Podcast appearances and mentions of Angela Davis

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American political activist

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  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
Angela Davis

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Latest podcast episodes about Angela Davis

MPR News with Angela Davis
Soccer star Briana Scurry's 'greatest save' was herself

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:30


There are many Minnesotans who have left home and gone on to become famous. And when we think about the athletes on that list, one name definitely comes to mind. Briana Scurry is considered one the best women's soccer players to ever play the game. She is a two-time Olympic gold medalist who graduated from Anoka High School. She has broken barriers as a Black woman and as an openly gay athlete. And now she has written a book, “My Greatest Save,” that tells her story.  Briana Scurry joined MPR News host Angela Davis to share stories about growing up in Minnesota, rising to the top as a professional soccer player, and then watching her life fall apart after a head injury ended her soccer career. Guest: Briana Scurry is a women's soccer player and a two-time Olympic gold medalist who graduated from Anoka High School. 

Sistas Who Kill: A True Crime Podcast
Angela Davis - Part 2

Sistas Who Kill: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 55:09


The Revolutionary --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sistaswhokill/support

MPR News with Angela Davis
In Focus: How housing can shrink the racial wealth gap

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 60:31


Income inequality is deepening in America. Economic gains in recent decades have been unevenly dispersed, with the vast majority of the wealth going to those already on top. Part of that discrepancy is rooted in the inability to buy property. Owning your own home is a key part of building wealth in the U.S., thanks to federal tax policy. But for many people of color, the door to home ownership has long been closed. In fact, Minnesota has one of the largest racial homeownership gaps in the country. Why is this, and what can be done to narrow the gap and set families of color on the road to solid housing and wealth creation? Listen to this recorded In Focus event as MPR News host Angela Davis leads a discussion about the racial wealth gap in Minnesota with panelists from across the state.  Guests: Kim Smith-Moore is the senior director of homeownership programs at MN Homeownership Center. LeAnn Littlewolf is the co-executive director of the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO), based in Duluth. Karla Benson Rutten, executive director of the St. Paul campus of the Jeremiah Program, which works with single moms and their children to break the cycle of generational poverty.

Dreaming in Color
Carmen Rojas, Ph.D.: The Promise & Curse of Philanthropy

Dreaming in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 36:52


Show description Welcome to Dreaming in Color, a show that provides a platform for BIPOC social change leaders to candidly share how their lived experiences (personal and professional) have prepared them to lead their work and drive the impact we all seek.  In this episode, Dr. Carmen Rojas, the President and Chief Executive Officer at the Marguerite Casey Foundation, joins the show. She shares stories of her upbringing as a child of Venezuelan and Nicaraguan immigrants, confronts the complexities and contradictions of the social sector, and offers us a space to think and dream boldly. We learn of the familial roots and values that shaped her path toward a Ph.D., brainstorm around collective liberation in an age of mass wealth and inequality, and discuss how philanthropy can sharpen its focus on social justice. Join us as we bask in Carmen's wit and wisdom.  Jump straight into: (00:21) - Introducing Dr. Carmen Rojas, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. (1:51) - Carmen shares a quote on optimism from Freedom is a Constant Struggle by Angela Davis. (03:24) - Moving to the US ​​at the peak of the civil rights movement: A cultural perspective on Carmen's roots and the family dynamics that shaped her. (09:19) - Liberation for the public sector: The people and events that encouraged Carmen to focus on social work. (14:18) - Everyone should be able to dream: Discussing the radical change that Carmen is working to achieve. (18:51) - Our collective being: How Carmen embraces the concept of contradiction to make it powerful and meaningful. (22:24) - The urgency of naming: Working to repair a broken system and shift philanthropy in a new direction (32:27) - A world organized around liberation: The hopes Carmen carries for our future Episode resources Follow Carmen Rojas through https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmen-rojas-phd-she-her-1b521316/ (LinkedIn) and https://twitter.com/crojasphd (Twitter) Read https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/780-freedom-is-a-constant-struggle (Freedom is a Constant Struggle) by Angela Davis Read https://www.amazon.com/Song-Solomon-Toni-Morrison/dp/140003342X (Song of Solomon )by Toni Morrison Learn more about Dr. Manuel Pastor's https://dornsife.usc.edu/eri/manuel-pastor/ (research) Know more about https://www.caseygrants.org/ (Marguerite Casey Foundation) Learn more about https://greenlining.org/ (the Greenlining Institute)  Learn more about https://www.kaporcenter.org/ (the Kapor Center) Learn more about https://sff.org/team-members/fred-blackwell/ (Fred Blackwell) and https://sff.org/ (the San Francisco Foundation) Thank you for listening to Dreaming in Color a https://www.bridgespan.org/ (Bridgespan) supported https://www.studiopodsf.com/ (StudioPod) production. Nicole Genova is the Show Coordinator and Teresa Buchanan is the Show Producer. The production team from The Bridgespan Group includes Cora Daniels, Michael Borger, Christina Pistorius, and Britt Savage. Additional music and editing provided by https://nodalab.com/ (nodalab).

Greater Boston
Presenting: 1972

Greater Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 25:32


Introducing 1972, a brand new show from Fable & Folly!  We hear the powerful voices of Angela Davis and Shirley Chisholm, the two women who launched a national and international movement of liberation. We witness the series of events that causes Davis to flee California. Written and directed by Yhane Washington Smith. First two episodes out now - search your podcatcher for more of 1972! Content Warning: This episode includes a depiction of police gun violence. We hear the powerful voices of Angela Davis and Shirley Chisholm, the two women who launched a national and international movement of liberation. We witness the series of events that causes Davis to flee California. Featuring in order of appearance: T.H. Ponders Ebonie Ellington as Shirley Chisholm, Emilio Smith as Jonathan Jackson, Jac'leen Smith as Angela Davis, Tom Smith, Isaiah Mueller as McClain and Conrad Chisholm, Jordan Stillman, Nina Smith, Shawn Regruto, Peter Kiley as Governor Ronald Reagan, Joshua Rubino as Edgar Hoover, Michael Minard as News Reporter, Jeanette Berry as Fania Davis, Steven Hylton as David, D. Rubin Green as the Congressman, Jimmy Mehiel as President Nixon., Sound Design by Xperience J., Editor, Producer, Sound Recording Engineer - T.H. Ponders, Art by Neville Harvey Written and directed by Yhane Washington Smith Support the show by purchasing an Angela Davis and/or Shirley Chisholm notebook! Go to Blackbirdletterpress.com Thank you! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MPR News with Angela Davis
Chef Gavin Kaysen on his new restaurant and fine dining in the Twin Cities

