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Latest podcast episodes about smithsonian institution national museum

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

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The Brian Lehrer Show
Kevin Young on Poetry and History

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 19:19


Kevin Young, poet, New Yorker poetry editor and the author of Stones: Poems (Knopf, 2021), talks about his new book of poetry and his new job as director of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Get Lit Minute
Kevin Young | “Ode to Midwest”

Get Lit Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 7:23


In this week's episode of the Get Lit Minute, your weekly poetry podcast, we spotlight Kevin Young, American poet and teacher of poetry and the director of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture. Read his full poem "Ode to Midwest" via our Get Lit Anthology. Support the show (https://getlit.org/donate/)

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Reading the Room

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 104:51


Today on Boston Public Radio: We’re on tape today, bringing you the ultimate BPR book club with back-to-back conversations from over the years with some of our favorite writers. Some of today’s highlights are featured below: Kevin Young discusses his latest  collection of poetry, BROWN. Young is the poetry editor of the New Yorker and the Andrew W. Mellon director of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture. Ann Patchett talks about her book “Commonwealth,” and as owner of Parnassus Books, argues for all readers to shop at local,  independent bookstores. T.C. Boyle drops in on the dropout culture with his novel “Outside Looking In,” which is based on the research of Timothy Leary.

OG INSPIRATION
Reverend Cary Grady- Faith Based Community Leader

OG INSPIRATION

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2020 56:24


Reverend Carey A. Grady was appointed the Pastor of Reid Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Columbia, South Carolina on November 14, 2014. Rev. Carey A Grady is a native of Charleston, S.C., and a product of the public school system. He received a Bachelor of Arts in History from Howard University, Washington, D.C., and a Master of Divinity from Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, GA. While a student at Howard, Rev. Grady was a tutor and after school counselor at the Sojourner's Community Center, interned at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History in the Duke Ellington Collection, served as a Congressional Black Caucus Intern and later a Patricia Roberts Harris Intern for Congressman James Clyburn and a Communication Intern at Amnesty International in the Mid-Atlantic Regional Office. While in college Rev. Grady accepted his call to Ministry and upon Graduation enrolled at the Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia. In Seminary, he worked in Student Government and was a Teaching Assistant to Rev. Dr. Mark Lomax, Professor of Homiletics. During his Sr. Year in Seminary Rev. Grady was assigned to pastor Bethlehem AME Church in Belton, S.C. Upon graduation, he worked for the Democratic Party of Georgia from 2000-2001. Rev. Grady has pastored 4 Churches including Bethlehem AME Church, Belton, S.C. Shiloh AME Church, McCormick, S.C. St. Peter AME Church, Decatur, Illinois, and Bethel AME Cathedral of Indianapolis, Indiana. While in S.C. he was named Minister of the Year by the McCormick County Chamber of Commerce for the 2002-2003 year. At Shiloh AME Church he led the Church in the remodeling of the sanctuary, installation of a state of the art sound system to produce tapes and CD's of the morning worship services, and the installation of Stained Glass Windows. In February of 2005, he did the Opening Prayer at the Illinois State Assembly, State Representatives. In October 2006 he was named clergy of the Month by the AME Christian Recorder during National Clergy Appreciation Month, in the summer of 2008, he was named "20 Under 40" by the Central Illinois Midwestern Business Journal for excellence in community and civic activity. While in Decatur, Rev. Grady and the St. Peter family were known for their Community Outreach to young people and their Radio Broadcasts. Rev. Grady has served on numerous Community and Non-Profit Boards. In McCormick, he served on the McCormick Community Development Enrichment Corporation (MCDEC), in Decatur, Illinois he served on the Neighborhood Housing Development Corporation (NHDC) and the Decatur African-American Genealogical & Historical Society (Decatur, Illinois). Rev. Grady was a Wabash Pastoral Leadership Fellow for the 2010-2012 year: Served on the Indiana Villages Healthy Families Advisory Council and is a founding member of the Indianapolis Congregation Action Network (IndyCan), a faith-based Community Organization and affiliate of PICO People Improving Communities through Organizing. While at Bethel, the oldest African American Church in the state of Indiana, Bethel went through an extensive renovation process. Rev. Grady was also the Executive Director of the Friends of Bethel Indianapolis Community Development Corporation. He is also a proud member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Rev. Grady is the youngest child of Bishop ZL and Mrs. C.R. Grady and is most appreciative that at a young age he was nurtured in the faith by his parents and siblings. While Rev. Grady is well accomplished, it is important to note that he grew up with a severe Speech Impediment from age 6 until age 20. He knows he was healed by God. He lives by these words. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/odell-glenn-jr/support

