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The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
When Consolidated Agencies are Not a Holding Company

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 30:13


Tim Ringle is Global CEO of Meet the People, an “international family of unified but independent agencies. In the three months since its inception, Meet the People has acquired 3 agency brands. Tim has bigger plans. He intends to bring in a total of up to 15 agencies, reaching from Canada and the US to Europe and Asia. “We have 400 people in North America right now. We want to be 2,000 people in at most 18 to 24 months globally.” Even though he is acquiring agencies at a fast pace, Tim says what he is not building a holding company. He explains that holding companies have been consolidating the industry, the trend a “survival response” to complications from the digitization of processes and channels and, more recently, because covid has changed how work is done. He says small agencies may need to hire one or more people “just to handle the benefits, taxes, payroll, inflation, and salary increases” of those employees who now want to work from “anywhere,” where “anywhere” has different laws, tax rates, and costs of living and working than at an agency's home office. Tim sees holding companies as a powerful trend. Even though there are 14,000 independent agencies in the United States, six major holding company networks “own sixty percent of the entire media industry within the agency space.” However, Tim says, they often don't act in the best interests of their clients because they are driven from the top by financial rather than client interests. He claims that both small, independent agencies and holding companies often fail in communicating when passing clients from one agency or holding-company-entity to the next. “They're only going to talk to each other if there's some money to be made in between . . . there's a lot of lost information . . . .” In Meet the People's “family,” the agency owns its affiliate agencies, but the people within those affiliate agencies also “own a part of Meet the People.” The network structure provides “a fully integrated approach for brands . . . to cross-pollinate across multiple services,” the opportunity for the agency to build multi-brand micro-offices, and scalable support for dealing with “anywhere” variances. Tim says, “Keep the brand, be the best you can, but let us create connective tissue between the different companies to see if we can increase share volume with a client.” Tim has a lot of experience building global agencies. He says he has learned that it is extremely important, “especially in the beginning of the engagement,” to build trust with the client. To do this, his team of disparate agencies will need to work as one. Tim is bringing his people together physically to take time to create “a deep understanding and culture between all the different offices, people, trades, and brands,” building what Tim describes as an “integrated DNA.” They also will be discussing the implementation of individualized OKRs (Objectives, Key Results), a tech tool for tracking accountability. Tim says his agency is very focused on operational excellence, on brand positioning, on bringing really good entrepreneurs . . . and on hyper-goals. He says it is important to make the right decisions now because, “if you build something with small cracks, they become massive gaps when you are at scale.”  As his agency network continues to grow, Tim is excited about finding “really talented entrepreneurs who want to change the industry who can't or are tapping out” with their skills/abilities/finances and being able, through Meet the People, to provide the experience, capital, and structure and small-enough scale “where they can actually still move things.”  Tim can be reached on his agency's website at: https://www.meet-the-people.com/. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast I'm your host Rob Kischuk and I'm joined today by Tim Ringle, Global CEO at Meet the People based in New York, New York. Welcome to the podcast, Tim. TIM: Hi, Rob. Thank you for having me. ROB: It's great to have you here. Why don't you start off by telling us about Meet the People, what is the business, and what are you all best at. TIM: I think, to understand what we are building with Meet the People, you have to understand a bit of my background. I've been an entrepreneur in the agency space – primarily digital agency space for 24 years. That sounds long but I'm also 45 years old so I can carry that. I started my first agency literally in the basement of my friend's house. We started as a SEO agency digital marketing agency, very much focused on performance marketing. I was blessed to be able to do that in '98, '99 – when this industry was about to develop and therefore was able build that business to 150 people and then sell the business. After that, I did a reverse takeover of the company that bought my business –and that got me to around 400 people in Europe. So, I started my first business in Germany – my native Germany – and we scaled the 400 people agency that was all across Europe into 1,000 people. It was stock market listed in beautiful Paris. I left that to move to the dark side of the ad industry as I call it. Having built multiple agencies as an independent agency entrepreneur, you were always battling the holding companies, right? And I swore to myself many times because they beat me and sometimes I beat them. That's how it works, right? I swore to them I would never work for them. So, I ended up moving to New York City and working for 1 of the holding companies who always wanted to acquire my business. So, I did that for 3 years within IPG. I have to say the experience was amazing. I really learned a ton of stuff that I couldn't learn from being someone who was leading 1,000 people. Now I was part of 65,000 people. I inherited an agency there – once again, a performance marketing agency – around 1,000 people – and then left it after 3 years scaling it to 3,000 people. So, I've done this a couple of times and what we're building with Meet the People is what I would say is version number four of my vision of what an independent agency network should look like. We're building it with my 24 years of experience of what I liked and disliked in the agencies that I've built in the past. What I liked the most was that people in the advertising industry are mainly driven by culture. If you're good in your trade in advertising, you can get a job anywhere on the client side in tech companies. You can build your own company because marketing, just like legal, is a service that you always need everywhere. So, selling a product, branding a product, coming up with a marketing strategy is something you can use pretty much in every business in the world. It's 1 of the integrated parts. Why do people choose to work for an agency? Because they love the culture in agencies, right? What we're doing at Meet the People – when we looked at the industry and I had – I still have the same vision. I'm building a global agency network as an alternative to the large holding companies. I figured that nobody's talking about the people anymore. Everybody's talking about technology, data, automation, and how computers will replace us, how AI will come up with creatives – all this kind of stuff. It's true that the technology has enabled us to be extremely more efficient. But, in the end, the new Coke logo or the new “just do it” from Nike does not come out of AI or a computer, it comes out of the brain of a human being a creative strategist. So, we believe (or I believe) that we have to remember in the ad industry that it's all about the people. We are a service industry. Without the people who are sitting behind the machines and using the machines, tech enabled, we're not going to produce disruptive, new ideas that actually put a brand on the map. That's why we're building Meet the People. I can obviously talk much more about it. But that's kind of it in a nutshell. ROB: When you say an agency network . . . what does that look like when it's an agency network? It's not a holding company. I'm curious about the differentiation of some of the different agencies within the network and how you think about that – because your website is very people-centric. It's more about the people, the partners, than it is about this brand and this specialization and this other thing we just acquired and all that you see in the holding company world. TIM: Correct. So, why am I not calling it a holding company? A holding company has one purpose – and it is a financial orientation. right? So, a holding company is most a holding company because it is actually managed by finance people. I don't necessarily I don't want to diss anyone. But I would say that a finance-led company most probably will be struggling with creating the best strategy, best creative, and best outcome for their clients. They might create the best outcome for themselves, right? That's why we're not calling ourselves a holding company. We are running this network of agencies who, don't misunderstand me, we do own the agencies – and the people within the agencies own a part of Meet the People. That's the concept. We are building this, first of all, to fulfill a fully integrated approach for brands so, instead of just servicing one client within one specialty with one agency, we are allowing the conversation to be elevated and to cross-pollinate across multiple services. For example, when our creative agency, VSA Partners, out of Chicago, New York, and San Francisco. Beautiful, creative design work and strategy. When they come up with a brand refresh or rebranding or brand strategy – I would love to see that through until you actually can see it on TikTok, Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn – wherever that brand comes to life besides on brochures, in magazines, or the logo or the CI. Many independent agencies, because of their size and their financial scrutiny because they're small, can't invest a lot of capital into innovation or additional services. They can't see that journey through. That means you have a lot of inefficient handshakes in between. That happens in holding companies because they're structured that way, but it happens in independent agencies as well. One independent agency is a hundred people might be excellent in creative. The next one might be excellent in social media. But they're only going to talk to each other if there's some money to be made in between. There's a lot of lost information when a chief creative officer comes up with a brand strategy and somebody implements that on social media in community management. We want to make that a much more seamless flow with less barriers for the client but also more excitement for the people involved because you actually see the product living there and a colleague of you in another agency – but it's part of our structure – has basically put that on the social channel or billboard. ROB: When you come to thinking about – there's, obviously, within a holding company lots of capabilities, you're talking about these more seamless handoffs. How do you think about building that team? Did you go out hunting for best of breed agencies to bring them into the group or did you build some capabilities from scratch? How did you think about this? TIM: We were going to do both. We started Meet the People three months ago and since then we had 3 agency brands join us – so we acquired 3 brands. Three agencies and we're going to bring more than 10 – probably 15 plus – companies into Meet the People as a group. We're going to do that in North America – so we already have US, Canada, some capabilities. We're going to do it in Europe and then we're going to do it in Asia. How we decide what to go for depends on what services we need next in that journey. Right now, we have a very strong creative agency with VSA Partners and we have a very strong experiential agency with Public Labels. We have certain services that sit in a similar bucket where the client sees the service, so that adjacent service is part of the scope. If we don't service that ourselves. then we should basically fill that gap either with another agency joining us or with building these capabilities organically with the acquire or actually hire before revenue. Ultimately, we want to have a seamless handshake between the different trades. ROB: We have 2 former guests who have been acquired into a similar opportunity recently – which is interesting. We had Chantel from Imagine Media and Techwood Digital were both acquired. Jared Belski, who was the CEO of 360i, has rolled up 3 or 4 agencies. That's all I know. Is this a trend or is this just 2 people that happen to have done a similar thing and why now? TIM: No, it is a trend. As much as I don't like the traditional holding company model, we have to respect that the holding companies have created an industry. Because there's 14,000 independent agencies in the United States alone. Fourteen thousand and there are six networks and the six networks own sixty percent of the entire media industry within the agency space, right? So they've created an industry. We all live in that ecosystem and that industry. The trend right now and primarily driven by the extreme success of what whatever intention Martin Sorrell, Sir Martin Sorrell, had to bid as for capital. If it was ego, if it was revenge, I don't know. He only knows. But he has been extremely successful from a financial perspective doing that because there is a gap, a vacuum in the Market. So, there's models like that that are older than the S4 Capital MediaMonks model. MediaMonks is only 3 years old but Stagwell MDC by Mark Penn is 5-6 years old and You & Mr. Jones is also 7 years old, I think. So, there's a couple of these what we call an agency rollup network model. They existed for years. What has changed in the industry is covid has accelerated the fact that independent agencies got scrutinized because of their size. Before, when you were 100 people, you could live a very good life as an independent agency. There's two real trends. One is the digitalization of processes and channels. At the same time covid is putting extraordinary pressure on talent, new work. This is all very complicated for smaller companies to handle because now your people tell you, “I want to work from anywhere.” How are you going to do that from a benefits perspective . . . tax perspective? It creates complications. Clients are the same. “Oh, I don't need you to come into my office anymore, but I want to take T&E out of your expenses.” Economy of scale becomes more and more important. A couple of people have understood that, so these networks are created over the last couple of years. But they're also created all over the planet. So there are networks in Asia, networks in Europe, networks in the US. There's only very few who can bridge multiple continents. This is one thing we're going to do with Meet the People. We're going to bridge multiple continents because we believe (or I believe) that our clients want the same quality of service across multiple jurisdictions that are not only North America. So, I've not invented this model, right? They exist. They're very successful. The main reason why they're successful is that, when you have, as I said, 100 people on your P&L, it's very difficult for you to invest a million dollars into innovation technology. You might only have a million dollars of profit and you want to keep some of that. Usually, it's very difficult for them to hire before revenue, to anticipate bigger jumps. In economy of scale, it's easier for us to say, “Ten, twenty percent of our EBITA goes to a business strategy consultancy layer that most agencies can't afford or a technology IP that you actually own as a company. We can make these investments. And that makes it extremely attractive. ROB: How do the capital markets feel about this sort of arrangement? I know there's a lot of money out there looking for yield. I could also see the case that you just have to self-finance this sort of thing if you want to. Where is the money side of the world? Are they looking to fund this sort of thing because they need something to believe in and something that's going to give them better than inflation? Although inflation is getting pretty good now. TIM: Let's make a relatable example. Let's imagine you have a million dollars excess capital right now. You have it lying around. Where are you going to put it? You can put it into crypto. Very risky. You can put it into NFTs. Even riskier. You can put it into traditional venture capital. So, there's a lot of money in the market. But there's also a lot of options in the market. You know pre-IPO, post-IPO, or FinTech, software as a service, space – there's so many categories. The service business as a sector in general or the advertising industry service side of it – not MarTech AdTech – it's not the most attractive industry to invest money. Why? Because you have no tangible assets. The desks, the computers – they're all at home right now. As people, as a company, you maybe own intellectual property. But mostly you have a lot of walking assets and that's your people. For the longest time, the ad industry was not super attractive for larger investors. That has dramatically changed because of the pressure coming from tech. Tech has gotten so heavy on advertising and so relying on advertising. Same time that there's more capital in the market and that a couple of people, including Sir Martin and others, have proven that you can make real money there. Most of the investment in this space is private equity and I would say large family offices. ROB: It's fascinating just to see this emerge. I think I hear what you're saying that you know there's all these different factors in play, right? You have some firms that are a little bit “walking wounded” due to . . . it does get complicated when people want to be in different states and now you're having to pay taxes on your payroll in different states. There's an economy to having 1,000 people, 10,000 people where you know what there's a department that handles that baked into the margins of the overall business. I totally get it. TIM: Yeah, and you don't go through this alone, right? If you have a 50-people business and 20 people decide they don't want to work from New York anymore or LA, they're going to work from anywhere, you need to hire at least 1 more person just to handle the benefits, taxes, payroll plus inflation increases plus salary increases. So, it's complicated. What's important about Meet the People is we give that layer at scale, but the agency brands stay independent in their DNA. We're not changing their brands. VSA Partners that joined us at the beginning of the year is VSA Partners. They've done that. This work for 40 years . . . successful. They're an incredible, talented shop and great people. Why would we change any of that? Doesn't make any sense. Keep the brand, be the best you can, but let us create connective tissue between the different companies to see if we can increase share volume with a client. You're already sitting on an amazing client. You define the strategy. Why don't we talk about who actually builds the website, who actually manages social media? Why don't we talk about it because we already have that relationship? That is very attractive to companies who don't have that client access. There's a lot of independent agencies who are very specialized, who would die to get into a client like Google or IBM or Ford who just can't because they don't have the gravitas.  ROB: When it comes to new and existing business, it sounds like you have some thoughts about the role of location. But the role of location is different from what it used to be. On the one hand you mentioned having offices and having people in these different geographies. But you also had this dynamic where some of the agencies that are joining the network may have played very much off a home field advantage that may not be the case anymore. So, how are you looking at the strategic role of geography? TIM: I think geography stays extremely important. I'm someone who grew up with in-person meetings and built businesses within in-person meetings. I do believe in-person meetings to create chemistry. Especially in the beginning of the engagement with the client, it's extremely important because you're not only buying a service, you're buying the trust into the person across from you. Because there's so many agencies out there. So many service providers out there. Who are you going to go for if the service is extremely comparable and they sadly so are? In the creative space, not as much, but in the digital execution, who does better search than that person – there is a chemistry factor to that. I think in person will stay extremely relevant. Our strategy here is to say, instead of having large headquarters, we're going to have more micro-offices. When we have 10 agencies, let's say in North America, it's extremely likely that we end up having 20 offices all over the place. Instead of having one person in a WeWork, we're going to have 20 people from maybe 5 different agencies in Austin, Texas. Or we're going to have the same in Dallas, or we're going to have the same in San Francisco. We already have 5 offices in North America and anyone from these companies can really work from anywhere within these proximities. We also hire outside of these proximities because we want to have at some point an office in Miami, maybe in New Orleans, and whatnot. So, I foresee that we have certain client-centric larger footprints in New York, LA, San Francisco. We have Boulder, Colorado, we have Chicago, we have Toronto . . . but we're going to have a lot of micro-offices because we need to have flexibility. That's new work. This is part of that. Maybe one of the things we got from covid . . . besides covid. ROB: Really fascinating. Tim, we quite often ask people what lessons they've learned and what they would do differently, but it strikes me that you are actually in the process of getting to do things differently. You know we say, what would you do if you were starting over? You, you have had a chance to do that in some cases. An interesting thing about this model is you're kind of starting on third base but you have agencies who have made it here on their own journeys and you're having to coalesce something together. What are you doing differently in the structuring of Meet the People that you learned in your past and said, “It's got to be different”? TIM: One thing that we're doing the same is creating a deep understanding and culture between all the different offices, people, trades, and brands. I've done this before. The last business I managed for IPG, I ended up having 72 offices around the globe. The business before had 25 offices around the globe and we made sure that these people met physically. It sounds counterintuitive during covid but, the fact that you spend time together workshopping. For example, let's say we have five companies and all their creatives can come together in one location for three days and talk about the differences of their work approach. That would be such a forming experience for them because they all are going to learn from that. You have some people who have done this for 40 years. You have some people who are doing this for 4 years. It's that culture of respect, of understanding, of bringing the different traits together. I think that is extremely powerful. I learned through this journey that you can have you can have the best product in the world. If your people don't believe in it, you're not going to go anywhere. Creating that belief and creating that culture and creating that integrated DNA is a little bit of magic that's extremely important to build a successful business. That's what I learned. What I go to do different, and I kind of promised my wife I would, is travel less. I don't think that's not happening. What I try to do is travel a little bit less because covid allows for that new model. The second thing that I learned is to run an agency a little bit more like an agile tech company. Not because I want to strip away the creativity or anything – none of none of that. The problem in many agencies is that there's a lack of accountability because of a mutual understanding that the creative process is complicated. You know what I mean. Building a tech product is as complicated and needs as much creativity. But somehow there are better levers or control mechanisms in there that allow you to achieve a target in your planning session a little bit quicker and more agile. We want to apply a little bit of startup thinking to a very traditional industry. ROB: I think anybody in the startup industry would claim the same degree of creativity and the same degree of craftsmanship. I'm very much from a software development background and if you want to talk about something that resists measurement. People always say, “Building software is not the same as building a house. You can stamp out houses, but software is a different thing.” Yet within technology there are certain constraints that you talk about. You don't get to just walk away and say, “Well I'm sorry. It'll take some amount of time and we'll show up and it'll be great. There's process to it. TIM: In the advertising industry, that is not always the case. People walk away and they say, “I'm going to come back in a week or two because I don't know when I'm going to come to a product.” I get that because it's creative and it needs time but in many of these trades you can have OKR's, for example. So you can have certain accountability factors or set certain targets. That's how you can manage a large company. A bit more agile and efficient.  ROB: Yeah, so to talk about OKR's for a moment because they're popularly said, but I think sometimes poorly understood. Where did you come to a good understanding of them and how do you think about deploying them? TIM: I've got to be honest with you. This is why I got my management team together in New York this week. They're all here in the office in New York – came in from Germany, London, Connecticut. Sounds like a long trip but we're all coming together. ROB: Can be. TIM: We are coming together right now, here in New York, to decide “how do we implement OKR's within an agency environment” and we're not done with that journey. We're not done with the discussion, but we do know we want to approach it a little bit different than the last 3 times we did it together. I think in six months' time I can answer that question much better. I do believe that OKR's need to be very individualized. Your overall underlying principles are the same, but you have to individually craft it towards your organization because you don't want to over-engineer it as well, right? You need to give people the freedom. So, I will be able to answer that question in three to six months ROB: Sounds good, sounds good. Tim, as you're thinking about what's next for Meet the People and for this evolved holding company model, what's coming up next? What are you excited about? TIM: For us, it's hyper-goals. We have 400 people in North America right now. We want to be 2,000 people in at most 18 to 24 months globally. So, we are very much focused on making the right decisions now because, once you build something with small cracks, they become massive gaps when you are at scale. So, we're very much focused on operational excellence, on our brand positioning, on bringing really good entrepreneurs. When I look at companies, we have to do the financial background checks and stuff like that needs to be in order. But I'm looking much more for entrepreneurs who see that the industry needs to change. That is where the minds are aligned with the companies we are looking at and acquiring and partnering with. That's what I'm most excited about, finding really talented entrepreneurs who want to change the industry who can't or are tapping out with their skills or their abilities or financially and asking, how do I get from 50 to 100 people? How do I get from 100 to 200 people? We bring the experience. We bring the capital. We bring structure where they can actually still move things – because we're not 10,000 people or 5,000 people like our competitors are. So, that's what gets me most excited. Then, obviously, there's always something new in our industry, there's always something new, right? It never stops. I remember when I built my first agency, I thought, when I master search, I'm going to be done with this. Affiliate marketing comes along. Oh well. Then I master affiliate marketing. Then social came and I mastered social. Programmatic came. It never ends – and that's also, to some extent, very exciting because you keep having to learn and adapt. At some point, I will age out, where people will tell me, “Tim you know what? Just drink your coffee. You know we have got it because you don't, and you don't get it anymore.” ROB: (Laughs) Ah, so it's always a struggle to try and figure out what things you might be aging out of and what things are just a little weird. It's always a little bit of both. TIM: That's right. And what's the little bit of bullshit right now in the industry that you can just face over. You don't need to go deep. ROB: I think there were moments early in social where it felt very experimental. It felt very strange. It felt very frothy. We've been through that on an influencer. You were around. I was around. You look at the crypto world and it seems almost like – I could be dead wrong – I think the thing that's most misunderstood but also well observed now about the dot Com era is everything happened eventually. But it didn't happen then. That's maybe where we're at with crypto. I'm not sure. TIM: Well, like crypto is one thing, but then think about NFTs, right?  ROB: Yeah, I'm lumping that in. Yeah TIM: Okay, if you lump it all into one OKR, fair enough. I can talk for hours about my diverse opinions on NFTs and the NFT world. Nevertheless, we have clients who are extremely excited about and who really want to deploy capital, being part of that industry because there's the strong underlying belief of making something really good at the same time. There is this unnecessary social hype on certain topics where I'm thinking, “Guys, you're destroying something that was meant to be really good. I think blockchain and crypto is falling or has fallen into a similar trap where the underlying idea . . . because technically I'm an engineer, right? I got my first pc when I was eleven. Taught myself coding and all this kind of stuff. So, I love the idea of blockchain and decentralized holding of assets and accountability and ledgers. That's amazing. It could solve so many problems in world. The problem is that when dodgecoin comes along in Shibona or whatever, the next thing is, it drags it in the dirt. The underlying technology is incredible. The sad story is people want to get rich fast and lots of them don't. ROB: That's right. It happened before. People built the worst websites in the world for a couple million bucks back once-upon-a-time early internet. TIM: But you remember when you could buy 1 pixel on a website or something like that for a thousand dollars and there were these crazy businesses out there and it's coming back, just differently now. My hope is that just like the dot com bubble . . . yes, there was a hype. Yes, there was a crash but, after that an actual industry developed. So, I'm hoping that we're going to go through the same thing with NFTs and some of these offsprings of crypto. ROB: That makes complete sense. Well, Tim, Thanks for hopping on. Thanks for illuminating us on what's going on in this holding company opportunity, what you're doing with that. I think it's interesting you started and you kind of knew what it looked like to run a large organization. I can imagine starting with 2 people in a closet might not always be the best use of those skills. It's neat to see the industry lining up in a way that that lets us see so much happen so quickly. So, thanks for coming on. Good to have you, Tim. TIM: Thanks Rob for having me. Thank you so much. Really appreciate it. ROB: Alright, be well, thanks, bye.