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 46:41


One of the most hotly anticipated new restaurants in Minneapolis opened earlier this month. Mara, a posh Mediterranean eatery, is the latest creation from chef Gavin Kaysen.  Kaysen, who is also the owner and chef at Spoon and Stable and Demi, grew up in Minnesota. He has won James Beard awards, cooked at restaurants around the world, and competed on cooking shows like “Iron Chef.” MPR News host Angela Davis talks with Kaysen about why he still believes in downtown Minneapolis, the importance of hospitality, his role with the new Iron Chef season and balancing family and work. Guest: Gavin Kaysen is an award-winning chef. He is the owner and chef of the Minneapolis restaurants Mara, Spoon and Stable and Demi.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Tim Wise Episode 634

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:02


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

MPR News with Angela Davis
The future of abortion access in Minnesota 

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 47:07


Roe v. Wade is one of the very few U.S. Supreme Court cases that many ordinary people know by name. The landmark 1973 decision made abortion legal in America. Now, a majority of the current court says that ruling was “egregiously wrong,” opening the way for states to restrict abortion or ban it entirely. Abortion is still legal under current Minnesota law. Could that change? And what does the decision mean for other states and the country as a whole? MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two law professors about abortion rights and access in a post-Roe world and other implication's of last week's ruling on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. Guests:  Laura Hermer is a law professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St. Paul and the author of the article, “Covid-19, Abortion, and Public Health in the Culture Wars.” Jill Hasday is a professor of constitutional law, family law and legal history at the University of Minnesota Law School and the author of two books: “Family Law Reimagined” and “Intimate Lies and the Law.”

The Amelia Project
Introducing 1972

The Amelia Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 25:16


Introducing 1972, a brand new show from Fable & Folly!  We hear the powerful voices of Angela Davis and Shirley Chisholm, the two women who launched a national and international movement of liberation. We witness the series of events that causes Davis to flee California. Written and directed by Yhane Washington Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sistas Who Kill: A True Crime Podcast
Angela Davis - Part 1

Sistas Who Kill: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 71:21


Happy Juneteenth - We always black over here --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sistaswhokill/support

MPR News with Angela Davis
Staycations in Minnesota

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 21:04


Everyone needs a break from their routines and daily stress. But for many people, a big summer vacation away isn't affordable or even desirable.  The idea of a “staycation” became popular during the Great Recession of 2008.  It returned during the COVID pandemic as people reluctant or unable to travel rediscovered their neighborhoods and nearby tourist attractions. As we head into summer, inflation and lingering COVID concerns are making nearby vacations appealing again.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two travel writers about finding Minnesota's hidden vacation spots and low-cost ways to find rest and renewal close to home.  Guests:  Lisa Meyers McClintick is a travel writer and photographer based in St. Cloud and author of the guidebook “Day Trips from the Twin Cities.”  Lizanne Dooner is a travel writer and blogger and creator of the blog Lizanne Lately. 

MPR News with Angela Davis
Gary Hines looks back at five decades with Sounds of Blackness

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 48:06


It's not an exaggeration to call Minneapolis musician Gary Hines legendary.  Hines is the music director and producer for the three-time Grammy Award-winning musical group Sounds of Blackness. He has been a fixture in the Twin Cities music scene for more than 50 years.  He's performed with Sounds of Blackness in cities across the world. He's worked with artists ranging from Aretha Franklin to Dolly Parton. And he teaches across the country and internationally about the history, impact and evolution of African-American music and culture.  MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with Hines about his career, Sounds of Blackness and what he is working on now.  Guest:  Gary Hines is the music director and producer of the Grammy Award-Winning Sounds of Blackness.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

Hot Mics From Left To Right
Trump's GOP Peer Pressure on Full Display and Gun Talks Moving Along

Hot Mics From Left To Right

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 32:42


Alice and Maria discuss the mounting testimony in House Select Committee hearings on January 6th indicating former President Trump's pressure on election officials to change the outcome of the 2020 election. High level GOP elections officials stand firm on their commitment to the constitution. And bi-partisan talks are slowly moving along to produce meaningful legislation to combat gun violence. In this week's Meaningful Moment, we hear words of inspiration from Brene Brown and Angela Davis.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Skin care and skin protection in summer

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 47:03


Summertime means sunshine. But all that sun isn't necessarily good for our skin.  Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and case rates are rising. The American Cancer Society estimates that almost 100,000 new melanoma cases, the most serious and third most common type of skin cancer, will be diagnosed this year. Minnesota has one of the highest rates of melanoma in the country. But skin cancer is usually preventable. Protecting skin from the sun and avoiding the cell damage caused by tanning and sunburn can mean a much lower risk of cancer decades later. MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with two dermatologists about skin cancer rates, who is most at risk, common ways we misuse sunscreen and how to keep your skin healthy. Guests Dr. Ingrid Polcari is a pediatrician and dermatologist and an associate professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School.  Dr. Dawn Davis is a pediatrician and dermatologist and a professor at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. 

Then & Now
University in Crisis: Disruption, Response, and Transformation During the Young Administration at UCLA

Then & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 46:38


This episode features a conversation with UCLA graduate and undergraduate students who authored a new LCHP report exploring the history UCLA's response to crises of major scale.  Jazz Kiang, Jannelle Dang, and Nayiri Artounians join Then & Now to discuss UCLA administrators' approaches to the student movement for ethnic studies in the late 1960s, and the on-campus killings of students Bunchy Carter and and John Huggins. They also discuss the firing of Angela Davis, and the implications for present-day university administrators. This episode is moderated by Prof. Eddie Cole, an advisor for the project. Read the report here.

MPR News with Angela Davis
More women of color are starting businesses

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 50:42


The number of businesses started by women of color is on the rise, despite deeply entrenched barriers to success. MPR News with Angela Davis shares the stories of several women of color entrepreneurs in a special broadcast of the podcast “small change: Money Stories from the Neighborhood.” Podcast co-hosts Chris Farrell and Twila Dang talk with the founders of four Minnesota small businesses about solving problems, leaving a legacy, building wealth and the importance of their businesses to their communities. “small change” highlights smart, practical, and collaborative money skills developed by people living with lower and unstable incomes. Guests: Sabrina Jones is the founder of SJC Body Love Products in the Twin Cities. Esperanza Lopez and her daughter Stephanie Lopez are the founders of Spurs Bar & Grill in Willmar. Denise Paradas, sister Tracey Dagen and daughters Dani Pieratos and Nikki Pieratos are members of the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa and founders of Harvest Nation in Tower. Arielle Grant is founder of Render Free in Minneapolis Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS. Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation.

City Arts & Lectures
Angela Davis with Alonzo King

City Arts & Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 68:47


Our guest is writer, scholar, and activist Angela Davis. For more than 5 decades, Davis has been fighting for Black liberation, equal rights for women, queer and transgender people. Davis first received national attention in 1969, after being removed from her teaching position at UCLA for her social activism and membership to the Communist Party. In 1970, she was placed on the FBI's “Ten Most Wanted List” on false charges, which culminated in one of the most famous trials in recent U.S. history. A massive international “Free Angela Davis” campaign was organized, leading to her acquittal in 1972. Davis is a founding member of Critical Resistance, a national organization dedicated to dismantling the prison-industrial complex, and the author of books including Freedom is a Constant Struggle and Women, Race & Class. On May 24, 2022, Angela Davis came to the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco to talk to choreographer and activist Alonzo King.

