951-10-14 Phil's Eye Exam and Jack Benny 1941-10-12 (416) Columbus Day

Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 101:14


Oh looky there, no missing episode this week!

Two Mikes with Michael Scheuer and Col Mike
Andre DiMino: Attacks on Christopher Columbus are Rooted in Hatred for Italian-Americans

Two Mikes with Michael Scheuer and Col Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 33:42


Today, The Two Mikes interviewed Mr. Andre DiMino who is a member of the Executive Board of the Italian American One Voice Coalition (IAOVC). The Coalition's website is https://www.IAOVC.org. Mr. DiMino explained that IAOVC operates to protect the reputations and heritage of Italian Americans and to prevent attacks on them like the removal of statues of Christopher Columbus and the removal of Columbus Day from the annual calendar of national holidays. "Listening to Two Mikes will make you smarter!”- Gov Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr.Sponsors:- Our Gold Guy - Talk to IRA about whether investing in gold is right for you. Let them know Two Mikes sent you at http://ourgoldguy.com - My Pillow - Support a true Patriot in Mike Lindell by ordering pillows and sheets. Use Promo Code TWOMIKES by calling 800-797-8492- Freedom Phone - Break away from Big Tech and order a Freedom Phone. Promo Code COLONELMIKE https://freedomphone.com/?ref=toomikes- Freedom First Coffee - Drink the coffee of Patriots. Use code TWOMIKES for 10% off at http://freedomfirstcoffee.com - Freedom First Apparel - Look as patriotic as you feel. Use code TWOMIKES for 10% off at http://freedomfirstshop.com

Trickle-Down Socialism
Abolition Should be Our Goal w/ Awkword of @TenDemands

Trickle-Down Socialism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 78:07


Pat spoke to Awkword, a founding member of Ten Demands, the Road to Abolition about the need for transformational change to our systems of policing and incarceration. With a system that was founded on racism, with its roots in slave-catchers, activists like Awkword contend that the system as it currently exists cannot simply be reformed. The conversation touched on many important aspects of an Abolitionist mindset: Mutual Aid, providing for key essentials in underserved communities, and helping communities thrive in order to eliminate the need for police and prisons. Also discussed: why the recent "crime wave" is just another scare tactic from the establishment to justify further investment in law enforcement. In the open, Dan, C-Money, and Pat discuss the need to ditch Columbus Day, move to naming it Indigenous People's Day, AND couple that change with real progress making with Indigenous groups across the US - like the Land Back movement. For more information on Ten Demands, the Road to Abolition: https://www.tenforjustice.com/demands --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/trickledownsocialism/support

Light After Trauma
Episode 65: Was It Bad Enough To Be Labeled "Trauma"?