Work From The Inside Out
153: Doctor on a Mission - Isabel Hunsinger

Work From The Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:37


When Dr. Isabel Hunsinger was five, her mother gave her the game, Operation. We talked about the buzzer sound that occurred if the game's tweezers touched the sides of the openings in the “patient”. And the nose would light up in red too. It was either a game you loved or found unnerving. Isabel loved it. Isabel had an uncle from Cuba who was an anesthesiologist and she absolutely adored him. She said he would walk into the room and light it up. Isabel's love for her uncle sparked her interest in medicine from a very young age. Or was it the Operation game?  When her parents divorced, Isabel went to live with her father in Buenos Aires, Argentina until she graduated from high school. Then, she returned to the U.S. and got a job on an organic farm in Pennsylvania. She was still thinking about medicine but also had a keen interest in agriculture, and began college intending to major in it. After one year, she realized it was not for her. Isabel left school, and moved to Boulder, Colorado where she got a job waiting tables. There, she had a defining moment, as she refers to it, “I was serving a cocktail and some guy pinched my bottom. And I said, I will never put up with this again. I'm going to become a doctor.“ Isabel has been a medical doctor since 1991 and over time, she grew unhappy with the U.S.  healthcare system. She wants to get to the root of diseases, not just throw a Band-Aid on them. Her goal is to see people healed. In 2000, Isabel, her husband, and their two young daughters moved to New Zealand to experience a different culture. She hoped to find a better system of care there but that was not the case.  With her husband, Culinary Nutrition Expert, Chef Michael, Isabel has created the brand Doctoronamission, where they prevent and reverse disease, and give hope.  In this week's Work From The Inside Out podcast, learn more about Isabel's journey: Isabel has been offering tele-medicine for the past seven years including online courses and 1-to-1 coaching. She focuses on Alzheimer's, Dementia, Cognitive Decline, Anxiety, Depression, Diabetes. Learn more and connect with Isabel here:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/doctoronamission/ https://www.facebook.com/doctoronamission https://www.instagram.com/doctoronamission/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/bossybrainsolution www.doctoronamission.com

GovEx Data Points
#74 - Data Science: Easy as P.I.E.

GovEx Data Points

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 25:55


Governments are often on the hook for some of society's most pressing challenges. How can city leaders find novel and flexible solutions to address these issues and improve the lives of residents? In a world filled with ever more complex technology, leaders are looking to data science as the answer for previously unsolvable problems.Today, we're joined by Richard Todd, Enterprise Data Lead for the City of Boulder, CO. We'd discuss what data science is, how data science paradigms can be applied to various challenges, and explore a few examples of how data science has been used to solve problems in US cities. We'll also discuss some tips to keep in mind as you launch a data science project in your city.To learn more about GovEx and our Academy Fellows, please visit us at govex.jhu.edu

Dr. Gameshow
74. Happy Birthday, Everybody!

Dr. Gameshow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 75:43


Hosts Jo Firestone & Manolo Moreno play listener-created games with callers!Games played: Heartwarming Hot Dog submitted by Spun & Jesse from indigenous Kizh land (aka Los Angeles, California), Dr. Game Shhhhh! submitted by Noah Levine from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Name That Movie submitted by Kassie Gale from Rogers, ArkansasCallers: Noah from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Toby from Chicago, Illinois; Dashiell (and dogs Spring & Bucatini) from Portland, Oregon; Spun & Jesse from indigenous Kizh land (aka Los Angeles, California); Kitty & Napoleon from Boulder, Colorado; Daniel from Port Orchard, WashingtonOutro theme cover by Wilder Adkins from Birmingham, AlabamaThis episode sponsored by: Magic Spoon - Go to magicspoon.com/GAMESHOW and use the code GAMESHOW to save $5 off!

Relish This: The Nonprofit Marketing Podcast
Ep 63: Telling your story at the intersection of marketing, branding, and sales with Suzi Bahnsen from Apple and Arrow Sales.

Relish This: The Nonprofit Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:35


In the for-profit world, Sales and Marketing are two sides of the same coin. They work hand-in-hand to build an organization. In the nonprofit world, however, these two components of brand building and stakeholder engagement get a bad wrap. But do nonprofits actually sell? Of course they do. Whether some component of your organization drives revenue through selling, or your ED is simply out drumming up donations during the giving season, at some level every non-profit depends on sales and marketing.My guest on this episode of Relish This is Suzi Bahnsen, founder of Apple and Arrow Sales. They help organizations and leaders navigate the intersection of marketing, branding, and sales. Suzi and I met when she was working at Boulder, Colorado's Small Business Development Center. She has a long history working with nonprofits and small businesses to improve their sales and engagement, and it was great to reconnect with her..We had a vigorous discussion about storytelling and how to use marketing and branding to get your message across to your stakeholders, how to develop a solid marketing and engagement strategy, and much more. This was a super fun episode. I hope you enjoy it. Link: Apple and Arrow SalesASK: Say something nice to a stranger and find a charity to give to!

Green Connections Radio -  Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil
Why Glaciers Matter – Twila Moon, Ph.D., Glacier Scientist, Univ of Colorado at Boulder – COP26

Green Connections Radio - Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:48


“For the entire development of modern civilization, Greenland and Antarctica have been holding vast amounts of water as frozen ice and helping us to maintain very steady sea levels around our coast. And that's allowed us to build infrastructure, build mega cities, right on the coast where many of our world's mega cities sit. Now….we're raising our air temperatures …and that's adding more water to our oceans, which is arriving at shores around the world… disrupting the infrastructure we built…(and) caus(ing) health and other problems.” Dr. Twila Moon on Electric Ladies Podcast We hear about melting ice caps as a symbol of global warming. What do they mean? What does the ice caps mean? What does the fact that they're melting mean? And what does it mean for our cities, towns and communities? Listen to Dr. Twila Moon, a climate scientist from and the University of Colorado at Boulder's National Snow and Ice Data Center who specializes in the ice caps - a cryosphere scientist – in this fascinating interview with Electric Ladies host Joan Michelson where she helps us understand what those melting ice caps mean for us. You'll hear about: Why glaciers matter How glaciers melting directly affects our daily lives. Why small changes in air temperature directly affect our infrastructure, food and water supplies. What we can do in our daily conversations to help people understand the impact of climate change. Plus, insightful career advice …. “So first recognizing that you're in a continually evolving space of influence and the dreams that you, that position that you were applying for three years ago, take the time now to consider…(that) you might've already grown out of that dream and already be able to take on bigger responsibilities or bigger roles. And the second thing is learning how to say no saying no is saying yes to the things already on your plate.” Twila Moon on the Electric Ladies podcast Read Joan's related Forbes articles here too. You'll also want to listen to: Sandrine Dixson, Co-President, The Club of Rome, from COP26, about the need for transformational public-private partnerships to get to net zero. Gillian Tett, Financial Times, from COP26, about what the new financial alliance means for a net zero economy. Olivia Martin, USAFacts.org, on the State of the Earth in 2021, using various sources of government data. Michele Wucker, thought leaders and author of “You Are What You Risk: The New Art & Science to Navigating an Uncertain World.” Subscribe to our newsletter to receive our podcasts, blog, events and special coaching offers.. Thanks for subscribing on Apple Podcasts or iHeartRadio and leaving us a review! Reach us on Twitter @joanmichelson

The Nugget Climbing Podcast
EP 97: Austin Hoyt — Favorite Zones in the Northeast, Rediscovering Old Projects, and Being a GUNKaholic

The Nugget Climbing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 95:37


Austin Hoyt is an 18-year-old kid from New York whose tick list rivals some professional climbers. We talked about balancing school with climbing, what he learned from his first coach, his FA of ‘Flashing Lights' V14, his love of The Gunks, making old-school climbing films, the support from his dad, and his ongoing goal to develop the bouldering scene in the Northeast.Check out Rhino Skin Solutions:rhinoskinsolutions.comUse code "NUGGET" at checkout for 20% off your next order!Support the Podcast:thenuggetclimbing.com/supportWe are supported by these amazing BIG GIVERS:Bryan Fast, Leo FranchiBecome a Patron:patreon.com/thenuggetclimbingShow Notes:  thenuggetclimbing.com/episodes/austin-hoytNuggets:4:30 – Austin's bouldering stats at age 18, and how he fits climbing in while going to school8:12 – Some of Austin's typical weekend destinations9:48 – Favorite areas in the Northeast11:38 – How Austin started climbing (Ninja Warrior + ice cream shop), and doing V3 his first week15:11 – Crediting everything to his first coach Charlie, and negative reinforcement18:41 – Drills and spray wall climbing23:34 – Climbing at Powerlines, and getting into doing first ascents (FAs)25:25 – “Chase me”, and what Austin learned from watching his coach Charlie climb27:25 – Finding new boulders in famous areas29:17 – The Gunks, and Austin's Gunkaholics film series33:40 – The season in The Gunks, and what Austin does when it rains for two weeks34:44 – Balancing projecting, outdoor climbing for volume, and indoor training37:15 – The mental battle of projecting, and the first ascent of ‘Flashing Lights' V1443:14 – ‘Nuclear War' V1345:52 – Filmmaking, and Austin's film equipment and influence 49:18 – College plans and dreams to make adventure films52:00 – Plan for a gap year, and comp training54:42 – Dave Graham56:18 – How Austin trains power on a spray wall 57:30 – Guidance for setting a spray wall, and the skill of making up hard climbs to train on1:00:24 – What a spray wall session looks like, and training strengths vs. weaknesses1:02:28 – Patron Question from Brandon: Do you have any roped ambitions in New England?1:04:22 – Bouldering vs. trad in The Gunks1:05:44 – Patron Question from Will: What is your favorite crag north of The Gunks?1:07:48 – Patron Question from Jack: What is your favorite problem on the Speed Boulder at GB?1:08:55 – Patron Question from Avery: How did you become the master of vert?1:11:25 – Austin's dad, motocross, and broken bones1:14:13 – How his dad supported him in climbing ‘Nuclear Base' V141:17:39 – Austin's new project1:19:18 – Climbing algorithms, “The Formula”, and Austin's perspective on grades1:22:36 – The dream of becoming a pro climber, the current goal of developing the Northeast, my experiences in Leavenworth, and making lists1:26:05 – Applying to colleges near climbing1:27:07 – Beta Labs, and ideas for building his own business1:30:54 – Shoutouts to his sponsors