A Seat At The Table
ANGELA DAVIS & RENI EDDO-LODGE

A Seat At The Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 50:30


Angela Davis er en ikonisk afroamerikansk politisk aktivist og professor. Davis har særligt markeret sig med et langt forfatterskab, og som borgerrettighedsforkæmper for afroamerikanske kvinder, homoseksuelle og personer i det amerikanske fængselssystem. I år fejrer hun 50 års for løsladelsen efter at være blevet sat på FBIs “Most Wanted” liste for sin aktivisme. Reni Eddo-Lodge er Nigeriansk britisk akademiker, forfatter og journalist. De fleste vil nok kende hende fra den hendes debut, why I'm No Longer Talking To White People About Race, der udkom i 2017, hvor hun siden blev den første sorte britiske forfatter til at toppe Storbritanniens bestsellerlister.I snart et årti har Eddo-Logde været en af stærkeste bidragydere til, at viden udbredes og diskussionen af racisme, klasse, feminisme, diskrimination og kolonialisme også kan tages i Danmark på et kvalificeret grundlag. Vi tog på Heartland Festival for at opleve disse to levende legender i samtale om abolitionisme, det opbyggelige i systemkritik og det kollektive arbejdsfællesskab, der er fundament for Davis' forfatterskab.I dagens afsnit reflekterer vi over de budskaber i deres samtale, som ræsonnerede særligt hos os. Det er ingen spoiler alert at sige, at vi begge stadig i dag er meget rørte over det enestående og nærværende i at opleve relationen og dialogen mellem den nuværende og forudgående generation, der stadig kæmper den samme kamp, legemliggjort gennem Angela Davis og Reni Eddo-Lodge. Vi kan derfor heller ikke komme udenom at snakke om, hvordan rammerne og mulighederne for at opleve disse to sorte kvinder på Heartland også var. Vi håber, at I tager godt imod denne samtale. Har I selv noget særligt forhold til Angela Davis og Reni Eddo-Lodge?Var I på Heartland Festival? Spill the tea! God lyttelyst ♥️ Dette er ikke sponsoreret indhold! Artworkfoto: Sissel AbelJingle: Awimbeh AyagibaKlipper: Mie BrandstrupStudie: The Lake Radio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Meet the team behind The Current's Carbon Sound

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 47:14


Is there a song that you just love? Do you have a favorite jam? Or are you a fan of a certain genre of music and will listen to anything that falls in line with it? MPR News host Angela Davis introduced us to the team at The Current behind Carbon Sound, the new music stream available online and via mobile app dedicated to celebrating Black musical expression from hip-hop and R&B to Afrobeats, funk and electronica. Carbon Sound launched on Thursday and is a collaboration between The Current and KMOJ/The Ice. The project is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Other stations launching as part of CPB's initiative include Radio Milwaukee and WJSU-FM in Jackson, Mississippi. Guests: Julian Green is the content director of Carbon Sound. He previously served as program director at Radio K at the University of Minnesota and founded their online hip-hop stream The Vanguard. Sanni Brown is the host of Carbon Sound. She also hosts The Message, The Current's hip-hop and R&B show that airs on Wednesdays. The Message will now also be heard on Carbon Sound. She has more than 10 years of broadcast experience at stations including KMOJ-FM, KFAI-FM and 107.1 MyTalk. Andre Griffin is the community engagement specialist for Carbon Sound. He has worked as a youth mentor at Banyan Community and as a community outreach specialist for the Pan-Afrikan Student Union at Augsburg University.

MPR News with Angela Davis
How have your fathers and father figures shaped you?

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 47:12


As Father's Day approaches, you may be reflecting on your relationship with your father or father figure.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks with a St. Paul poet and author who has written about fatherhood, and a Twin Cities performer who has served as a mentor and father figure to young artists.  Guests:  Michael Kleber-Diggs is a poet, essayist and literary critic in St. Paul. He is the author of the poetry collection “Worldly Things.” T. Mychael Rambo is an actor, vocalist, educator and community organizer based in the Twin Cities. 

Filosofia Pop
#157 – Angela Davis, com Thaís Rodrigues

Filosofia Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 79:09


Recebemos Thaís Rodrigues de Souza para uma conversa sobre Angela Davis. Leia mais → The post #157 – Angela Davis, com Thaís Rodrigues first appeared on Filosofia Pop.#157 – Angela Davis, com Thaís Rodrigues was first posted on junho 13, 2022 at 11:49 am.©2019 "Filosofia Pop". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at marcosclopes@gmail.com

Yellow Parenti
Angela Davis, “Oppression and Repression in the US.”

Yellow Parenti

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 86:34


Speech given in 1972 at California State University at Fullerton.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Past and current Bush fellows reflect on changes needed to foster care in Minnesota

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 47:19


Minnesotans who have experience with the child welfare system understand the unique challenges children and families face. They also know that the system designed to help isn't perfect. Take foster care. While it sometimes leads to better outcomes for at-risk children, we also know it has a disproportionate impact on some communities. Native American children, Black children and multi-racial children in Minnesota were significantly more likely to be in foster care than white children. MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two Bush fellows who have dedicated their careers to addressing problems within Minnesota's child welfare and foster care systems. With more than 13,000 children in Minnesota placed in foster care in 2020, these two leaders are working toward a world that no longer needs foster care. Guests: Hoang Murphy is the founder and executive director of  Foster Advocates. He is a 2022 Bush Fellow.  Amelia Franck Meyer is the founder and CEO of the national non-profit Alia Innovations. She is a 2015 Bush Fellow. 

MPR News with Angela Davis
Chronic stress is burning out more parents 

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 46:43


The pandemic stretched many parents to their limits. Two-thirds of working parents are showing signs of exhaustion and chronic stress, according to a report released in May from researchers at Ohio State University. In fact, most parents are so stressed juggling demands of work and home that they meet the criteria of burnout, a term usually reserved for people experiencing unrelenting stress in the workplace.  The loss of regular schooling and support systems over the last two years took a toll. Many parents are still feeling overwhelmed and isolated. It can show up as increased irritability, emotional detachment or simply feeling like you have nothing more to give.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two mental health providers who work with parents about burnout and how to cope.  Guests:  Jenny Britton is licensed independent clinical social worker and director of children and family services at Washburn Center for Children where she works with parents and caregivers.  Katie Thorsness is a perinatal psychiatrist with Hennepin Healthcare's Mother-Baby Program and the Redleaf Center for Family Healing. 