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:17


This episode is for those moments when we find ourselves wondering if what we went through is “bad enough” to be considered trauma. Tune in for a deep exploration of what trauma is and what it isn't, as well as the differences between being triggered and being traumatized.  Support the Podcast Light After Trauma website Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Oh, hey friends, what's up and welcome back to another episode of The Light After Trauma Podcast. I am your host, Alyssa Scolari, and I'm happy to be here today. It has been a super difficult week, but I have made it through and I have a lot of things going on medically. So for the listeners out there, if you could please just send some healing vibes my way, I would very much appreciate that as I try to navigate what has been a very difficult process so far. And with that said, just on other housekeeping things, thank you all again, for those of you who connected with me on Instagram after the podcast two weeks ago. I know that during that episode, it was a solo episode. And I had asked a lot of you guys to follow me on Instagram, which my Instagram handle is Light After Trauma and, message me and kind of tell me if there's any topics that you are interested in hearing about on the podcast. Alyssa Scolari [01:36]: And a lot of you did, and I got you connect with a lot of you and meet some of you. And that was really fun. I love getting to hear from you all. And I love getting your feedback because this podcast is for all of you, just as much as it is for me and your healing is important to me. So if there are topics that you think that you might want to hear about on the podcast, please feel free to message me again. My Instagram is Light After Trauma, but also go check out my Instagram anyway, because we have really been ramping up the content and putting out some great tips and things for you all. And yeah, it's just been really fun to connect with you all on Instagram. So again, that handle is Light After Trauma. Alyssa Scolari [02:26]: And also if you can spare just a few seconds of your time, I would really appreciate a review on the podcast. I will leave it at that because I know I asked for that a couple of weeks ago. So if you are willing to do that, thank you so much. I appreciate it and appreciate you. And if not, that's okay as well. And today's episode, we are talking about feeling like what happened to us, isn't really defined as trauma or feeling like what happened to me, like I don't know if it was bad enough to be trauma. And I get quite a few people in my office and also have quite a few peers and colleagues and friends who feel that way as well. And I think it's a very important topic to talk about because we tend to feel very invalidated in our emotions. And there are some things that we can very much label, very clearly as trauma in this world. Alyssa Scolari [03:33]: For example, we can label sexual assault and rape as trauma. We can label child abuse as trauma. We can label fatal car accidents as trauma and a whole host of other things that in our society, we look at that and we go, oh, that's definitely trauma, that's traumatic. Being a victim of a violent crime, domestic violence, suicide, it's all very, very traumatic. But then I find that there's this other piece to trauma that a lot of people are missing and that doesn't really get talked about enough, which then causes people to think to themselves, well, do I have trauma? And well what happened to me wasn't that bad and other people have it worse. I know plenty of people who think to themselves and I myself was one of these people. People think to themselves, well, at least I wasn't this, or at least I wasn't that. And at least I wasn't sexually abused as a child. Now that, that must really be trauma. What I experienced, eh, it's not really that traumatic. Alyssa Scolari [05:03]: And I feel like this is a result of a couple of things. I think one, it's a result of just a general lack of understanding about what trauma is and what it can look like. But then I also think it's a result of a perhaps subconscious level of denial wherein, and I know this was the case for me when I call it trauma, when I sit here and I say out loud that I have been traumatized and I have endured trauma in my life, it doesn't really feel that good. It kind of ... Being able to say oh, well this wasn't trauma, this was hard, but this wasn't trauma, keeps me almost in a level of denial. Alyssa Scolari [06:01]: So it's almost a way of us like gaslighting ourselves and talking ourselves out of feeling the way that we feel about what happened to us and talking ourselves out of our human experiences. And that in itself can be a coping mechanism. If I tell myself that what happened to me or what I went through or what I didn't get in my life, and I'm going to circle back to that. If I tell myself those things, then I don't necessarily have to feel as bad. And I don't necessarily have to face all of the feelings or the intensity of the feelings. Therefore, it's easier for me to say other people have it worse, or this really wasn't trauma. It sort of gives us an out and a workaround for how we can avoid dealing with the heavy feelings. And here's the thing. Alyssa Scolari [07:07]: That works for a little while, but eventually it catches up to us. So I know that for me, when I was with one of my abusers and I was questioning. For a long time I was questioning whether or not it was actually rape. And I kept saying to my therapist at the time, "I don't think this was rape because I could have been more clear about it. I could have said no." In fact, I actually remember sitting in therapy one day and saying to her, "Well, what if I was the abuser? What if I'm the one who hurt him? What if I'm the one that manipulated him into having sex?" And I was so deep in this level of denial and I was so hung up on all of the things that I could have done or said to prevent what had happened. Alyssa Scolari [08:12]: Well, it couldn't have been rape because I did not scream, or kick, or cry, or try to fight for my life. And it wasn't rape because I stayed with him. And it wasn't rape because I thought that I wanted it at first. I said, yes at first. It was my fault. And again, these things aren't necessarily about just sexual assault. This can really be about any type of trauma. There are also lots of folks who find themselves thinking things like, well, my parents never hit me. So I don't really think it's fair to say that I was abused because there are children out there that really get beaten and raped. And I wasn't either of those things. And it becomes especially tricky. I think when we start thinking about, well, I had a lot of my needs met, for example, my parents had a lot of money. They bought me anything I needed. I never wanted for anything. I always had food on the table. Therefore, the emotional neglect couldn't have been trauma. It couldn't have been that bad. Alyssa Scolari [09:34]: And like I said before, that kind of works for a while, that like mindset and that mind frame and that way of thinking, and it helps keep the emotions at bay. But it doesn't help forever. Because what happens is when you start saying those things to yourself, you, like I said, deny yourself your true experience. And in doing so you also deny yourself the emotions that might go along with your experience. And this finds a way to somehow ruin your life in the future. Or I should say ruin parts of your life in the future. And a lot of this is subconscious. Alyssa Scolari [10:23]: So for example, if you're somebody who was in an emotionally abusive household, but let's say your parents were wealthy and you never wanted for anything. You might say to yourself, well, this wasn't trauma, but when you become older and you start looking for relationships yourself, what you tend to do is you tend to seek out partners who are just as emotionally, as abusive as the household that you grew up in, because you have never allowed yourself to come to terms with the fact that what you experienced was traumatic and was abusive. So when you continue to tell yourself on one level that nothing bad happened, but your body and your brain and your subconscious know on another level that it was bad, your body is forever seeking to get out of that cognitive dissonance that you have put yourself in. Alyssa Scolari [11:27]: And your body wants to do that by then recreating the childhood that you grew up in, where you were emotionally neglected or emotionally abused. You will recreate that over and over and over again in adulthood, in an attempt to either prove to yourself that it was okay, and there was nothing wrong with what happened to me as a child, or as a way to prove to yourself, oh, this wasn't okay. This is what happened to me when I was a kid. Or what my partner is saying to me right now is what my father used to say to me or what my mother used to say to me and it doesn't feel safe. Alyssa Scolari [12:19]: So it works in the long run to tell ourselves my trauma wasn't that bad, or it wasn't even trauma, but it catches up with us eventually. And that is a really, really hard thing to be able to sit with, this idea that what happened to you may have been in fact trauma, because then you would have to do something with that. And that can be really painful, but it's not nearly as painful as repeating the same patterns into adulthood and having difficult relationships or friendships that don't work out, partners that you don't end up with because you're spending your time trying to recreate your childhood. And again, I don't want to be very specific to childhood abuse here because this can also just run the gamut of all types of trauma. Alyssa Scolari [13:25]: I got into a car accident in October. Oh, it was October 12th, I believe, 2015. It was Columbus Day, which is now Indigenous Persons Day. Yes, I believe I said that right. But hurray for that. Goodbye Christopher Columbus. Get out of here. This land was never yours. I digress. Back then, it was Columbus Day and I got into a car accident and I was fine, I had some serious bruises and my car was totaled and it was a pretty bad accident. I have no idea how I made it out of that accident alive. There were three cars involved in total and somebody had run a red light and I was at the green light and I was just going through the intersection, minding my business and I got pretty much T-boned. So I don't know how I made it out with just a few bruises, but I did, and I could not get back into the car afterwards. I just couldn't. I wouldn't drive. I was shaking and I didn't really understand it at the time. I didn't. Alyssa Scolari [14:37]: All I knew is that my reaction was so strong and so intense. And I do remember my mom kind of being like, what is going on here? Like, I understand that it was scary, but you have to get back in the car and get on the road. And I was just like, no, I refused to drive. And when I would drive, I would have massive panic attacks. And I think that if you had asked me back then, if that was traumatizing, I would have been like, no, it really wasn't bad enough to be traumatizing because I lived, everybody else lived. Nobody was hurt. Nobody died. It was just a really bad car accident and things happen and it wasn't traumatizing. Alyssa Scolari [15:31]: So then I would get in my head about like why am I like this? Why am I having such a severe reaction to this? And that was five, six years ago. Yeah, because today is, the day that we're recording this, this is October 15th, 2021. So this was just around six years ago that this happened. And I just hadn't the faintest idea why I was reacting so strongly then, and now all these years later, when I look back on it, I realize that I was very traumatized by that. And