Delmarva Today
Delmarva Today 09-18-2020 Part Two

Delmarva Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2020 29:43


My Guest on Delmarva Today this Friday is Darrin Lowery. Dr. Lowery is Director of the Chesapeake Watershed Archaeological Research Foundation. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Penn State University at the Mont Alto Campus in Mont Alto, PA as well as a Research Associate & Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. Lowery will talk about eroding archeological sites, particularly here on the Eastern Shore and the importance of preserving our prehistoric heritage. Our discussion will include the perspective archeology and geology offer on issues like climate change and the attendant sea level rise.

World War I Podcast
The Pigeon Service

World War I Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 32:13


While radio and telephone were becoming more and more a part of the battlefield, these communication technologies also had weaknesses on the World War I battlefield. A secure, reliable, low tech communication option was needed. Armies on both sides turned to Homing Pigeons to provide this vital link. We sat down with Dr. Frank Blazich, Curator of Modern Military History at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History, to discuss the U.S. Army's pigeon service and how these birds contributed to the war effort.

Momentum 2020
Jordi Rivera Prince C16 - Bioarchaeologist in the field in Peru

Momentum 2020

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2020 31:26


Jordi Rivera Prince C16, is a PhD student in Bioarchaeology at the University of Florida, where she is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and a National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine Ford Predoctoral Fellow. Her research focuses on skeletal studies of ancient maritime communities (ca. 400 BC - 0) and sociopolitical development on the North Coast of Peru. She is a a project bioarchaeologist for the Huanchaco Archaeology Program (PAHUAN), led by Dr. Gabriel Prieto, and mentors Peruvian archaeology students in skeletal recovery methods during excavation. Rivera Prince graduated from the College in 2016 with a BA in Anthropology with Honors. During her time at Penn, she worked in the Penn Museum Physical Anthropology section, training in human skeletal analysis and active in community educational outreach programming. Rivera Prince’s independent research was supported by her tenure as a College House Research Fellow, and as a member of the University Scholars Program. Furthermore, Rivera Prince was an active in MEChA and La Casa Latina, and was a First-Generation, Low-Income (FGLI) Penn graduate. Since graduation, Rivera Prince has also worked as a Researcher at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), and completed a Fulbright Open Research Award to Peru (2017-2018).

The Splendid Table
The Oyster King and the Seagull Test

The Splendid Table

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2019 50:33


This episode is all about the oyster. We meet two cousins -- Ryan and Travis Croxton -- who have reimagined their family oyster business, The Rappahannock Oyster Company on the Chesapeake Bay, and reinvigorated the industry through their innovative oyster farming techniques. Thomas "Uptown T" Stewart is an oyster-shucking fixture in New Orleans; he teaches us how to shuck with swagger. We talk to Joanne Hyppolite, curator at Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture, about the amazing story of Thomas Downing aka The Oyster King of New York City. Dan Souza from America's Test Kitchen shares his expert advice on selecting, grilling and serving oysters. Chef Brandon Jew of San Francisco's Mister Jiu's cuts no corners when it comes to handmade oyster sauce. And writer Alicia Kennedy finds solace in a half shell following a family tragedy. Broadcast dates for this episode: March 16, 2018 (originally aired) March 15, 2019 (rebroadcast) November 8, 2019 (rebroadcast)

'By Design' by Sir John Soane's Museum in partnership with Luke Irwin

An intimate discussion about the power of spaces born of Adjaye’s own experience growing up. His brother who is a wheel chair user was regular unable to access buildings and this evolved to a personal crusade that national spaces should be for all. Sir David Adjaye OBE is an architect who's Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture, opened on the National Mall in Washington DC in fall of 2016, this opening was named Cultural Event of the Year by the New York Times. In 2017, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and was recognised as one of the 100 most influential people of the year by TIME magazine.