For The Long Run
189. Sara Manderscheid: Filling up your cup and spreading joy

For The Long Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:32


Sara Manderscheid is a sister, daughter, dog mom, an adventurer and lover of life who also runs and coaches runners. In this episode we talk about: -discovering running as an adult -staying true and betting on yourself -challenging fears and opening yourself up to success -the Boulder running community -finding flow and fun on the run -coaching others versus coaching yourself -going big and exploring your potential -living authentically with no regrets -prioritizing the coach-athlete relationship -filling up your cup and spreading joy -small steps gaining momentum -consistency with the process -questioning you why -the people you surround yourself with -chasing big goals with fun first -running for the love of it This episode is brought to you by Tracksmith and Goodr. Tracksmith recently released their fall collection, which was designed to celebrate the seasonal shifts as we find our rhythm this fall. I'm proud to partner with Tracksmith, and they're going to donate 5% of your order value to the Michael J Fox Foundation for all orders, and you'll also get free shipping. The Michael J Fox Foundation is dedicated to finding a cure and helping those living with Parkinsons. Both of my grandfathers have or had Parkinsons, and I'm grateful of Tracksmith's support for something so personal. Visit Tracksmith.com/forthelongrun to see some of my favorite pieces, and all orders that start from that page will contribute towards this donation!  Recover Athletics is a supporter of not only this podcast, but my own running. It was built in Boston by two lifelong training partners who got tired of aches and pains getting in the way of their running.  In 90 seconds, their app will customize a program for your body and your training. I plugged in some of my more common aches and pains, and I got a custom built program designed to strengthen the muscles and tendons that will help avoid those issues going forward.  Your first custom prehab program is free, AND they have an unlimited free trial. Give Recover a try today. Your legs will thank you --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/forthelongrun/support

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Colorado Music Experience: Interview with Kyle Hollingsworth

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 33:59


After attending college, majoring with a focus on jazz piano, Kyle Hollingsworth set out on a career in music. Moving to Boulder, Colorado, he eventually joined String Cheese Incident, writing and performing in a mosaic of styles with the acclaimed jam band. The innovative and virtuosic musician has collaborated with a horde of major acts and leads a solo project, Kyle Hollingsworth Band. He is also an avid craft brewer and has hosted events and concerts spotlighting his collaborative beverages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Upstream
NFTs with Nathan Schneider and Cory Doctorow (In Conversation)

Upstream

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 62:39


In this episode we're talking NFTs. If you don't know what this latest phenomenon in the crypto, blockchain, asset speculation world is, if you've heard of NFTs but wanna know more, or if you wanna hear why NFTs might be leading us to an (even more) dystopian future — we've got you covered. We've brought on two guests to help unpack the NFT craze: Nathan Schneider is an Assistant Professor of Media studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder, journalist, founder of the Media Enterprise Design Lab, and author most recently of Everything for Everyone: The Radical Tradition that Is Shaping the Next Economy, published by Nation Books. Cory Doctorow is an author, activist, journalist and blogger, editor of Pluralistic dot net, former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and author of the novels Attack Surface and Walkaway, as well as nonfiction books like How to Destroy Surveillance Capitalism. Thank you to Beulah for the intermission music. Upstream theme music was composed by Robert. Support for this episode was provided by the Guerrilla Foundation and by listeners like you. Upstream is a labor of love — we couldn't keep this project going without the generosity of our listeners and fans. Please consider chipping in a one-time or recurring donation at www.upstreampodcast.org/support Also, if your organization wants to sponsor one of our upcoming episodes, we have a number of sponsorship packages available. Find out more at upstreampodcast.org/sponsorship For more from Upstream, visit www.upstreampodcast.org and follow us on social media: twitter.com/UpstreamPodcast Instagram.com/upstreampodcast You can also subscribe to us on Apple Podcast and Spotify: Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3HRN2OX Spotify: spoti.fi/2AryXHs

The Bret Saunders Podcast
John Novasad

The Bret Saunders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 11:05


John Novasad, the Boulder comedian formerly known as Hippieman, joins the podcast this week. In his conversation with Bret, John talks about transitioning away from the Hippieman persona, and how Boulder figures into his stand up (Did you know you can't let a llama graze on public land in Boulder?). They also talk vegetarianism and the worst thing he must deal with as a comedian.

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment
Luke Schroeder: Paradoxes, Painting, Pareidolia, and Folding It All In

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 144:32


LISTEN: APPLE  | SPOTIFY | STITCHER | YOUTUBE If You Enjoy This Show Please Subscribe and Give Us a 5-Star Rating ★★★★★ and Review on Apple Podcasts | Donate On Patreon or PayPal  Become a Patron and get access to bonus episodes, early access releases, my new comedy show, Dosadelic, merch, the inner sanctum discord + other rewards and goodies, and mush mush more. Only on Patreon. Live Gatherings & Events: INWARD: A Primal Masculine Winter Solstice Journey  Friday, Dec 17 - Sunday, Dec 19 Boulder, CO https://authenticue.com/inward Permission Retreat Recap Video: You Have Permission   Luke Schroeder is an amazing artist, a fun and funny guy, brilliant and humble. Luke and I chat about art, painting, philosophy, psychedelics, time, how to hold paradoxes, flow states, the nature of consciousness, metaphysics, bacteria, and how to create the good world.   Mikeadelic is Sponsored by: Waveblock:  Enter Code MIKEADELIC is or 20% off! https://bit.ly/3FGf6TA   innovative WaveBlock™ Protect Stickers are laboratory-tested to deflect EMF waves away from the brain, reducing the harmful effects of radiation exposure up to 87%   Element kombucha: Use code Mike11 and get 11% Off the best Kombucha in the multiverse. This is my new favorite kombucha. I love it. So happy to have them sponsor the show. https://elementkombucha.com/ Being True To You: A one-of-a-kind Coach Training and Certification Program for people who want to build a career helping others transform their lives in a positive way. Starts Sept 8https://bit.ly/3lNLNb9 Fungi Academy: Enter Promo Code Mikeadelic at checkout for 25% Off https://bit.ly/3z0A6ln   Connect With Luke: Instagram: @luke_schroeder_art Etsy Shop: https://etsy.me/3CTaGHm   Connect With Mike: Website: https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX Men's group Experiences: website coming soon - for now email me Mikeadelicpod@gmail.com to stay in the loop for some epic brotherhood connection.  1 on 1 Mind Jam Sessions - http://bit.ly/3aJ0Yv6 Instagram: https://bit.ly/2Pqc50B Email/ContactMe: https://bit.ly/2Dsv2v4 Facebook: https://bit.ly/2XCchg7 Twitter: https://bit.ly/2IwIhik Donate On Patreon or PayPal  All My Links: https://linktr.ee/Mikeadelic Subscribe to the Inner Sanctum Monthly Newsletter  https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX Thanks To: Student Loan Tutor: https://bit.ly/2X2meF4 * Say you found them through Mikeadelic for extra special magical love and care. Intro Music Provided by Danny Barnett & Galaxia:  https://bit.ly/2XB3sDr

Profit From the Inside with Joel Block
145: Outmaneuvering: The Inside Track on the Best Branding

Profit From the Inside with Joel Block

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:07


Contact info: Marc Gutman WILDSTORY 303-818-6533 https://www.WildStory.com Marc@Wildstory.com Bio: Marc Gutman is a storyteller, entrepreneur, adventurer, and idealist. But most importantly, Marc loves brands and their stories. Marc held several positions in the story business. He served as Story Editor for Oliver Stone's Illusion Entertainment, and wrote stories and screenplays for Oliver Stone, Warner Bros., and 20th Century Fox. In addition to his time in Hollywood, Marc itched the entrepreneurial scratch by founding a multimillion dollar tech company in Boulder, Colorado. Today, Marc focuses his energy on Wildstory, the brand strategy studio for brands that want to outmaneuver their competition. Wildstory has worked with brands like Thor Industries, Airstream, El Cap, Planet Granite, Earth Treks, Movement, Inboard, Outward Bound School, and First Descents. Marc is on a mission to help the world après… one brand at a time. He is also the host of the Baby Got Backstory podcast; delving into the story behind great brands such as Priceline.com, Patagonia, Ugg, Build-A-Bear Workshop and Kswiss. Marc lives outside of Boulder, CO with his saintly wife and three dirty kids Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Art and Soul Show
Reclaim Your Time - Using Automation Strategies to Create a Profitable and Sustainable Photography Business with Colie James

The Art and Soul Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 40:17


Colie joins me today on the podcast to talk about building a profitable and sustainable photography business.We talk about automation + reclaiming your time with strategy and streamlining.She also shares the benefits of doing automation early in your business so that you create the time and space to either work more ON your business or spend that quality time with your family that you are missing.Discover more about Colie James Website:  https://coliejamesphotography.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColieJamesPhotography/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coliejames Bio: Colie James is a family filmmaker and photographer educator based outside Boulder, Colorado. In addition to making art that reflects the reality of parenthood, she helps family photographers create businesses that are sustainable and profitable.

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
What does humanity need to survive after a global catastrophe? (with David Denkenberger)

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:18


What kinds of catastrophic risks could drastically impact global food supply or large-scale electricity supply? What kinds of strategies could help mitigate or recover from such outcomes? How can we plan for and incentivize cooperation in catastrophic scenarios? How can catastrophic and existential risks be communicated more effectively to the average person? What factors cause people to cooperate or not in disaster scenarios? Where should we be spending resources right now to prepare for catastrophe? Why does it seem that governments are largely uninterested in these questions?Dr. David Denkenberger (also known as 3D) received his master's from Princeton in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado at Boulder in Building Systems (dissertation on his patented heat exchanger). He is an assistant professor at University of Alaska Fairbanks in Mechanical Engineering. He cofounded and directs the Alliance to Feed the Earth in Disasters (ALLFED) and donates half his income to it. He received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, is a Penn State distinguished alumnus, and is a registered professional engineer. He has 73 peer reviewed publications and is the third most prolific author in the existential and global catastrophic risk field. His work has been featured in more than 25 countries in over 200 articles, including articles in Science.

The Past Lives Podcast
The Past Lives Podcast Ep186 - Marilyn Kaufman

The Past Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 62:10


Past Life Regression. This week I'm talking to Marilyn Kaufman about her book 'Lifetimes: Exploring Your Past Lives and Life Between Lives Can Empower You to Live the Life You Were Meant to Live'. Fifteen years ago while studying energy healing, Marilyn Kaufman found herself in a spontaneous past life. The incredible experience left her wondering what other lifetimes could be influencing her current existence. And so she began an introspective journey to find out more.After gaining a better understanding of the experience, Marilyn began studying hypnosis and regression therapy, and eventually incorporated the techniques into her existing energy healing practice. While guiding her clients down an enlightening path through past lives, into the in between, and to connect to their Spirit guides, Marilyn learned much about the purpose of life. By sharing her insights, Marilyn helps others who may be awakening or searching for meaning in their lives to embrace the power of past life regression therapy to move through challenging obstacles, explore and heal relationships, and realize their true life's purpose.Lifetimes shares fascinating personal stories of an empath's journey and related experiences with past life regression as she achieved peace, gained eternal knowledge, and went on to guide others down a path of self-actualization.BioMarilyn Kaufman, CHt, a true believer in life-long learning and eternal progression, started her metaphysical journey studying Healing Tao Meditation for many years. She has since become a Certified Hatha Yoga Teacher, Reiki/Energy Practitioner, Certified Hypnotherapist, Certified Between Life Soul Regressionist and Master of NLP.Marilyn has studied at the Transformational Arts College and the Rocky Mountain Mystery School in Toronto, with Dick Sutphen at Fellowships of the Spirit in Lilydale, N.Y., and Dr. Linda Backman at the Ravenheart Center in Boulder, Colorado as well as many others. In 2016, Marilyn received her Master of Hypnosis certification from Georgina Cannon in Toronto. In 2019 she certified as a master of NLP (NeuroLinguistic Programming) after studying with Eliot Hoppe in Toronto.https://www.amazon.com/Lifetimes-Exploring-Lives-Between-Empower-ebook/dp/B09HMGDKRY/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1637432354&sr=8-1https://youareasoul.ca/http://www.pastliveshypnosis.co.ukhttps://www.patreon.com/pastlivespodcasthttps://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/the-past-lives-podcast

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment
The Alchemical Process Of Earth Medicine Integration W/ Jeremy Colbert (Taragápe)

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 114:09


LISTEN: APPLE  | SPOTIFY | STITCHER | YOUTUBE If You Enjoy This Show Please Subscribe and Give Us a 5-Star Rating ★★★★★ and Review on Apple Podcasts | Donate On Patreon or PayPal  Become a Patron and get access to bonus episodes, early access releases, my new comedy show, Dosadelic, merch, the inner sanctum discord + other rewards and goodies, and mush mush more. Only on Patreon. Live Gatherings & Events: INWARD: A Primal Masculine Winter Solstice Journey  Friday, Dec 17 - Sunday, Dec 19 Boulder, CO https://authenticue.com/inward Permission Retreat Recap Video: You Have Permission   Jeremy Colbert, also known as J Taragápe, is a musician, educator, and integration coach specializing in Earth medicine integration with a focus on developing practices around psilocybin and N,N-Dimethytryptamine as well as supporting those who've had challenging experiences. Jeremy has taught children and adults the foundations of music for over 11 years and now seeks to help adults re-connect with their inner child and truer self through the alignment and integration of nature, its cycles, and innate intelligence. J is not a transformational coach, rather a transmutational coach who cultivates the alchemy of deeply honoring one's entire experience in order to acknowledge, accept, and ultimately love oneself so that a transmutation can happen to create an energetically-efficient pivot toward a more authentic and embodied life for clients.  Taragápe utilizes music to aid in this process. The album Spirit Maze is an integration album of his own created for others, featuring handpan arranged with strings as well as conscious guitar and lyrical compositions, and can be found on Spotify, iTunes, or wherever you listen to music.    Mikeadelic is Sponsored by: Waveblock:  Enter Code MIKEADELIC is or 20% off! https://bit.ly/3FGf6TA   innovative WaveBlock™ Protect Stickers are laboratory-tested to deflect EMF waves away from the brain, reducing the harmful effects of radiation exposure up to 87%   Element kombucha: Use code Mike11 and get 11% Off the best Kombucha in the multiverse. This is my new favorite kombucha. I love it. So happy to have them sponsor the show. https://elementkombucha.com/ Being True To You: A one-of-a-kind Coach Training and Certification Program for people who want to build a career helping others transform their lives in a positive way. Starts Sept 8https://bit.ly/3lNLNb9 Fungi Academy: Enter Promo Code Mikeadelic at checkout for 25% Off https://bit.ly/3z0A6ln   Connect With Jeremy : Free 45 min exploratory call to see if Integration Coaching is for you: https://calendly.com/taragape/exploratorycall Mission/Purpose Statement (& YouTube Channel): https://youtu.be/0ml-6YITj10 Spirit Maze album (432hz integration journey) - https://spoti.fi/3mQzZ6y Instagram: @taragape  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/taragape     Connect With Mike: Website: https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX Men's group Experiences: website coming soon - for now email me Mikeadelicpod@gmail.com to stay in the loop for some epic brotherhood connection.  1 on 1 Mind Jam Sessions - http://bit.ly/3aJ0Yv6 Instagram: https://bit.ly/2Pqc50B Email/ContactMe: https://bit.ly/2Dsv2v4 Facebook: https://bit.ly/2XCchg7 Twitter: https://bit.ly/2IwIhik Donate On Patreon or PayPal  All My Links: https://linktr.ee/Mikeadelic Subscribe to the Inner Sanctum Monthly Newsletter  https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX Thanks To: Student Loan Tutor: https://bit.ly/2X2meF4 * Say you found them through Mikeadelic for extra special magical love and care. Intro Music Provided by Danny Barnett & Galaxia:  https://bit.ly/2XB3sDr