MPR News with Angela Davis
Chronic stress is burning out more parents 

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 46:43


The pandemic stretched many parents to their limits. Two-thirds of working parents are showing signs of exhaustion and chronic stress, according to a report released in May from researchers at Ohio State University. In fact, most parents are so stressed juggling demands of work and home that they meet the criteria of burnout, a term usually reserved for people experiencing unrelenting stress in the workplace.  The loss of regular schooling and support systems over the last two years took a toll. Many parents are still feeling overwhelmed and isolated. It can show up as increased irritability, emotional detachment or simply feeling like you have nothing more to give.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two mental health providers who work with parents about burnout and how to cope.  Guests:  Jenny Britton is licensed independent clinical social worker and director of children and family services at Washburn Center for Children where she works with parents and caregivers.  Katie Thorsness is a perinatal psychiatrist with Hennepin Healthcare's Mother-Baby Program and the Redleaf Center for Family Healing. 

MPR News with Angela Davis
Talking performing arts with leaders of the Guthrie and the Ordway

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 47:07


After COVID-19 shuttered live performances and left theater seats empty for nearly two years, live theater returned to the Twin Cities in late 2021 and early 2022. But performing arts companies face ongoing challenges. They continue to deal with the uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic. And many are working to address racism and discrimination in theater after the racial reckoning in 2020. MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with two leaders in Minnesota theater, Joseph Haj at the Guthrie in Minneapolis and Christopher Harrington at the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts in St. Paul. Guests:  Joseph Haj is the artistic director of the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis.  Christopher Harrington is the president and CEO of the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts in St. Paul.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Solar power is on a roll in Minnesota

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 46:34


Solar power still accounts for less than 4 percent of electricity generated in Minnesota, but it's growing fast as a way to reduce carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels. Utility companies in the state are on track to get 10 percent of their electricity from this renewable source by 2030. But there are still challenges to developing solar, including connecting far-flung solar arrays to the electrical grid and tariffs that boost the cost of importing solar panels manufactured overseas. MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with two solar developers about the state of the solar industry. Plus, MPR News senior economics contributor Chris Farrell shares the latest economic news. In booming solar industry How to avoid ‘bad actors' Guests:  Eric Pasi has been involved with developing solar in Minnesota for more than 15 years and is chief development officer at Impact Power Solutions, a large solar developer based in Roseville. He's also the author of "CleanWave: A Guide to Success in the Green Recovery."  Jamez Staples is founder and CEO of Renewable Energy Partners in north Minneapolis. The company develops solar projects and trains people to work in green energy jobs.

MPR News with Angela Davis
The wedding rebound in Minnesota 

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 47:26


It's turning into a boom year for weddings. Many engaged couples canceled their weddings in 2020 or simply delayed tying the knot because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now they're making plans to celebrate in 2022.  Minnesota weddings took a dip in 2020, came back in 2021 and are revving up in 2022 with a predicted 33,000 weddings this year, up about 13 percent from pre-pandemic numbers, according to The Wedding Report, a trade group that gathers data by surveying couples and wedding vendors.  The pandemic trends of small weddings and elopements are still popular. But big bashes are back, too. The average cost of a Minnesota wedding in 2021 was close to $25,000 and the median cost was about $15,000, according to The Wedding Report. Alyssa Lund Photography Mary Carlson, left, is a wedding planner and owner of Pure Event Planning in Duluth. MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two wedding planners about how couples are celebrating their marriages.    Julia Mary Photography Josey Stafford is a wedding planner and owner of Sixpence Events & Planning based in Bloomington. Guests:  Mary Carlson is a wedding planner and owner of Pure Event Planning in Duluth. Before that she worked at several venues in the Twin Cities area.  Josey Stafford is a wedding planner and owner of Sixpence Events & Planning based in Bloomington. She also hosts the podcast Under the Veil: Witty Wedding Advice. Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

MPR News with Angela Davis
How Minnesota's farmers handle extreme weather, inflation and supply chain woes

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 47:24


Heavy rain and high winds have caused trouble for many Minnesota farmers this spring. And that's just the latest challenge. Following last year's historic drought, farmers are now dealing with supply chain issues, rising costs, avian influenza and instability caused by international conflict. Gov. Tim Walz recently signed an agriculture omnibus bill that will fund drought relief, rural broadband and support for emerging farmers. MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with Minnesota's agriculture commissioner and representatives from the Minnesota Farmers Union and the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association about the state of farming.  If you are a farmer struggling with stress or mental health concerns, you can contact the Minnesota Farm and Rural Helpline at 833-600-2670 or by texting FARMSTRESS to 898211. Guests:  Thom Petersen is the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.  Anne Schwagerl is the vice president at the Minnesota Farmers Union. She owns and operates a farm in Browns Valley, Minnesota.   Mike Skaug is the president of the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association. He owns and operates a farm in Beltrami , Minnesota. Click the audio player above to listen to their conversation. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify.