I was traumatized by that for a very specific reason. And it was because not long before that car accident, I witnessed somebody be hit and killed or struck by a car and killed on the spot. And that was extremely traumatizing. And I never got help for that. I just stuffed those feelings down. And before that, I had had a history of my best friend's mom died in a car accident. One of my best friends in high school died by also getting hit by a vehicle. Alyssa Scolari [16:54]: And I just had a history of issues with cars, car accidents, anything, being on the road was extremely triggering. So I didn't really understand it back then because I didn't understand trauma to the depth that I understand it now, but that reaction that I was having wasn't just a result of that car accident. Even though if it was, that would be okay too. It wasn't just a result of the car accident. It was a result of all of the things, all of the traumas with cars that I had had in the past coming to the surface. And that is why I had such a strong reaction, but I didn't know it at the time. Alyssa Scolari [17:42]: So I just continued to invalidate myself and think that I was crazy. And I hate that word, but that is what I would tell myself. I do my best not to use that word anymore, even though I am a fan of ... Or not a fan, but I have a habit of saying things like, wow, that's crazy. I try very hard to substitute it with words like, that is wild. I do my best. I do my best with this linguistic evolution. But anyway, I digress. Alyssa Scolari [18:13]: So I wish that I could go back and I wish that I could tell myself that the truth is it doesn't necessarily matter if what happened to you was a one time thing, if what happened to you was traumatizing because it triggered things from the past. All that matters is that you are having an extremely strong reaction and you are experiencing symptoms of trauma. It doesn't matter. You don't necessarily need to have all of the pieces. I didn't have all the pieces back then and I wish, I wished then, and I wish now, that I had had a therapist that said to me, you don't need to have all the pieces of the puzzle for your emotions and your reactions to be valid. Alyssa Scolari [19:08]: Because I think that we get in our heads a lot about how, I think that something bad might have happened to me when I was younger and I don't have any memories, just kind of this weird feeling, but what if I'm just making it up? And what if it didn't really happen? And what if whatever did happen, wasn't really that big of a deal? But then the other question that we ask ourselves is, but then why am I like this? If nothing happened, why do I have these intense feelings? Why do I have these intense triggers? Why do I find myself feeling rage, or guilt, or shame over my body, or over the subject of sex or whatever it may be, why am I having this reaction if nothing happened? Alyssa Scolari [20:01]: And I think we put a lot of pressure on ourselves to put all the pieces of our childhood together and all the pieces of our past together, I should say, so that we can have an answer. And so that we can feel validated in saying, see, I am the way that I am because of A through Z that happened up to my life to this point. And unfortunately, trauma just never works like that because our brains are so brilliant and they're so wired for protection and survival, that there are certain things that our brains just store in the back, or just let go of forever. And that we can't store into memory as a way to protect ourselves. And I use this analogy with a lot of my clients. So I'm going to share it with you all because I think it's a really good one. Alyssa Scolari [20:55]: If you are a police officer or a law enforcement officer, and you get a call that there is a weird scene that you need to go out and investigate, and you go out to somebody's home and the glass is shattered and there are pools of blood on the floor. And there are shell casings from a gun and the furniture is broken and there's nobody home, but you just see lots of blood and broken glass and just lots of chaos, lots of disarray. It probably would make sense to a law enforcement officer or honestly, any human being that something really bad happened here. Alyssa Scolari [21:54]: Now, a police officer isn't going to go, well I don't have all the details and I don't have a body. So I'm not really going to investigate this and clearly nothing happened because nobody saw anything. I have no body, nobody saw anything. So clearly nothing happened and this is all just a random pile of disarray that means nothing. Yeah, no, that's not going to happen. Cops are not going to do that. Law enforcement officer's not going to do that. What they're going to do is they're going to be like, oh shit, something terrible happened here because look at all of the clues we have. We've got the blood, we've got the broken glass, we're going to dust for fingerprints, we've got fingerprints here, we've got a gun here, we've got shell casings. And they're going to do a thorough investigation, even though they don't have all of the pieces of the puzzle. And I think that we can use that analogy when it comes to trauma. Alyssa Scolari [22:58]: You may not ever get all of the pieces of the puzzle. I still don't have pieces of the puzzle. But I don't tell myself that just because I don't have those pieces doesn't mean that something bad happened or it doesn't mean that something bad didn't happen. Is that a double negative? Ah whatever, you get the gist of it. So we would still work on healing ourselves, and we would work with the clues that we have just as law enforcement would work with the clues that they have. The same thing goes. We get clues, whether it's, I'm finding myself getting really triggered during sex, or when somebody says this to me, I find myself getting really angry, or I find myself having nightmares all the time about something. I'm not quite sure what it is. I find myself being very hypervigilant. I panic often. I'm very sensitive to noises. You've got all those clues. You don't necessarily need the whole picture to call it what it is. Alyssa Scolari [24:19]: I hope that that is helpful because that has been super helpful for me because I am a big fan of invalidating myself. I was even doing it last night. I was sitting in my office and I had a break in between clients and I'm sitting there and I'm going well, what happened to me isn't nearly as bad as other things that I've seen people go through. And I found myself down this rabbit hole of like, who do I think I am, having a podcast, speaking about trauma when other people have had it so much worse than I have. And I was just like, Alyssa, stop sister, stop, stop doing that to yourself. Because all it did was make me feel like shit and it completely invalidated my experience. I invalidated my own experience. You don't deserve that. You don't need all the pieces to know it was trauma. Alyssa Scolari [25:24]: And the other thing I want to come back to you, which I said at the beginning, but I will circle back to, is that one thing that I think is very difficult in the world of mental health and the world of trauma, well, one of many things that I don't think gets talked about nearly enough is that, you know what? Sometimes trauma is about what you didn't get. So oftentimes there are folks that will say, I don't have a history of trauma. I was never abused, or raped, or assaulted, or living in poverty or a victim of a violent crime or whatever it may be. But trauma doesn't end there. Trauma can also be about what you didn't get in life. Did you not have stable parent figures? Did you not have the validation and support that you needed? Did you not have the financial security that you needed growing up? What didn't you have as a child? Because that can be just as traumatizing. Alyssa Scolari [26:37]: Now I know that as I go on and on about this, somebody out there is probably having this thought because my mother said this to me. And I think it's a very valid point. My mother said to me, back in May, I think we were having a conversation. And I was sort of giving my perspective on a situation and talking about trauma. And she said to me, "But you're a trauma therapist. Like you look at everything as trauma. Like, in your opinion, Alyssa, everyone has trauma." And I've actually been like really thinking about that for the last couple of months and I actually agree with her. I don't think that everything is trauma. I want to be clear about that. I really don't. I think that trauma really depends on the individual and that what might be traumatic for some person might not be traumatic for someone else. And I think a lot of that depends on protective factors. Like what's the level of support that they have? What are the types of resources that they have? Alyssa Scolari [27:49]: So I can get into protective factors on another podcast, but while I don't think that everything is traumatizing, I do think that everybody does have some level of trauma or will have some level of trauma in their lives. I mean, this pandemic alone has been traumatizing for folks. So I do believe that, and that's not really ... I do believe that there's more extensive trauma than others. But I do believe that everybody walks around carrying some level of trauma in their lives and that's okay. Alyssa Scolari [28:35]: Again, I think that when we hear the word trauma, we think of it as like, it has to be this huge, horrific thing. That like I was sexually abused as a child. Like no, it doesn't always have to be like that. It really doesn't. And it is so specific to every individual. But I do believe that all of us are walking around with our own undigested trauma, whether it be generational trauma, religious trauma, you name it. There are so many different types of trauma out there. So some people may disagree with that and take it or leave it. But I truly do believe that. And that doesn't mean that I'm pathologizing anybody. I don't think that trauma is what's wrong with you. I think that trauma is about what has happened to you. And I guess I just don't believe that any of us make it out of this world unscathed. So, I mean, that's my take on that. Alyssa Scolari [29:36]: So I hope that this was eye opening for some you. I hope that this was helpful for some of you. It took a lot of having to say this to myself over and over and over again, for me to start to realize what I was doing to myself and I still do it. Like I said, I was even doing it yesterday. I was invalidating myself. But ultimately, this is how I feel about it. This is my viewpoint on it. And I think that it doesn't matter the severity. If it's trauma, it's trauma and you don't need all the pieces to know it's trauma, and there's no such thing as it wasn't bad enough to be trauma, nobody gets to decide that for you. Nobody. The only one who gets to decide that is you and you alone. Alyssa Scolari [30:37]: So thank you for tuning in today. Thank you for listening. I really hope that this was helpful. Again, give me a follow on my Instagram, Light After Trauma and reach out, say hi, connect with me. I would love to hear from you. And if you have any questions about this or want any follow up questions answered again, just either shoot me an email, which is lightaftertrauma@gmail.com or just DM me on Instagram. In the meantime, I will be back next week and it was a pleasure as always. Love getting to share some of this stuff with you all. And I will be holding you in the light and wishing you you all a beautiful week. And I will talk to you soon. Alyssa Scolari [31:18]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram we are at Light After Trauma. And on Twitter, it is @LightAfterPod. Lastly, please head over to at patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support. [singing]