On Life and Meaning
Renee Stout | Conjure Woman - Ep. 17

On Life and Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2017 48:57


Renee Stout is a visual artist who explores the mystical and rhythmic planes of existence. Her assemblages combine painting, sculpture, found objects, vintage photographs, ancient symbols, herbs and potions, and remnants of stories and letters. Her mixed-media, multi-sensory installations delve into spiritualism, soothsaying, magic and spells. She creates fictional narratives with imaginary characters derived from alter egos that trace her personal history and address contemporary issues of community strife and healing. Her work has been exhibited internationally and at the National Museum of American Art, the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African Art, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and the Smithsonian Institution American Art Museum.  Renee is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University.  This episode is perfect for anyone interested in the conjuring of mystical powers and the life of a contemporary visual artist. IN THIS EPISODE Renee explains her art and what viewers would see at one of her exhibits. She shares what she wants viewers of her art to feel and the story she is telling. She reveals the role alter egos play in the construction and presentation of her work. She discusses what herbs, roots and found objects have to do with her art. She explains who Fatima Mayfield is and the conjuring of supernatural forces. Renee talks about connecting with spirits and interventions from other dimensions. She discusses moments of possession and the role music plays in her work. She tells a story about when she cast a spell of her own. She reveals who exactly are Madame Ching and Dorothy. Renee talks about how the relationship of her parents affected her and the burden and benefits of being sensitive. She shares what it was like growing up in Pittsburgh and key advice she received from her father. She tells the story of an early encounter with art that changed her life. She discusses how she feels about the label 'black art' and being known as a black artist. She talks about her breakout exhibition and what people don't know about the life of an artist. Renee shares what she is working on now, whether her art is where she wants it to be, and what spell she would cast on the world.   After the conversation, host Mark Peres adds a personal word that begins this way, "When I hear Renee Stout talk about spirits and music and spells, I'm brought back to the street of Rio de Janeiro watching African-Brazilian women in white crinoline dresses..."  

Webcasts from the Library of Congress II
DPLAfest 2016: Smithsonian, Library of Congress, National Archives: Opportunities & Challenges for Working Together

Webcasts from the Library of Congress II

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2016 45:41


April 14, 2016. With the 100th anniversary of the US entry in World War I next year, the Library of Congress, Smithsonian Institution, and National Archives are working together on a project to bring new WWI content to museums, teachers and coders. The collaboration and content on this project are unique. Panelists discuss the WWI project, the collaboration, and the barriers that can slow organizations from working together. Speaker Biography: Jon Voss is director of strategic partnerships for Historypin. Speaker Biography: David McOwen is new media developer at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History. Speaker Biography: Pamela Wright is chief digital access strategist for the National Archives at College Park. Speaker Biography: Helena Zinkham is chief of the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7366

Woodsongs Vodcasts
Woodsongs 683: Martha Redbone Roots Project and Ben Miller Band

Woodsongs Vodcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2013 74:42


MARTHA REDBONE is a leading voice in contemporary Native American music. Her award winning work is recognized by the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian. Redbone's musical talent has caught the ears of legends and she has recorded and/or performed with Bonnie Raitt, Pete Seeger, Youssou N'Dour, George Clinton, Rita Coolidge, Randy Brecker and Nona Hendryx. Her new album "The Garden of Love - Songs of William Blake" takes the immortal words of poet William Blake, the great Romantic visionary from 18th century England, and sets them in the Appalachian Mountains, bringing her uniquely soulful voice to hollered melodies, lullabies, ancient chants and inspired hymns. The result, produced by Grammy Award-winning Nitty Gritty Dirt Band founder John McEuen and David Hoffner, is a wondrous folk, country, gospel and blues reading in which the songs feel like timeless mountain classics with lyrics that are strikingly relevant. BEN MILLER BAND is a one-of-a kind trio that combines the frenetic energy of bluegrass, the soul of the delta blues and the haunted spirit of Appalachian mountain music. Band members Ben Miller, Scott Leeper, and Doug Dicharry create a unique and modern sound while continuing the tradition of blending together many different musical styles, which has long been a trait of their native Ozarks in Joplin, Missouri.