MPR News with Angela Davis
How to handle a third summer with COVID-19

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 47:38


We're heading into a third summer with COVID-19 and a lot of people are finding it hard to assess their risk in this new stage of the pandemic. Most of Minnesota, including the Twin Cities, seems to be coming out of a small surge, but cases are rising in southern Minnesota.  By now, two thirds of Minnesotans have had at least two doses of a vaccine. Even more have likely had the virus. The CDC estimated in April that almost 60 percent of people had been infected. Other studies put that number higher, and it's sure to have gone up with the recent waves of infection. But, we also know that being vaccinated or recovering from COVID-19 once doesn't protect people from getting it again. New strains keep popping up. Wastewater samples from the Twin Cities show that people now are spreading a third version of the omicron variant that hit in January.  More than ever, our individual risk of catching the virus or falling ill boils down to our individual situation. MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with Minnesota Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm and infectious disease expert, Dr. Greg Poland, about the risk of variants, masking advice, when to time a booster, new vaccines coming in the fall and how to cope with a virus that isn't going away.  Below are highlights from the show that have been edited for length and clarity. Listen to the full conversation by clicking the audio player above. When you look at the most recent number of cases in Minnesota, how do you describe what they show? How are we doing? Malcolm: It's even hard to count how many waves we've had now and some of the waves really never ended before the next one kicked in. Certainly, over the last couple of months, we've seen cases going back up but at a slower rate than we did with the original omicron strain in December and January. We've watched this kind of slow build. I think thanks to vaccination and boosting and treatments, hospitalizations have not risen to the same degree. Over the last week or two weeks, we've seemed to be stabilizing a bit. What about deaths? Malcolm: We have been grateful that we haven't seen as many deaths in this most recent wave. We've pretty much been in the single digits. Still, we've lost over over 12,600 Minnesotans over the last two years. Even when we're having five and 10 deaths a day, that's five and 10 too many. Dr. Poland, how about you? Are you seeing reasons for us to be optimistic now or not? What do you see in how we're doing right now as a state? Poland: We seem to be divided into two categories: People who believe in science, who believe in the effectiveness of public health measures. And those that don't. Those that I would say, sort of live in a world of hesitancy, doubt and rejection of the scientific method. And so, you see nationwide, it's almost hard to say, almost unbelievable, that since COVID started, one out of every 320 Americans is now dead of COVID. Over a million people, more than we had during the 1918 influenza pandemic. So, as a health care provider you're caught in this odd world where I go into a room and especially early on people were saying, “When can I get the vaccine?” Now we'd go into a room and say, “I notice you haven't had the vaccine.” (And they say) “I don't want that. That's dangerous.” The problem we're having now is really a complex matrix of time since last booster, the development of new variants and psychological human issues. “COVID fatigue,” as it's being called, should have no rational place in deciding what do I do to protect my life and the life of my family and my community members. And yet, in Minnesota and elsewhere, the majority of people are pretending that the pandemic is over. It is not. For example, during the omicron wave we've just come through, we had more people die in four months than we did with six months of delta last year. That's stunning. We should have learned as a population that wearing masks indoors makes a lot of sense. Social distancing makes sense. Getting my vaccine and my booster makes sense. And yet we've got a sizable minority that doesn't believe that and don't follow those recommendations. Caller question: Some in my family are getting over their first bout of COVID, but others in the same household continue to test negative. Why? And what should we do to stay safe this summer? Malcolm: The pattern of who gets it and who doesn't can be a mystery. One of the most important things that we can do at this point is to stay up to date with vaccines and the boosters. It's very clear now that these new variants can evade immune protection, whether that's from a prior illness or from a from a shot that has worn off. I really appreciate how Dr. Poland laid out the logic case. There's a lot of virus out there, certainly outdoor environments are much safer. But when you're in an indoor environment around other people, you might just as well expect to that you're going to encounter folks who are infectious. So stay up to date with those boosters and wear masks indoors. Poland: One thing to remember, when we talk about evasion of immune response, it's not that there's no protection, it's that each of these new variants requires higher levels of antibody to perform an actual lower level of neutralization. So your age, your medical condition, your genetic background, the time since your last vaccine and which variant is circulating, all play a complex role in in determining this. There's no strict time limit or time interval between when you got infected and when you get your booster. In general, I'd let you recover and wait a month or so and then get the booster as recommended. What do the new variants mean for our chances of getting reinfected? Poland: Let me be clear to the point of maybe being blunt: If you're not somebody who has been immunized or who's wearing masks indoors around people who are not your family, you will get infected, and you will get infected repeatedly as new variants arise. These variants will continue to arise as long as large numbers of people are getting infected. And that will occur through both mutation and what's called recombination. That is what these RNA viruses do. I've studied them for almost 40 years. And this is playing out exactly as you would predict, given the distortion of human behavior happening in the context of a worldwide pandemic. For people who have recovered from the virus recently, how long are we protected from getting it again? Poland: I could have told you the answer to your question with omicron, which is almost certainly what you got infected with. I don't know the answer to your question in the face of BA.2.12.1. I particularly don't know what the answer to your question is should BA.4 or .5, currently ravaging South Africa, spread here. It's changing so fast that it is almost impossible to develop the scientific data fast enough. How do we time our booster shots if you're trying to stay fully vaccinated? Poland: If you tested and it was positive, we would consider that the equivalent of a booster. Now, what's going to happen is sometime this summer, we are expecting a variant focus booster. That'll be important because for the second booster the recommendation is based on two pieces of data, both from Israel. One showing that (the variant focused booster) decreases the risk of death by about 78 percent. Now stop a moment to think about that. What that means is you reduce your risk from .1 percent to .03 percent. A measurable real difference, but a real fractional one. Why? Because you are gaining the value of the previous three doses that you got. It reduced the risk of severe or serious illness by about two-fold and moderate illness by about that same amount. But that effect only lasted four weeks, and by eight weeks was gone, highlighting the need for updated boosters, or so called variant focused boosters. Caller question: I was exposed to COVID, had a negative test, I've had one booster. What's my quarantine protocol? Malcolm: Those are difficult decisions. The abundance of caution is still advised even if you've tested negative. I'm guessing you used a rapid test, which are optimal when you use them for a couple of days in a row. Poland: If you have no fever or symptoms, then what I personally would do would be to consider going, but wearing a proper mask properly. Like a KN95, or 94. And wear it properly, crimped around your nose, no air spaces around your face, not below your nose, not below your chin, as you see so many people doing. And maintain some physical distance. That way, I think you're probably protecting other people should you be harboring an asymptomatic infection. Caller question: What's on the horizon for vaccines? Poland: We will likely have a vaccine recommendation for children down to six months. I can tell you definitively that, for example, Moderna has done studies looking at a combination COVID and influenza vaccine. The real triple winner is the idea of making a COVID, flu and RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) vaccine. All of those are being worked on. Whether they would get through the approval process in time for the beginning of this flu season is anybody's guess. We'll get them eventually but I don't know how quickly. What do you want people to know about long COVID? Malcolm: We're just now starting to get a little bit better data. Potentially, 20 plus percent of all people, depending on age and underlying conditions, who even who had a very mild case, can come down with long-term complications and a very confusing array of symptoms. I don't think we even know yet the full extent of organ damage and other things that might be happening. So there's a lot of work to do to support people who have long COVID and to support clinicians who are trying to help them. Certainly, a lot of the actual clinical research will be done at the national level, but here at the state level we are working get better educational information out there to folks about resources that might be able to help. Poland: We know that about 60 percent of the long COVID cases are in females. Why is there a disproportionality? We know that it is more likely to occur in young to middle ages, not so much in young kids. Not as common in elderly. We know severity has something to do with it. We know that it can be in part prevented by having gotten prior immunization. And the public does not understand this well, because they tend to track on “well, you know, my next door neighbor had it and she didn't die.” Here's the problem with that kind of thinking. The risk of a subsequent mental health diagnosis goes up 40 to 60 percent. The risk of subsequently developing Type 2 Diabetes, even after a mild case goes up 40 percent. The risk of some 20 different cardiovascular diseases for the next year goes up considerably. This is not a benign flu-like infection. It has consequences that we don't generally see. When will a vaccine be available for babies and toddlers? Poland: So the plan is that the FDA is going to meet in mid-June. They're going to review a Moderna and a Pfizer application. The Moderna application is going to request a 25-microgram dose that's one-fourth the adult dose, and there'll be two doses roughly a month apart. And this will be for kids six months to five years of age. Pfizer's going to ask for approval for a three-microgram dose. Remember, the adult dose is 30, so one-tenth of it. But they will get three injections at zero, three weeks and 12 or more weeks after the second dose for kids 6 months to 4 years old. The Moderna study, we don't have full data on, but it shows about a 40 to 50 percent reduction in symptomatic disease. The Pfizer data show about an 80 percent decrease in symptomatic disease, at least during the omicron outbreak. How either of these will operate in the face of future variants is unknown. If the FDA meets in mid-June and if they approve it. If it then goes to the CDC and the CDC approves it, by early July, kids would be able to get the vaccines and complete, at least in the case of Moderna, the full series, and in the case of Pfizer have the three doses prior to going to school. Caller question: Could I have my antibodies measured and use that as a marker of whether I am protected? Poland: The answer to that is generally no. And the reason for it is we don't know what level of antibody protects you against what complication of the disease or even against infection. Obviously, the higher the antibody level, the better. If there were no antibody or if it was very, very low, we might have some level of concern. But remember that that level of protection is going to vary by which variant you get infected with. So we do not have, the formal name for it is, a “correlative protection.” How has testing changed over the past few months? Malcolm: We do continue to offer both rapid testing and PCR testing at a number of state sites. We want to make sure that whether they're tests at pharmacies at health care providers, or other kind of community locations, that everybody around the state has access to tests. You are able to order online free tests from the federal government as well as from the state. And currently, while we're in a federally declared public health emergency, insurance companies have to cover the cost of tests without copayments, up to eight per month. And testing does remain important. People can protect themselves and others if they know their status before they are doing something social, are going to a big, eagerly awaited event. Testing continues to be one of the tools in the toolbox. It's good idea to have a supply of rapid tests at home for that kind of use. What can you tell us about the new antiviral medications? Poland: In terms of treatment, there are four things that can be used Paxlovid; remdesivir; which is administered intravenously; one monoclonal — we only have one monoclonal now that we can use to treat because the variants have outwitted it; and, then a third antiviral, Molnupiravir. Paxlovid is the one that you most hear about. There's difficulties in accessing it. I think we should make it easier. It's generally for people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised or people 65 and older who have a positive test and are at high risk of complications. You have to take it for five days. There's beginning to be some concern of so-called Paxlovid rebound, which means we may have to treat people longer than the normal five days. And the one difficulty with it that is there are a large number of medications, herbs and supplements, that you cannot be taking while you take Paxlovid. What's the value of it: about an 89 percent efficacy in preventing death and severe disease.