Weather with Cliff Mass
The Columbus Day Storm--the Strongest Northwest Storm Ever-- and the Latest Forecast

Weather with Cliff Mass

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 10:29


This week brought the anniversary of the great 1962 Columbus Day Storm, the most severe weather event in Northwest history. I will talk about the fascinating origins of the storm and its extraordinary impacts. And I will provide the forecast, with wet, stormy conditions ahead for Sunday morning

Bernie and Sid
No Fly List | 10-13-21

Bernie and Sid

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 159:52


Bernie & Sid in the Morning get you through this hump day with all of the days news before you can even get the crust out of your eyes. The debacle that is the current supply chain shortage continues to kick into a higher gear as the holiday season approaches. If you were expecting a plethora of gifts from family members this season, don't get your hopes up because retail store shelves across America are being left deserted and empty. Ask Jen Psaki and the Biden administration about the crisis and they'll probably tell you it doesn't exist or that it won't last long, but the reality of the situation is that it's getting harder and harder for Americans to dodge the effects of inflation on a daily basis. Also, vaccine mandates for big corporations continue to throw a wrench in our freedom as Americans, as cancellations of commercial flights via Southwest Airlines are rising exponentially by the day presumably because airline pilots don't want to abide by Biden's mandates. Not as much has been admitted publicly by Southwest Airlines or the Biden Administration, but to continue to use non-existent weather forecasts as an excuse for the cancellations is an insult to Americans' common sense and wherewithal. In other news. Star Trek actor William Shatner prepares for his brief trip to space today, Kamala Harris slams Columbus Day, and comedian Damon Wayans has some wise words in regards to Dave Chappelle and his Netflix special. All this and more on the Wednesday edition of Bernie & Sid in the Morning. Finally, make sure you do not miss today's installments of Lidia Reports and The Peerless Boilers Beat Bernie Contest.

Lions of Liberty
ELL 250: Indigenous People Day vs Columbus Day

Lions of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:09


A still Vegas-hungover Brian give the honest truth about Indigenous People Day vs Columbus Day as well as the wonderful “Let's Go Brandon” meme and Southwest Air's employee-led no fly zone in response to the covid vaccine mandate. Join Jason Stapleton's Nomad Network with THIS LINK to join free and start networking with other liberty minded folks! http://www.nomadnetwork.app/lion Invest in your future with iTrustCapital and use LIONS for 1 month FREE https://rebrand.ly/lionsofliberty Subscribe to THE BOHRING Podcast! https://redcircle.com/shows/bravo-and-beer http://www.Patreon.com/LionsofLiberty to produce your own episode and for all our amazing bonus content, like Good Morning Fuckhead, Conspiracy Corner, Rick and Morty Recaps, Do Nothing Man, Degenerate Gamblers and bonus interviews!  

KTSE Ave
Ep 74: "Michelin Lips" #KTSE

KTSE Ave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 68:20


Happy Indigenous people day! We talking Chappelle embracing "cancel culture", why "Columbus Day" is problematic, Breeze going to apparently Jon Grudens last game as Raiders head coach along with his problematic e-mails, the Falcons getting the W in London, Tyson Fury droppin' Wilder and a N bomb, a hilarious date story along with Breeze's take on Code Geass (anime for the uncultured). TAP IN Let us know what you think on Twitter @ktseavepod @techmessiah @southbreeze706 **Disclaimer: Objective truth expressed on this podcast is for entertainment purposes only. ENJOY! SUBSCRIBE! RATE! DO IT

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Canceling those whose celebrate Columbus Day - 10.12.21 - Hour 4

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 37:20


Anthony Napolitano, owner of Maria's Restaurant joins Howie to talks about the hate he and his restaurant received for celebrating Columbus Day.