Dawgman Radio
Kyler Gordon, Cameron Davis, and Bob Gregory talk after Colorado loss

Dawgman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 9:21


The Washington Huskies lost 20-17 Saturday afternoon to the Colorado Buffaloes in Boulder, Colo. Washington defensive back Kyler Gordon, running back Cameron Davis, and interim head coach Bob Gregory spoke to the media postgame about the loss and what went wrong. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dawgman Radio
DawgmanRadio: Huskies Go On The Road To Face Off With Colorado

Dawgman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 44:08


Heading to Boulder for their last road game of the season, Washington sits at 4-6 and on the brink of missing a bowl game for the first time in 12 years. They have to figure out a way to come out of this afternoon's game against the Buffaloes with a win. How do they do that? Dawgman's Chris Fetters and Scott Eklund sit down and discuss some of the biggest keys to the game. Will Sam Huard play? Will he start? How much will Dylan Morris play? Can the Huskies stop the run and run the ball? Can they force some turnovers? There are a lot of things at play as the Huskies prepare to take the field, not the least of which is the absense of Jimmy Lake who was dismissed as the head coach after serving a one-week suspension. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
Scott Ohlgren | Enhance Brain Function With Plant Based Nootropics KKP: 338

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 56:43


Today, I am blessed to have here with me Scott Ohlgren. He has lived his life as a self-proclaimed adventurer and trailblazer. Scott is originally from a small town in Wisconsin and, after traveling the world, spent many years in Boulder, CO. Scott and his wife currently reside in Sarasota, Florida.  Scott is the author of several books on wellness and was the developer of the drink Brain Toniq, carried primarily by the Whole Foods brand. Scott's wellness business, Synaptic Science, features the cutting-edge science of nootropics. In this episode, Scott reveals how he got started in the health space and the inspiration behind his wellness business, Synaptic Science. Scott explains the research behind cognitive-enhancing plants and how he came up with plant-based ingredients to nourish the mind. Tune in as we dive into Scott's product Cognition; it's a highly concentrated liquid brain-boosting supplement, a mix of Ayurvedic plant extracts that each has been shown to support beneficial effects on brain health, emotions, and overall mental wellness. Use code "ketokamp" and get Cognition here: https://synapticscientific.com/?ref=ba Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use BEN10 at checkout for 10% off your order.  Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  [00:30] How Scott Ohlgren Got Involved In The Health Space Scott came from a tiny town in Wisconsin, and his health wasn't excellent. After traveling, Scott learned about the connection between diet and diseases. Scott went to a school where he learned all about the connections between disease and diet. He ended up writing three books on the connections. Scott loves to talk about the idea of cleansing; it's the idea of eating very clean for certain periods of time.   [16:30] The Research Behind Cognitive-Enhancing Plants Scott always hires people smarter than him. Through Brain Toniq, Scott met someone who was extremely knowledgeable in botany. He understands the power of plants in healing humanity. It took a long time to find the right ingredients for Scott's products – many iterations were too bitter for consumers. Scott started Synaptic Scientific because he's interested in feeding the system with plant-based ingredients that nourish the mind.   [23:45] What You'll Notice After Using Cognition From Synaptic Scientific What a supplement does for one person will be different for somebody else. Any cognitive boosting plant or compound will markedly improve a variety of mental functions. Ingredients that Scott includes in Cognition: Mucuna pruriens Convolvulus pluricaulis Centella asiatica Celastrus paniculatus Bacopa monnieri Ocimum sanctum Griffonia simplicifolia A-glyceryl Phosphoryl Choline You can expect to feel a sense of wellbeing when you take Cognition. Plus, these ingredients support overall brain health. Scott says that Cognition makes him sleep very well. Use code “ketokamp” here: https://synapticscientific.com/   [33:05] The Best Way You Can Use Cognition In Your Daily Life Cognition contains 1 bottle, 120ml. One serving is 2ml (about four pumps), so each bottle has 60+ servings.  Leave it at room temperature. Cognition contains MCT oil. If you put it in the fridge, then it's not going to shake well. So, leave it a room temperature and give it a shake. Use a spoon because the pump isn't that accurate. 3 – 6 ml a day is about average. For some people, 1 ml can be too much. Americans have to start putting more bitters into their diets; it is the key to liver and gallbladder health.   [38:40] How Cognition Is Nourishing The Brain Instead of Tweaking It You want to take enough Cognition so that you actually feel the difference. Sometimes, it's better to split Cognition up into two or three servings in a day. If you take enough, you'll experience the following: Increase in mental focus Loss of brain fog A sense of motivation An ability to focus An uptick in mood and a sense of wellbeing A lessening of anxiety Fewer frustrations The ability to sleep much better   AND MUCH MORE!   Resources from this episode: Check out Synaptic Scientific (use code: ketokamp): https://synapticscientific.com/?ref=ba Follow Scott Ohlgren LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottohlgren/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scottohlgren Read The 28-Day Cleansing Program: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0098AD1QS/benazadi-20 Join theKeto Kamp Academy: https://ketokampacademy.com/7-day-trial-a WatchKeto Kamp on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUh_MOM621MvpW_HLtfkLyQ Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use BEN10 at checkout for 10% off your order.  Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  *Some Links Are Affiliates* // F O L L O W ▸ instagram | @thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2B1NXKW ▸ facebook | /thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2BVvvW6 ▸ twitter | @thebenazadi http://bit.ly/2USE0so ▸clubhouse | @thebenazadi Disclaimer: This podcast is for information purposes only. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. This podcast including Ben Azadi disclaim responsibility from any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own, and this podcast does not accept responsibility of statements made by guests. This podcast does not make any representations or warranties about guests qualifications or credibility. Individuals on this podcast may have a direct or non-direct interest in products or services referred to herein. If you think you have a medical problem, consult a licensed physician.

The Daily Sun-Up
Boulder athletes with Parkinson's team up with former boxers; Martin Truex Jr. wins Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 15:22


On any given day in a sweat-stained gym in Boulder, 70 and 80 year old athletes with Parkinson's disease are strapping on the boxing gloves and learning some new moves. The debilitating disease can cause tremors and body stiffness, among other challenges, and these older Coloradans are trying new ways to keep limber and keep their minds sharp. Kevin Simpson takes us into a world where former boxers are teaming up with some unlikely clients to go a few rounds with their body demons. And in the process they are opening the eyes of other athletes. Michael Booth talks with Kevin about the Boulder gym, and the coaches and older athletes who make it a lively place. Learn more about this story at coloradosun.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

For The Long Run
188. Gwen Jorgensen: exploring unknown potential

For The Long Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 53:26


Gwen is mom to 4 year old Stanley and husband to Pat, new Boulder resident and professional athlete. She prefers to orient her identity around family rather than athletics. In this episode we talk about: -gratitude for what our bodies can do -growing up swimming and running and the pitfalls of early specialization -raising an active son -making running fun -trusting the process and understanding the purpose behind each run -including family in the training -transitioning from the highs of triathlon Olympic gold to the lows starting afresh in running -setting and achieving big goals -a team effort -what motivates Gwen Jorgensen -evolving relationships with running, data and metrics -an introvert's approach to social media -role modelling hard work and dealing with disappointment -not caring about what other people think -fearing success more than failure -redefining success and recognizing the positives regardless of the outcome Thank you to Tracksmith and Recover Athletics for sponsoring this episode. Tracksmith recently released their fall collection, which was designed to celebrate the seasonal shifts as we find our rhythm this fall. I'm proud to partner with Tracksmith, and they're going to donate 5% of your order value to the Michael J Fox Foundation for all orders, and you'll also get free shipping. The Michael J Fox Foundation is dedicated to finding a cure and helping those living with Parkinsons. Both of my grandfathers have or had Parkinsons, and I'm grateful of Tracksmith's support for something so personal. Visit Tracksmith.com/forthelongrun to see some of my favorite pieces, and all orders that start from that page will contribute towards this donation! Recover Athletics is a supporter of not only this podcast, but my own running. It was built in Boston by two lifelong training partners who got tired of aches and pains getting in the way of their running. In 90 seconds, their app will customize a program for your body and your training. I plugged in some of my more common aches and pains, and I got a custom built program designed to strengthen the muscles and tendons that will help avoid those issues going forward. Your first custom prehab program is free, AND they have an unlimited free trial. Give Recover a try today. Your legs will thank you --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/forthelongrun/support

Running Things
The icing on the cake with Oliver Hoare

Running Things

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:11


Guest host Sean Whipp is joined by On Running athlete Ollie Hoare from Boulder, Colorado. He's a newly minted Olympic finalist and 3:32.35 1500m runner. The 24-year-old enjoyed a spectacular collegiate career at the University of Wisconsin. Ollie's time as a Badgers saw the Sydneysider win the 2018 NCAA 1500m title, including eight All-American finishes indoors and outdoors. Following his first fully-fledged professional season with On Athletic Club, under the keen eye of new coach Dathan Ritzenhein, we hear Ollie's insights on his Olympic debut and racing on the Diamond League circuit.Ollie explains how he decided on joining the On Athletic Club, and how the athlete-brand relationship is evolving. Enjoying the dream start to his professional career, Ollie set a national record indoors over 1500m to kick off a globally competitive season. Walking listeners through qualifying for the Olympics during a pandemic, Ollie describes the rain-soaked, unofficial Australian Olympic 1500m trial at the Gateshead Diamond League. A debut Olympic Games is high-pressure for the best of the best, Ollie imparts a lesson or two to all runners in how the fastest middle-distance athletes cope at the biggest event in athletics. Ollie's 2022 provides major championship opportunities at the World Indoor Championships, Commonwealth Games and World Championships – tune in to find out how Ollie plans on attacking the next year.LinksWatch Running Things on YouTubeOllie Hoare on InstagramOllie's On Running profileOllie Hoare 1500m Indoor National RecordOllie Hoare 2018 NCAA 1500m winSean Whipp on InstagramTempo Journal on Instagramtempojournal.com

Tripping Over the Barrel
Tripping over the Crypto with Bitcoin Kween Laura Pommer

Tripping Over the Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:31


Boulder is many things. One thing it is for SURE NOT is an Oil & Gas town. So, imagine growing up in Boulder into a family of Petroleum geologists. Like, your ENTIRE extended family are Petroleum Geologists. Welp, Laura Pommer knows about it. And she's...different. This emerging industry superstar brings her unique spirit and years of industry experience to EnergyFunders and has carved out her role as THE Bitcoin Queen. Laura raises the hash rate in this one of a kind episode. Check out EnergyFunders: https://www.energyfunders.com/ The post Tripping over the Crypto with Bitcoin Kween Laura Pommer appeared first on Digital Wildcatters.

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment
Shems Heartwell: Navigating Relationships In Honest, Healthy Ways

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 108:10


LISTEN: APPLE  | SPOTIFY | STITCHER | YOUTUBE If You Enjoy This Show Please Subscribe and Give Us a 5-Star Rating ★★★★★ and Review on Apple Podcasts | Donate On Patreon :  https://bit.ly/3d0piI0 & PayPal:  https://bit.ly/2AV4pAt Become a Patron and get access to bonus episodes, early access releases, my new weekly comedy podcast, Dosadelic, merch, the inner sanctum discord + other rewards and goodies, and mush mush more. Only on Patreon. In Person Events: INWARD: A Primal Masculine Winter Solstice Journey  Friday, Dec 17 - Sunday, Dec 19 Boulder, CO https://authenticue.com/inward Permission Retreat Recap Video: You Have Permission   Shems Heartwell is a guide and facilitator who specializes in personal and relational empowerment. His work goes to the core of what is needed for embodied transformation by integrating the physical, mental, sexual, emotional, and spiritual. Shems has been honing and sharing his craft for 20 years. He has mentored with some of the most influential teachers in the fields of coaching, healing, relationship, and transformation. He is a Licensed Acupuncturist, Certified Coach, Relationship guide and Qi Gong teacher. He blends his experience and knowledge into a unique way of coaching and mentoring that is on the leading edge of the human potential movement. Shems is also a passionate athlete, gardener and musician, living with his beloved wife Achintya on the beautiful island of Maui   Mikeadelic is Sponsored by: Element kombucha: Use code Mike11 and get 11% Off the best Kombucha in the multiverse. This is my new favorite kombucha. I love it. So happy to have them sponsor the show. https://elementkombucha.com/ Being True To You: A one-of-a-kind Coach Training and Certification Program for people who want to build a career helping others transform their lives in a positive way. Starts Sept 8https://bit.ly/3lNLNb9 Fungi Academy: Enter Promo Code Mikeadelic at checkout for 25% Off https://bit.ly/3z0A6ln   Connect With Shems : Website: shemsheartwell.com Navigator retreat: navigatorproject.org/retreat Instagram: @shemsheart     Connect With Mike: Website: https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX Men's group Experiences: website coming soon - for now email me Mikeadelicpod@gmail.com to stay in the loop for some epic brotherhood connection.  1 on 1 Mind Jam Sessions - http://bit.ly/3aJ0Yv6 Instagram: https://bit.ly/2Pqc50B Email/ContactMe: https://bit.ly/2Dsv2v4 Facebook: https://bit.ly/2XCchg7 Twitter: https://bit.ly/2IwIhik Donate On Patreon or PayPal  All My Links: https://linktr.ee/Mikeadelic     Listen Everywhere: Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Vf2RKf Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2W8w72c Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3mYzExX Audible: http://adbl.co/3tDx0RN Stitcher: https://bit.ly/2DrRnc6 YouTube: https://bit.ly/2IzMz8I   Also Available on Podbean, Speaker, Breaker, Tunein, Castro, I heart radio, Overcast, Soundcloud and everywhere podcasts are found  Subscribe to the Inner Sanctum Monthly Newsletter  https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX If You Enjoy This Show Please Subscribe and Give Us a 5-Star Rating ★★★★★ and Review on Apple Podcasts | Donate On Patreon or PayPal  * Become a patron and get access to bonus episodes and a private chat group  Thanks To: Student Loan Tutor: https://bit.ly/2X2meF4 * Say you found them through mikeadelic for extra special magical love and care. Intro Music Provided by Danny Barnett & Galaxia:  https://bit.ly/2XB3sDr Its Never Perfect, But Its All Here.