Harlem Queen
1972 - We Are the Revolutionaries

Harlem Queen

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 5:17


In 1972 we hear the powerful voices of Professor and activist Angela Davis and Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm. We witness the series of events that put Davis on the F.B.I. most wanted list and we join Chisholm on her campaign trail for president of the United States. Starring: Ebonie Ellington as Shirley Chisholm Jac'leen Smith as Angela Davis Emilio Smith as Jonathan Jackson Sound Designer - Xperience J. Producer, Audio Engineer and Editor - T.H. Ponders Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MPR News with Angela Davis
With 40 percent of food getting wasted, what are your strategies for wasting less?

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:59


No one actually intends to waste food, and yet, it happens.  Even if you're great at meal planning and buy only the food you know you'll need over the next several days, life sometimes gets in the way. And then fresh produce goes bad and gets thrown out. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that 40 percent of food is thrown out. And our farming, grocery and restaurant industries all contribute to food waste as well.  But we could do better. Wasted food could instead help feed people who are struggling financially. And if we cut down our food waste, we are helping to cut back greenhouse gas emissions.  MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with expert guests about how we can prevent food waste. Guests: Kelly Kunkel is a health and nutrition educator with the University of Minnesota Extension in Mankato. May Klug is the garden and foodshare coordinator for North Country Food Alliance, a worker-run non-profit that works to build a more sustainable local food system in Twin Cities Metro area  Cauê Suplicy is the founder of Barnana, a snack company that focuses on reducing food waste in banana and plantain farms Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

KPFA - UpFront
Fund drive special with Angela Davis

KPFA - UpFront

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 59:59


Out Loud in the Library
Equity Action Plan Update with Dr. Angela Davis

Out Loud in the Library

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 27:00


Remember Durham Tech's Equity Action Plan from 2020? We're getting an update on how we are doing from Vice President Dr. Angela Davis. Learn about Durham Tech's community partnerships, equity scorecard, and some challenges we've faced along the way. If you have any comments, questions, or concerns you can contact Dr. Davis at Davisa@durhamtech.edu.  Take a look at Durham Tech's Equity Scorecard.  Find out more about the Durham Living Wage Project.  Dr. Davis read What Got You Here Won't Get You There by Marshall Goldsmith, available at the Durham Tech Main Campus Library. Reading Circle Guides (under construction) can be found on our website.  Find the 2022 Read Great Things Challenge on the Library Blog (and don't forget to subscribe).  Context for the Parks and Recreation quote that was censored can be found here. Follow the library on Facebook and Instagram. Contact me, Courtney Bippley, at bippleyc@durhamtech.edu. Contact the Durham Tech Library at library@durhamtech.edu.  Music for this podcast was made by Robert Isaacs. 

MPR News with Angela Davis
Breastfeeding isn't easy. How can lactation support help?

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 47:52


The baby formula shortage in the United States has put many parents in dire situations. As of mid-May, an increasing number of stores reported having no formula or very low stocks. And breastfeeding is not an easy solution. Health, economic and time constraints can impact a parent's ability to breastfeed. Breastfeeding and pumping throughout the day can be challenging for working parents. And Black, Indigenous and Hmong parents are less likely than white parents to breastfeed.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks about the disparities in who breastfeeds, and how to better support parents and their babies.  Guests:  Shashana Craft is a indigenous lactation consultant, certified perinatal educator and indigenous doula.  LaVonne Moore is a certified nurse midwife, women's health care nurse practitioner and lactation consultant. She is also the founder and CEO of Chosen Vessels Midwifery Services. She has a PhD in nursing practice.  Ellen W. Demerath is a professor of epidemiology and community health at the University of Minnesota. She has a PhD in anthropology. 

Mood Ring
Coping with Prolonged Grief

Mood Ring

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 49:33


Anna and the Mood Ring team are all still reeling from the horrific shootings over the past two weeks, and if you've been following along with us so far, you know that we believe strongly in not forcing the show to go on, and giving ourselves space to be human and feel our emotions in experiencing things as they are happening to us, rather than numbing out attempt to pretend like everything is normal. So, in lieu of our Mood Ring episode this week, we wanted to share a conversation from yesterday, May 25, about coping with prolonged grief as terrible things just continue to happen, produced by our friends over at Minnesota Public Radio and host Angela Davis.  We thought some of you might find it useful right now with everything going on. We'll be back with a regular episode of Mood Ring next week and we really hope that you are able to take care of yourself in the meantime. In the light of the recent tragic mass shootings, Minnesota Public Radio News host Angela Davis talks with listeners and with two therapists about the waves of loss many people experienced over the past two years, they discuss how people can cope with prolonged grief and trauma. Her guests are:  Bravada Garrett-Akinsanya is a psychologist who specializes in African-American mental health. She is the president and founder of Brakins Consulting & Psychological Services and the executive director of African American Child Wellness Institute, Inc. in Plymouth. Fiyyaz Karim is a lecturer in the University of Minnesota's masters programs for integrated behavioral health and addictions counseling. He has worked in the areas of grief and loss associated with unemployment, relationship break ups, chronic illness, addictions and, most recently, the pandemic.