In The Thick
Settler Colonialism

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:13


Maria and Julio are joined by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, historian and author of the new book “Not A ‘Nation of Immigrants': Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion.” They dive into a conversation about U.S. imperialism and colonialism, immigration and dismantling the myth around Christopher Columbus. This episode was mixed by Rosana Cabán.ITT Staff Picks: Teen Vogue published an excerpt from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's “Not A ‘Nation of Immigrants,'” on how Italian immigrants used Christopher Columbus to assimilate to the United States.Kyle T. Mays writes about the history of Black and Indigenous solidarity, and how they “have tried to reimagine the foundations of American society,” for George Washington University's History News Network. Kathleen Foody and Wilson Ring report on the issues and tensions around celebrating Columbus Day, for The Associated Press. Photo credit: Courtesy of Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The History of the Americans
Sidebar: Considering Columbus Counterfactuals!

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


This is our special Columbus Day episode, dropped on "old school" Columbus Day, instead of the "Canadian Thanksgiving" Columbus Day long-weekend holiday. This episode is not actually about the Columbus Day social war, except in passing. Instead, we consider the larger consequences of Columbus's "Great Enterprise," and various counterfactuals -- "what if" moments that might have made it all go quite differently. Along the way we say some challenging things that will irritate almost everybody, but we know you are only listening because of your resolutely open minds! Selected references for this episode Samuel Eliot Morison, Admiral of the Ocean Sea: A Life of Christopher Columbus Alfred W. Crosby, Jr., The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492, 30th Anniversary Edition Nathan Nunn and Nancy Qian, “The Columbian Exchange: A History of Disease, Food, and Ideas” Charles C. Mann, 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created Noble David Cook, Born to Die: Disease and New World Conquest, 1492-1650

Red Eye Radio
Red Eye Radio 10/12/21 Part 1

Red Eye Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 108:32


Southwest Airlines cancellations continue, vaccine mandates, Gov of Texas says no vaccine mandates, what one company did with worker shortage, best headline about Columbus Day, toy company executive warns of supply chain crises See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza- THE ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:10


Dinesh D'Souza- THE ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD. Dinesh D'Souza Podcast Watch the entire episode at- https://youtu.be/OZCvDH7O5bg Dinesh D'Souza 625K subscribers In this Columbus Day special episode, Dinesh celebrates Columbus as the architect of the modern world.  Dinesh debunks several leftist myths surrounding Columbus: that he was a racist, that he was the originator of slavery, that he is responsible for wiping out a large segment of the Native American population. Dinesh argues that the Columbus landing inaugurated the transmission of Western concepts of freedom and enlightenment to large parts of the world that would not likely have developed them otherwise. If pre-Columbian America was such a paradise, Dinesh asks, why don't people go back to living that way now? — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Email: http://www.dineshdsouza.com/email/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://balanceofnature.com https://www.moinkbox.com https://www.puretalk.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Books mentioned in podcast: https://www.amazon.com/Great-Explorer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona... Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-...

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
October 11, 2021:  John Rothmann asks whose day is it anyway: Columbus or indigenous people?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:32


A pair of House Republicans introduced a measure in support of the federally recognized Columbus Day holiday amid efforts largely on the left to promote Indigenous Peoples Day instead. The resolution from GOP Reps. Andrew Garbarino and Mark Amodei expresses  support for recognition of the explorer Christopher Columbus and "his impact on the Italian-American community." "Columbus Day honors not just the contributions and ingenuity of Christopher Columbus, but also of the generations of Italian Americans that followed. It is a day of great pride and celebration for the Italian American community," Garbarino tweeted on Monday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The African History Network Show
What is Indigenous People's Day? Columbus Day; Africans In Americas

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 97:00


What is Indigenous People's Day? Why do people still Celebrate Columbus Day? What about The Africans that were in the Americas before Columbus and Native Americans?; Dave Chappelle gets major support from Netflix. - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 10-11-21   Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow   NEXT Class Starts Sun. 10-17-21, 12:00pm EST (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. ON SALE $80; ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND! REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 10/11/21

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 112:48


On Monday's Mark Levin Show, it's not indigenous people's day, its Columbus Day and NBA coach Gregg Popovich says that Biden's proclamation is appropriate because acknowledging Christopher Columbus is to acknowledge the new world genocide he presided over. Popovich likely got his erroneous information from communist Howard Zinn's " A People's History of the United States" which was written to indoctrinate college students. Then, the first step to liquidate a people is to erase their history. That's why the left teaches this propaganda in every institution they have commandeered since the beginning of the American Marxist takeover of this country. AG Merrick Garland's memo targeting parents that protest critical race theory being taught at school meetings is proof that the conservative anti-Marxist movement is making an impact. Later, Texas and Florida now have COVID rates that continue to drop and Governors Abbott and DeSantis have done a great job tackling the surge of the delta variant. This is why red states are growing while blue states are losing population. Democrats want to impose national standards all over the country to eliminate free thinking Governors. Free states like Florida and Texas have no state income tax and Democrats hate that because it competes with their huge Washington iron fist spending plans. Afterward, Victor David Hanson joins the show to explain how Amazon claimed his book was out of stock when it wasn't. Hanson explained that the relentless attack on the middle class and on the information they receive is part and parcel of why he wrote "The Dying Citizen" in the first place.

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 10/11/21

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 112:48


On Monday's Mark Levin Show, it's not indigenous people's day, its Columbus Day and NBA coach Gregg Popovich says that Biden's proclamation is appropriate because acknowledging Christopher Columbus is to acknowledge the new world genocide he presided over. Popovich likely got his erroneous information from communist Howard Zinn's " A People's History of the United States" which was written to indoctrinate college students. Then, the first step to liquidate a people is to erase their history. That's why the left teaches this propaganda in every institution they have commandeered since the beginning of the American Marxist takeover of this country. AG Merrick Garland's memo targeting parents that protest critical race theory being taught at school meetings is proof that the conservative anti-Marxist movement is making an impact. Later, Texas and Florida now have COVID rates that continue to drop and Governors Abbott and DeSantis have done a great job tackling the surge of the delta variant. This is why red states are growing while blue states are losing population. Democrats want to impose national standards all over the country to eliminate free thinking Governors. Free states like Florida and Texas have no state income tax and Democrats hate that because it competes with their huge Washington iron fist spending plans. Afterward, Victor David Hanson joins the show to explain how Amazon claimed his book was out of stock when it wasn't. Hanson explained that the relentless attack on the middle class and on the information they receive is part and parcel of why he wrote "The Dying Citizen" in the first place.