Don't Retire...Graduate Podcast
Simple Wealth: How Your Mindset and Core Values Can Grow Your Wealth

Don't Retire...Graduate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:45


Welcome back to Don't Retire... Graduate! Our guest on today's episode is a visionary and pioneer in the personal finance industry. Holly Morphew is the CEO of Financial Impact and her journey to financial independence was truly a wild ride, eliminating overwhelming debt, combatting chronic illness, and reaching financial freedom while she was only in her 30s. She joins us today to talk about how she did it and share her tips for recreating some of her success. In this episode we'll talk about: How growing up in a household that talks about money can inspire a life of entrepreneurship The importance of mindset in wealth-building  The difference between people who call themselves coaches and those who are accredited financial coaches Telling the difference between a fiduciary advisor/coach and one that's out for their own benefit Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and how it can be applied to your financial journey  Discovering your core values and using them to shape your life Creating residual income The differences between financial advisors, financial coaches, and financial therapists and the value they each bring   Links mentioned: https://www.amazon.com/Simple-Wealth-Practical-Transform-Relationship/dp/0578840308/ref=sr_1_6?keywords=simple+wealth&qid=1637083798&sr=8-6 About Holly Morphew: Holly Morphew is a visionary, financial coach, and multi-generational entrepreneur. She's the founder + CEO of Financial Impact, which helps professionals and entrepreneurs create personal wealth and financial independence. A pioneer in the personal finance industry, Holly's work has been featured in Forbes, Business Insider, Yahoo Finance, FemFounder, and more. Her own journey to eliminating $67k in debt in her twenties, reaching financial independence in her thirties, and overcoming chronic illness are what inspire her to help others realize their dreams too. Holly's professional background in finance, real estate investing, and entrepreneurship are the foundation of her transformational programs, which also include well-being and mindfulness practices to align behavior and mindset. In 2008 Holly received the prestigious “Rotarian of the Year” award for her work in financial literacy, and in 2017 she was recognized by the Association for Financial Planning and Counseling Education ® with the "Bridging the Gap" award for outstanding work as an Accredited Financial Counselor® in private practice. Her book Simple Wealth is a #1 best seller in nine out of ten categories including money management, women & business, personal finance, real estate, retirement, budgeting, personal transformation, credit repair, and wealth management. Holly has a B.A. from the University of Colorado in International Affairs and Japanese with a Minor in Business. Today, Holly speaks, coaches, and writes about money, personal transformation, and creating a life of design. She now resides in Boulder, CO. Her favorite things to do are travel, hike fourteeners, and watch the sun rise.  Connect with Holly: https://www.financialimpact.com/ https://www.facebook.com/HollyMorph https://www.linkedin.com/in/hollymorph/ https://twitter.com/HollyMorph

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment
Matt Xian: Timewheel | Creation Is Fractal

Mikeadelic | Liberty. Psychedelics. Self-Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 112:45


LISTEN: APPLE  | SPOTIFY | STITCHER | YOUTUBE If You Enjoy This Show Please Subscribe and Give Us a 5-Star Rating ★★★★★ and Review on Apple Podcasts | Donate On Patreon :  https://bit.ly/3d0piI0 & PayPal:  https://bit.ly/2AV4pAt Become a Patron and get access to bonus episodes, early access releases, my new weekly comedy podcast, Dosadelic, merch, the inner sanctum discord + other rewards and goodies, and mush mush more. Only on Patreon. In Person Events: INWARD: A Primal Masculine Winter Solstice Journey  Friday, Dec 17 - Sunday, Dec 19 Boulder, CO https://authenticue.com/inward Permission Retreat Recap Video: You Have Permission   Matt Xian rejoins the pod. We talk about time, Kairos and Chronos, the felt sense of knowing that only direct experiences can provide,   augmenting consciousness through various altered states and beliefs, indulging in the mystery and magic of life, the beginners mind/child's mind, imagination and whats "real", aliens as higher dimensional beings, dreams, timelines, and much more. Matt Xian is the creative director and founder of TIMEWHEEL, an independent record label, artistic media platform and creative studio whose mission is to create and celebrate forward-thinking music, art and culture. Matt is also a musician, entrepreneur, social media wiz, soon to be podcast host, and just an all around awesome, kind hearted and thoughtful human earth person.  Mikeadelic is Sponsored by: Element kombucha: Use code Mike11 and get 11% Off the best Kombucha in the multiverse. This is my new favorite kombucha. I love it. So happy to have them sponsor the show. https://elementkombucha.com/ Being True To You: A one-of-a-kind Coach Training and Certification Program for people who want to build a career helping others transform their lives in a positive way. Starts Sept 8https://bit.ly/3lNLNb9 Fungi Academy: Enter Promo Code Mikeadelic at checkout for 25% Off https://bit.ly/3z0A6ln Intro & Outro Music by Savej https://spoti.fi/3HtWRSV   Connect With Matt: Website: https://timewheel.net/ Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/xianarchive Facebook: https://bit.ly/2ZBo5mW Instagram: https://bit.ly/3fHS0iI Something Fiction (band): https://spoti.fi/3hbKbm0 DMT: The Spirit Molecule: https://bit.ly/2Cq8duu     Connect With Mike: Website: https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX Men's Journey: https://authenticue.com/inward One on One Sessions - http://bit.ly/3aJ0Yv6 Instagram: https://bit.ly/2Pqc50B Email/ContactMe: https://bit.ly/2Dsv2v4 Facebook: https://bit.ly/2XCchg7 Twitter: https://bit.ly/2IwIhik Donate On Patreon or PayPal  All My Links: https://linktr.ee/Mikeadelic     Listen Everywhere: Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Vf2RKf Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2W8w72c Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/3mYzExX Audible: http://adbl.co/3tDx0RN Stitcher: https://bit.ly/2DrRnc6 YouTube: https://bit.ly/2IzMz8I   Also Available on Podbean, Speaker, Breaker, Tunein, Castro, I heart radio, Overcast, Soundcloud and everywhere podcasts are found  Subscribe to the Inner Sanctum Monthly Newsletter  https://bit.ly/2GqH7kX If You Enjoy This Show Please Subscribe and Give Us a 5-Star Rating ★★★★★ and Review on Apple Podcasts | Donate On Patreon or PayPal  * Become a patron and get access to bonus episodes and a private chat group  Thanks To: Student Loan Tutor: https://bit.ly/2X2meF4 * Say you found them through mikeadelic for extra special magical love and care. Intro Music Provided by Danny Barnett & Galaxia:  https://bit.ly/2XB3sDr Its Never Perfect, But Its All Here.

Out of the Fog with Karen Hager
Out of the Fog: Empathy, Balance, and Belonging with Signe Myers Hovem

Out of the Fog with Karen Hager

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:00


Are you highly sensitive? Empathetic? Empathic? An empath? Accepting and embodying your empathic nature is an intentional path towards balance and belonging to yourself. Signe Myers Hovem demystifies empathic receptivity, believing that it is not a “gift” or “power” but a feature of one's sensory perception and intuition, an ability that allows us to live in extended communication with nature and humanity. Signe Myers Hovem has created homes on five continents over twenty years, raised four uniquely sensitive children, pursued a special education lawsuit appealed to the US Supreme Court, volunteered in a hospice in Texas and an orphanage in Azerbaijan, worked as a spiritual counselor in Houston Texas, and taught workshops and trainings in the art of being an empath and the power of language in many countries around the world. She splits her time between Boulder, Colorado, and Oslo, Norway. Her new book is The Space In Between: An Empath's Field Guide.

Ten Laws with East Forest
Blake Spalding - Food, Nature, & Pioneering Immeasurability (#185)

Ten Laws with East Forest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 71:44


BLAKE SPALDING, originally from New Hampshire, began cooking when she was a small child. By the time she was eight years old, she was preparing full meals for her family. Blake began working in the restaurant world at an early age and at the age of sixteen moved with her family to Flagstaff, Arizona. In her twenties, Blake began cooking as a river chef, mostly on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, and continued to do this for many years. She also worked for Greenpeace, during which she helped with an anti-pesticide campaign that inspired her passion for organics, sustainability, and all things biochemically and genetically unaltered. While working as a river chef, she began another career: “extreme catering”—cooking in remote, isolated locations, including a deserted island in the Bahamas and the Amazon rainforest. She also opened a catering business in Flagstaff. As a practicing Buddhist, she was often asked to cook for Tibetan lamas, and this directed her relationship with food into one fused with spirituality and meaning. In the year 2000, the opportunity to own Hell's Backbone Grill presented itself, and she moved to Boulder with her friend in cooking, Jen Castle.https://hellsbackbonegrill.com/Cookbook! - https://www.amazon.com/This-Immeasurable-Place-Farming-Wilderness/dp/0999458817 ANNOUNCING JOURNEY SPACE -***Check out the new platform JourneySpace.com - a space for online live facilitated journeys.  The inaugural event will be a live stream open to anyone on Dec 4th, 2021.  Visit Journeyspace.com for more information. Also. New Music from East Forest! -"IN" - the latest studio album  from East Forest - LISTEN NOW:Spotify / AppleOrder the album on vinyl - limited edition + check out the new Possible clothing, dad hats, sheet music and more: http://eastforest.org *** Support this free podcast by joining the East Forest COUNCIL on Patreon.  Monthly Zoom Council, Podcast exclusives, private Patreon live-stream ceremony, and more.  Check it out and a great way to support the podcast and directly support the work of East Forest! - http://patreon.com/eastforest *****Please rate Ten Laws w/East Forest on iTunes.  It helps us get the guests you want to hear.  Tour - Catch East Forest LIVE - Pledge your interest in the upcoming East Forest Ceremony Concert events in 2022.  More info and join us at eastforest.org/tourCommunity - Join the newsletter and be part of the East Forest Community.Meditation - Listen to East Forest guided meditations on Spotify & AppleRam Dass album - Check out the East Forest x Ram Dass album on (Spotify & Apple) + East Forest's Music For Mushrooms: A Soundtrack For The Psychedelic Practitioner 5hr album (Spotify & Apple).Socials -Stay in the East Forest flow:Mothership:  http://eastforest.org/IG:  https://www.instagram.com/eastforest/FB:  https://www.facebook.com/EastForestMusic/TW:  https://twitter.com/eastforestmusicJOIN THE COUNCIL - PATREON: http://patreon.com/eastforest

The Outdoor Biz Podcast
Outdoor Living: A Modern-Day Nomad With Professional Rock Climber, Jonathan Siegrist [EP 303]

The Outdoor Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:59


Living in Boulder, Colorado, a place that almost seemed to be one with nature, it would be difficult not to be interested in the outdoors. In this episode, Rick Saez is joined by Professional Rock Climber Jonathan Siegrist. Jonathan shares how his family influenced him to love the outdoors. He takes us to his journey of making a living out of his passion for outdoor activities, especially mountain biking and rock climbing, and why he decided to live by himself outdoors through a camper van. Join in this conversation as Jonathan tells us his incredible journey of turning passion into living. Tune in to discover how you could make your life brighter too with the outdoors!   Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://ricksaez.com/listen/ Snippets 4:07 - 4:22 being a kid, I kind of wanted to like go fast and jump off things. [EP 303] 14:39 - 14:54 I bet I've spent like no joke, six or seven months in it of the last year. So. I've put a lot of wear and tear on it. [EP 303] 15:48 - 16:05 it doesn't matter if you're a climber or a fisherman or a mountain biker, or you're just like a guy or a girl who wants to go hiking or sightseeing or whatever.  [EP 303]

Revel Revel
Be Happy and Share this One day with Me

Revel Revel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


  Karen Auvinen is an award-winning poet, mountain woman, life-long westerner, writer, and the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Rough Beauty, a finalist for the Colorado Book Award and the Willa Award. Her work has appeared most recently in The New York Times, High Desert Journal, LitHub, Ascent, and The Colorado Sun and a collection of short stories about outliers in the West is forthcoming. Karen teaches at the University of Colorado – Boulder and lives at 8600 feet within the Roosevelt National Forest with the artist Greg Marquez, their dog, River, and Dottie the Cat. More at https://www.karenauvinen.com/ Karen Auvinen Author of Rough Beauty: Forty Seasons of Mountain Living Colorado Book Award and Willa Award Finalist   Twitter:  @karenjamestown Instagram: @awomansplaceisinthewild Facebook:  Karen Auvinen Author     Topics: Learning to live through our relationship with our pets! It was an amazing discussion, even beyond what I could have imagined considering how wonderfully she wrote about her dog in her book. Order of the Good Death: https://www.orderofthegooddeath.com/ Sisu: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisu Labor Union history in Philadelphia: https://jacobinmag.com/2019/09/a-labor-day-history-of-philadelphia-home-of-americas-first-general-strike Generational Trauma: which is a big topic and if you don't know much about it, here's an interesting article on it:https://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/daily-videos/can-trauma-be-passed-to-next-generation-through-dna/ And of course life in the mountains and what community here means!

KHOL Jackson Hole Community Radio 89.1 FM
Boulder Turns to Accessory Dwelling Units in Attempt to Ease Longtime Affordable Housing Crisis

KHOL Jackson Hole Community Radio 89.1 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 5:48


Boulder Turns to Accessory Dwelling Units in Attempt to Ease Longtime Affordable Housing Crisis by KHOL

The County 10 Podcast
PODCAST: 195-pound jade boulder unearthed north of Jeffrey City

The County 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 33:04


(Lander, WY) - Local jade hunters Nachalo Faris and Dave Freitag recently sat down with County 10's Amanda Fehring for an episode of Fehring in the Field. They discuss their recent find of a 195-pound wind slick jade boulder, the history of jade in the Fremont County area, establishing claims, and more. (h/t Dave Freitag)(h/t Dave Freitag)(h/t Dave Freitag) Listen to the full episode of Fehring in the Field below.

The Daily Sun-Up
A string of fentanyl-related overdoses in Boulder County; Denver frontrunner to host 1976 Olympics

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:02


There has been a string of fentanyl-related overdoses in Boulder County in recent months. More than a dozen people have died, ranging in age from 18 to 68. Two 18-year-olds died less than three days apart. Two young men, including a University of Colorado student, died separately on the same day in June. Reporters Jen Brown and Olivia Prentzel dug into what's happening. They spoke with Jesse Paul about what they found. Read more on this story at coloradosun.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BE with Champions
Taylor Knibb - Professional Triathlete & U.S 2020 Olympic

BE with Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 74:49


Welcome to The Greg Bennett show, an AnyQuestion podcast hosted by Former Professional Olympic and World Champion Athlete Greg Bennett.  Greg chats with the world's greatest athletes and high performers to find out how they got to the top of the world and how they are able to sustain it.  In this week's episode, Greg chats with U.S Triathlete, Taylor Knibb. Taylor Knibb is 23 and has already taken the world by storm. Her win at the WTS Yokohama event at the start of 2021 earned her an Olympic spot for the US team in Tokyo. In Tokyo, her performance in the mixed relay was one of the most powerful performances of the day, earning herself, and her team the silver medal. A few weeks after the Games, she went on a stampede. She placed 2nd at the Boulder 70.3. Second at the WTS Montreal. Won the WTS Grand Final in Edmonton, then smashed the incredible field at the Collins Cup in Samorin, Slovakia on a road bike with the fastest time by over 3 minutes, and then wrapped it up, by finishing 3rd at the Ironman 70.3 World Championships. Add to that her Junior and U23 World Titles ... and wow ... the future of women's triathlon is truly here.  Her current PTO World Ranking is 4th in the world – and that ranking does not include the Olympics or World series events. On top of all that, she's one of the sweetest, most down to earth women I've had the pleasure of meeting and getting to know.   timestamps 09:56 - Greg asks Taylor if she is pleased with all your career decisions she has  had to make to date. 20:53 - Taylor talks about her time at University and being one of 10  (TEN!) family members to have previously attended Cornell university. 27:12 - Greg rewinds the clock with Taylor and they discuss her first triathlon, and her first run (at age 4!) plus her motivation to start entering races … and it wasn't to win ... 31:16 - Taylor and Greg discuss her U23 World Championship versus her junior world titles. 36:04 - Greg asks Taylor about her race tactics. 38:17 - Taylor and Greg discuss the U.S Olympic team trials in 2019 and how Taylor prepared for Yokohama. 46:53 - What has been your biggest career highlight to date? 54:52 - Taylor talks through a typical training day. 1:02:54 - Greg and Taylor chat about how, at only 23 years of age being thrust onto the world triathlon stage … she optimizes her life ... from race nerves, to confidence and self belief. 1:09:27 - Greg asks Taylor, if she could sit and have a coffee with ANYONE in the world, who would it be … .   Visit the Greg Bennett Show  Patreon or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.  This episode was brought to you by ATHLETIC BREWING … please check em out and support them - www.athleticbrewing.com

UNcivilized UNplugged
Dr. Carla Clements — MDMA, psychedelics and the future of therapy.

UNcivilized UNplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 57:36


We all know the healing methods such as going to therapy, breathwork, psychologists, but have you ever thought that the use of the MDMA may be all you need? Today's guest, Dr. Carla June Clements, learned about the benefits of psychedelics in the '60s before it was outlawed. In this episode, she shared with us her point of view on the use of psychedelics for therapy and personal healing. ABOUT DR. CARLA CLEMENTS Dr. Carla Clements (PhD, LPC, BCPB) has been a professor at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, in the Mindfulness-Based Transpersonal Psychology Department for the last 15 years. She was the chair of the department for a decade, and taught Assessments, Group Dynamics, Helping Relationships, and Transpersonal Psychology. In May 2018, she retired to become the Principal Investigator of the DMTx program. Carla has also maintained a private practice in psychotherapy, specializing in the treatment of PTSD in women for the past 30 years. For three years, Carla was the Independent Rater for the MAPS-sponsored phase 2 study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment resistant, chronic PTSD. This experience renewed a lifelong interest in consciousness-expanding compounds which she continues to research today CONNECT WITH CARLA LinkedIN: Carla Clements Email: drcjclements@amazon.com Website: Medicinal Mindfulness WHAT YOU WILL HEAR [3:57] Meeting today's guest [9:30] Using psychedelics as a method of healing [12:53] Experiencing psychedelics. [15:35] Transpersonal psychology. [23:26] The benefits of MDMA therapy. [30:46] Studies that approve the use of psychedelics. [37:50] How to use it responsibly and who shouldn't use it? [42:02] Post-traumatic growth. [45:23] How can the couple support the use of this method? [50:40] What can we do for Carla?Dr. Carla Clements — MDMA, psychedelics and the future of therapy. If you look at the civilized world and think, "no thank you," then you should subscribe to our podcast, so you don't miss a single episode! Also, join the UNcivilized community, and connect with me on my website Man UNcivilized.com or Instagram so you can join in on our live recordings, ask questions to guests, and more. Find Traver on Instagram @traverBoehm Get a copy my book, Man UNcivilized Join us on the New Year's Costa Rica Unfolding Retreat Dec. 27th 2021- Jan 3, 2022.