New Books Network
Abolition

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 16:43


Leading up to Mayday, the nationwide Day of Refusal, and Abolition May, Saronik talks with Sean Gordon about abolition as an historical movement to end the transatlantic slave trade and a transformative justice movement to abolish prisons and defund the police. The episode focuses on the relationship between absence and presence, destruction and reconstruction, in abolitionist narratives and thought, and makes reference to Angela Davis's Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture (2005), Mariame Kaba's We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice (2021), Tiffany Lethabo King's The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies (2019), and works by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Frank Wilderson, and Jared Sexton. There is no doubt that abolition will save the world. Sean recently finished his PhD in English and American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research and teaching focus on nineteenth-century American literature, abolition, and the environmental humanities. You can visit the We Do This ‘Til We Free Us publisher's website to donate copies of the book to people who are incarcerated. Image: “A is for Abolition”, one in the series titled Collidescopes by Julia Bernier Music used in promotional material: “Heartbeat” by ykymr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Critical Theory

Leading up to Mayday, the nationwide Day of Refusal, and Abolition May, Saronik talks with Sean Gordon about abolition as an historical movement to end the transatlantic slave trade and a transformative justice movement to abolish prisons and defund the police. The episode focuses on the relationship between absence and presence, destruction and reconstruction, in abolitionist narratives and thought, and makes reference to Angela Davis's Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture (2005), Mariame Kaba's We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice (2021), Tiffany Lethabo King's The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies (2019), and works by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Frank Wilderson, and Jared Sexton. There is no doubt that abolition will save the world. Sean recently finished his PhD in English and American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research and teaching focus on nineteenth-century American literature, abolition, and the environmental humanities. You can visit the We Do This ‘Til We Free Us publisher's website to donate copies of the book to people who are incarcerated. Image: “A is for Abolition”, one in the series titled Collidescopes by Julia Bernier Music used in promotional material: “Heartbeat” by ykymr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

High Theory
Abolition

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 16:43


Leading up to Mayday, the nationwide Day of Refusal, and Abolition May, Saronik talks with Sean Gordon about abolition as an historical movement to end the transatlantic slave trade and a transformative justice movement to abolish prisons and defund the police. The episode focuses on the relationship between absence and presence, destruction and reconstruction, in abolitionist narratives and thought, and makes reference to Angela Davis's Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture (2005), Mariame Kaba's We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice (2021), Tiffany Lethabo King's The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies (2019), and works by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Frank Wilderson, and Jared Sexton. There is no doubt that abolition will save the world. Sean recently finished his PhD in English and American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research and teaching focus on nineteenth-century American literature, abolition, and the environmental humanities. You can visit the We Do This ‘Til We Free Us publisher's website to donate copies of the book to people who are incarcerated. Image: “A is for Abolition”, one in the series titled Collidescopes by Julia Bernier Music used in promotional material: “Heartbeat” by ykymr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MPR News with Angela Davis
Coping with prolonged grief over George Floyd, mass shootings and the pandemic 

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 48:41


Wednesday marks two years since George Floyd, a Black man, was murdered by a white Minneapolis police officer.  His death brought anger and deep sorrow over America's racist legacy to the forefront. Many people are grieving not only his death but also the deep wounds of racial injustice.  At the same time, the pandemic has thrown us loss after loss. Loved ones have died from COVID-19. The pandemic has stolen life milestones, jobs and our sense of security.  And now the month of May brings new collective grief with the deadly shooting in a grocery store in Buffalo, New York and this week's shooting in a Texas school. Like stress, grief can accumulate, sometimes without us recognizing what we're feeling.   MPR News host Angela Davis talks with two therapists about the waves of loss many people experienced over the past two years and how people can cope with prolonged grief and trauma.  Guests:  Bravada Garrett-Akinsanya is a psychologist who specializes in African-American mental health. She is the president and founder of Brakins Consulting & Psychological Services and the executive director of African American Child Wellness Institute, Inc. in Plymouth.  Fiyyaz Karim is a lecturer in the University of Minnesota's masters programs for integrated behavioral health and addictions counseling. He has worked in the areas of grief and loss associated with unemployment, relationship break ups, chronic illness, addictions and, most recently, the pandemic.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Minnesotans respond to the rise in anti-LGBTQ legislation

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 48:21


In 2022, state lawmakers across the country have introduced an unprecedented number of bills that target the rights of LGBTQ children and their families. And regardless of whether the bills pass, they can take a toll on LGBTQ youth mental health. A survey by the Trevor Project found that 85 percent of trans and non-binary youth reported that news of anti-trans legislation has negatively affected their mental health. MPR News host Angela Davis talks about how the surge in anti-LGBTQ bills affects young people locally, and how Minnesotans are responding. She talks with a transgender youth advocate and their mother about advocating for a safe, inclusive space in school. And she talks with a healthcare leader about how anti-LGBTQ hate affects children's health.  Guests:  Dr. Angela Kade Goepferd is the chief education officer and chief of staff for Children's Minnesota, the medical director of Children's Minnesota Gender Health Program and a pediatrician in the Children's Minneapolis Primary Care clinic. Christy Hall is Senior Staff Attorney at Gender Justice, where she represents clients challenging gender discrimination. Hildie Edwards is an advocate for transgender youth.  Hannah Edwards is Hilde's mother and an advocate for transgender youth. 

Getting Informed: a Leftist Lit Podcast
Women Race & Class Part 3

Getting Informed: a Leftist Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 34:03


This week, Al and Collin cover chapters three and four of Women Race & Class by Angela Davis! We'll be back in two weeks! Special thanks to Nicole Cuddihy, Andrew Harvey, and Shane Ragland, our editor! Follow this podcast @leftistlitpod on Twitter, or send us h8 mail at gettinginformedpod@gmail.com

MPR News with Angela Davis
The college decision and why fewer Minnesota students are enrolling

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 47:31


May is traditionally the month when many high school seniors make their final decisions about where they'll go to college.  But so much has changed with college: Admissions requirements have shifted, college enrollment has declined and more people are questioning the cost of college — especially if it involves years of repaying student loans.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks with a school counselor and admissions director about about the state of college. Do young people view the value of a college education differently than previous generations? And why are so many colleges re-thinking how they approach admissions?  Guests: Derek Francis is the manager of counseling services at the Office of College and Career Readiness for the Minneapolis Public Schools. Brian Jones is the Director of Admissions at Minnesota State University, Mankato and is the president-elect of the Minnesota Association for College Admission Counseling.