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: The Sky Is Green Again

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:59


The Southwest Airlines saga is another example of Jesse Kelly's 'The Sky Is Green' theory in action yet again. Jesse will get you up to speed on everything that has happened and what is going to happen in the future. Jesse also catches up with Pastor Darrell Scott and Lt. Col. Oliver North to discuss the dire straits facing our country right now. Plus, a touching tribute to Indigenous Peoples on Columbus Day.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Jesse Kelly Show
TV: The Sky Is Green Again

Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:59


The Southwest Airlines saga is another example of Jesse Kelly's 'The Sky Is Green' theory in action yet again. Jesse will get you up to speed on everything that has happened and what is going to happen in the future. Jesse also catches up with Pastor Darrell Scott and Lt. Col. Oliver North to discuss the dire straits facing our country right now. Plus, a touching tribute to Indigenous Peoples on Columbus Day.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Celebrating Columbus Day, Turmoil in Virginia Over School Curriculum, and Pros & Cons Of Living in California

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:00


Tonight's rundown: Celebrating Columbus Day or as progressives would prefer it to be called, Indigenous People Day  Parents in Loudoun County, Virginia continue to rally against the idea of Critical Race Theory being taught to their children as the Democrat nominee for governor says that they shouldn't have a say in what is taught in school Thousands of U.S. troops remain unvaccinated despite being required to do so by the Biden administration in August California became the first state in the nation to adopt a law requiring large retail stores to provide gender-neutral toy sections The United States has agreed to provide humanitarian aid to Afghanistan despite the Taliban's refusal to cooperate with Washington  This Day in History, 1975: ‘Saturday Night Live' premieres on NBC Final Thought: Bill's review of the new James Bond movie Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Howie Carr Radio Network
'Let's Go Brandon' Chants for de Blasio - 10.11.21 - Hour 2

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 39:19


'Lame Duck' Mayor de Blasio joins the ranks of politicians that have gotten the 'Let's Go Brandon' treatment getting flak from attendees of the Columbus Day parade in New York.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2693 - The Myth Of A "Nation Of Immigrants" w/ Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:45


Sam and Emma host historian Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz, to discuss her recent book Not A "Nation Of Immigrants": Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, And A History Of Erasure And Exclusion. Sam and Emma host historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, to discuss her recent book, “Not A ‘Nation Of Immigrants": Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, And A History Of Erasure And Exclusion,“ on the settler-colonial roots of the US and the impossibility of obscuring them, no matter how much liberals push the “melting pot” ideology. They start off with the coining of the term “nation of immigrants” by Senator John F. Kennedy in '58, which was quickly adopted by the liberal US elite during their ‘60s fad of multiculturalism, and the status of which Biden has restored on the White House immigration page following Trump's removal of it. To help emphasize the meaninglessness of this term, Dunbar-Ortiz helps define what a “settler state” is, and how the US has always been one; they start with the British origins of settler-colonialism and the replacement of local and indigenous peoples in Northern Ireland, before the empire moved on to New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and, of course, North America. While colonialism had existed since Columbus' first arrival in the western hemisphere, the settler state brought about a new form of it, different even from the enslavement and exploitation of local peoples and resources engaged in by the Spanish, and saw the migration of Brits to new lands, while still claiming wholeheartedly their citizenship status to the British Empire. From a start that could not be more contrary to the concept of a  “melting” of cultures, Roxanne, Emma, and Sam then dive into the nature of the US as a Fiscal Military state, made for and by war, as they laid claim to “property rights” across the world via militia, before they move to reflect on the connections between the myth of Columbus and the Americanization of white immigrant populations, and the cultural perception of whiteness that drives American ideology. She particularly looks into the birth of an explicitly racist warfare ideology during the Spanish Inquisition, ingraining this blood quantum view of whiteness into a certain Christian ideology, and touches on how the legacy of Columbus reaches back to the first founding of the US, with the District of Columbia, and continues to be central in the history of Americanizing foreign white folks. Sam and Emma also discuss the absurdity of pretending to care about Columbus Day, and watch the Bobby Jindal-funded Black-Box Republican-Theater-commercial that aired during this weekend's Red Sox-Rays game.  Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: StitchFix: You know your closet well, but what does it sound like? Yes, your closet. With Stitch Fix Freestyle, a shop that evolves alongside your taste, your closet will scream “so you” without actually screaming. Stitch Fix Freestyle is your trusted style destination where you can discover and instantly buy curated items based on your style, likes and lifestyle. Whether you're looking for a brand you love or to try a new one, at Stitch Fix Freestyle, you can shop hundreds of brands personalized to your size and fit. Get started today by filling out your style quiz at StitchFix.com/MAJORITY. That's StitchFix.com/MAJORITY to try Stitch Fix Freestyle. StitchFix.com/MAJORITY. ZocDoc: With Zocdoc, you can search for local doctors who take your insurance, read verified patient reviews and book an appointment, in-person or video chat. Never wait on hold with a receptionist again. Whether you need a primary care physician, dentist, dermatologist, psychiatrist, eye doctor, or other specialist, Zocdoc has you covered. Go to Zocdoc.com/MAJORITY and download the ZocDoc app to sign-up for FREE and book a top-rated doctor. Native: Sometimes life stinks. But you don't have to, because Native has your back. Native cares about the products you put on your body, and they're all about stopping the stink, the right way. You probably already know about Native's legendary aluminum-free deodorant, but they also have body wash, toothpaste, and their brand new mineral based sunscreen! Stay fresh, stay clean with Native by going to nativeDEO.com/majorityreport or use promo code majorityreport at checkout, and get twenty percent off your first order. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 523 | National Coming Out Day Featuring Bisexual Superman