Tootell & Nuanez
Nuanez Now November 10, 2021 - Hour 1 - Rob Stanton, Tyson Rostad, Montana State Minute, Tucker Sargent

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 59:57


In a prep-focused first half of the show, Colter Nuanez welcomes in Billings West head football coach Rob Stanton and Andrew Houghton gets on the phone with Hamilton quarterback Tyson Rostad as both teams prepare for state semifinals this weekend. Colter also talks with Alex Eschelman of SWX Montana for the Montana State Minute after the Bobcats football team beat Eastern Washington and the men's basketball team nearly walked out of Boulder with a win over the Colorado Buffaloes. Tucker Sargent, GM of Griz Hockey, also visits the studio to discuss the continuing popularity of the first-year team.

Behind the Movement
#74 - Leah Woods

Behind the Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 101:00


Leah Woods grew up studying West African Guinean, Flamenco, and Middle Eastern dance and continued on to study Ballet and Modern dance in College. She spent 11 years in the Bay Area studying Contemporary and Ballet intensively alongside the many global forms that thrive in that region. She enjoyed an extensive performance career dancing for Loose Change; an Urban Contemporary Dance Company, NAVA Collective and Ballet Afsaneh; Contemporary Central Asian Fusion Companies, Butoh projects with Bad Unkl Sistah, and as a solo Fusion artist. She is a Transnational Fusion dancer nationally, a hybrid form combining Hip Hop, Middle Eastern movement, Contemporary, and Africanist aesthetics. She received her M.F.A. in Dance and Performance from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She was the first Transnational Fusion MFA candidate at CU Boulder where she received her secondary emphasis in Somatics and a tertiary emphasis in Performance and Culture. She studied the Alexander technique, Body-Mind Centering, and the Franklin method alongside Gyrotonics. She is a grateful student of Tom Weksler, Liav Memada, Miriam Peretz, Sadie Marquardt, Marlo Fisken, and Rachel Brice whenever she gets the chance to be in under their facilitation. They have each had a tremendous influence on her. She is a certified Gyrokinesis Trainer, a Gyrotonics Apprentice Teacher, a certified Datura Style Transnational Fusion Dance Teacher, and a RYT at the 300 hour level. She is continually adding to her education most recently by studying with Lucas at Range of Strenth, FRC with Traci Bennet, and with some upcoming PNF and Fighting Monkey courses.

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever
JF2626: 5 Parameters to Qualify Syndicators with Ruth Hiller

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:04


Ruth Hiller is no novice when it comes to multifamily investing, as the 3rd generation of investors in her family. Now she's syndicating her own deals all across the US. Ruth is discussing how she became an accidental businesswoman, investor tax benefits you may not know about, and how her mentorship program skyrocketed her success.    Ruth Hiller Real Estate Background: Full time multifamily investor and syndicator Syndicator in one multifamily deal in Texas 143 doors, passively involved in 8 syndications totalling over 1900 doors, 50% co-owner of 118 unit multifamily in Los Angeles, CA, and 20% owner in NYC retail space Based in Boulder, CO Say hi to her at: www.yesmfnow.com Best Ever Book: Think and Grow Rich Click here to know more about our sponsors: Deal Maker Mentoring | PassiveInvesting.com | FollowUp Boss

Thinking with Plato: Gregg's Guide to the Republic
5.4 The Roots of American Order | Ancient Rome with Dr. E. Christian Kopff

Thinking with Plato: Gregg's Guide to the Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 58:06


McConnell Center Director Dr. Gary Gregg and University of Colorado, Boulder professor of classics Dr. E. Christian Kopff explore Ancient Rome and its influence on America. The two examine the impacts Latin, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire had on the development of American institutions and the Founders' views of law and power. Corresponding Reading  Chapter 4, pp. 97-136 of Russell Kirk, The Roots of American Order Important Links  Download the corresponding reading guide to The Roots of American Order here Learn more about The Roots of American Order at https://louisville.edu/mcconnellcenter/programs-events/bic E. Christian Kopff, The Devil Knows Latin: Why America Needs the Classical Tradition  Subscribe to our newsletter and receive McConnell Center updates directly in your mailbox Please share any thoughts, questions, comments, or concerns with us via email at connor.tracy@louisville.edu. This podcast is a production of the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville. For more information, including upcoming events, please visit us online at mcconnellcenter.org or on social media at:  Facebook: @mcconnellcenter  Instagram: @ulmcenter  Twitter: @ULmCenter Contributors  Host: Dr. Gary L. Gregg II, McConnell Center Director Guest: Dr. E. Christian Kopff, University of American University  Producers and Editors: Connor Tracy, McConnell Center SBS Coordinator & Will Randolph, McConnell Scholar  

Inside Outside
Ep. 272 - Dave Parker, Author of Trajectory: Startup on Ideation to Product Market Fit