Fresh Air
Best Of: George Floyd's Life / The Queer History Of A Women's Prison

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 48:01


We remember George Floyd as we approach the second anniversary of his murder. We'll speak with Washington Post reporters Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa. They argue that George Floyd's struggles in life reflect the challenges and pressures of institutional racism in the country. Their new book is His Name is George Floyd.Also, we'll hear about the Women's House of Detention, the forgotten women's prison in Greenwich Village that played a role in the gay rights movement of the '60s, including the Stonewall Uprising. Angela Davis and Afeni Shakur, Tupac's mother, were incarcerated there. We'll talk with Hugh Ryan, whose new book is about what this prison tells us about queer history.David Bianculli will review the new HBO documentary George Carlin's American Dream.

MPR News with Angela Davis
How evangelical Christians in Minnesota are responding to calls for racial justice

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 52:28


Next Wednesday marks two years since George Floyd, a Black man, was murdered by a white Minneapolis police officer. Floyd's death prompted many Minnesota institutions to pay new attention to racial disparities in Minnesota.  Some Minnesota churches and Christian institutions also have been grappling with how they supported racial prejudice and inequality in the past and what they can do now to address it.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks about churches and racial justice, specifically how white evangelical Christians are responding to calls for racial equity.  She's joined by two leaders in the evangelical church and MPR News education reporter Elizabeth Shockman, who is reporting on a group of Black students pushing for equity changes at the University of Northwestern, a small evangelical school in Minnesota.  Guests:  The Rev. Edrin C. Williams is the lead pastor at Sanctuary Covenant Church, which was started in 2003 in north Minneapolis as an intentionally multicultural congregation associated with the Evangelical Covenant Church.  Carl Nelson is president and CEO of Transform Minnesota, a network of evangelical Christian congregations across Minnesota.  MPR News reporter Elizabeth Shockman covers education.

MPR News with Angela Davis
At Walker West Music Academy, music education is a tool for growth

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 46:35


Music can be a source of healing, catharsis and inspiration. And it can also be used as a tool for learning, growth and building community.  That's part of the vision behind Walker West Music Academy, a St. Paul music school founded in 1988 by musicians Rev. Carl Walker and Grant West. The school provides affordable music education to children and young adults, and it is believed to be the oldest community music school founded by Black musicians in the U.S.  Now, the academy's executive director Braxton Haulcy is leading the school through a new transition: He is leading a campaign and he is working on plans for the academy to move to a new building.  MPR News host Angela Davis sits down with Haulcy to talk about music education, and the history and future of Walker West.  Guest:  Braxton Haulcy is the executive director of Walker West Music Academy in St. Paul.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Youth mental health is in a state of emergency. How is Minnesota responding?

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:52


In 2021, leading medical groups and the U.S. Surgeon General declared youth mental health a national emergency, citing increased rates of depression, hopelessness and thoughts of suicide.  The percentage of teens reporting “persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness” jumped from 26 percent to 37 percent between 2009 and 2019. In 2021, it was 44 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  On Tuesday, American Public Media's Call to Mind initiative explored the mental health experiences of young people across the nation. And it took a close look at schools' role on  the frontlines of the youth mental health crisis.  On Wednesday, MPR News host Angela Davis continued the conversation. She talked with three guests about how the mental health crisis is affecting Minnesota youth and schools.  Guests:  Daniel Knewitz is the legislative chair of the Minnesota School Psychologists Association and a licensed school psychologist.  Sandy Lewandowski is the Superintendent of Intermediate District 287. Sierra Grandy is a volunteer with NAMI Minnesota.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Ryan Busse and Tim Wise Episode 605

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 81:00


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Ryan Busse is a former firearms executive who helped build one of the world's most iconic gun companies, and was nominated multiple times by industry colleagues for the prestigious Shooting Industry Person of The Year Award. Busse is an environmental advocate who served in many leadership roles for conservation organizations, including as an advisor for the United States Senate Sportsmen's Caucus and the Biden Presidential Campaign. He remains a proud outdoorsman, gun owner, father, and resident of Montana. About the book.... A long-time former executive at one of the country's top gun manufacturers reveals how his industry radicalized a large swathe of America, and explains how it must change before we can reduce gun violence and heal as a nation. Ryan Busse has traveled a long, circuitous path along the American gun journey. As an avid hunter, outdoorsman, and conservationist–all things that the firearms industry was built on–he rose to the highest ranks of the rapidly growing, multibillion-dollar firearms industry. But replacing self-imposed decency with rampant fear-mongering, racism, hardline conservative politics, massive profits from semi-automatic weapons sales, and McCarthyesque policing have driven Busse to do something few other gun executives have done: he's ending his 30-year career in the industry to tell its secrets. He watched the industry change from its smaller, less corporate and far-less-powerful form to the partisan, power-hungry entity it is today. He thought he could go up against the power of the industry from within, and over the years had made small inroads toward sensible gun ownership and use. But that's simply not possible anymore. This book is an insider's call-out, a voice-driven tale of personal transformation, and a fast ride through wild times and colorful characters that populate a much-speculated-about, but little-known industry. It's also a story of how authoritarianism spreads in the guise of freedom, how voicing one's conscience becomes an act of treason in a culture that demands sameness and loyalty. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Follow and Support Gareth Sever  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Tim Wise and Dr Dana Suskind Episode 595

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 130:39


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more NEWS DUMP. Recap of the BREAKING NEWS of SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ABORTION   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Dana Suskind, MD, is a pediatric otolaryngologist who specializes in hearing loss and cochlea implantation. She directs the University of Chicago Medicine's Pediatric Hearing Loss and Cochlear Implant program. Recognized as a national thought leader in early language development, Dr. Suskind has dedicated her research and clinical life to optimizing foundational brain development and preventing early cognitive disparities and their lifelong impact. She is founder and co-director of the TMW Center for Early Learning + Public Health, which aims to create a population-level shift in the knowledge and behavior of parents and caregivers to optimize the foundational brain development in children from birth to five years of age, particularly those born into poverty. Her book "Thirty Million Words: Building a Child's Brain" was published in 2015. Dr. Suskind has received several awards for her work, including the Weizmann Women for Science Vision and Impact award, the SENTAC Gray Humanitarian Award, the LENA Research Foundation Making a Difference Award, the Chairman's Award from the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in 2018, and the John D. Arnold, MD Mentor Award for Sustained Excellence from the Pritzker School of Medicine. Connect with Dr. Dana Suskind at @drdanasuskind. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page