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:58


It's National Coming Out Day and Columbus Day today, so let us CELEBRATE and welcome Superman into the LGBTQIA2+ family … DC Comics has revealed that Superman is bisexual. Why is the Left attacking our superheroes? Southwest Airlines has had a very interesting weekend after having to cancel about 1,800 flights. If you ask the airline, it'll give you a different answer than some reporters are reporting. Is this because of the BLAH BLAH mandate? In Missouri a woman has filed a lawsuit against Geico, and it's not because Geico won't pay an insurance claim. Megachurch pastor Joel Osteen SHAMED into returning $4.4 million in PPP loans. Why is the church taking government money? We had Jeremy Story on the program the other day, and you heard him talk about how he got the shaft from his local school board because he tried to exercise his free speech in the prescribed manner. What did he get for his troubles? A night in the clink, that's what. Every day, you turn the news on and what do you hear? Tyranny, tyranny, and – wait for it – more tyranny. Today's Sponsors Don't settle for less than Vincero Collective. They have a collection for every look, quality you can be proud of, and a price point you can feel good about. And to make you feel even better, as a thanks for our partnership, Vincero is offering 15% off to you listeners if you go to http://vincerocollective.com/WATCHCHAD Reliefband has an exclusive offer just for my audience. If you go to http://Reliefband.com and use promo code WATCHCHAD you'll receive 20% off plus free shipping and a no questions asked 30-day money back quarantee.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PRI's The World
Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:55


The US is grappling with its identity today. Is it Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples' Day? Or neither? Depends on where you live. In Spain, there's little doubt — Columbus Day is a massive celebration, referred to as the National Day of Spain. This year in Madrid, the right-wing government is spending more than $1 million on a two-week long festivity with dozens of events. Also, Poland has ruled that its constitution takes precedence over EU Law. That has raised the possibility of Poland leaving the 27-nation bloc. Or, more likely, a standoff over whose law reigns supreme. And, whether it's called soccer or fútbol, the sport unites immigrant children in the US from diverse backgrounds. Yet, it doesn't always provide equal opportunities for all of the kids.

The Charlie Kirk Show
Southwest On Strike: How Airlines Became the Frontlines in the Fight for Medical Freedom

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 39:02


With over 2,000 Southwest flights cancelled or delayed across the country, and the company trying baselessly to blame the weather, Charlie examines the real reason behind the quagmire and walks through why the brave men and women standing up against the Corporate Oligarchy's vaccine mandates are some of the bravest among us on the frontlines of the culture war. Diving even deeper, Charlie walks through the activist media's sinister motivation for not covering this massive story with any semblance of truth. And finally, with Columbus Day upon us yet again, and with the left continuing to co-opt this historic occasion on behalf of so-called "indigenous people," Charlie ends the show by resisting the calls to Cancel Columbus. Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H3 – Oct 11 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:24


Buck on the left's mission to erase Columbus Day, ignore the brutal history of the Aztec Empire, Muslim slave trade. Australian police question man for 6-month-old anti-lockdown Facebook post. Fauciites demand more covid authoritarianism. Supply line backup. Buck takes calls. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | October 11, 2021

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 116:12


M&R are celebrating Scott's birthday, also known as Columbus Day. Dana Bash interviewed Dr. Anthony Fauci, to find out the latest with permission to celebrate Halloween, and other holidays. SW Airlines canceled more than 1K flights over the weekend, blaming the weather despite a lack of reports of inclimate weather. British Airways instructs pilots and cabin crew to refrain from addressing passengers as “ladies and gentlemen,” in an effort to recognise “diversity and inclusion.” The Metropolitan Police will be taking “no further action” in the investigation of Prince Andrew, so the issue turned out to be no sweat for the Prince. President Biden was caught off guard with a question about Hunter, but a reporter hurriedly covered by asking about the President's allergies.Governor Gavin Newsom signed several new laws over the weekend, including legislation with gas-powered equipment, and feminine products in men's rooms. Vice President Kamala Harris gave some space age McGurkin, when talking to some kids about space exploration, and looking at the Moon.

The Matt Walsh Show
Ep. 815 - No, I Will Not Celebrate "Indigenous People's Day"

The Matt Walsh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 61:09


Today on the Matt Walsh Show, Columbus Day has been increasingly replaced by Indigenous People's Day. We're told that we should celebrate Indigenous People rather than Columbus, because Columbus was a violent man who conquered lands that didn't belong to him. And that's mostly true, but I still say we should celebrate him and I'll explain why today. Also, Southwest canceled thousands of flights right as its employees went on strike over its vaccine mandates. But the media insists that the two issues are not connected at all. Plus, the family of the Texas school shooter continues to defend him, even though he brought a gun to school and shot people. And in our Daily Cancellation, we'll talk about one of the most nauseating ESPN segments ever aired on the network.  You petitioned, and we heard you. Made for Sweet Babies everywhere: get the official Sweet Baby Gang t-shirt here: https://utm.io/udIX3 Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 10/11 - The Very Intense Miss Navajo Nation Pageant

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:28


It's Indigenous Peoples' Day. More and more local governments are making it official, but why did we start celebrating Columbus Day to begin with? Plus, the impressive and gnarly competition to be crowned Miss Navajo Nation. And the history of National Coming Out Day, including the connection between Pride celebrations and Halloween.Sponsors:Indeed, Get a free $75 credit at Indeed.com/goodnewsRaycon, Get 15% off at buyraycon.com/kottkeLinks:Biden is first president to mark Indigenous Peoples' Day (AP)Indigenous Peoples' Day, as explained by Native Americans (NPR)Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples' Day? How the holiday has been shaped by oppression (National Geographic)Miss Navajo Nation is a pageant like no other (LA Times)Reservation Dogs (FX)All My Relations PodcastNative Appropriations | Representations MatterNotable Native People by Adrienne Keene Dallas Goldtooth (@dallasgoldtooth) (Instagram)The history of National Coming Out Day contains both pride and pain (The 19th)Statement by President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. on National Coming Out Day (White House)International Day of the Girl Child (UN Women)#GirlsGetLoud Day of the Girl (Twitter) Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show
10/11/21 Monday, Hour 1: Happy Columbus Day!

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:00


Jesse went hiking…; Columbus Day vs Indigenous Peoples Day…; Brent from NY has a suggestion for a biblical question. He asks "Do you believe that God can act supernaturally in your life?" --- Larry from Albany, GA asks Jesse why he talks down on black people. William from California comments on hypocritical black callers.