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:41


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Dave Parker, five-time founder, and author of the new book Trajectory: Startup. Dave and I talk about a range of topics for helping founders go from ideation to product market fit. And this conversation was part of our IO Live Series recorded during Startup Week Lincoln. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, Founder of InsideOutside.io. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Dave Parker, Five-time founder and Author of Trajectory StartupBrian Ardinger: I wanted to thank our sponsors for this event. We are part of the Techstars Startup Week here in Lincoln. So, we wanted to give a shout out to them and Startup LNK for making this all possible.Also Inside Outside is sponsored by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. As many of you may know about the Kauffman Foundation, they run 1 Million Cups and a variety of other things, but they're a private, non-partisan foundation based in Kansas City. They seek to build inclusive prosperity through entrepreneurship- led economic development. So, we're super excited to have them as partners with us here. And you can find out more about them at kaufman.org or follow them on Twitter at Kaufman FDN on Facebook or Twitter. So, thank you again to the sponsors. Thank you, Dave, for coming on, we had set this up when your book was coming out and I said Hey, I've got the perfect time to do this during startup week. When we might have some startup founders who may be having some questions. You and I met eight or nine years ago through Up Global. We were with Startup America. And you were based in Seattle. You also helped found Code Fellows and you're a five-time founder, so you've got a lot of experience in this particular space. Eight years ago, the startup ecosystem, and what it was like was a little bit different than is today. So, what has been the biggest trends or things that you've seen that it's changed over the course of the few years that we've known each other? Dave Parker: Well, let me go a little further back. I started my first company in 98 in Seattle. And believe it or not bill gates and Jeff Bezos weren't really giving back to the startup community at that time. Oh, wait, they haven't yet. I mean, Bill gives back to like global change the world stuff. Right. But the idea there was, wow there's a bunch of us doing this startup thing, but there's not really anybody to give much advice. So, we did a peer cohort. Which was my first thing. And after a while I was like, wow, we need to level up our city. All of us tend to think of the next city bigger than us as like, oh, we want to be more like, Seattle doesn't want to be like Vancouver, Canada. We want to be like San Francisco. Where Portland's like, well, we want to be more like Seattle.Because I grew up in Portland and then moved here to go to college and never went back. First startup in 1988. Built a software distribution company called license online. The company went from zero to 32 million in sales in 4 years. Which was ridiculously fast. And we went from 3 employees to 150 and in four years. And then we sold the company in 2002.So then in 98 to 2002, if you remember back there, there was a tech bubble in there and there was 9/ 11 in there. So, it was an interesting time. Wasn't a great time to sell a company now, too. But got it sold anyway. And that was my first startup. First of five. Three of them sold. Two of them failed. One in a rather epic crater fashion. Which is funny. Because it was after the first one, that actually worked. So, you know, people were like, I wouldn't do this again. And they're like working on the next one? I'm like obviously got a serial glutton for punishment. So, 16 exits total. So as a founder board member advisor. So, my day job is helping companies and founders sell their companies. Which allows me to my 20% time to work on community building and giving back.Which kind of got me to Startup Weekend and Up Global. Up Global was the merger of Startup America and Startup Weekend. And we did about 1,265 events worldwide, my last full year there, before we sold to Techstars. Including launching Startup Week globally. And we launched it in 26 cities globally, the second year. I ran it in Seattle.Andrew Hyde started it in Boulder. And we ran it in six cities, the first year. And 26 cities the second year. So, startup communities stuff is awesome. And I love it. It's, as you know, though, it doesn't pay, so you have to have a day job. You have to have a side hustle, so you can keep your community building job, right. Or vice versa.Brian Ardinger: Exactly. Yeah. I think we're nine years here at the Startup Week in Lincoln. We got grandfathered in when Techstars made it a global deal. But we found it very helpful to have these conversations, even if it's just once a year to get people connected and reengaged with why it's important to have a startup and why a startup ecosystem is so important in your own backyard.So, you've got a great book out called Trajectory Startup. I would encourage you to take a look at this. There's a lot of books about startups out there. What made you say, I want to take a different take in this and give back to the community by writing a book about startups Dave Parker: Two big things about the book gap that I saw in the marketplace is one, I mean, you, you know, Brian, you've been around Startup Weekend. I'd see people coming out of Startup Weekend and they're like, woo. I met my co-founder, Charles. We're going to leave at eight and then go start our start up. And I'm like, yikes. Like, there are some things you can know before you leave your day job and your benefits and all those things, which allow you to really look at what do I want to know so I can de-risk this as the first semester, right. So, I got to do the market research and competitive analysis and look how big the market is and like, and how do I do that? The book's really focused on, the original title was Six Month Startup. And then I started delivering it in different formats and I'm like that doesn't work for the brand. So, it became Trajectory Series. But the program now is focused on a five-month program that takes you from ideation to revenue. And the idea there is, if you can't get to revenue in six months, it's probably not a great idea. There are exceptions to that rule. Like if you're a B2B or B2B enterprise and you need to build a really robust product, like that's an exception. Or biotech. Or you're doing B to C and you're competing with clubhouse and you're really about growth of users, right? You won't get to revenue in six months. But in general, you should be able to validate or invalidate your idea in six months was the goal. The second thing that came out of it, I kind of backed into was somebody came to me during my time at Startup Weekend. And they're like, hey, can I have your financial model?I'm like, well, yes, you can have it. But yours is a business consumer marketplace and mine's a business- to- business subscription. And those are fundamentally different. I mean, we use the same lingo. And as you know, in startup land, we have our own language, which is knowing how to work the system for sure.But the key there was how many templates would there be. So, I reached out to Crunchbase at the time and the CEO of Crunchbase and said, hey, can you give me a list of every seed funded company in the last 18 months globally. Ends up being twenty-six hundred and fifty-four companies. So hired a team. My son who was in college at the time was my project manager.And we basically looked at all twenty-six hundred and fifty-four websites and where they didn't have a pricing model or a revenue model, that was obvious, I reached out to them and said, Hey CEO, I'm doing this research project on revenue models. How do you monetize? So, we ended up breaking down 2,600 companies into the logical revenue models and there were 14. And that was it.So, I would say the most unique part of the content of the book is really the breakdown of the 14 revenue models that are successful in tech. And how you monetize them. So, the basic unit economics of what are the key metrics and KPIs of each of the 14 revenue models. Consequently, I became super geeky about pricing and revenue.When somebody now gets to give a pitch and they're like, hey, we're doing a blah, blah, blah. I'm like, oh, you're a marketplace that monetizes this way. And people are like, how did you know that? And I'm like, it's actually not a secret. There's 14 just like pick from the list. Right. So, I think for first time founders, the question then becomes what you're building I hope is unique, but how you monetize it is almost never unique. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: That's an important point, because I think a lot of times we think about the features or the problem we're solving, but we don't necessarily think about the business model itself and you don't have a business without a business model. So, that's so critical to think even at the earliest stages. It may pivot. It may change based on what you find in the marketplace, but at least going in with here's our initial assumption of how we might make money. And the model that we need to... Dave Parker: And that, let me break down the business model in three parts for you, because I think one of the things that all of us look at and we're like, oh, it's in our business model. Kind of like this. It's a black box and it's a secret thing. And one of the things I discovered in the process was here are the components of the business model. So, think about it as a Venn diagram. The top circle is really creating value and how you create value is your product, your service, and your team. And those are the costs associated with creating a product or a service.So, if you're in a service business, if you and I were lawyers, God forbid. We would bill out on an hourly basis. We'd have a pay rate and a bill rate, and that differential would create gross margins. It's a service business. In a product business it's a little harder to predict because we build the software once and we have thousands of users. So, it's not like, oh, every time we build it, we have to create a new and separate version, right. But the cost of building that product, whether it's the six engineers in six months or three years, depending on what it is, is a cost associated with creating value. The value created is the product or the service. There's a cost associated with creating a value. Circle Number Two is the cost of delivering value. And that is your pricing. Because that's a variable, right. That I can adjust. It's my revenue model. How I monetize. It's my marketing and my sales. I fixed the cost to build. I have now fixed the cost to sell. And there's lots of variables in there. There's lots of marketing things you can test. There are a few sales models, not a lot. Marketing is the most creative, and obviously it can be the most expensive in some ways too. And then what you have leftovers, the third bubble which is your top line revenue and your gross margin and hopefully net profit. Those are outcomes. You don't get to control those. You get to control your cost to build it, and you get to control your cost to sell it and the price. But when you think about it, that way, you're like, oh, there's only so many variables I get to be in control of. And since those are the ones that you control of, then I'm a strong advocate of like, know what the levers are you can pull. I talk to a lot of founders and some of the research was interesting. It basically showed that most founding teams don't change their price at all in the first three years. Which is when you think about it kind of crazy. But us as founders, were like, oh, I know all the product detriments and you know, it was kind of like, I would liken it to, if you said, hey, show me a picture of your son, Brandon, I'd be like, oh, I can show you a three-year-old picture of Brandon.He's a super cute kid. He's 28 today. Plays lead guitar in a metal band. Tatted up and you know, with sleeves and gages in his ears. It would be true, but I just want it to be accurate. Right. And I think that as founders, one of the challenges we have is how do I continue to reprice my product as a product feature set goes.So, one of the things I always recommend to founders is having a pricing council, you do once a quarter. Not that you're going to change price every quarter, but you are, you should really think about it. Brian Ardinger: Well, and you can also do tests around it as well. I remember a story, Eric Ries was talking about. He was working in a corporate environment, but they were saying like, this is the price. And he said, well, have you ever tested it? Do you know if you can go higher? And they said, no, no, because you know we know our customers and blah, blah. And he said, well, why don't we just run a test? And let's, you know, throw out a different price and see what happens. So, they ran the test. And it worked. And they said, well, why don't we do it again? Let's bump up the price again. And they ran a test and it worked again. And they realized like all these years they were leaving all this money on the table, so to speak. Because they had never even tested it. They never test to see if they could extract more value out. Dave Parker: There was a company in Seattle and I'm blanking on the name, that I was trying to see if they pull up real quick. So, they were doing a competitor for PowerPoint. It would look at contextually what the content was, and it would make the image suggestions for you. When they launched the product, the product is all the same price, and they came back at one point, and they just doubled it. And they had zero churn. Right. Which makes you think like, oh my God, how long ago could we have done that? Like nobody left. Everybody's like, yeah, makes sense. Like it would have paid more for it all along.Brian Ardinger: So, what are the most common questions that you get from founders at the earliest stages? What are most founders struggling with when they come to you? Dave Parker: When we think about the go to market strategy is definitely a question. So, I'm a product person or I'm an engineer and I'm new to like go to market. There's still a little bit of that theory of like, well, if I get on Tech Crunch, I'll just go viral. And the answer is, no, it doesn't work that way. Right. I mean, it would be awesome if it did. And we see some examples of companies going viral and there's a misattribution Brian of like, well, I'm going to go to market like Clubhouse.I'm like you're B2B and only B to C companies get a chance to go viral. Like B2B companies get good word of mouth maybe but going viral is math. Right. There's probably three big things in startups that are mysteries, but when you peel them back, they're actually not a mystery. It's just math. Going viral means it's called a K factor.So, if you have a K Factor of greater than two, I'll give you this base formula. Every customer I buy, I generate two additional paid customers. So, if you think about WhatsApp right or clubhouse, the answer is I'm in a business model there that actually doesn't require a business model. So, I call it new media.And what you're trying to do is grow your customer base so fast that at some point you'll monetize it through advertising. Not a surprise. Facebook, WhatsApp, et cetera. At some point you'll monetize it through advertising. So Clubhouse, you're starting to see some of those things, Tik TOK with pre roll. And people apply that revenue model or lack of revenue model to like a B2B business and B2B companies don't go viral.There's been two examples of things that went close, right? So Slack super close to viral. Interestingly enough, Slack before their pivot was a gaming platform. The game sucked but the communication platform was great. So that's one example of a B2B company kind of going viral, but it's really just group invitations.And the second one was LinkedIn for a very short period of time, about nine months, early, early on. And they built a tool that allows you to upload your entire contact database. And for that nine-month window, they went viral for every paid customer, they got more than two. So that's what viral means. The second one is traction or product market fit.And one of the things you'll hear from investors all the time. And I work as a venture capitalist now for a fund out of Atlanta. People are like, well, when you get traction, come see us again. Which is really the VC patting you on the head and saying, you're really cute. Like, let me know how it goes. And most first-time founders are walk away from those and go like, oh, that was an awesome meeting.And I'm like, actually, no, it wasn't, you're going to get ghosted. This is just like, they just swipe left or right. Or I don't know, I don't use dating apps. So whichever way they swipe, they swipe. Wrong way. Traction and product market fit is just math as well. Right. So, when people are like, oh, it's a mystery. Like we'll know it when we see it. I'm like a VC saying it's like porn, like that's crazy. Right. But product market fit is really not a mystery, it's math. So, when I think about the method Product Market Fit, there are early indicators of Product Market fit and there's trailing indicators. And the trailing indicators are easy. Churn. Surveys of, hey, if you didn't get use our product, what would it be like and how much disappointed would you be? And lack of customer retention through either contracts going down in value versus contracts going up in value. Those are lagging indicators. The early indicators are really things around like, is the traffic at the top of your site going up, right? Are the number of people downloading your app? Is that going up? Is the time to close going down? Is the conversion from demo to customer going up? And is my average contract value going up? When I put those five factors together. Right? So, closing ratios are improving. Traffic is improving. Demos are improving. Time to close is going down. And average contract value is going up.It's like the miracle of compound interest. If you don't have any of those indicators moving the right way, maybe you have product market fit, but it's too early to tell. If you do have those indicators coming together, then the answer is right, good on you, man. This is, this is exciting. And as an investor, that's where I get excited about writing the check. Because I'm like... Brian Ardinger: Because you know your money is going towards the fueling of that growth versus building something or guessing. Dave Parker: It's the early shift between risk capital and growth capital. And typically, what I see in the early stages are people like, well, we're not spending any money, we're just doing organic growth. And that's okay. But the big question is, okay, how do you scale it with paid growth so that organic growth can go fast. Oh, I'm just doing it through my network today. So I think about it as 10, 100, 1000 customer rule, right?The first 10 customers as the founder, you're going to go hand-to-hand combat. Go get them yourself. The first hundred, you probably can't do that. You're going to need to hire a salesperson or two. And you need to get good at making them, your value proposition clear. You need to get good at getting your pricing, right.But that's when you start to scale and as the first investor for you as the founder, that's good news, right? Because it's starting to scale past what I would call the Binary Risk Stage. Right? It's a zero or one it's going to succeed. Right. And angels will invest in you because we like you, right? I'm like, oh, writes you a check for $10,000 and you know, maybe be a board advisor, right, as an angel. When I'm ready to check for the fund, our average check is $650,000. I'm looking for like numbers and math. Right. And I can help the founders see it. But typically, what happens in venture is if a VC sees the math before you do, they're going to get a really good deal because they're going to put a check in and go like, Ooh, we saw the math before the founder did. And I'm not good at that. So, when I talk with founders, I'm like, here's the math you should be looking for. And one of the funds I used to work for, it was like, why are you telling them that? And I'm like, because I think better trained founders is always a good thing. So, if you're geeky about math and numbers and unit economics, you'll love the book.If you're new to that. And don't know, you're like Dave, you're speaking a foreign language and I recognize it is English. You'll learn the lingo with the book as well. Brian Ardinger: Well, I do think that's vitally important. Especially as you go out and want to go that more venture capital type of route, because these are the things you have to be able to talk to and understand and know, like you said, the levers and that, that you have to pull to make that work. The other question I want to talk about is early-stage solo founders. One of the biggest things they've got to figure out is how to build that team and the culture and things along those lines. What kind of advice or insights have you seen at the early stage of how do I build that team create it.Dave Parker: I'm going to give you a little contrarian advice. It frustrates me at times when people pontificate around stuff that they don't actually know. So you'll hear VCs often say culture matters is the most important thing. What they mean by that is personality. When you have a two-person founding team or a three person founding team, you don't actually have culture.Like there are few repeat entrepreneurs or people come from organizational development, or maybe you're in the services business. And you're like, we're going to build our company on a services culture, and that we really understand. If you're building a product, your first milestone is product market fit. Because if you get the culture wrong, you can fix it. But if you don't get product market fit, your culture doesn't matter. You don't have a company. Right? Right. So, the first milestone is product market fit. So, in VC you say, oh, culture really matters. What they're really talking about in a three-person startup is do they like you from a personality standpoint or are you an ass?Right? So, cause if the answer is, I don't think you'll listen to feedback, I'm probably not going to write a check. If I'm like the average investment for me as an angel is probably eight years to exit. So, if I don't like you, I'm probably not going to write a check. Right. So, there's, the things I'm looking for there from a personality profile type tends to be, then there's totally from views, right?There's the Introvert view, right? Bill gates did okay. Jeff Bezos, I don't think it was really an extrovert. But people will over-index on charisma or salesmanship when the answer is maybe, right. So ultimately, I kind of look at it first and say, is this the right founder? Is it Founder Market Fit? Are they the right people to solve this problem or not?So, I remember with Mitsui when I was there at one point. I was with a big fund out of Silicon Valley for three years. We got invited to invest in this deal, that was like spin the bottle where 70% of the attendees were girls and 30% were boys. And it was like late teenagers, early twenties. I'm like, we can't invest in this. This is just creepy. We're a bunch of old guys by comparison. It's just weird. Like, wait, this is the wrong investor fit for us. So, I'm looking at the founders and going, are they the right founders for this market and for this product first off. Brian Ardinger: And I think that's an important point for the founders to understand is like not every angel or not every fund is the right fit for you. And it's not necessarily, they don't like you or don't think it's great or whatever, sometimes it's an industry that they don't invest it. Dave Parker: For sure, like the fund that I'm supporting out of Atlanta, is called the Fearless Fund. So Fearless Fund is two African American women were the founders of the fund. They launched the fund with a $5 million exploratory fund. For all the wrong reasons. It blew up, right George Floyd, et cetera. And they're going to close on $30 million. We invest exclusively in black and brown women. And when they recruited me on it, I was like, oh, hell yeah, this is like, so on-mission right. Because 3.1% of all venture capital over the last 20 years is went to white dudes named Dave. Now I just want to pinpoint Jims are worse than the Daves. They got 3.4%. 2.8% went to all women. 0.8% went to people of color. Like if I could spend the next chapter of my life helping to level that playing field, I'm in. Like, it's kind of a no brainer. But if you came to us and said, hey, I'm a black and brown woman, but I'm based in London.We would be like, sorry, I can't do it. It doesn't matter how good your ideas because we have what's called an LP Agreement. An LPA. The LPA says we invest in these things, US-based companies, black and brown women founders. And if you're not in that mix, it doesn't matter how good your idea is. And people tend to take it personally. They're like, I can't believe you told me. No, my idea is brilliant. And I'm like, you're not in our thesis. Right. And if you're not in our thesis, we can't invest in it. So, know that that's pretty common for a lot of venture capital funds. Some VCs are opportunistic by definition and the answer is they can invest in a very broad category and angels can invest in the stuff that they love. Right. I like you as a founder. And I think it's a cool idea. I give it a shot. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. At Nelnet where I do some investing, obviously on our venture capital side, we are a lot more opportunistic or we'll take different bets based on community or other things, rather than things that are always in our sweet spots, so to speak. So corporate venture is a lot different as well. So, it pays to understand who has the money. Why do they want to invest for sure? What are they looking for? Dave Parker: One of the chapters, I break down what the investor profiles are and why they invest. So, if you think about this as an enterprise sales process, if you, as a founder are out raising money, the question is, is like what stage appropriate capital. Right? So as a corporate VC, you're probably not investing in early risk stage capital. But you're investing in markets you want to keep an eye on usually. Because you're like, oh, that's a super interesting development. Let's put some money over there and see how that works and we'll follow on with it. Brian Ardinger: So, Andrew has a question in the chat. He says, I work with very early-stage VC funding, pre prototype presales. I've noticed this new trend where companies are being trained in their pitch to propose who they might be acquired by in the coming years. Do you feel this as a legitimate trend and if not, how we advise founders to prepare for acquisition? Dave Parker: So, I've done 16 exits. So, I definitely have an opinion on this one. I would say the first thing you need to focus on is like focus on building a great product and a great company. Right? And then your acquisition thing becomes a lot easier to discuss. Like I will say my general default is I like products and companies that have logical upmarket buyers.Right. So there's like, oh, it makes sense that they've and people like, oh, Google's going to buy me. I'm like, actually you can, there's a Wikipedia page. Every acquisition that Google has ever made. And in most cases I will tell you, they're not going to buy you. Now, I know aspirational, you want them to buy you and that's super cool. But there's a big difference between oh, Microsoft will buy us or it's like, actually, no. Right. So, we're selling a company right now. They're doing about $10 million runway and run rate and revenue. And at one point I was talking with the CEO and he's like, Salesforce will buy us. I'm like, no Salesforce, isn't going to buy you. You have to be way over 10 million in revenue to have Salesforce actually be interested.So, they bought Slack for, you know, something incredible in the billions of dollars. But they have to do an acquisition that moves the needle in the billions, not in the oh, it's 10 or 20 million. Right. It doesn't mean you're a bad company, it just means you have limited buyer set. So, from a founder perspective, I think if they're asking you the question there may or may not be the right investor because we don't typically look to flip deals.I know I'm going to be in the deal 7 to 10 years. But I do like where there's a logical upmarket buyer who has a track record of doing acquisitions. So, I would say it's a bit of a Catch 22. By contrast, I will tell you I've been on the board of the company for 17 almost 18 years. That we're the largest player in our space. Which means the company today is a great, you know, kicks off great dividends. We do really well with it, but there's no easy exit for it because we're the biggest player in that kind of niche market. Which gets you back to the market sizing and why you want to go after a market, that's a much bigger market than a niche market for sure. Brian Ardinger: Andrew says. Thanks. Great insight. Thank you for that. Question around what are some of the trends that you're seeing and what are you excited about when it comes to startups?Dave Parker: I think one of the ones that I'm aspirationally looking for, and I can't get myself to get off the bench and go do myself, is I think there's going to be a shift in the social platforms, not just solely based on the fact that watching Facebook stab themselves has been awkward. But the idea of platforms that empower the creatives and creators is super interesting to me.Like when I look at Sub Stack and things like that, it's like the revenue models are still flipped. Where it's too much of the money, goes to the platform and not enough money goes to the creator. So, I think there's probably a really interesting opportunity that says, hey, how do you flip that model, where the creators make most of the money and the platforms making less.You know, obviously Facebook's the extreme version of that. But Tik TOK is a good example of, hey, somebody gets on to try to monetize something and finds that they made quite a bit. I think we'll see more platforms develop that empower the creatives. Creative class. I think that's super exciting. Brian Ardinger: That's interesting too. The whole no-code low-code movement has really changed over the last five years where again five or six years ago, you, at some point had to have a development team or a, or a developer on your team to start building product. And nowadays I tell most founders, there's probably enough out there with low-code no-code tools that you can at least get your MVP some early insight without having to have that developer co-founder on board. Dave Parker: Yeah, I think that's super exciting as well. It's one of the categories we're following. And I think low-code no-code is the equivalent of what AWS was to buying servers. So, I've raised $12 million and exited $85 million. In my first startup, we had to buy servers and racks and build them ourselves and put them in a, an Exodus Data Center.And people were like Exodus, what was that? It was one of the biggest epic fails of all time. And when AWS came along and they didn't have to, I could just turn up a virtual server. I didn't have to order something from Dell. It fundamentally changed the cost of doing a startup. Low-code no-code I think will be the same. And my cost of actually doing it.Now, I still have to learn how to do that. But from a founder perspective, I can learn how to do that in months and not years. And then not have to build the development team. So, using Bubble or Air Table, for sure. Monday, I would say is the expensive version of Bubble or Air Table by comparison, from a founder perspective.Brian Ardinger: What I like about it is it allows for greater customer discovery and experimentation around your product earlier to get that feedback, to see if you're on the right stage and figure out what features you do need to build or scale or optimize. Dave Parker: Yeah. Yeah, that one's great. I think in a revenue model side, one of the things we're seeing is in the marketplace components. As we're seeing marketplace shift from transaction fees only to subscription fees, plus transaction fees. I would tell you watching revenue models over the last seven years, ish, total, there's been a few changes in them. One, if you remember Groupon, there's thousands of competitors to it because at a fundamental level, I would say revenue models aren't, they're not defensive. Revenue models, so think of they're very public domain. So even Google and pay-per-click copied that model from Yahoo. Lost the lawsuit against them. Yahoo had bought a company from Idea Lab who'd had actually patented the pay-per-click model. Yahoo ended up being a great holding company for Alibaba and Google stock, right at the end of the day.Revenue models are defensible, but if you look at all the copycats of Groupon, you see, most of those went away. Groupon is still alive in a public company, but they traded 0.49 times trailing 12 revenue. So, if you take the market cap of the company divided by sales, I would say that it's 50 cents on the dollar. Right. So as far as what they trade at. Now, compare that to a subscription business. Well, maybe the next step up would be you and I do a consulting business for a million dollars. That company is worth roughly a million dollars. It's worth one times revenues. So, because if you remember Groupon booked the top line sales of what they sold you for that certificate, but they really only made the margin on the, you know, the 10 or 15% on the margin of it.So, if you and I had a consulting company for a million dollars, it'd be worth roughly a million dollars. If we did a million-dollar subscription company, it would be worth somewhere between 12 and $15 million. And one of the new models that really came out in the last five years was the idea of a metered service company.So Twilio is a great example, AWS, if it was pulled out of Amazon is a pay as you go model. It is predominantly is B2B, but those companies traded really 35 times, right? So, if you think about, okay, if I'm going to do a startup, which revenue model should I use, I would tell you to think about again, if you're going to go back to Andrew's question about the exit multiple, I would be interested in less than who's going to buy it. More interested in the revenue model and the multiple of sales. So, I'd be like go for a metered service company for sure, or subscription at very least. Brian Ardinger: I wanted to ask around the topic of founders. It's obviously a very lonely, difficult journey at the very early stage. Do you have any advice for early-stage founders to how to get better connected and deal with the mental challenges of building a company?Dave Parker: Yeah. Great question. It was probably my most read blog post ever is I wrote about my personal battle with depression. And then I hit publish and I thought, what the hell? What did I do? What was I thinking? And I got more positive comments on it than I could have imagined. Brad Feld, who used to be on my board, as you know. Brad sent me a note with one word, and it just said brave. I think that the challenge there from a founder perspective is, you know, you're always trying to be positive. You're trying to, I was trying to be upbeat. If it's motivate the team or motivate investors. And so consequently leads to a lot of isolation.And I think that's one of the things that, like, one of the things we're doing here in Seattle is we run a cohort program for founders. We don't take any equity. There's no cash. They don't pay for it. And it's really about us up leveling the community of founders 25 to 30 founders twice a year, which is our math.And we're really helping them navigate the ecosystem, here in Seattle in six months instead of 18 months, which improve their odds of success. But also connecting them with other founders. Because other people are asking the same questions you're asking. They're not competitive. They're going through the same challenges.And by putting them in community, it serves one of those two purposes. One is we want to help them navigate the ecosystem, but we also want to help them connect with other founders like them at the same stage, which we think has two benefits. One is personal connection and not being in isolation for sure.And second is really helping them think about reinvesting in the community over time. So, if you think about classically, it was the PayPal mafia and then reinvested in each other. So, Reed Hoffman and Elon Musk and Peter Thiel, et cetera. And then it's now become the Uber mafia, right? All the people that were at Uber that are now launching other companies that are reinvesting in each other. We've never had that in Seattle. And most cities don't. It's one of the biggest gaps. So that's our secondary benefit is we think if we have them in community and at five years, but when we launched this as a program, which through the Washington Technology Industry Association. And I went back to the CEO. I'm like, this is a ten-year plan. Right. I'm like you can't judge it at three years or four years. And we're coming into our fourth year right now. And I'd say it's worked out better than we thought. But as I told him, I'm like, you don't get actually judge on it for 10 years. We've had some exits; we've had a bunch of fundraising. Our teams do it a lot faster than other teams. So, it's become a program. People are like, I want to get in. So, we just actually, Brian took it and put it into an document for a national scale-up grant for the Department of Commerce, with the State of Washington. So, we actually have those documents set up now. If somebody wanted to take it to Nebraska and say, Hey, we want to replicate all of this programming.We've opened source all the programming, we've open sourced, the narrative doc and the fundraising docs. So, somebody could turn around and say like, okay, we're going to go launch this program here as a, as a copycat with, with pride. Like we want you to knock it off. Brian Ardinger: Well, that's interesting. That may be an interesting model to explore now with COVID and the whole virtual remote angle of it. Or even in communities like Lincoln, where again, just by the pure numbers, we're not going to have thousands of founders. So how do you scale that? Dave Parker: For sure. And we're basically taking a program we were running in Seattle now and run it in Kent, Washington and Yakima. And Vancouver, Washington, and Tacoma. And we're trying to provide it from an access perspective. Like we want to make sure that we provide people with access that didn't have access to that before.But also, with a path to funding, because if you give people access to programming, but no, they can't ship an MVP at the end because they don't have any money. That's still a problem. So, we're trying to address that problem next. But the grant was a $750,000 grant over three years. Which means we'll kind of be able to take the show on the road and obviously virtual too. I think the nice thing about if there's a positive outcome of the whole COVID thing is place matters a lot less than it used to.Like the good news is I don't have to get on a plane to come be on stage with you. I'd like to be. That'd be kind of fun, because we could go have a beer afterwards and have dinner. But that that'll happen too. But I think from an efficiency standpoint, I've been doing programs for the Middle East, like six or seven cities in the middle east over the last two years. And I fly out Thursday night to Abu Dhabi for four days. And I'm like, it's kind of a fast turn for Abu Dhabi. Could do it just virtually. And be fine. More InformationBrian Ardinger: I wanted to thank you again for coming on. Here's Dave's book Trajectory Startup. Pick it up at any place you buy books. I'm going to put it in a call to action. He also is giving away some free stuff on his website. So let me share that right now. You can download his free resource guide on 14 successful Tech Revenue Models to check that. And then I also, again, I want to thank all our sponsors for bringing this today. And I encourage folks to also sign up for Inside Outside.io. Our newsletter and our podcast, where we bring these types of things whenever we can. So that's the link to that. Thanks for coming out. Thanks for all the audience for being here. Thanks for the great questions and looking forward to doing this again, at some point. And maybe having you come and see us in real life. So, I appreciate your time. And thank you again, Dave. If people want to find out more about yourself or your book, what's the best way to do that?Dave Parker: Yeah, they can find all the information is on my blog, DKparker.com. If you don't want to buy the book, you just have to figure out how to navigate all the blog posts in order. But that should be, you know, there's only 180 blog posts there. So DKparker.com, you can find the book and more information. The 14 revenue models.You can also find me on social media. I'm at Dave Parker CA for Seattle, when you find, you know, LinkedIn, Twitter. I'm not on Facebook anymore. I just finally had to just say, no. I'm still on Instagram because I want to see what my kids are doing. But Daisy, my dog has more followers on Instagram than I do at this point. But so yeah, you can find me on social media, and you can find me on DK parker.com. Brian Ardinger: Excellent. Well, thank you again, Dave. We're looking forward to having future conversations. And go out and have fun everyone at Startup Week Lincoln, and we'll see you around the neighborhood. Thanks very much for coming out.That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