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1750: Jonathan Emord, Columbus Day, Ordinary man, Birthday Contest

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:23


In today's 10th episode, Jason welcomes Jonathan Emord, a constitutional and administrative law attorney. He is the author of five books, including his most recent, The Authoritarians: Their Assault on Individual Liberty, the Constitution, and Free Enterprise from the 19th Century to the Present (2021). He is one of the United States' leading constitutional and administrative law attorneys. He has defeated the FDA eight times in federal court, more times than any other attorney in America.  Jason also talks about today's US national holiday, Columbus Day, and the courage it took for European explorers who discovered the Americas. He also shares the lyrics of "Ordinary Man" an old song from the 1970s by the Canadian band Triumph, and how apt those lyrics are in today's political environment, including big tech's role in our daily lives! The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect  What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com  Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
Columbus Day Under Assault

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 5:22


RUSH: Bonnie in Lehigh Valley Pennsylvania, welcome to the EIB Network. Great to have you, sir, hello. Ma'am! Sorry. CALLER: That's okay, Rush. Today is Columbus Day. And I would like you to talk about Christopher Columbus. RUSH: Well, I have a stack of Christopher Columbus stuff here. CALLER: Oh, great. Great. RUSH: It's not what you're gonna want to hear. CALLER: Maybe. (chuckles) I think he was a great, courageous visionary. I think he's a great role model for today's youth. He was an entrepreneur. If he didn't come here, if he didn't bump into America, who knows how the world would be different, but it would definitely be different. RUSH: I know. We wouldn't have cigars. CALLER: (laughing) That's right we wouldn't have all this great food. We wouldn't have freedom, because he really laid the foundation for that here. And I'm so frustrated when I hear only the bad things about him and all the garbage that they taught in the schools about him, and so I'd like to ask everybody to put their flag out today and maybe make a good dinner for their family and celebrate Columbus Day. RUSH: All right. CALLER: Thank you. RUSH: You bet. I'm glad you called. From the Rasmussen Reports Web page: ‘Twenty-four percent of Americans believe we should not honor Columbus with a national holiday.' This is the result of government and multicultural education winning. From, let's see, where's this from? The Washington Post. Boyce Rensberger, November 1, 1992. We went back to the archives. This is, what, seventeen…? Man, oh, man that's seventeen years ago. ‘The chief rival position — called the Columbian theory — argues that there was no syphilis in Europe until Columbus took it there. Advocates of this view agree that ‘leprosy' was a mixture of true leprosy with other sexually transmitted diseases, but that none of them was syphilis. More likely, they argue, the other disease was gonorrhea,' which my health teacher in junior high be pronounced gong-gorrhea. ‘Question: Did Syphilis Sail to Europe With Columbus and Crew?' And they've been debating this. https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2009/10/12/columbus_day_under_assault/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:34


In this Columbus Day special episode, Dinesh celebrates Columbus as the architect of the modern world.  Dinesh debunks several leftist myths surrounding Columbus: that he was a racist, that he was the originator of slavery, that he is responsible for wiping out a large segment of the Native American population. Dinesh argues that the Columbus landing inaugurated the transmission of Western concepts of freedom and enlightenment to large parts of the world that would not likely have developed them otherwise. If pre-Columbian America was such a paradise, Dinesh asks, why don't people go back to living that way now?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ben Shapiro Show
Ep. 1351 - Yes, Happy Columbus Day

The Ben Shapiro Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 48:24


We examine the recasting of Columbus Day into Indigenous People's Day; Dr. Anthony Fauci continues to preach doom and gloom; and Southwest mysteriously cancels thousands of flights, while denying it has anything to do with pilots sitting home thanks to vaccine mandates. Check out Debunked. Where Ben Shapiro exposes leftist fallacies in 15 minutes or less. Watch the full season available only on The Daily Wire: utm.io/uc9er  Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rich Zeoli
Cultural Oppressed (Non-Stop Talk 10-11-21)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:16


  In today's hour of non-stop talk, Rich expressed his concerns regarding Christopher Columbus day. Rich provided historical stories of Italian culture. Columbus Day is a cultural appreciation of Italian culture.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Armstrong and Getty
Caving to Bernie's Demands

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:45


It's a new week! Monday's A&G features massive flight cancellations by a major airline. Kim K hosts SNL, and the debate rages by the woke over Columbus Day and Indigenous People's Day. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: What's in a Name? Rewriting History on Columbus Day

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


In a decision representing the triumph of anti-Columbus sentiment, President Joe Biden announced Friday he plans on officially commemorating Indigenous Peoples Day, rather than Columbus Day, on Monday. The controversy surround Christopher Columbus has spanned decades. To some, Columbus serves as a symbol of bloodthirsty colonial expansion, a petty tyrant hellbent on pillaging native lands. […]

Public Health On Call
382 - Indigenous Peoples' Day: Un-Erasing America's History

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 15:10


Monday, October 11 is Indigenous Peoples' Day in the U.S.—a day previously recognized as Columbus Day that is now reserved for reflection, education, and untangling the false narrative of discovery. Dr. Sophie Neuner of the Center for American Indian Health and co-host of a new podcast, Indigenae, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about how non-Indigenous people can think about this observance and how Indigenous people are leading on health practices and environmental revitalization. Learn more about Indigenae: https://caih.jhu.edu/programs/indigenae-podcast. Find your area on the Native Land map: native-land.ca

Axios Today
The forecast for holiday travel doesn't look good

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 11:22


Over the weekend, Southwest Airlines cancelled nearly 2,000 of their flights citing weather and air traffic control issues. And while the Federal Aviation Administration confirmed staffing shortages in air traffic control, they also said it was likely that the airline was experiencing their own staffing problems. This is likely a preview of what the holiday travel season will look like. Plus, women's heart health in a pandemic. And, why retailers are side-stepping the Columbus Day sales. Guests: Axios' Joann Muller, Marisa Fernandez, and Jennifer Kingson. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Ten News
Celebrating Indigenous Peoples' Day with Guest Mahtowin Munro ✨

The Ten News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 15:46


In today's special episode: ✨ It's Indigenous Peoples' Day!