Telepractice Today
Kristin Martinez Discusses the Therapy Essentials Platform from PresenceLearning

Telepractice Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 55:21


Kristin Martinez received her M.A. in Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and has been a speech-language pathologist for over 20 years. Kristin provided speech-language services to children in her local school district and in private practice before starting as a teletherapist with PresenceLearning in 2013. Kristin has supported teletherapy services for hundreds of school districts and has presented on the topic of teletherapy nationwide, and currently serves as the Clinical Director for PresenceLearning.

Monday State of Mind
Episode 80: Into Me I See

Monday State of Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 36:36


Do you know what is a perfect match?This topic and my guest today! Ed Tilton, with Begin Again Institute in Boulder, CO joins me today and digs deep into the issues surrounding intimacy in recovery.Tune in! It's worth it!Mentions:Harmony Foundation, Inc.Begin Again Institute

City Cast Denver
Chipotle vs. Illegal Pete's: A Denver-Style-Mission-Style Burrito Battle

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:23


Way back in the early '90s, the Denver-style-Mission-style burrito rolled into town thanks to Chipotle. They introduced a massive meal you could eat with two hands — a steamed tortilla chock-full of rice, beans, meat, and all sorts of toppings. Illegal Pete's appeared just a few years later in Boulder with a similar style burrito, but a restaurant environment all its own. Today on the show, the City Cast Denver crew gets together to talk about these burrito behemoths and tries to decide who makes the best Denver-style-Mission-style meal in the Mile High City. Want more of Peyton's culinary recs? Check out the City Cast Denver newsletter: https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ Tell us where you stand on the Chipotle/Illegal Pete's debate on Twitter: @citycastdenver

Brand Builder
How To Transform Your Brand into a Venture Funding Magnet with Break Trail Ventures Founder Jay Hirsh

Brand Builder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 60:05


When it comes to the world of venture capital, it can feel eerily similar to Squid Game, though not nearly as gory (thank goodness). Thousands of brands competing for the resources and mentorship they need to take their product to new heights, some getting better outcomes than others.  So, how can today's founders find the most successful venture partner to help their brand grow? How can they rise above the noise, grab attention, and win support?  We thought, "Who better to ask than a venture capitalist?" That's why we sat down with Jay Hirsh, founder of Break Trail Ventures, an early-stage venture fund based in Boulder, CO and Columbus, OH. In this episode, he gives us the ultimate crash course on finding and attracting the right venture partner for your unique brand, red flags to avoid, and his learn-first approach for success in venture and life.  

Talking With Teri
Talking With Teri and Matt Meister

Talking With Teri

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 20:16


Matt Meister, Meteorologist Matt joined the FOX21 News team as chief meteorologist in January 2018. Matt has a lengthy history of forecasting weather in Colorado Springs and southern Colorado. From the Waldo Canyon and Black Forest fires, to post-fire flooding, the Holly tornado and numerous high plains blizzards – Matt says “it's really about the impacts weather causes to people, not the how and why. My forecasts focus on what the weather means for the people living in it.” Matt has received numerous awards for his coverage of weather in southern Colorado: Associated Press Best Weathercast: 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Colorado Broadcasters Association Best Meteorologist: 2011, 2020 Colorado Broadcasters Association Broadcast Citizen of the Year: 2011 Matt has also won numerous other local "Best of" awards: Colorado Springs Independent Best Local TV News Personality: 2012, 2013, 2019, 2020 Colorado Springs Independent Best Local Twitterer: 2012 Colorado Springs Gazette Best TV News Hottie: 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 Colorado Springs Gazette Best Weather Anchor: 2019, 2020, 2021 Matt's work history includes time at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder.   He's a published author of several scientific papers, focused on his research of thunderstorms as part of an automated forecasting and tracking system. The NCAR Thunderstorm AutoNowcaster was deployed to Sydney, Australia and was used to forecast thunderstorms during the Summer Olympic Games in 2000. Components of that system are integrated into thunderstorm analysis tools in local National Weather Service offices across the country today. All of Matt's education and professional experience resides along the Front Range. Matt holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Meteorology with a minor in Mathematics from Metro State in Denver. Matt worked as the weekend meteorologist at KGWN-TV, the CBS affiliate in Cheyenne, Wyoming before arriving in Colorado Springs at KRDO NewsChannel 13 in September of 2001 as the weekend meteorologist. In April of 2005 Matt was promoted to the weekday evening meteorologist and later in the year became the chief meteorologist. In October of the same year Matt was the first meteorologist in southern Colorado to be recognized as a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist by the American Meteorological Society.   Matt left television to join School District 49 as the director of communications in 2014. Matt led District 49 marketing, communication, public relations and media relations efforts through a transparent, two-way communication strategy. Matt helped lead the district's continuous improvement and process development efforts. The District 49 communications department received numerous Colorado School Public Relations Association Awards, including two Medallion Awards for overall excellence under his leadership. Matt is blessed to live in Colorado Springs with his wife Misty and his two children. He enjoys cooking, playing guitar, and a number of outdoor activities including hunting and skiing. Matt donates time as volunteer youth sports coach, at his church, and a number of non-profit organizations. Matt loves personally interacting with viewers, whether its at the grocery store or online.Connect with her:Email: mmeister@fox21news.com  Website: https://www.fox21news.com/  Twitter: @TheWxMeister  Facebook: @TheWxMeister  Instagram: @thewxmeister   

Ali on the Run Show
440. Catching Up with Laura Thweatt

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 79:58


"I can do this. I am more capable than I give myself credit for. I can bet on myself. I can show up on race day, on that start line, and be confident in what I've done and know there's no reason why I can't go out there and have the race of my life." The last time Laura Thweatt was on the Ali on the Run Show, she had just finished fifth at the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials in Atlanta. (Listen to that episode here.) She was running professionally for Saucony (still true) and training with coach Joe Bosshard and the Team Boss crew in Boulder, CO (no longer true!). On this episode, Laura offers an update on life after Team Boss. She talks about her decision to step away from her training group, and shares the news about her new coach and training plan. She also talks all about the work she's done leading up to this weekend's New York City Marathon. Laura is a 2:25 marathoner who made her marathon debut in New York City in 2015. Now, she's heading back to the start line in Staten Island with big goals, big dreams, and some big life changes happening behind the scenes. Plus, reality TV talk, Laura's hilarious story of her interaction with Des Linden after the Trials, and so much more. SPONSOR: AfterShokz — Visit ontherun.aftershokz.com for 15% off wireless headphones. Follow Laura: Instagram @lthweatt Twitter @thweatt11 Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

City Cast Denver
Colorado Snagged $34 Million For Transit and RTD Gets... None?

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 16:35


It's no secret that RTD has been struggling for years. Even before the pandemic, the regional public transportation provider was experiencing a drop in ridership, despite the state seeing a population boom. Then there was the bus driver and light rail operator shortage, the organization's ever-consuming debt, constant bus schedule changes, and whole routes being cut. Recently though, $34.2 million in federal transit aid made its way to Colorado… but RTD didn't get any of it. Instead, the millions of dollars landed in Boulder. Host Bree Davies talks with RTD Board Director Shontel Lewis about what happened with this money and why the transit organization continues to struggle.  Read Shontel's Op-Ed for the Denver Post about CDOT withholding federal transit funding: https://www.denverpost.com/2021/10/25/rtd-cdot-federal-funding/ Looking for more local news? Subscribe to the City Cast Denver weekday newsletter: https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ Tell us about your commute on twitter: @citycastdenver

Here We Are
The Knowledge Illusion w/Steve Sloman and Phil Fernbach

Here We Are

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 72:48


This week I'm speaking with authors of The Knowledge Illusion, Steve Sloman and Phil Fernbach.  Steven Sloman is a cognitive scientist at Brown University who studies how people think. Phil Fernbach is a cognitive scientist and professor of marketing at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The book explores why we think we know so much more than we do, and the profound implications for individuals and society. Humans have built hugely complex societies and technologies, but most of us don't even know how a pen or a toilet works. How have we achieved so much despite understanding so little? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Strength Running Podcast
219. Western States 100 winner Cat Bradley on Career Pivots, Self-Belief, and Training Staples

The Strength Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 49:45


Cat Bradley is an athlete that absolutely loves the sport. She's an ultra-endurance runner coached by Matt Fitzgerald who I had the pleasure of meeting this past August at the Endeavorun retreat in Boulder, CO. Her resume is shocking, in the best of ways: Winner of the 2017 Western States 100 Miler Winner of the 2017 Canyons Endurance Run 100k Former Fastest Known Time record holder of the Grand Canyon Rim to Rim to Rim in 7:52 (first woman to break 8 hours) Winner of the 2016 Rio Del Lago 100 Miler Winner of the 2018 Moab Red Hot 50k Winner of the 2018 Quicksilver 100k Winner of the 2019 Castle Rock Trail Festival 50k Winner of the 2020 TransRockies Run stage race (team division) I could go on, but I think you understand now that Cat Bradley is one of the best ultra runners in the United States. Cat didn't start out as a distance runner. In fact, she was an 800m specialist at the University of California - Santa Barbara. At about a half-mile, the 800m distance might as well be a different sport than ultras! Soon, Cat realized that she didn't love the track. She wanted some adventure and found herself taking time off from her college career to focus on through-hiking the Appalachian Trail. That's where she fell in love with mountains, woods, and losing yourself in the visceral beauty of nature. Within a few short years, Cat's passion for ultra distances bloomed and her competitive drive propelled her forward. Soon, she became one of the most dominant ultramarathon runners in the country. In this conversation, we discuss: How she made the switch from 800m track athlete to Appalachian Trail through-hiker to ultra runner The training demands of a 120 mile, 6-day stage race vs. a 100-mile ultra How she mentally grappled with pivoting her running career almost 180 degrees What made her start to believe she could run professionally How she trains for the Grand Canyon R2R2R FKT Whether you're about to run your first ultra or you're a seasoned veteran, you'll love this conversation with one of the sport's greats. Links & Resources from the show: Follow Cat Bradley on Instagram or check out her website How to increase your endurance and run longer 5 tips on running your first ultra Thank You InsideTracker! Our show is supported by our longtime sponsor InsideTracker. Today, more than ever, it's essential that we're making the right decisions to keep our bodies healthy. To help us be resilient, prevent over-training, and optimize our running to get the most from it. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood and DNA biomarkers along with your lifestyle habits to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. InsideTracker's patented system will transform your body's data into knowledge, insights, and a customized action plan of science-backed recommendations. The data can help you determine whether you're running too much, not enough, or have some other issues that could be affecting your recovery or performance. I've had my own blood drawn with InsideTracker several times and have been amazed at the valuable information that they provide. Not only are the results very detailed, but they also share guidance for how to improve any markers that are out of range. If you're ready to take control of your health and optimize your training, InsideTracker offers a selection of plans that best suit your needs with a limited time 25% discount. Thank you Elemental Labs! A big thanks to Elemental Labs for their support of this episode! They make electrolyte drinks for athletes and low-carb folks with no sugar, artificial ingredients, or colors. And you can get a free sampler pack of 4 flavors and 8 individual packets when you pay $5 in shipping. Elemental Labs' products have some of the highest sodium concentrations that you can find. Anybody who runs a lot knows that sodium, as well as other electrolytes like magnesium and potassium, are essential to our performance and how we feel throughout the day. The citrus flavor has quickly become my favorite. I'm drinking one a day now to help me get enough fluids in our dry Colorado air. It's tasty and delicious and I find that I'm not peeing every 45 minutes throughout the day, which might be an indication I wasn't eating enough sodium. There's now mounting evidence that higher sodium intake levels are not unhealthy – and athletes need substantially more than your typical sedentary person. Of course, ask your doctor if you're worried. But for those athletes running outside in the heat, an electrolyte replacement makes a lot of sense. They just released their first new flavor of 2021, their most requested flavor, watermelon salt. So check out Elemental Labs to try their new flavor or get a free sampler pack.